Retail Security Resource Crime Prevention Division by dominic.cecilia

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									Retail Security Resource
                                                                 MAKE SECURITY YOUR BUSINESS




 This Resource is designed specifically for the retail sector.
 It provides practical information to both management and
 staff that will assist in reducing the likelihood of crime
 occurring within their business.
Retail Security Resource - Introduction
                                                                                                        MAKE SECURITY YOUR BUSINESS




Introduction
The Department of Attorney General and Justice is integral in the NSW Government’s strategy to develop a
better understanding of crime and to apply this knowledge in ways that actively prevent crime from occurring.
The Department develops a number of programs and policies aimed at reducing crime across NSW.
In July 2011, the Department established the NSW Retail Crime Strategic Partnership. The partnership brings
together Government, law enforcement and the retail sector to discuss the factors leading to retail crime
and collaboratively develop solutions to respond. The partnership has membership from the National Retail
Association, Australian National Retailers Association and Australian Retailers Association, as well as NSW
Police, NSW Fair Trading, NSW Business Chamber of Commerce and the Designing Out Crime Research Centre,
University of Technology Sydney.
The key outcomes of the partnership are to:
•	   To	explore	opportunities	to	implement	strategies	to	support	and	encourage	law	enforcement	
•	   To	facilitate	discussion	on	issues	of	retail	theft	and	prevention	
•	   To	provide	expert	advice	to	Government	on	crime	issues	currently	affecting	retailers	
•	   To	determine	the	most	effective	ways	to	engage	retailers	in	crime	prevention	
•	   To	promote	best	practice	and	provide	a	platform	to	consider	retail	crime	prevention	innovations	such	as	those	
     developed by the Designing Out Crime Research Centre

The Department, in consultation with the Australian Retailers Association, has developed the NSW Retail Security
Resource to assist in the reduction of retail crime impacting our local businesses. Research and consultation
with local retailers indicate that shoplifting is the most common crime that impacts on retailers. Retail crime can
impact	on	a	businesses	profit,	customers,	staff,	and	day-to-day	trading	practices.
This	Resource	is	designed	specifically	for	the	retail	sector.		It	provides	practical	information	to	both	management	
and staff that will assist in reducing the likelihood of crime occurring within their business.




                                                Retail Security Resource
Retail Security Resource - Introduction
                                                                                                    MAKE SECURITY YOUR BUSINESS




The NSW Retail Security Resource covers the following key areas:
•	   An	Overview	of	Retail	Crime	in	Australia
•	   The	Financial	Implications	of	Retail	Theft
•	   Understanding	Retail	Loss
•	   Shoplifting	–	signs	and	prevention
•	   Good	Practice	for	Retailers
•	   Using	Store	Design	to	Reduce	Shoplifting
•	   Employee	Theft
•	   Cash	Handling
•	   Break,	Enter	&	Steal
•	   Robbery
•	   Fraud
•	   Vandalism
•	   Reporting	Incidents	to	the	Police
•	   Designing	Crime	Out	of	Your	Business	Checklist
By putting in place crime prevention measures within your business, you are protecting your business, customers,
and	staff.		Preventing	crime	from	occurring	within	your	business	can	have	a	significant	impact	on	the	community	
and across NSW.
For further information on crime prevention, please visit the NSW Crime Prevention website
www.crimeprevention.nsw.gov.au and the NSW Police website www.police.nsw.gov.au




                                              Retail Security Resource
An Overview of Retail Crime in Australia
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An Overview of Retail Crime in Australia
Retailers may experience a variety of crimes but shoplifting is the most prevalent. The chart1 below shows the
breakdown of all incidents of crime, by crime type, experienced by retailers.


                                                                                            !"#$%&'()&*+%&,$'--&./0#(%00&

                  Crime and the                                                                                         Robbery
                                                                                                                          1%


                  Small Business                                                              Vehicle Theft
                                                                                                  1%                Burglary
                                                                                                                                  Vandalism
                                                                                                                                     5%

                                                                                                                      6%


                               Shoplifting 70%                                                          Assault
                                                                                                         3%



                               Employee Fraud 7%
                                                                                                  Cheque/credit fraud

                               Cheque/Credit Fraud 7%
                                                                                                         7%




                               Assault 3%                                                          Employee Fraud
                                                                                                        7%




                               Vehicle Theft 1%                                                                                               Shoplifting
                                                                                                                                                70%


                               Burglary 6%

                               Robbery 1%

                               Vandalism 5%

                                                                     	
  



The 2011 Global Theft Barometer indicates that shrinkage on a global scale is increasing, and retail theft cost the
Australian economy more than $2 billion. Globally, in 2010 Australia records the second highest levels of employee
theft in the world, with over 40% of theft resulting from employees. Employee theft has consistently remained a
significant concern in Australia for a number of years. The Global Theft Barometer indicates that the top 5 items
stolen in Australia are lipsticks, shaving products, fragrances, infant formula and clothing2.

Retail theft has been fuelled by consumer demands for low-cost goods coupled with a reduction in staff on the retail
selling floor3. This environment provides numerous opportunities and motivation for the enterprising shoplifter and
dishonest employee. Research has shown that often goods stolen are resold on the secondary market, through
auction sites for example, and to unscrupulous retailers. On average products resold on the streets will attract
approximately 30 cents on the dollar, and in anonymous internet sites up to 70 cents on the dollar4.

Retailers also have a general duty of care or legal obligation to their employees to ensure the health, safety and
welfare at work of all employees and others who come in to the store. It is the employer’s responsibility to ensure
that all reasonably practicable measures have been taken to control risks against all possible injuries arising from
the workplace5.




1.   “Reporting of crimes against small business”, Crime Facts Info – Number 43. 18 February 2003.
2.   “Liquid Technology to Reduce Retail Theft ”, RetailBiz: Australian Retail News.
     Accessed 11/05/2011: http://www.retailbiz.com.au/2010/11/17/article/Liquid-technology-to-reduce-retail-theft/UYXYCQREXG.html
3.   Lynch, M. (2009). “Retail Theft Soars in Economic Downturn (WWD)”. RILA (Retail Industry Leaders Association.
     Accessed 23/11/2009: http://www.rila.org/news/Documents/WWD%20BD%20ORC.pdf
4.   Leavenworth, J. (2009). “Sophisticated and Organized Shoplifters Are An Alarming Trend”, All Business.
     Accessed 13/01/2010: http://www.allbusiness.com/crime-law-enforcement-corrections/law-police-forces/13581552-1.html
5.   WorkCover Authority of NSW. “Duty of Care”. Accessed 8 June 2011: http://www.workcover.nsw.gov.au/healthsafety/Pages/Dutyofcare.aspx




                                                                            Retail Security Resource
The Financial Implications of Retail Theft
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The Financial Implications of Retail Theft
How theft (unknown loss) reduces the gross profit of a retail business

Imagine that a store should have had $105,000 of stock on hand, however after a stock-take it was discovered
that there was only $101,000 of stock, therefore $4,000 of the stock has gone missing. This difference ($4,000) is
unknown loss; you don’t know how it has been lost.

The $4,000 unknown loss in turn leads to an increase in the Cost of Goods Sold (COGS) of $4,000.

If the store had sales of $40,000 and an ‘original’ Cost of Goods Sold of $ 20,000 the Gross Profit of the business
would be $20,000. However the $4,000 loss increases the COGS which in turn drives down profit from $20,000 to
$16,000.

It is clear that the impact of unknown loss on the gross profit of a retail organisation is to decrease the Gross Profit
amount.



                               You just cannot ignore the impact of
                                loss upon the bottom line profit of
                                          your business



The impact of theft on a store’s net profit

The impact of theft goes beyond reducing the gross profit of your business, it also reduces your net profit. Each
dollar of theft reduces the gross profit which in turn leads to a reduced bottom line net profit for the business.

In simple terms it really comes down to this:

• Higher theft levels reduce your Gross Profit
• Reduced Gross Profit lowers your Net Profit
The formula to calculate net profit is as follows:

Net Profit$ = $GP – $Store Expenses

That is, a store ‘pays’ for its business expenses out of the Gross Profit, so if theft reduces the gross profit, the
business has less Gross Profit to pay for their business expenses.




                                                 Retail Security Resource
Understanding Retail Loss
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Understanding Retail Loss
Retail businesses are susceptible to crime. The real issue for retailers however is the loss that results from crime and
the impact of this upon business profits.

Retailers use a variety of terms to describe this loss. Let’s look at some of these:

‘Shrinkage’ is a word that is often used in retail environments to describe the unwanted reduction in value of
a retailer’s stock. The use of the word shrinkage may however be confusing, as some retailers use the term to
describe only losses of an unknown cause, such as theft. Other retailers use the word shrinkage as a term that
includes both their known and their unknown losses. In order to simplify matters, in this resource we will avoid using
the term shrinkage and instead will use the terms Known Loss and Unknown Loss.

Known Loss is a loss that has been identified, recorded and processed. It may be broken into the following sub-
categories:

•   Known theft processed
•   Known errors processed, such as out-of-date or damages
•   Cost of sales adjustments, such as tasting, markdowns or out-of-date
•   Other, such as donations

The key point here is that any recorded reduction in stock value is a Known Loss.

Unknown Loss, on the other hand, refers to losses only discovered following the reconciliation between the results
of a physical stocktake and the retailer’s book stock.

To reduce unknown loss requires the following actions:

• Understand the causes of the problem (e.g. error, theft or waste)
• Identify actions to attack it
• Motivate your team to implement those actions




                                                Retail Security Resource
Shoplifting
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Shoplifting
The term ‘shoplifting’ describes theft by customers from retail businesses through taking goods without paying for
them. Whilst shoplifters come in many different shapes and sizes a simple way of separating shoplifters is to use
two categories, professionals and amateurs. Both groups steal from retail businesses, however the methods that
can be used to prevent theft vary for each group.

Here are some descriptions of both types as well as hints that can help to prevent them from stealing from your
store.


Professionals
• Usually highly skilled and hard to spot
• Tend to concentrate on high-demand, easily resold consumer goods
• May case a store well in advance of the actual theft

Amateur Shoplifters
•   May seem like any other customer
•   Theft may not be planned but may occur on the spur of the moment
•   May be driven by an urgent physical need, such as addictions
•   Often clumsy or erratic in their behaviour
•   May be easier than other types of shoplifters to detect
•   May steal on a dare or simply for kicks
•   Often expect store owners and courts to go easy on them
•   May enter stores in groups in an attempt to intimidate team members



           While both groups may be quite skilled at shoplifting, professional
           shoplifters steal to make a living and may use force or intimidation.
                  The non-professional shoplifter may be easier to spot.



                                              Retail Security Resource
Shoplifting - Signs of Shoplifting
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Signs of shoplifting
Thieves come in all ages, races and from various backgrounds. However, there are some signs that should signal a
red flag for retailers. Fortunately, most shoplifters are amateurs.

While the following characteristics don’t necessarily mean a customer is a shoplifter, retailers should keep a close
eye on shoppers who exhibit the following:

• Spends more time watching the cashier or salesperson than actually shopping
• Wears bulky, heavy clothing during warm weather or coats when unnecessary
• Walks with short or unnatural steps, which may indicate that they are concealing stolen items
• Takes several items into a dressing room and only leaves with one item or none
• The customer’s eyes are not looking at what their hands are doing; instead they are looking out for staff! So if
  the eyes don’t match the action…beware!
• Seems nervous and may pick up random items with no interest
• Frequently enters store and never makes a purchase

Many shoplifters work in groups of two or more, and learn to take advantage of busy stores during peak hours or
they may hit at times when employees are less alert, such as opening, closing and shift changes. Some of the
following are methods used to steal from retailers:

• A large group enters the store at one time. A member of the group causes a disturbance or asks for assistance
  to distract sales staff whilst the others shoplift.
• Items can be concealed in clothing, handbags, prams, umbrellas, reused shopping bags, or inside purchased
  merchandise.
• Bold shoplifters may grab an item and run out of the store.
• Paying a cheaper price for products through price label switching for one of a lesser value, and incorrect
  amount of money given to the cashier.
• Return of stolen goods without a receipt for either cash or a credit voucher.
There are a number of reasons why people steal products from retail stores. Some of these reasons include
psychiatric or pathological reasons, for excitement, peer pressure, lack of money, to support their family or lifestyle,
embarrassment associated with purchasing an item, unable to purchase a product due to laws e.g. alcohol and
aerosol spray paint cans, to support an addiction e.g. drugs or gambling, and revenge.

The below table6 expands on the previous two categories of shoplifters, and details some of the motivations that
may cause people to shoplift.

      Category of                                                                                                Response when
                                           Frequency                                Motivation                                                 Percentage
      Shop Thief                                                                                                  Apprehended
                                  Often only once or                                                      Exhibited shock, shame
Impulse                                                                  Not planned                                                               15.4
                                  twice                                                                   and guilt
                                  3 to 10 times in last                                                   Admitted guilt but downplayed
Occasional                                                               Enjoyed the challenge                                                     15.0
                                  year                                                                    the seriousness of the act
                                                                         Exhibited emotional              Compliant; usually requires
Episodic                          Periodic episodes                                                                                                 1.7
                                                                         psychological problems           treatment to alter behaviour
                                                                                                          Admitted guilt but usually
Amateur                           Regular (often weekly)                 Economically rewarding                                                    56.4
                                                                                                          downplayed previous acts
                                                                         Took more expensive              Likely to have a “prepared
                                  Frequently (at least
Semi-professional                                                        items; only type who did         story”; and to claim unfair              11.7
                                  once a week)
                                                                         so for resale purposes           treatment if the story is rejected
6.   Nelson, D., & Perrone, S. (2000). Understanding and Controlling Retail Theft




                                                                               Retail Security Resource
Shoplifting - Commonly Stolen Items
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Commonly Stolen Items
Goods and items that are frequently stolen are known as ‘Hot Products’. Hot products generally include items such
as mobile phones, jewellery and other fashion accessories, electronic goods, personal care items, cash and food.

Hot products have characteristics that are captured in the acronym CRAVED:
• Concealable – and/or not easily identified as not belonging to the thief
• Removable – not fixed and secured down (for physical objects)
• Available – Widely available and easy to find, as well as new products that hit the market.
• Valuable – in terms of monetary gain or psychological gain such as social status
• Enjoyable – either from personal use, from the money gained when it is sold (see disposable below), or again
  from psychological gain
• Disposable – the product can be sold on for monetary or other gain – there is a ready black market.




                                               Retail Security Resource
                                        Retail Security Resource - Introduction
Shoplifting - Preventing Shoplifting
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Preventing Shoplifting
The most effective deterrent against all forms of customer theft is excellent customer service. This is true both
for amateur and professional thieves, it is just much harder to steal when you are being served well. In fact when
shoplifters have been caught and questioned about their shoplifting, they admit that they actively look for stores
with poor service.


Here’s what you can do
• Staffing: Schedule an adequate number of
  employees to work at one time.

• Greetings: Ensure every customer that enters the
  store is greeted. This lets the customer know you
  are aware of their presence.

• Be Attentive: Staff must make themselves
  available to all customers and never leave the
  store unattended.

• Receipts: Each customer must receive a receipt
  for every purchase. Receipts must be required for
  refunds. Discard any old receipts immediately.

• Stay Focused: Don’t allow customers to distract
  the sales people while another person is being
  served.

• Bag Check: Implement a policy and procedure for
  backpacks and bags brought in by customers.

• Service calls: If you notice suspicious activities,



                                                            	
  
  alert other employees immediately. In larger stores
  consider implementing a security code to alert
  staff of possible shoplifters.

• Helping Hand: If you are suspicious of a customer
  ask if he/she is finding everything okay. Mention
  that you’ll be nearby should he/she need your
  help. Make the potential shoplifter feel watched.
  If they are an honest person they will actually be
  pleased with the service.




                                              Retail Security Resource
Good Practice for Retailers
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Good Practice for Retailers
It is important to implement policies and procedures that can reduce the likelihood of shoplifting from occurring.
Policies and procedures assist management and staff prepare for, and appropriately deal with shoplifting incidents.
The following information should be considered when developing your store’s policies and procedures to reduce
and deal with shoplifting.

• If a person is caught shoplifting make sure the store policy is to always call the Police.
• Clearly communicate the store bag check policy by having a clear sign at the door stating “It is a condition of
  entry that bags, parcels and prams may be checked”. Retailers have no legal right to search a bag. It is not an
  offence if a person refuses to have their bag searched. However, you can ask them to leave the store and ban
  them from re-entering.
• It is important to provide clear instructions to your staff about store policy in relation to bag checks and
  shoplifting. This will help to promote and ensure consistent practices in your store.
• If you catch someone in the act of shoplifting ask them to wait in the store, and call the Police. Also:
  o    Tell them who you are.
  o    Tell them why they have been asked to stay in the store.
  o    Advise them that Police have been called
  o    Ask the person to surrender any property that doesn’t belong to them. Remember, retailers and other
       citizens have no legal right to search a person.
  o    Most importantly, do not put yourself at risk.
• When you contact Police provide the following information:          If the situation causes danger to
  o  Your name                                                       you, your staff or your customers,
  o  Your location and the nearest cross street
  o  Your contact telephone number
                                                                       do not approach the shoplifter.
  o  Type of incident (e.g. shoplifter)
  o  The full name and date of birth of the offender (if you have it)
  o  The current behaviour of the offender (This will help to determine the type of Police response required).
• When an offence is reported, Police will determine if there is enough evidence to support a charge. You may be
  asked to provide a statement describing what you saw, heard, said, did or touched.


                                                Retail Security Resource
Using Store Design to Reduce Shoplifting
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Using Store Design to Reduce Shoplifting
Giving consideration to crime prevention practises in and around your business ensures staff and customer security.
Consider the following suggestions to reduce the impact of crime upon your business:


Business Identification
• Clearly display business names and numbers as this will assist emergency services locate your business if
  needed
• Ensure your business name and store signs are visible at night, either by using luminous signs or lighting

Entry/Exit
• Where appropriate bell chimes/alarms should be fitted to notify of customers entering and exiting the store
• High shelving should not be placed in front of the entry/exit as staff must have a clear view of people coming in
  to or leaving the store

Windows
• Windows should be clear of excessive signage
• The inside of the store should be clearly visible from outside the store
• Open-style grilles or shutters should be used instead of solid style shutters to protect windows and doors.
  This reduces opportunities for vandalism as well as increasing visibility into the store

Lighting
• A well-lit area increases the chances of any unwanted behaviour being detected
• Ensure car parks are well lit to assist staff and customers feel safe as they leave and reduce the likelihood of
  victimisation by increasing visibility
• Do not light areas outside of store hours that cannot be seen (e.g. loading docks) by passing pedestrians or
  cars, as they may assist potential burglars access your store




                                               Retail Security Resource
Using Store Design to Reduce Shoplifting
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Shelving
• Reduce the height of shelving where possible to increase visibility in the store
• Shelving that is above shoulder height should have mirrors positioned around them to ensure staff can see
  customers on the other side
• Shelving should be positioned so that aisles between shelves are visible from the register

Other Displays
• Ideally displays throughout the store should be no higher than waist-height to prevent blocking sightlines
  throughout the store
• Higher display units and shelving should be placed against the walls of the store to ensure clear visibility of
  those using them as well as maximising clear sightlines
• Displays next to store exits or outside of the shop are extremely vulnerable to theft. Reconsider the use of
  these, unless you have staff monitoring these displays at all times

Sales Counter & Register
• Elevate the sales counter/register so staff have greater visibility of the store
• Registers should be positioned either near entry/exit points or with clear visibility to entry/exit points
• Consider leaving empty cash registers open at night (to prevent their being broken into)

Storage Room
• Access to storage rooms should be controlled with either a key or pin code. These should be changed to
  ensure former staff are unable to access these areas once they have left your employment
• Where appropriate, ensure CCTV monitor storage areas/reserves

Fitting Rooms
• Limit the number of items customers can take into the fitting rooms, and ensure staff enforce this
• Ensure staff are rostered on to fitting room areas to increase security and identify if items go missing from here

Staff Areas
• Ensure there are designated secure areas for staff to leave their bags, phones and wallets. Having staff lockers
  assists staff to securely store their belongings
• Discourage staff leaving their personal items around the sales counter/register as this may place their items as
  well as your business at risk of theft

Blind spots/difficult areas in your store
• Install a convex mirror to increase the visibility of blind spots
• Reduce the height of the shelf or increase distance between shelves so staff can see customers on the other side
• Elevate the sales counter/register so staff have greater visibility of the store

Product positioning
• Position high-value items in areas that are well monitored by staff
• High-value items should have security devices attached, for example source tagging, cable ties or even locked
  in display cabinets
• If security tags are on store products, ensure customers’ bags are checked if sensors are alerted, whether they
  are walking into or out of the store



                                                Retail Security Resource
Using Store Design to Reduce Shoplifting
                                                                                                       MAKE SECURITY YOUR BUSINESS




• Consider displaying empty boxes for the same marketing impact, as this greatly reduces the risk of theft
• Keep a record of the items most commonly stolen from your store. This will help you to determine the
  products most at risk, as well as vulnerable areas of your store
• Give careful consideration about placement of products next to doors, fire escapes and windows that are left
  open – these items may be vulnerable to theft

CCTV
• If you have CCTV, ensure that they are positioned to gain maximum coverage. Consult your local Crime
  Prevention Officer of the NSW Police Force to assist with this
• Ensure CCTV is recorded with new tapes or DVDs to ensure clear images
• Ensure hanging displays, decorations and signage do not block lines of sight for CCTV
• Ensure you regularly review CCTV footage, and ensure that staff know that you do this. Reviewing CCTV
  can assist in detecting patterns of crime, identify blind spots, and notice any technical errors with CCTV
  and its footage
• Consider registering with the NSW Police Force CCTV register. For more information go to www.police.nsw.
  gov.au/cctv_register
• Ensure you are complying with the necessary privacy legislation. For more information visit http://www.privacy.
  gov.au/law

Staff
• Ensure staff greet and make eye contact with all customers that enter the store. This let’s all people entering
  the store know that you are aware of their presence
• Ensure there is an adequate number of staff to work at all times, so the store or sales floor is never unattended.
• Ensure staff have been trained in loss prevention and customer service
• Communicate with staff about any recent shoplifting that has occurred in the store or in other stores in your area
• If appropriate hire staff to work at night to clean up, restock and change window and other displays. This
  ensures the store is being monitored at night

Signage
• Security messages should be displayed as they may act as a useful deterrent. For example ‘Shoplifters will be
  Prosecuted’ and ‘No cash kept on premises after hours’
• Display signage about bag-checking policies
• Inform customers if you have CCTV and that they are being monitored

Community Network
• Join a local business watch or Chamber of Commerce if they exist in your area. This will help in finding out
  and sharing local knowledge about any recent crimes against retailers
• Get to know your local Police Crime Prevention Officer at the Local Area Police Command. The local Crime
  Prevention Officer can also provide security advice about your store

For more information on securing your retail premises and identifying vulnerable areas in your store, download a
copy of the ‘Designing Crime Out of Your Business’ checklist on the crime prevention website www.crimeprevention.
nsw.gov.au. There is also a copy at the end of this resource manual.




                                               Retail Security Resource
Employee Theft
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Employee Theft
One of the most serious threats to the success of a retail business is employee theft. On average more than 40% of
all retail theft is committed by staff. Misplaced trust, poor hiring and inadequate supervision, along with a failure to
implement basic financial controls can lead to an environment that is ripe for internal theft and fraud. Retail business
owners can help protect their profits from employee theft and fraud by following these recommendations.


Preventing Employee Theft
Create a positive work environment: This encourages employees to follow established policies and procedures, and
act in the best interests of the business. Fair employment practices, written job descriptions, clear organisational
structure, comprehensive policies and procedures, open lines of communication between management and
employees, and positive employee recognition will all help reduce the likelihood of internal fraud and theft.

Implement internal controls: These measures are designed to ensure the effectiveness and efficiencies of operations,
compliance with laws and regulations, safeguarding of assets, and accurate financial reporting. The controls for
safeguarding assets and financial reporting require policies and procedures addressing:

• Separation of duties. No employee should be responsible for both recording and processing a transaction.
• Access controls. Access to physical and financial assets and information, as well as accounting systems,
  should be restricted to authorised employees.
• Authorisation controls. Develop and implement policies to determine how financial transactions are initiated,
  authorised, recorded, and reviewed. Internal controls will reduce opportunities for fraud.
Restrict personal belongings: Petty theft and misunderstandings can be significantly reduced if your store
employment policy restricts staff from taking personal items, such as bags, wallets and money, onto the shop
selling floor. To support this policy, you should provide staff with lockers or a secure area to leave their personal
belongings.

Recruitment checks: Dishonest employees will ignore your attempts to provide a positive work environment, and
search for ways to defeat even the most comprehensive internal controls. Pre-employment background checks are
an excellent way to cut down on hiring dishonest employees.

Educate your employees: Inform your employees about your policies and procedures relating to fraud prevention
and other loss prevention strategies. Employees should receive training on these topics and on the definition of
what’s considered fraudulent and criminal behaviour, and sign an acknowledgement each time.



                                                Retail Security Resource
Employee Theft
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Aim at the target: Monitoring and prevention measures should be centred on items that are the most expensive and
easiest to steal. Such items include jewellery, leather, and small consumer electronics. The most important item a
company should direct its focus on is its most liquid asset: cash.

Implement an anonymous reporting system: Every retail business should provide a confidential reporting system for
employees, vendors, and customers to anonymously report any violations of policies and procedures.

Perform regular, and irregular, audits: Every retailer should have regular audits/stocktakes and also random,
unannounced financial audits and fraud assessments. This can help identify new vulnerabilities, and measure the
effectiveness of existing controls.

Keep a watchful eye: No prevention step can be truly effective if it is not frequently checked and observed for flaws.

Investigate every incident: A thorough and prompt investigation of policy and procedure violations, allegations of
fraud, or warning signs of fraud will give you the facts you need to make informed decisions and reduce losses.

Staff sign in: Ensure staff sign in and out when they start and finish work. This helps you identify who is in the
store and the hours they worked. This will help in emergency situations, and assists with staff information relating
to incidents.

Lead by example: Senior management and business owners set the example for the business’s employees. A
relaxed approach to rules and regulations will be reflected in the attitude of employees.




                                                Retail Security Resource
Cash Handling
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Cash Handling
Good practice procedures for cash handling will vary according to your retail store. The retail location, number of
staff, quality of existing security measures and the amount of cash exchanged all impact on the most suitable form
of cash handling for your store.

A good cash handling procedure can reduce the risk of theft from staff, threats to staff and robberies.

Some tips for good cash handling procedures are listed below:

• Count cash out of sight of customers or passers-by, preferably in a secure office
• Where possible use two people to count the cash and transfer it to and from the bank. This increases
  accountability, as well as increases personal security
• Whilst cash is being counted, staff should not attend other duties (serving customers) and leave the cash
  unattended
• Busy retailers may wish to consider depositing cash multiple times in a day or into a secured safe in the store
  before the daily bank visit
• Vary the times that cash is counted and transferred to the bank
• When transferring cash to the bank, do not place cash in obvious bank bags
• Leave the empty cash register drawer open when the store is closed to indicate that there is no cash to steal
• Consider displaying signs in the store window indicating that no cash is kept on premises over night
• Ensure you have clear procedures in place for the use of registers and cash. Strictly apply these procedures.
  For example, if policy suggests any variation of $5 or more needs to be investigated, then investigate every
  variance of $5 or more.




                                               Retail Security Resource
Break Enter and Steal
                                                                                                             MAKE SECURITY YOUR BUSINESS




Break Enter and Steal
Small businesses are prime targets for burglars and robbers. Because your business may be the victim of a robbery
or a break enter and steal, you should be aware of preventative measures that will reduce the impact of these crimes.

Break enter and steal is any unlawful entry to commit a theft. Retailers whose stores have been broken into know
that break enter and steal are costly – both financially and through time spent investigating and recouping loss.

Prevention must start with the business owner and their team. Use a combination of the following measures to
protect your store from being broken into, including:

•   Suitable locks
•   An appropriate alarm system
•   Adequate indoor and outside lighting
•   A secure store safe

In addition, the owners of high-risk stores should also consider using:

•   Open style security grilles or shutters to increase visibility, but reduce opportunities for vandalism
•   Burglar-resistant glass windows
•   Security patrols
•   Watchdogs




                                                 Retail Security Resource
Robbery
                                                                                                         MAKE SECURITY YOUR BUSINESS




Robbery
Robbery is stealing or taking anything of value by force, violence or threat. Whilst the incidence of robberies is
relatively low, the victims of robberies may often suffer actual physical harm or psychological distress.

Some stores are more at risk than others, this may be dependant upon whether your business:

• Trades at night-time
• Is in an identified higher risk area, for example away from other stores
• Holds cash on the premises
What can you do to reduce losses from robbery in your store?

• Form a neighbourhood business watch system with nearby retailers, alerting each other of suspicious activity
• Limit volume of cash in store and regularly clear cash from registers
• Improve the lighting within your store

Use your store design to make it harder for robbers

•   Install deadlocks on doors and fit alarm systems
•   Reduce opportunities for physical contact with staff – for example, by installing security screens
•   Install coded locks to restrict public access to staff areas
•   Fit electronic sensors that emit a sound when customers enter or leave

The person conducting a Business or Undertaking (employer) must notify Workcover immediately, or as soon as you
become aware of a fatality, serious injury or illness, or dangerous incident. Visit the Workcover website for further
information. www.workcover.nsw.gov.au

In the event of a robbery, it is essential that you contact police. The following indicates the types of questions and
information Police will ask you regarding the crime. It is important that you fill in this information by yourself, and
without the assistance of others to ensure it is as accurate as possible.




                                                Retail Security Resource
                                                                                                           FIREARMS
HANDGUNS                                                                                                                                      SAWN OFF SHOTGUNS

                                                                               Large
                                                                               Automatic
    Long Barrel
    Revolver                                                                                                                                       Pump Action




                                                                                                  OTHER WEAPONS

                                                                                                                                       Other - Illustrate




Descriptions:

..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

       Syringe                                          Blade Colour:               .......................................................       Handle Colour:                .................................................................

       Club                                             Blade Width:              ........................................................        Handle Material:                  .............................................................

       Screwdriver                                      Blade Length:               .......................................................       Handle Length:                 ..................       .................     .................

       Other


                                                                         VEHICLE (damage, accessories etc.)

TYPE
                                                                                                                                                                                                Passenger side
                                                                         Driver Side
       Sedan
       Station Sedan
       Utility
       Panel Van
       Bicycle
       Motor Bike
       Other Vehicle

  State Reg.                                   Reg. No.                                      Year                               Make                                           Model                                          Colour




                                                                                     DISTINGUISHING FEATURES
       Automatic                                                                            Damage                                                                             Modified
       Bucket seats                                                                         Ex tras                                                                            Radio
       Cassette                                                                             Floor gears                                                                        Rust/Primer
       Column gears                                                                         Instruments                                                                        Seat Covers
       Custom wheels                                                                        Manual
                                                                              Description Form
                                  If you’re a victim or witness to a crime, please complete this form by yourself. If you are unsure of
                                  an answer, don’t guess - leave it blank. If there are other witnesses, record their names at the
                                  base of page and ask them to complete these descriptions on a piece of paper.
                                                                                                DESCRIPTION OF                                                                          CLOTHING
                                                                                                  OFFENDER                                           (Use diagram to show par ticular marks/patterns)

                               Hair
                                                                                          Age:                                                      Upper body:
           Earring
                                                     Eye colour,                          ...............................................           ...............................................................................................

Stained or                                              Pimples,                                                                                    Lower body:
                                                                                          Race:
  missing                                                  Facial hair,
     teeth                                                                                .................................................         ...............................................................................................
                                                             Scars,
                                                              etc,.                       Build:                                                    Headwear:

                                                                                          .................................................         ...............................................................................................

                                                                                          Weight:                                                   Footwear:
                                                                 Jeweller y,
                                                                  Tattoo                  .................................................         ...............................................................................................

                                                                                          Height:                                                   Bag:
 Gloves                                                Scar,                              .................................................         ...............................................................................................
                                                       Tattoo,
                                                                                          Complex ion:                                              Other:
                                                       Ring,
                                                                                                                                                    (Include: Jeweller y/scars/tattoos/deformities etc):
                                                       etc,.                              .................................................
                                                                                                                                                    ...............................................................................................
                                                                                          .................................................
                                                                                                                                                    ...............................................................................................
                                                                                          .................................................
                                                                                                                                                    ...............................................................................................
                                                                                          .................................................
                                                                                                                                                    ...............................................................................................
                                                                                          .................................................
                                                                                                                                                    ...............................................................................................
                                                                                          .................................................
                                              Make of shoe
                                                                                                                                                    ...............................................................................................
                                                                                          .................................................




BEHAVIOUR - (include words/spoken, accent & mannerisms)                                                                                                                To repor t suspicious activity
                                                                                                                                                                         phone Crimestoppers on
 .........................................................................................................................................................
                                                                                                                                                                              1800 333 000
 ........................................................................................................................................................             In the event of an emergency
                                                                                                                                                                                 phone 000

                                                                                                     COMPLETED BY
        Police
                                Name (print):              ............................................................................................
        Victim
                                Address:          .....................................................................................................                   .........................................................................
        Witness                                                                                                                                                           Signature
                                Contact No.: (Home)                       .............................................................................

                                                          (Work)        ..............................................................................                    Date      ................./ ................./ ....................

                                                          (Mob)        ................................................................................                   Time:       ....................................


 OTHER WITNESS

 Name (print):              ............................................................................................             Contact No.: (Home)                      ....................................................................

 Address:          .....................................................................................................                                        (Work)        ....................................................................

 .......................................................................................................................                                        (Mob)        ......................................................................

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                0906
Fraud
                                                                                                       MAKE SECURITY YOUR BUSINESS




Fraud
Fraud is described as intentional deception and dishonesty through the use of false means or information - resulting
in personal or financial gain.

A retail business can be defrauded in many ways, whether through your employees, your customers, other
businesses and/or your suppliers. The most common types of frauds against retailers are:

•   Credit Card fraud
•   Refund fraud
•   Supplier fraud
•   Card Skimming
•   Counterfeit Notes
•   Cheque fraud

Credit Cards
With the introduction of chip technology and the increased use of pin numbers rather than signatures the risks to
retailers has declined over recent years. Customers may still choose to sign rather than use a PIN. If customers use
a signature make sure this is always checked.

Be alert for customers that display the following behaviours:
• Try to rush through a sale or distract staff during the sale
• Make purchases without regard to size, quality or price
• Have no identification
• Request transactions to be manually entered
• Sign their name slowly or unnaturally

To minimise the risk of credit card fraud, ensure staff always check the front and back of the card.
• Check if the card is damaged
• Check the expiry date
• Check the printing and embossing – does it appear to have been changed?
• Check the hologram is 3D and changes colour when it is tilted
• Check that the card has been signed, and that the signature panel has not been altered



                                                Retail Security Resource
Fraud
                                                                                                         MAKE SECURITY YOUR BUSINESS




• Ensure the customer’s signature matches the signature on the card.

Other advice includes:

• Counterfeit cards are near indistinguishable to authentic credit cards. At times the magnetic stripe data may
  not match the bank details on the front of the credit card, that is the stripe data is for a different financial
  institution. Mastercard, Visa and AMEX cards have Ultra Violent/UV (black light) watermarks printed on the
  front of the card. Mastercard has the letters M C. Visa has a V across the ‘visa’ word logo, while AMEX has
  that lettering across its card. A card that lacks these features under a UV light is fraudulent.

Following the above checks, if you are suspicious of the card, request further photo identification such as a driver’s
licence or passport.


Refund Fraud
The legal right to obtain a refund requires that the customer has a valid receipt and that the product is either faulty
or not suitable for the purpose for which it was sold. Many retailers however provide refunds to customers who
have simply changed their mind. This is done as a form of customer service. However dishonest people will take
advantage of this generosity by claiming refunds under fraudulent circumstances. Types of refund fraud include:

•   Customers who purchase goods at another store and return it to your store
•   Employees keeping receipts and using them to obtain refunds either for themselves or friends
•   Customers buy products at sale prices then return them for refunds at higher prices
•   Customers returning used products for refunds at full prices

Consider the below tips to prevent refund fraud:

•   Only accept refunds with a valid receipt
•   Ensure all refunds for staff are processed by management
•   Ensure all returned goods are closely inspected
•   Implement a store policy around a specific timeframe that goods can be returned e.g. 14 days

Supplier Fraud
Dishonest delivery people and suppliers can steal from you by delivering fewer goods to your store than you have
been charged for on the invoice.

The simplest method of deterring this type of behaviour is by checking all deliveries to ensure that you are receiving
what you have been charged for. Also consider the following suggestions:

• Only allow one delivery to be processed at a time
• Do not allow delivery people to enter your storeroom area or unload your delivery

Card Skimming
Card skimming is a crime that is increasing globally. Sophisticated techniques are used by criminals to steal or
skim data from a customer’s card as it is swiped through a terminal. A customer’s PIN may also be at risk of being
stolen through these techniques.

For retailers, some criminals will steal EFTPOS terminals, make the required changes, and replace it. Other criminals
may simply replace your terminal with one that has already been modified. In both instances, your terminal is
targeted and accessed.




                                                Retail Security Resource
Fraud
                                                                                                            MAKE SECURITY YOUR BUSINESS




Some common ways your terminal can be modified are:
• Someone posing as a technician has come to service
  your terminal                                                                      Always ensure that you
• Distractions or disturbances are caused to remove attention                         verify all service visits
  from terminal
• Terminals that have been left unattended or not secured
  down may be targeted
Below are a few tips to reduce the likelihood of card skimming at your store. Ensure your terminal:
•    Looks the same and has no damage or modifications
•    Has the same number and types of cables
•    Has the correct serial number
•    Prints receipts indicating the right business name and address
•    Is clear of any hidden cameras
•    Is kept out of sight and reach of customers. Lock them away whenever possible

If you or your staff notice any modifications or changes to your terminals, missing terminals, or a suspicious
technician servicing or replacing your terminal contact police immediately.


Counterfeit Notes 7
There are a few signs retailers can use to identify counterfeit money.

•    Feel the note. Australian money is made using a special plastic polymer that is difficult to tear
•    Hold the note to the light and look for the Australian Coat of Arms when looking at the front of the note
•    The main design of the note is slightly raised printing and can be felt
•    Look for the seven pointed star inside a circle
•    Look for any distortion or undefined patterns in the background printing
•    Check that the note has a clear window and that it has a clear printed image: $5 note has a gum flower;
     $10 has a windmill; $20 has a compass; $50 has the Southern Cross and the $100 has a lyrebird. Also, in
     the window of the $10 note a wave pattern is slightly visible, and the numbers 20, 50 and 100 appear in the
     window of respective notes

If you suspect that you have received a counterfeit note:

• Advise the customer that you think that the note is counterfeit and that you are going to call the Police
• Handle the note as little as possible and place it in an envelope or other protective covering
• Notify the Police straight away

For further information visit The Reserve Bank of Australia’s guide to detecting counterfeit currency
www.rba.gov.au/banknotes/counterfeit/detection.html




7.   Bizsafe (February 2006). Fraud and Business Scams.




                                                          Retail Security Resource
Fraud
                                                                                                         MAKE SECURITY YOUR BUSINESS




Cheque Fraud
The use of cheques is generally declining and with it the risk to retailers. Perhaps the best way of reducing the risk
of cheque fraud is by deciding not to accept cheques at all. If however you decide to accept cheques as payment
for goods make sure that you do the following:

• Cheques may be entirely fraudulent. Look for spelling mistakes such as ‘check’ rather than ‘cheque’ and the
  quality of the paper.
• Ask for a suitable ID, Drivers Licence or Passport, record the details on the back of the cheque
• Ensure that the cheque is signed in your presence and that the signature matches that on the ID
• There are services available that are able to provide on the spot clearance of cheques. Your business should
  consider using this service

Invoicing Fraud
• Companies may be the victim of fraudulent invoicing by offenders sending fake invoices for goods or services.
  Be suspicious of invoices not correctly addressed or referenced. Identify the recipient in the company of
  the goods or service to ensure it was received for the amount specified. Offenders may register fake email
  addresses and websites for legitimate suppliers using a .com or other domain extension rather than a .com.au
  to advertise and receive inquiries, or use slightly different/similar spelling, therefore contact the supplier using
  details in the phone book to verify the authenticity of the invoice.




                                                Retail Security Resource
Vandalism
                                                                                                          MAKE SECURITY YOUR BUSINESS




Vandalism
Vandalism is any deliberate act that damages or defaces property. Common vandalism targets for retailers include:

• Store lights, signs or windows
• Graffiti on walls or other surfaces

Repairing vandalism costs businesses millions of dollars each year and most end up passing on such costs to their
customers through higher prices.

Vandalism can be reduced in the following ways:

• If your store is located where there is regular vehicular or pedestrian traffic, make sure your store and its
  surrounds are well lit. This may increase the likelihood of detection, deterring vandals.
• Use toughened glass in your windows, it reduces the chance that vandals efforts will succeed. Open style
  grilles or shutters reduce the opportunities for graffiti, whilst still providing protection to your store windows.
• With vandalism generally and graffiti in particular it is important to repair any damage (remove graffiti) as soon
  as possible. Property that is not maintained creates the appearance that the area is uncared for.
• Reduce the opportunity for vandals to access your property. Use locks on gates and install high open-style
  fences to deter vandals. Ensure the fences are not easy to climb on or over.
• As with all illegal acts upon your business, report them all to police.

Graffiti itself is the most common form of vandalism upon business properties. Follow these suggestions to help
reduce its impact on your store:

•   Remove graffiti promptly
•   Maintain your property
•   Install fencing that won’t attract graffiti
•   Paint walls/fences with dark colours. Paint over graffiti using the same colour the wall is painted
•   Plant vegetation in front of walls/fences
•   Improve lighting
•   Use graffiti coating in high risk areas




                                                Retail Security Resource
Reporting Incidents to the Police
                                                                                                              MAKE SECURITY YOUR BUSINESS




Reporting Incidents to the Police
Report all incidents to the police. The police cannot help you counter shoplifting and other business crimes if they
don’t know you are experiencing them.

Why should I report shoplifting?

It is important to report all incidents of shoplifting in your store. Information relating to shoplifting may assist in:

• Processing insurance claims
• Targeted security operations. Information on shoplifting can assist Police and Security identify hotspots and
  provide additional patrols of the area
• Catching an offender. Offenders will be dealt with through the criminal justice system, which provides a number
  of resolution options for both the victims and offenders

How should shoplifting be reported?
You can report an incidence of shoplifting to the Police Assistance Line on 131 444. This allows you to quickly report
the crime over the phone and the information is immediately available to your local police.

In an emergency, or if you are holding an offender, dial 000.

You will need to give police as many of the following details as you can:
• Your name
• Your location and the nearest cross street

Your contact telephone number
• Type of incident (e.g. shoplifter)
• The full name and date of birth of the offender (if you have it)
• The offenders current behaviour

Record all incidents of theft including what was stolen, when it was stolen and where it was stolen from in the store.
This will help you to identify items most at risk; the times the store is most at risk; and the areas of the store most at
risk. You can then consider appropriate security measures to help overcome this.

Police will determine whether there is sufficient evidence to support charges.



                                                  Retail Security Resource
Reporting Incidents to the Police
                                                                                                           MAKE SECURITY YOUR BUSINESS




What happens if a shoplifter is caught?
• Police may issue a young offender (under 18 years of age) with a formal caution against further offending. The
  caution process involves the participation of the juvenile’s parent or carer. It is officially recorded on the police
  record system. In this instance the offender does not go to court. However, cautions are not unlimited. If a
  juvenile is an habitual offender they will be charged.
• Police may issue an offender with a court attendance notice in which case the offender appears before the
  court to be sentenced.
• Police may refer juvenile offenders to a Youth Justice Conference. For more information contact the Youth
  Liaison Officer at your local police station.
• Banning notices can be issued to known offenders in conjunction with Centre management. A banning notice
  prohibits entry to a specific area, such as the store. If the person then enters the store uninvited they can be
  charged.

NSW Police Force
The NSW Police Force has established Crime Prevention Officers (CPOs) to work with the community to reduce
local crime.

CPOs play an important role in coordinating government, community agencies and businesses at a local level to
develop strategies and solutions to tackle the social and economic causes of criminal behaviour.

CPOs work closely with the business community to:

• Conduct security assessments on individual businesses, including positioning of CCTV for maximum coverage
  of a store.
• Establish Community Safety Precinct Committees
• Coordinate and participate in crime prevention initiatives to reduce crime against business
• Promote awareness and understanding of crime prevention issues that impact on the business community
• Support victims of crime by conducting security assessments and suggest treatments to reduce repeat
  victimisation.

All 80 local area police commands across NSW, have a CPO working closely with the community.




                                                 Retail Security Resource
Reporting Incidents to the Police
                                                                                                       MAKE SECURITY YOUR BUSINESS




CCTV Register
The CCTV Register is an initiative of the NSW Police Force. The purpose of the Register is to record the location of
closed-circuit television (CCTV) camera systems, and other related information, across the State.

The mission of the NSW Police Force is to have the police and the community working together to establish a safer
environment by reducing violence, crime and fear. If your business operates a CCTV system, you can help the
police solve crime by registering your details.

There are two ways you can register:

1. Online via the NSW Police Force Internet site www.police.nsw.gov.au/cctv_register
2. Manually via a ‘CCTV Register Form’. These forms are available either online via the web address or via your
   local Crime Prevention Officer. Completed forms can be handed to your local Crime Prevention Officer or fax to
   the VIEW Team on 02 8835 7679.

All data will be stored in a secure database owned and operated by the NSW Police Force. Authorised officers
will be able to access the Register for law enforcement purposes eg; investigating crime. No information will be
provided to third parties.




                                               Retail Security Resource
                         Designing crime out of
                         your retail business
This checklist has been developed as a guide for assessing your retail business’s resistance
to loss. Answering “No” to a question indicates areas where you could take action to
improve the security of your business and it’s stock.

Retail Theft Prevention
Signage can be used to deter potential thieves from stealing from your business. Staff should be aware of
the highest risk products in the store. High-risk products should be displayed in a secure manner. Electronic
security systems can be used to ensure products do not leave the store without payment. Fitting room security
is essential in order to prevent theft from clothing stores. Ensure staff are aware of suspicious behaviours.

                                                                                     Date to be
Question                                 Yes   No   Comment                                       Completed
                                                                                     actioned

Do prominent signs tell customers that
bag inspections may be carried out?      q q                                                         q
Do prominent signs tell customers that
goods will not be exchanged without a
receipt?
                                         q q                                                         q
Do prominent signs say that thieves
will be prosecuted?                      q q                                                         q
Are staff advised to keep a special
watch on goods which are most likely
                                         q q                                                         q
to attract thieves?
Are expensive items secured in locked
display cabinets?                        q q                                                         q
Are electronic bar codes, shop ID
stickers or ink tags fixed to goods?     q q                                                         q
Can price tags be removed or
switched?                                q q                                                         q
Is the use of fitting rooms closely
controlled?                              q q                                                         q
Are staff told to watch customers with
bags, loose-fitting clothing, etc?       q q                                                         q
    Cash-handling procedures
    Establish clear cash-handling procedures within your business to reduce opportunities for crime. Try to reduce
    the amount of cash your business deals with. It is good practice to limit the amount of money carried in the
    cash drawer at any time. Use as small a float as is practical for your business. Lock cash drawers when not in
    use, and clear money from the cash drawer on a regular basis (e.g. to a safe). Avoid counting cash in public
    view.
    Use a minimum of two staff, or security services, when personally transferring money to or from the bank, and
    do not use obvious bank-bags when transferring the money. Consider using a reputable security company to
    do your banking especially when transferring large amounts of money.

                                                                                                      Date to be
    Question                                     Yes    No    Comment                                               Completed
                                                                                                      actioned

    Do you have established cash-
    handling procedures?                         q q                                                                    q
    Do you have a lockable cash drawer?
                                                 q q                                                                    q
    Do you have irregular banking
    procedures to prevent routine?               q q                                                                    q
    Is a company used to transport cash?
                                                 q q                                                                    q
    Is money counted out of public view?
                                                 q q                                                                    q


    Additional Point of Sales Security
    Some simple security measures at the point of sale can prevent loss of stock and money from your store. Staff
    should be trained on security measures relating to the acceptance of credit cards and other forms of payment.

                                                                                                       Date to be
    Question                                     Yes    No    Comment                                             Completed
                                                                                                       actioned

    Are staff asked to examine price tags
    and items at point-of-sale for alteration
                                                 q q                                                                    q
    or damage?

    Are staff instructed to check that a
    customer’s signature matches that on
                                                 q q                                                                    q
    the card?

    Do you ask for supporting ID (such as
    a driver’s licence) to verify the card.
                                                 q q                                                                    q




2                                             NSW Department of Attorney General and Justice: Designing crime out of your business
Protecting your stock
The most valuable asset in your retail store is your stock. Ensure stock-takes are undertaken regularly. Develop
policies and procedures that outline to staff the accepted way to receive stock into your store.

                                                                                       Date to be
 Question                                   Yes    No    Comment                                     Completed
                                                                                       actioned

 Do you conduct a regular stocktake?
                                            q q                                                         q
 Are delivery personnel, suppliers and
 other visitors escorted while on the
 premises?
                                            q q                                                         q
 Do you check that the quantity and
 type of goods delivered corresponds
 with your order?
                                            q q                                                         q


Protecting your staff
Your staff’s safety is paramount. Design your store to minimise the risk to staff. Ensure staff know what to do in
the event of an armed robbery. Emphasise that staff should under no circumstances physically tackle robbers or
shop thieves. Staff should be aware of what to do and who to call in the event of a robbery.

                                                                                       Date to be
 Question                                   Yes    No    Comment                                     Completed
                                                                                       actioned

 Does the layout minimise the
 chance of physical contact between
                                            q q                                                         q
 customers and staff?

 Do you tell your staff not to resist
 armed robbers, but to be calm and
                                            q q                                                         q
 cooperative?

 Do staff know not to physically
 struggle with a robber, or grapple for a
                                            q q                                                         q
 weapon?

 Do staff know not to pursue a robber,
 but to close the premises, touch
                                            q q                                                         q
 nothing and call the police?




NSW Department of Attorney General and Justice: Designing crime out of your business                                 3
Retail Store Design
When designing your store consider how your design may deter potential thieves. Staff should be able to see
all areas of the store. Customers should be prevented from accessing secure parts of the store such as your
storeroom and office. Merchandise placed near to exits presents a risk.

                                                                                                  Date to be
Question                                     Yes    No    Comment                                               Completed
                                                                                                  actioned
Can the counter be seen from outside
the business?                               q q                                                                      q
Are customers prevented from
accessing the area behind the
counter?
                                            q q                                                                      q
Is shelving arranged to provide good
sightlines within the store?                q q                                                                      q
Is there stock displayed outside the
store?                                      q q                                                                      q
Do you keep attractive or expensive
merchandise away from entry/exit?           q q                                                                      q


Keys and valuables control
A record log should be kept to control keys and valuables (e.g. laptops, mobile phones). This will identify which
staff have access to keys and other valuables, the type of keys and valuables, and the areas each staff member
has access to. All valuables should be clearly marked with the business details to reduce the likelihood of theft
or damage. You should also limit the number of keys and valuables left unsecured or in plain sight of potential
intruders.

                                                                                                  Date to be
Question                                     Yes    No    Comment                                            Completed
                                                                                                  actioned
Do you maintain a key log?
                                            q q                                                                    q
Are all spare keys secured?
                                            q q                                                                    q
Do staff have a location to secure their
personal items?                             q q                                                                    q
Does this location have restricted
access?                                     q q                                                                    q




4                                          NSW Department of Attorney General and Justice: Designing crime out of your business
 Surveillance Equipment
 Surveillance equipment can enhance the physical security of your business and assist in the identification
 of people involved in anti-social or criminal behaviour. Cameras should be installed with professional advice
 to maximise surveillance opportunities. TV monitors should enable staff to monitor activities on the camera.
 Videotapes need to be replaced quarterly to maintain quality images. Staff should be trained in the correct
 use of the surveillance system.
 Ensure that the requirements of the Surveillance Devices Act 2007 (NSW) are adhered to.

                                                                                       Date to be
  Question                                   Yes    No    Comment                                   Completed
                                                                                       actioned
  Do you have surveillance equipment
  installed?                                 q q                                                      q
  Is footage recorded on video?
                                             q q                                                      q
  Are cameras monitored?
                                             q q                                                      q
  Does the business have a customer
  TV monitor?                                q q                                                      q
  Does the camera system need
  upgrading?                                 q q                                                      q
  Are cameras suitably positioned?
                                             q q                                                      q
  Are tapes changed regularly?
                                             q q                                                      q
  Are tapes kept for a minimum of seven
  days?                                      q q                                                      q
  Have you confirmed your practices
  comply with the Surveillance
  Devices Act?
                                             q q                                                      q


 Business identification
 It is important that your street number and business name are visible from the street to assist emergency
 services locate your business.

                                                                                       Date to be
  Question                                   Yes    No    Comment                                 Completed
                                                                                       actioned
  Is your street number clearly visible
  from the street?                           q q                                                      q
  Is your business name clearly
  displayed?                                 q q                                                      q
  Is your business identifiable from
  the rear of the shop?                      q q                                                      q


NSW Department of Attorney General and Justice: Designing crime out of your business                             5
    Intruder alarm systems
    To enhance the security of your business, you can install a monitored intruder alarm system. Ensure the
    system has been designed and installed to the Australian Standard. It is suggested that you consider a
    supplementary system such as Global Satellite Mobile (GSM) or Radio Frequency (RF) systems to transmit
    alarm signals. Thieves have been known to cut telephone lines to prevent access to security monitoring
    companies.
    Consider installing a duress facility to enable staff to activate the system manually in the event of an emergency.

                                                                                                      Date to be
    Question                                    Yes    No    Comment                                             Completed
                                                                                                      actioned
    Is an intruder alarm system installed?
                                                q q                                                                    q
    Is the intruder alarm system
    monitored?                                  q q                                                                    q
    Does the alarm have a duress facility?
                                                q q                                                                    q
    Is the intruder alarm system and
    duress facility regularly tested?           q q                                                                    q
    Do you have a sticker displayed
    warning of the intruder alarm?              q q                                                                    q


    Safes
    Consider installing a safe for added security for your valuables. Safes should be manufactured and installed to
    the Australian/New Zealand standard. The safe should be concealed and securely anchored to the foundations.
    The safe should have a drop-chute facility so that staff can deposit money without having to open it, and the
    safe should remain locked at all times it is not being used. Consider a time delay lock, which means that the
    safe can only be opened at a particular time (or times) each day. The safe should be installed in an area where
    access is limited and away from public view.

                                                                                                     Date to be
    Question                                    Yes    No    Comment                                               Completed
                                                                                                     actioned
    Do you have a safe installed?
                                                q q                                                                    q
    Is the safe securely anchored?
                                                q q                                                                    q
    Is the safe out of view?
                                                q q                                                                    q
    Does the safe have a drop-chute
    facility?                                   q q                                                                    q
    Is the safe kept locked?
                                                q q                                                                    q




6                                            NSW Department of Attorney General and Justice: Designing crime out of your business
 Windows
 External windows and frames should be of a solid construction. All windows should be fitted with quality
 key-operated locks and locked when not in use.
 Existing glass can be laminated or reinforced internally with a shatter-resistant adhesive film to restrict access.
 Windows can also be protected through the use of open-style security grilles or shutters. The open-style
 grilles or shutters enable passers-by visibility into the business, and reduce opportunities for graffiti.
 No more than 15% of the display area of windows should be covered with promotional materials so that
 surveillance opportunities to and from the business are maximised.

                                                                                           Date to be
  Question                                    Yes    No   Comment                                       Completed
                                                                                           actioned
  Are windows solidly constructed?
                                              q q                                                          q
  Are windows fitted with quality locks?
                                              q q                                                          q
  Are windows free of promotional
  materials?
                                              q q                                                          q
  Are security grilles or shutters of an
  open-style?
                                              q q                                                          q


 Doors
 External doors and frames should be of a solid construction and fitted with single cylinder locksets that meet
 the standards of the Building Code of Australia. This enables occupants to escape during emergencies such
 as fires.

                                                                                           Date to be
  Question                                    Yes    No   Comment                                       Completed
                                                                                           actioned
  Are external doors and frames of a
  solid construction?                         q     q                                                      q
  Are all doors fitted with quality locks?
                                              q     q                                                      q
  Are entry/exit points clearly identified?
                                              q     q                                                      q
  Are all fire exit doors self-closing?
                                              q     q                                                      q
  Are vulnerable doors locked at all
  times?                                      q q                                                          q




NSW Department of Attorney General and Justice: Designing crime out of your business                                   7
    Fences and gates
    Where appropriate, fences can be used to define your property boundary and limit access into your
    business. Front fences should be open-style to increase visibility, this will assist identify intruders to
    your business.

                                                                                                        Date to be
    Question                                       Yes    No    Comment                                               Completed
                                                                                                        actioned
    Are there boundary fences erected
    around the business?                           q      q                                                               q
    Do you have an open-style fence?
                                                   q      q                                                               q
    Is your fence in good condition?
                                                   q      q                                                               q
    Can the gate(s) be secured?
                                                   q      q                                                               q
    Landscaping
    Trees and other landscaping around your business should be maintained to increase visibility and reduce
    hiding places. Trees and bushes should be trimmed away from doors and windows to increase visibility
    around, into and out of the business. Landscaping should also be maintained to prevent intruders accessing
    your business.

                                                                                                        Date to be
    Question                                       Yes    No    Comment                                               Completed
                                                                                                        actioned
    Does landscaping block visibility
    when travelling into and out of your
    business?
                                                   q q                                                                    q
    Could an intruder find a place to hide
    around your business?                          q q                                                                    q
    Do trees and other landscaping provide
    natural ladders to access other areas of
    your business?
                                                   q q                                                                    q

    Lighting
    Sensor lighting should be installed around the perimeter of your business, particularly over entry/exit points.
    Consider leaving a limited amount of internal lighting on at night to enable patrolling police, security guards or
    passing people to monitor activities within your business.

                                                                                                        Date to be
    Question                                       Yes    No    Comment                                               Completed
                                                                                                        actioned
    Do you have sensor lighting installed?
                                                   q q                                                                    q
    Does the sensor lighting work?
                                                   q q                                                                    q
    Is the business well lit, particularly at
    night?                                         q q                                                                    q
    Is the lighting positioned in a way to
    reduce opportunities for vandalism?            q q                                                                    q

8                                               NSW Department of Attorney General and Justice: Designing crime out of your business
 Building design
 Maintain clear sightlines between the street, neighbouring properties and buildings. Bollards or barriers can
 be installed to reduce the opportunity for ram-raid attacks.
 The number of entry/exit points to the business should be limited to monitor who is entering or leaving.
 Consider adjustments to the width, height and location of the counter to reduce the opportunity for crimes
 to occur, or to limit access behind the counter. The counter should be placed in a location that maximises
 surveillance of the store and the entry/exit points.
 Shelving within the business should be limited in height, or be transparent, to increase natural visibility within, into
 and out of the business. Shelves should be positioned so that staff behind the counter have good lines of sight.
 It is recommended that stock is not displayed outside of the store to reduce opportunities for theft.

                                                                                                Date to be
  Question                                   Yes     No   Comment                                          Completed
                                                                                                actioned
  Is the building of solid enough
  construction to restrict unauthorised
  access?
                                             q q                                                                q
  Is the building secured to reduce the
  risk of vehicle ram-raid?                  q q                                                                q
  Is there adequate protection against
  entry via the roof?
  Are manholes secured?
                                             q q                                                                q
  Is the height of the counter appropriate
  for the business?                          q q                                                                q
  Can the counter be seen from outside
  the business?                              q q                                                                q
  Are customers prevented from
  accessing the area behind the counter?     q q                                                                q
  Is shelving arranged to provide good
  sightlines within the store?               q q                                                                q
  Is shelving and stock displayed so it
  does not limit surveillance into and out
  of the store?
                                             q q                                                                q
  Is there stock displayed outside the
  store?                                     q q                                                                q
  Do you keep attractive or expensive
  merchandise away from entry/exit
  points or shop blind spots?
                                             q q                                                                q




NSW Department of Attorney General and Justice: Designing crime out of your business                                        9
Property identification
Record descriptions/model/serial numbers and photos of business property (e.g. mobile phones, computers)
for easy identification. Ensure these records are secured safely. Permanently mark valuable property with a
corporate identifier such as your ABN.

                                                                                       Date to be
Question                                    Yes    No    Comment                                     Completed
                                                                                       actioned
Have you photographed and recorded
details of your business’s valuables?      q q                                                         q
Is your property permanently marked
with a corporate identifier?               q q                                                         q
Do you have insurance?
                                           q q                                                         q
Are the photographs and recorded
details of valuables securely stored?      q q                                                         q


General business security tips
Security services may be used to randomly patrol your business, particularly in isolated areas.
Sensitive materials, including confidential records, should be appropriately destroyed or secured
(e.g. confidential records should be shredded or disposed of through security destruction services).
Computer passwords should be changed regularly to restrict access and avoid misuse by past and present staff.
Passwords should not be recorded and displayed near computers.
Staff should be suitably trained in evacuation procedures.
Garbage bins must be stored appropriately so that they do not act as natural ladders to areas of your business,
or are easily accessible to the public.

                                                                                        Date to be
Question                                    Yes    No    Comment                                     Completed
                                                                                        actioned

Do security services patrol your site?
                                           q q                                                         q
Are sensitive documents appropriately
destroyed?                                 q q                                                         q
Are computer passwords changed
regularly?                                 q q                                                         q
Do you have an emergency evacuation
plan?                                      q q                                                         q
Do staff understand the plan?
                                           q q                                                         q
Are garbage bins suitably located?
                                           q q                                                         q
If you have been a victim of a robbery,
have you submitted the relevant
information to Police?
                                           q q                                                         q
Do you report all suspicious or criminal
activity to the Police?                    q q                                                         q

NSW Department of Attorney General and Justice: Designing crime out of your business                         10
Victim support
If you or your staff have been victims of crime, you can contact the Victims of Crime Bureau by telephoning Sydney
(02) 8688 5400 or Toll Free 1800 633 063. Staff at the Bureau can provide, or put you in contact with, services
you may require such as: counselling; information about other support services; information about legal processes;
information about eligibility for, and applying for, victims compensation; and resolving complaints.
The Victims of Crime Bureau’s assistance line operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The telephone counselling and
referral service is operated by the Victims of Crime Bureau in conjunction with Sydney City Mission.

                                                                                                                          Date to be
Question                                             Yes      No     Comment                                                               Completed
                                                                                                                          actioned
Do you have a Victim Support Policy
established?                                        q q                                                                                         q
Have victims of crime been referred to
support services?                                   q q                                                                                         q




© State of New South Wales through the Department of Attorney General and Justice, 2012. You may freely deal with this work for any purpose,
other than for profit.
This checklist has been prepared by the Department of Attorney General and Justice for general use. We hope that through public use of the above
checklist, the likelihood of crime will be reduced and personal and community security will increase. This checklist does not guarantee that all security
risks have been identified or that the area evaluated will be free from criminal activity. ISBN 978-1-921301-62-9

								
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