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					December 4, 2009

Dear Funding Officer,

Food Gatherers is requesting funding in the amount of $302,443 from the Michigan
Community Service Commission to become the administrative hub for a unique non-profit
capacity building project called the Healthy Food Access Collaborative (HFAC). The great
majority of the requested amount will go toward the salaries of Americorps members (12
full-time and 12 part-time). Food Gatherers, Washtenaw County’s food bank, is partnering
with six other agencies including Packard Health Clinic, Washtenaw County Department of
Public Health, Growing Hope, Project Grow, Avalon Housing, and Ozone House. The HFAC’s
goal is to end hunger in our community through increasing low-income people’s access to
healthy foods, establishing additional gardening projects, leveraging volunteer support, and
actively involving food assistance recipients in project implementation.

HFAC recognized the urgent need for action after reviewing data collected from food
assistance recipients in Washtenaw County. Only 13% of those surveyed in the Food
Gatherers Community Food Security Plan stated that they eat the USDA recommended five
servings of fruits and vegetables per day. Of those who were not consuming the
recommended amount, 70% cited the high cost of produce as the prohibitive factor. As the
economic recession continues, more residents are going to need assistance for them to eat
healthfully with limited financial resources.

Rather than duplicating services, the HFAC emphasizes non-profit capacity building that will
have a direct impact of providing hunger relief to those in need. HFAC is aligned with
Americorps’ mission of helping communities meet their needs through service. In addition,
the HFAC understands the importance of staff development for Americorps members so they
benefit from challenging and meaningful project activities. Americorps members will be
provided with extensive on-the-job training, peer support through monthly team building
meetings, and mentorship from their site supervisors as well as Food Gatherers staff.

We look forward to hearing from you and are available to answer any questions you may
have about this proposal. Please feel free to contact me at (734) 761-2796. Thank you for
your consideration.

Sincerely,
Missy Orge
Food Gatherers Director of Outreach and Training




                                                                                               1
A. Narrative

1. Executive Summary

Food Gatherers is requesting funding in the amount of $302,443 from the Michigan
Community Service Commission to become the administrative hub for a unique non-profit
capacity building project called the Healthy Food Access Collaborative (HFAC). The great
majority of the requested amount will go toward the salaries of Americorps members (12
full-time and 12 part-time). Food Gatherers, Washtenaw County’s food bank, is partnering
with six other agencies including Packard Health Clinic, Washtenaw County Department of
Public Health, Growing Hope, Project Grow, Avalon Housing, and Ozone House. The HFAC’s
goal is to end hunger in our community through increasing low-income people’s access to
healthy foods, establishing additional gardening projects, leveraging volunteer support, and
actively involving food assistance recipients in project implementation.

HFAC recognized the urgent need for action after reviewing data collected from food
assistance recipients in Washtenaw County. Only 13% of those surveyed in the Food
Gatherers Community Food Security Plan stated that they eat the USDA recommended five
servings of fruits and vegetables per day. Of those who were not consuming the
recommended amount, 70% cited the high cost of produce as the prohibitive factor. As the
economic recession continues, more residents are going to need assistance for them to eat
healthfully with limited financial resources.

Rather than duplicating services, the HFAC emphasizes non-profit capacity building that will
have a direct impact of providing hunger relief to those in need. HFAC is aligned with
Americorps’ mission of helping communities meet their needs through service. In addition,
the HFAC understands the importance of staff development for Americorps members so they
benefit from challenging and meaningful project activities. Americorps members will be
provided with extensive on-the-job training, peer support through monthly team building
meetings, and mentorship from their site supervisors as well as Food Gatherers staff.




                                                                                               2
2. Purpose of Grant

                                     Needs Statement

Many low-income residents of Washtenaw County, including families with children and the
elderly, worry about how to stave off hunger and eat healthfully with limited financial
resources. Hunger is caused by unemployment, poverty, and not having the financial
resources to purchase basic necessities. Individuals and families are more likely to face
hunger when they have food insecurity, which is defined as lacking confidence in knowing
that they will have enough food to feed themselves and their household. The 2009 Food
Gatherers Community Food Security Plan surveyed more than 440 clients at twenty local
food pantries and the Ypsilanti Farmer’s Market. Three quarters of respondents using food
pantries were found to be food insecure with a great majority (85%) having an income of
less than $500 per month.

Food insecurity is worsening in Washtenaw County due to the ongoing economic recession.
Increasing unemployment and high cost of living in Washtenaw County have caused more
community members to be in need of food assistance. The county currently has an
unemployment rate of 9.3% (US Bureau of Labor Statistics). This is a 3% increase in
unemployment since June 2008. Fourteen percent of Washtenaw County’s approximately
348,000 residents are living in poverty (American Community Survey, 2006). In addition,
Washtenaw County is one of the two most expensive counties in Michigan for renters. The
Ann Arbor News reported that a two-bedroom housing unit in the Ann Arbor metropolitan
area is $942 per month compared to $805 for the metropolitan area containing Detroit,
Warren, and Livonia.

Though food pantries are meant to be emergency resources, about 75% of Community Food
Security Plan respondents indicated that they receive food from a food pantry on a regular
basis. For 35% of respondents, food pantries are their only or primary source of food. In
2008, approximately half of the 44 food pantries and meal sites who partner with Food
Gatherers saw an increase in demand that resulted in them purchasing additional food and
referring clients to other agencies for assistance. These sites projected that their level of
funding for food purchases will be lower in 2009 compared to 2008. Food Gatherers is
struggling with the high cost of purchasing more produce at wholesale and retail prices to
address the increased need for fruits and vegetables. When the supply of free food cannot
keep pace with community demand, more low-income people face food insecurity and
difficult choices. 33% of households served by Food Gatherers' network choose between
paying for food and utilities. More than a quarter said they choose between food and
housing or food and medicine.

People who experience food insecurity also have difficulty accessing healthy foods, which
has implications for their health. The USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans states that the
major causes of morbidity and mortality in this country, such as cardiovascular disease, type
2 diabetes, hypertension, osteoporosis, and certain cancers, are related to poor diet and a
sedentary lifestyle. The USDA recommends each person to consume five servings of fruits
and vegetables daily as well as eating a variety of produce to receive various nutrients.
However, only 13% of those surveyed in the Community Food Security Plan consume the


                                                                                            3
USDA recommended amount of produce. 70% of those who did not consume the
recommended amount indicated that the high cost of fruits and vegetables prevented them
from eating more. Food Stamp recipients can use their benefits to purchase fresh produce,
but only 36 of the 124 food retailers that accept Food Stamps in Washtenaw County also
sell produce. Access to healthy foods for low-income people is also influenced by the
availability of food pantry services. There are currently 28 food pantries in close proximity to
the high density poverty neighborhoods located in Pittsfield and Ypsilanti townships.
However, only five pantries in these high density poverty areas are open more than eight
hours per week. Four out of the five food pantries have the capacity and storage facilities to
offer produce. The low-income neighborhoods in Augusta Township’s Lincoln School District
are located farthest from existing food pantries.

                                    Promising Approaches

Two food banks stand out as promising approaches on how to increase fresh produce
availability to low-income people while containing costs. The Food Bank of Western
Massachusetts located in Hatfield owns 60 acres of land and contracts farmers to run the
operation. Shareholders purchase a portion of the harvest and their fees cover 100% of the
farm’s operating costs. Then half of the harvest is then donated back to the food bank for
distribution. The Tahoma Food System in Washington runs the Kitchen Garden Project that
provides yard gardens to low-income families, seniors, people with disabilities, and single-
parent families. Raised garden beds were built by the Tahoma Food System and
participants were given seeds, soil, and instructions at no-cost so they have the opportunity
to grow their own food.

The Washtenaw County non-profits participating in the proposed Healthy Food Access
Collaborative (HFAC) have the expertise to implement a similar community gardening
program. Food Gatherers, the coordinating organization for HFAC, began its food rescue
program in 1988. Food Gatherers became the county food bank in 1997 and since then
has distributed 35 million pounds of food. In 2009, Food Gatherers launched an initiative
called Big Community Harvest with partners from Avalon Housing, Project Grow, Growing
Hope, and Washtenaw County Public Health Department that resulted in more than 5,000
pounds of fresh produce and $5,200 in tokens for low-income patients that are redeemable
at the Ypsilanti Farmer’s Market. That same year, Food Gatherers began its on-site, large-
scale gardening project called Gathering Farm, which produced 21,000 pounds of fresh
produce for distribution. The positive impact of Food Gatherers’ food distributions are clear
from the 2009 Paper Plate Campaign where more than 1,500 food assistance recipients
from all areas in Washtenaw County expressed their thoughts on meal programs, pantries,
and food distributions by writing or drawing on paper plates. Responses include “I like
having fruits and vegetables to eat” (Jaylen P.) and “I am diabetic with no food. If it wasn’t
for the food programs, I’d be in the ER. I really appreciate what they do” (Timothy). This
grant proposal for Americorps funding aims to expand upon the success of the Big
Community Harvest and Gathering Farm by increasing coordination and staffing with
Americorps members.




                                                                                               4
                                      Program Narrative

This grant proposal seeks a three-year period of funding from the Michigan Community
Service Commission to hire 12 full-time and 12 part-time Americorps members. Each
Americorps member will be assigned to serve at Food Gatherers or one of the following six
organizations that constitute the Healthy Food Access Collaborative:
          Growing Hope
          Project Grow
          Packard Health Clinic
          Washtenaw County Department of Public Health
          Ozone House
          Avalon Housing
Food Gatherers will be the administrative hub for the HFAC and will be responsible for
reporting progress to the Michigan Community Service Commission as well as processing
payroll for Americorps members.

The goal of the HFAC is to eliminate hunger in Washtenaw County by establishing a
collaborative to support community gardening, develop additional food pantry sites for fresh
produce distribution, and recruit long-term volunteers so this effort continues past the three-
year Americorps funding period. The following are measurable objectives designed to move
toward this goal:
        Objective 1:
               To establish 12 additional food distribution sites that provide fresh produce to
               low-income people by end of Year Two.
        Objective 2:
               To increase by 15% the number of personal and community gardens that yield
               produce for low-income people by end of Year Two.
        Objective 3:
               To establish and train 25 volunteers to carry on HFAC efforts by end of Year
               Three.

Development of these objectives was guided by input from food assistance recipients. Of
those who participated in the Community Food Security Plan, 22% said they grow some of
their own food. Among those who do not, approximately 20% indicated that they would like
to. Thus, at least 180 low-income residents of Washtenaw County have interest in
gardening and would benefit from community gardening projects. Establishing gardens at
subsidized, supportive housing sites through Avalon Housing and utilizing the existing
gardens operated by Project Grow and Growing Hope would provide these individuals with
the opportunity to grow their own fresh produce thus increasing their food security. Hands-
on instruction and assistance from trained Americorps members can help current gardeners
increase their crop yields. Americorps members can also aid first-time gardeners to
overcome the barriers associated with learning a new skill.

The HFAC’s goal and objectives are consistent with the mission of Food Gatherers, which is
to “alleviate hunger and eliminate its causes in our community.” A sense of common
purpose is shared by all of the collaborative agencies. Project Grow provides Ann Arbor–
area residents with the space, know-how, and inspiration to grow their own fresh, organic


                                                                                              5
food. Growing Hope is dedicated to helping people improve their lives and communities
through gardening and healthy food access. Avalon Housing is a community-based, non-
profit organization dedicated to developing and managing permanent supportive rental
housing for people with extremely low incomes in Washtenaw County. Packard Health is
guided by their vision of a healthy community. Washtenaw County Public Health
Department’s mission is to ensure the health and well being of all county residents. Ozone
House provides supportive services to high-risk youth so that they may realize their full
potential for growth and happiness. Many of the young people who utilize the Ozone Drop-In
Center located in Ypsilanti are from low-income households that face food insecurity.

Food Gatherers is a community leader in hunger relief that currently partners with more than
150 local non-profits to delivery food to those in need. United Way of Washtenaw County
invited Food Gatherers to serve as the lead agency to investigate the impact of current food
assistance efforts in meeting the needs of low-income people. The result of that project was
the 2009 Community Food Security Plan. Food Gatherers partnered with the other HFAC
agencies to implement programs such as the Big Community Harvest, food distributions at
Avalon Housing sites, the Prescription for Health program that gave County Health
Department patients tokens redeemable for food at the Ypsilanti Farmer’s Market, provision
of sugar-free foods and nutritional supplements for Packard Health patients, and a hot meal
program for youth who attend the Ozone Drop-In Center. Before pursuing Americorps
funding, Food Gatherers contacted these agencies to assess their interest in participating in
the HFAC along with their commitment to training and supervising Americorps members.
Each agency replied they would be able to designate one staff member as the Americorps
site supervisor and indicated the number and type of Americorps member (full-time, part-
time) they would like to serve at their site. In addition, each agency agreed to provide
Americorps members with on-the-job training. Project Grow and Growing Hope will take the
lead in training Americorps members to become gardeners. Food Gatherers then proceeded
to update existing memorandums of understanding. Additional information about the
formation of the HFAC can be found in the letters of support included in this proposal as an
attachment.

HFAC differs from the current collaborative relationships between Food Gatherers and these
partner agencies since it will have dedicate staff, in the form of Americorps members.
Americorps members will receive extensive training and play a critical role in facilitating
collaboration, referring low-income people to programs offered by partner agencies, and
recruiting volunteers for sustainability. During grant Year Three, Americorps members will
recruit and train volunteers who are committed to continuing HFAC projects. Food Gatherers’
Volunteer Coordinator and Director of Outreach and Training will work together to ensure the
projects are sustained over time by volunteers. Food Gatherers can dedicate a portion of its
unrestricted funding to perpetuate HFAC projects past the Americorps funding period and
will engage in fundraising efforts to bring in additional resources. Rather than duplicating
services, the HFAC emphasizes non-profit capacity building to increase low-income residents’
food security and healthy food access. HFAC is aligned with Americorps’ mission of helping
communities meet their needs through service.




                                                                                           6
                             Qualifications and Roles of Key Staff

Americorps members recruited for the HFAC will possess at least a high school diploma or
GED. Members will be selected based on their experience/interest in gardening, community
organizing, working with disadvantaged populations, and familiarity with the food
assistance/social service programs currently operating in Washtenaw County. Individuals
with bilingual language skills in Spanish, Chinese, Arabic, or Russian are encouraged to
apply. Full-time members will provide staffing for the food security and healthy food access
programs operating at their site while building the capacity of their agency through
participation in HFAC projects. Part-time members will serve during the growing season
(May through November) to assist in HFAC’s community gardening efforts.

Role of Americorps Members:
        Assist in identifying land for cultivation, prepare land for gardening, recruit
          volunteers to work in community gardens, encourage community members to
          donate part of their harvest to Food Gatherers, assist low-income residents in
          starting/maintaining their personal gardens, help maintain community gardens,
          and clean up gardens in preparation for winter.
        Assess the capacity of food pantries in high density poverty areas, provide
          additional staffing support to increase hours of operation, leverage community
          resources to increase pantry’s infrastructure capacity for fresh produce
          distribution, and assist in establishing new food pantries that offer produce in
          underserved neighborhoods.
        Conduct outreach to community members to raise awareness about hunger,
          encourage volunteerism, recruit and train volunteers to work on HFAC projects,
          and help volunteers take increasingly greater responsibility over projects.

HFAC Coordinator will be hired by Food Gatherers to provide administrative services during
the Americorps funding period, with the possibility of continuing in the position after funding
ends to supervise HFAC volunteers. The coordinator will possess at least an Associate’s
Degree and have at least one year of related work experience. A strong candidate for this
position would be someone who is organized, has good time management skills, and
communicates in a professional manner. Demonstrated experience in resolving conflicts
and miscommunication within teams is a plus.

Role of HFAC Coordinator:
        Facilitate the monthly team building meetings of Americorps members.
        Collect and process reports from Americorps members and their site supervisors.
        Schedule trainings and site visits for Americorps members. Send meeting
          reminders to Americorps members and their site supervisors.
        Assist Food Gatherers’ Director of Outreach and Training in processing payroll for
          Americorps members.
        Facilitate communication and information sharing among Americorps members,
          site supervisors, and Food Gatherers.

In addition, three senior staff members at Food Gatherers will supervise the HFAC
Coordinator and train Americorps members. The Director of Outreach and Training has 8


                                                                                              7
years of work experience at Food Gatherers. She will provide ServSafe food safety training
and familiarize Americorps members with the Food Gatherers food distribution system. The
Volunteer Coordinator, who supervises volunteers daily at the Food Gatherers warehouse
and Community Kitchen, will train Americorps members on how to recruit and supervise
volunteers. The Director of Agency Relations is very knowledgeable about Food Gatherers’
150+ partner agencies and the services available at local food pantries. She will connect
Americorps members with food pantry coordinators and provide technical assistance as
needed. Through extensive training and mentorship, Americorps members will gain
knowledge and become skilled in community-based strategies for hunger relief.

                                    Working as a Collaborative

To foster inter-agency collaboration, the HFAC has developed a system of communication
and record keeping. All Americorps members will participate in monthly team building
meetings where they conduct site visits to local food pantries and community gardens.
These monthly meetings will also provide Americorps members an invaluable opportunity to
share their experiences with peers. Each Americorps member will submit a monthly
progress report along with their timesheet to their site supervisor and the HFAC Coordinator.
Site supervisors will conduct a performance review of their Americorps members once a
month. These reviews will be shared with the members to encourage continuous learning
and with the HFAC Coordinator for grant reporting purposes. Performance reviews are times
for Americorps members to provide feedback and reflect on their job responsibilities with
site supervisors. Site supervisors will meet on a monthly basis with the key Food Gatherers
staff members mentioned above to discuss successes and challenges with implementation.

                               Timetable for Implementation

See following page for timetable.




                                                                                            8
 Start and End Dates                    Activity                      Person Responsible                     Outcome/Evaluation
Jan 1 to Jan 31             Interview potential Americorps     Food Gatherers Dir. of Outreach and   Check references
(Year One)                  members and HFAC                   Training along with relevant site
                            Coordinator                        supervisors
Jan 31 to Feb 14            Hire Americorps members and        Food Gatherers Dir. of Outreach and   Highly qualified staff
(Year One)                  HFAC Coordinator                   Training
Feb 14 to March 15          Orient new hires with on-the-job   Food Gatherers lead staff and site    Successful completion of initial
(Year One)                  training and site visits           supervisors                           training, set foundation for ongoing
                                                                                                     training
March 15 to June 1          Identify and prepare land for      Site supervisors and Americorps       Plots ready for community members
(Year One)                  gardening                          members                               to begin gardening

                            Conduct outreach to Avalon         Americorps members                    Identification of the Avalon Housing
                            Housing residents and                                                    residents who are interested in
                            community members to                                                     gardening. Identification of
                            encourage gardening                                                      community members willing to
                                                                                                     donate part of their harvest to FG
June 1 to August 31         Identify current FG food           Americorps members and Food           Identification of areas that would
(Year One)                  distribution sites in areas        Gatherers Dir. of Agency Relations    greatly benefit from fresh produce
                            lacking access to fresh                                                  distributions
                            produce. Identify poverty areas
                            without food pantries
August 31 (Year One) to     Gather man power and               Americorps members                    Established 12 additional food
Dec 31 (Year Two)           infrastructural resources to                                             distribution sites that provide fresh
                            expand capacity of existing                                              produce to low-income people
                            pantries/develop new pantry                                              [OBJECTIVE 1]
                            sites
                            Teach gardening techniques         Americorps members                    To increase by 15% the number of
                            and provide ongoing support to                                           personal and community gardens
                            community gardeners.                                                     that yield produce for low-income
                            Continue outreach to identify                                            people
                            more gardeners.                                                          [OBJECTIVE 2]
January 1 (Year Three) to   Recruit, train, supervise, and     Americorps members                    To have 25 well-trained, prepared
Dec 31 (Year Three)         retain volunteers.                                                       volunteers to carry on HFAC work
                                                                                                     once Americorps funding ends
                                                                                                     [OBJECTIVE 3]




                                                                                                                                             9
                                          Evaluation

Two types of evaluation will be used to measure success for this grant: performance
evaluation of Americorps members and evaluation of HFAC outputs/outcomes.
Performance evaluations are included in the supervision plans for Americorps members and
are described above in the Program Narrative. In addition, Americorps members will be
assessed at end of Year One by their site supervisors to evaluate their level of training and
competency. The number of training sessions and monthly team meetings attended by each
Americorps member will be noted. Extra training will be provided to Americorps members as
needed. Monthly timesheets will be used to track the number of hours served by
Americorps members. The satisfaction of Americorps members, site supervisors, and key
Food Gatherers staff with the collaborative process will be evaluated on a monthly basis
through team meetings and supervision.

The evaluation of HFAC outputs and outcomes will be headed by an outside evaluator from
Alexander Resources Consulting. Food Gatherers’ Director of Outreach and Training along
with HFAC Coordinator will work closely with the evaluator to obtain missing reports, analyze
data, and develop grant reports. Reporting to the Michigan Community Service Commission
will be completed in a timely manner based on the deadlines given in the Request for
Proposal. The evaluator will draw upon the monthly progress reports and performance
reviews submitted by Americorps members and site supervisors then compare these with
the implementation timetable (a more detailed timetable will be created with input from all
HFAC agencies). Successfully meeting the HFAC objectives will be defined and measured in
the following ways:

Objective 1: To establish 12 additional food distribution sites that provide fresh produce to
low-income people by end of Year Two.
        Count the number of existing food pantries in high density poverty areas that
           expanded their operations to include fresh produce distribution. Count the
           number of new food pantries established in these areas that provide fresh
           produce.

Objective 2: To increase by 15% the number of personal and community gardens that yield
produce for low-income people by end of Year Two.
        Count the number of gardening trainings and outreach events conducted by
           Americorps members for community members.
        Count the number of personal and community gardens that yield produce for low-
           income people. Total number = personal gardens operated by low-income people
           + personal gardens operated by other community members who donate part of
           their harvest to Food Gatherers + new community gardens maintained by low-
           income people + existing community gardens that donate part of their harvest to
           Food Gatherers.

Objective 3: To establish and train 25 volunteers to carry on HFAC work once Americorps
funding ends by end of Year Three.
        Count the number of volunteers who are committed to serving on HFAC projects
           for one-year after Americorps funding ends and the number of their service hours.


                                                                                            10
The desirable outcomes from greater consumption of fresh produce by low-income residents
of Washtenaw County and more food security for these individuals will be measured through
pre and post tests that survey food assistance recipients. Whether the quality of produce
distributed by food pantries remained high will also be assessed. The data collection
method will be very similar to that of the Food Gatherers Community Food Security Plan and
will include the new pantries established due to HFAC. A list of agency partners who
participated in the Community Food Security Plan and a copy of the household food security
survey used for data collection can be accessed by visiting http://foodgatherers.org/pdfs/
FGFOODSECURITYappendix.pdf. The outcome of greater community participation in growing
food will be measured by using the methods listed under Objective 2 and by the pounds of
fresh produce distributed through Food Gatherers before and after HFAC implementation.
Additional information will be collected from those low-income residents and other
community members who had direct interactions with Americorps members. They will be
asked specifically to share what they gained from the outreach and gardening trainings
provided by Americorps members.

Evaluation results will be compiled in a report for distribution to HFAC agencies, Americorps
members, volunteers, Michigan Community Service Commission, and other funders.
Information will be disseminated throughout Washtenaw County in local newspapers via
press releases. Flyers with a summary of evaluation results will be passed out to food
assistance recipients at meal programs and food pantries.




                                                                                            11
                              Budget Narrative/Justification

See attachments for Grant Budget Format. Budget includes expenses and revenues for the
first funding year. Budget for year two and three can be estimated using year one figures.
Amounts are rounded to the nearest dollar. Items with an asterisk are funds requested from
Michigan Community Service Commission. Other remaining categories will be provided
through commitments of in-kind donations. In the event that Michigan Community Service
Commission is unable to meet the amount requested, please prioritize Americorps member
salaries, HFAC Coordinator salary, Americorps member insurance, and mandated travel and
meetings.

Salaries:
*HFAC Coordinator (1 FT) = $28,000
Director of Outreach and Training (0.5 FT) = $26,523
Director of Agency Relations (0.25 FT) = $13, 261
Volunteer Coordinator (0.5 FT) = $15,265
*Americorps Members (12 FT) = 12 x $11,800 = $141,600
*Americorps Members (12 PT) = 12 x $6,035 = $72,420
                                                  AMOUNT REQUESTED: $242,020
                                                  TOTAL: $297,069

Payroll Taxes:
*FICA = 7.65% of Total Americorps Member Salaries = $16,373

Fringe Benefits:
8% of Total Salary per Staff Member, excludes Americorps Members
HFAC Coordinator = $2,240
Director of Outreach and Training = $4,244 x 0.5 = $2,122
Director of Agency Relations = $4,244 x 0.25 = $1,061
Volunteer Coordinator = $2,442 x 0.5 = 1,221
                                                 TOTAL: $6,644

Consultants and Professional Fees:
Accountant = $320/day x 12 (once a month for a year) = $3,840

Insurance for Americorps Members:
*Worker’s Comp = 2.89% of Total Americorps Member Salaries = $6,185
*Health Insurance = $1,800 x 12 FT Americorps Members = $21,600
                                              AMOUNT REQUESTED: $27,785
                                              TOTAL: $27,785

Travel for Mandatory Meetings:
*Director of Outreach and Training to attend Americorps grantee meetings in Lansing = 6 x
        $250 = $1,500
*HFAC Representatives to attend Corporation for National and Community Service meeting
in      Washington D.C. = $2,000
*HFAC Representatives to attend two statewide Americorps meetings = 2 x $150 = $300


                                                                                        12
*All Americorps members to attend Member Celebration = 24 x $250 = $6,000
                                             AMOUNT REQUESTED: $9,800
                                             TOTAL: $9,800

Mileage Reimbursement for Americorps Members for Travel within Washtenaw County (site
visits, team meetings, and other HFAC related activities):
250 miles x $0.55 per mile = $138 x 24 Members = $3,312

Supplies:
*Americorps Uniforms = $35 x 24 Members = $840
*Boots for gardening = $50 x 24 Members = $1,200
Gardening tools = $50 x 24 Members = $1,200
Office supplies = $50 x 24 Members = $1,200
                                              AMOUNT REQUESTED: $2,040
                                              TOTAL: $4,440

Printing and Copying:
Flyers, outreach materials, progress reports, performance reviews, and end-of-year report =
$700

Telephone and Fax for Americorps Members:
$10 per person per month = $10 x 24 x 12 = $2,880

Postage and Delivery:
Mailing outreach materials to partner agencies = $300

Office Space usage by Americorps Members and HFAC Coordinator:
Food Gatherers already owns its building so there is no mortgage or rent. Office space
usage calculated by adding up Food Gatherers’ yearly operating expenses and dividing by
number of current staff then multiplying by number of Americorps members and HFAC
Coordinator. The following figures on office space, utilities, and maintenance are based on
Food Gatherers and can be used to estimate such costs at the other HFAC sites.

$66,200 / 19 Food Gatherers current staff = $3,484 x 19 FT new staff (12 FT Americorps +
12 PT or 6 FT equivalents Americorps + 1 HFAC Coordinator) = $66,200

Utilities usage by Americorps Members and HFAC Coordinator:
$39,000 / 19 Food Gatherers current staff = $2,053 x 19 FT new staff = $39,000

Maintenance on Food Gatherers Warehouse and Office Space:
$30,000 / 19 Food Gatherers current staff = $1,579 x 19 FT new staff = $30,000

Evaluation:
*Alexander Consulting Resources $525 per day for 5 days in a year = $2,625




                                                                                          13
Training:
*Americorps Members to attend Michigan Community Service Commission trainings = 24 x
       $75 = $1,800
ServSafe Trainings = 24 x $250 = $6,000
CPR Training = 24 x $60 = $1,440
Orientation and Monthly Meetings = $2,500
                                            AMOUNT REQUESTED: $1,800
                                            TOTAL: $11,740

------------------------------------------------------


AMOUNT REQUESTED for Year One: $302,443
      +
IN-KIND DONATIONS for Year One: $220,265
      =
TOTAL PROJECT EXPENSES for Year One: $522,708

Upon satisfactory evaluation of HFAC projects, Food Gatherers will request ongoing funding
at the same levels from Michigan Community Service Commission to continue the project for
Year Two and Year Three. Some costs from Year One will not need to be repeated for Year
Two and Year Three such as gardening tools and ServSafe trainings.

This budget follows the proposal requirement that Food Gatherers and other HFAC agencies
provide at least 24% of all expenses.
220,265 / 522,708 = 42%




                                                                                       14
                                 Organizational Information

Food Gatherers exists to alleviate hunger and eliminate its causes in our community by:
reducing food waste through the rescue and distribution of perishable and non-perishable
food, coordinating with other hunger relief providers, educating the public about hunger and
developing new food resources. Food Gatherers was established in 1988 and is an
independent 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization governed by a board of directors and
operated by 19 staff people and more than 4,500 different volunteers. Food Gatherers
became the county food bank in 1997 and since then has been the primary distributor of
food in Washtenaw County.

Food Gatherers has extensive experience in procuring and distributing food, and currently
provides enough food for more than 8,000 meals a day. Food Gatherers brings the food to
more than 150 community programs serving our neighbors – mostly families and children –
in need of food.

Food Gatherers is a founding member of the Washtenaw Housing Alliance and is an active
participant in developing and implementing the Blueprint to End Homelessness in
Washtenaw County. We are now serving as the United Way of Washtenaw County's lead
agency in Hunger Relief Services. Since June 2007, we have handled the logistics for The
Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP) distribution for Washtenaw County. As a
result of this partnership we have increased the units available to the county from 600 units
per quarter to 2,000 units per quarter. Food Gatherers has also received a 4 star rating
from Charity Navigator (an independent charity evaluator) for the past 5 years in a row and
has received multiple awards for collaboration and innovation.

We operate the Community Kitchen Job Training Program, which has had more than 75
graduates in 9 classes since 2005. We manage several city, county and federal grants,
including FEMA grants for more than 10 years. For two years, we have operated a Summer
Food Program through the USDA. This summer, we successfully partnered with Washtenaw
County in the Workforce Investment Act Summer Youth Employment Program (WIA/SYEP).
Food Gatherers also collaborates with Washtenaw County Community Support and
Treatment Services (CSTS) and Project Outreach Team (PORT) by providing a supportive
work environment for people with special needs. The majority of Food Gatherers’ grant
funding is from the City of Ann Arbor, national and local food bank associations, United Way
allocation, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Grants totaled $676,515 for
the 2008 – 2009 fiscal year with many of these grants on one-year funding cycles. General
donations from individuals and corporations totaled $793,767. In addition, Food Gatherers
receives $7 million a year in the form of in-kind food donations.

Throughout its 21-year history, Food Gatherers has learned the importance of strategic
planning, meaningful collaboration and the necessity of addressing root causes. Since our
inception, the board and staff have been guided by a series of Five Year Strategic Plans. We
have met all the objectives articulated in those plans and soon will be creating a new plan
that will draw heavily on our findings from the Community Food Security Plan.




                                                                                          15
                                                                          Logic Model

Environmental Scan           Goal and              Activities             Inputs                Outputs               Outcomes/Impact      Measurements
                             Objectives
Target Population:           Goal: To eliminate    Recruit and train      Supplies for          12 or more            Greater              Number of additional
Low-income residents of      hunger in             Americorps             Americorps            produce               consumption of       produce distribution
Washtenaw Co.- food          Washtenaw Co.         members.               members: uniform,     distribution sites.   fruits and           sites.
stamp recipients, county                                                  boots, and                                  vegetables by low-
food bank clients (Food      Objective 1:          Identify current FG    gardening tools.      15% more              income residents     Number of HFAC
Gatherers), supportive       To establish 12       food distribution                            personal and          of Washtenaw Co.     volunteers and their
housing residents (Avalon    additional food       sites in areas         Personnel and         community                                  service hours.
Housing), youth (Ozone       distribution sites    lacking access to      Salaries: HFAC        gardens.              More food security
House), and patients         that provide          fresh produce.         Coordinator,                                for low-income       Number of Americorps
(Packard Health Clinic &     produce to low-                              Americorps            25 volunteers         residents.           members and their
Washtenaw Co. Public         income people by      Increase operational   members, and          committed to                               service hours.
Health Dept.).               end of Year Two.      capacity of existing   support from FG       HFAC projects.        Greater community
                                                   sites and/or create    Dir. of Agency                              participation in     Number of trainings for
Need:                        Objective 2:          new sites to handle    Relations, Dir. of    24 trained            growing food.        Americorps and
In 2009, Food Gatherers      To increase by        fresh produce          Outreach, and         Americorps                                 community members.
(FG) surveyed clients who    15% the number        distribution.          Volunteer             members (12 FT,
use meal programs and        of personal and                              Coordinator as well   12 PT).                                    Number of
food pantries. 87% eat <     community             Identify land for      as staff from                                                    organizations and
5 servings of fruits &       gardens that yield    cultivation and        partner agencies.     Coordinated                                individuals who receive
vegetables per day. 70%      produce for low-      prepare land for                             training program                           outreach.
of these respondents         income people by      gardening.             Benefits and          that includes on-
cited high cost as the       end of Year Two.                             Payroll Taxes         site training and                          Pre and post test:
reason for low                                     Conduct outreach to                          supervision.                               Fruit and vegetable
consumption. 85% of all      Objective 3: To       Avalon Housing         Workman’s                                                        consumption by low-
respondents reported         establish and train   residents and          Compensation          Coordinated                                income people. Level
incomes of < $500 per        25 volunteers who     community                                    reporting among                            of food security.
month. Unemployment          will carry on HFAC    members to             Health Insurance      HFAC agencies to                           Satisfaction of produce
rate in Washtenaw Co. is     work once             encourage                                    evaluate progress                          received from food
9.3%.                        Americorps            gardening.             Travel: Americorps    of Americorps                              distribution sites.
                             funding ends by                              meetings in           members,                                   Number of gardens.
Service Model:               end of Year Three.    Teach gardening        Lansing & DC.         volunteers, and                            Pounds of fresh
In 1988, FG began its                              techniques and         Local travel.         work toward                                produce distributed
food rescue program that                           provide support to     Mileage               objectives.                                through FG.
served Washtenaw Co.                               gardeners.             reimbursement.
FG has been the county
food bank since 1997,                              Recruit, train,
has distributed 35 million                         supervise, and
pounds of food, and is                             retain volunteers.

                                                                                                                                                                     16
partnered with 150+                                  Consultants:         Survey of HFAC
local non-profits. In         Each organization in   accountant,          beneficiaries:
2009, FG launched Big         HFAC will submit       evaluator, and       Experiences with
Community Harvest and         ongoing reports of     trainers.            gardening. Interactions
Gathering Farm.               Americorps                                  with Americorps
                              members’               Office space,        members.
Impact:                       performance and        computer access,
When low-income people        progress toward        and utility usage    Survey of Americorps
receive healthy food at       completing             (phone and fax) by   members: Satisfaction
no-cost, they can then        objectives.            Americorps           with training and
use their limited funds for                          members.             supervision. Skills
housing, medicine, and        Evaluate level of                           gained. Community
other necessities.            training and           Printing and         impact.
                              competency of          Copying
Request:                      Americorps                                  Survey of HFAC
The proposal seeks            members at end of      Office Supplies      Agencies: Satisfaction
funding from Michigan         Year One.                                   with Americorps
Community Service                                    Postage              members. Experiences
Commission to hire 12         Evaluate whether                            with collaboration.
full-time and 12 part-time    Objectives 1 & 2                            Community impact.
Americorps members.           were accomplished
                              at end of Year Two.                         Outside evaluator

                              Evaluate whether                            Evaluation data will be
                              Objective 3 was                             kept by HFAC
                              accomplished at                             Coordinator.
                              end of Year Three.
                                                                          Evaluation results will
                                                                          be compiled in a report
                                                                          distributed to HFAC
                                                                          agencies, Americorps
                                                                          members, volunteers,
                                                                          and funders.
                                                                          Information will be
                                                                          disseminated through
                                                                          local newspapers and
                                                                          flyers passed out at
                                                                          food distribution sites.




                                                                                                     17
B. Attachments:

1. A copy of the current IRS determination letter
2. Organizational chart
3. List of Board of Directors with affiliations
4. Finances
5. Letters of support
6. Food Gatherers Accomplishments for 2008 and Current Five-Year Strategic Plan
7. Grant Budget Format




                                                                                  18

				
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