The Faculty of Engineering is organized into the Departments by elitecx764

VIEWS: 141 PAGES: 60

									Dean, Chairs, Directors ...................................................................................2

A Word from the Dean of Engineering ............................................................3

Choosing a Major at the Right Level of Technological Concentration ..........4

Degree Programs and Faculty Research Descriptions
     Applied Physics ........................................................................................6
     Biomedical Engineering ...........................................................................10
     Chemical Engineering .............................................................................13
     Electrical Engineering..............................................................................17
     Environmental Engineering .....................................................................22
     Mechanical Engineering .........................................................................25

    Related Programs
     Applied Mathematics ...............................................................................30
     Computer Science ...................................................................................31
     Electrical Engineering/Computer Science................................................32

Research
   Research and Teaching Facilities and Staff.................................................33

Special Projects and Senior Projects.............................................................34

Select Program in Engineering, Bachelor’s plus Master’s Degree ..................37

Distributional Requirements:
     The Literate Engineer ..............................................................................39

Student Research, Research Support, Jobs, Organizations, Prizes
    Freshman and Summer Research Projects...............................................41
    Support for Undergraduate Research.......................................................42
    Summer Employment..............................................................................42
    Organizations for Engineering Students...................................................43
    Engineering Prizes ..................................................................................44


Engineering Faculty Residential College Affiliation.....................................46

Staying Informed ..........................................................................................47

2002-03 Undergraduate Engineering Courses ..............................................48



For information about courses in all Yale College departments, visit the offi-
cial Yale Online Course Information Web site, www.yale.edu/courseinfo


Cover: 2002 marked 150 years of engineering education at Yale University




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The Faculty of Engineering comprises the Departments of Chemical Engineering, Electri-
cal Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Applied Physics, and the interdepartmen-
tal programs of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Engineering. The Faculty of
Engineering works closely with Applied Mathematics and Computer Science.

  Each Department and Program has a Director of Undergraduate Studies, DUS (see in-
side front cover). Graduate students are the responsibility of the Director of Graduate
Studies, DGS.

     Dean of Engineering
      Paul A. Fleury, Frederick William Beinecke Professor of Engineering & Applied
      Physics
      Dunham 235, 432-4220, paul.fleury@yale.edu
     Chair, Department of Applied Physics
      A. Douglas Stone, Professor of Applied Physics and of Physics
      Becton 305, 432-4279, douglas.stone@yale.edu
     Chair, Department of Chemical Engineering
      John Y. Walz, Professor of Chemical Engineering
      Mason 321B, 432-4382, john.walz@yale.edu
     Chair, Department of Electrical Engineering
      Tso-Ping Ma, Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Applied Physics
      Becton 319, 432-4211, t.ma@yale.edu
     Chair, Department of Mechanical Engineering
      Marshall B. Long, Professor of Mechanical Engineering & of Applied Physics
      Becton 201, 432-4229, marshall.long@yale.edu
     Director, Biomedical Engineering Program
      James S. Duncan, Professor of Diagnostic Radiology and of Electrical Engineering
      Brady Memorial Laboratory 332, 785-6322, james.duncan@yale.edu
     Director, Environmental Engineering Program
      Menachem Elimelech, Llewellyn West Jones Jr. Professor of Environmental
      Engineering & Professor of Chemical Engineering
      Mason 323A, 432-2789, menachem.elimelech@yale.edu

     Director of Educational Affairs
      Roman Kuc, Professor of Electrical Engineering
      Dunham 233, 432-0159, roman.kuc@yale.edu

     Director of Graduate Studies
      Alessandro Gomez, Professor of Mechanical Engineering
      Mason M4, 432-4384, alessandro.gomez@yale.edu
     Director of Graduate Admissions and
     Director of the Select Program in Engineering
      Daniel E. Prober, Professor of Applied Physics and of Physics
      Becton 417, 432-4280, daniel.prober@yale.edu




For information about all faculty and academic programs of Yale College, visit
www.yale.edu/ycpo/ycps

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                                                 2
                       Yale University is a remarkably exciting and dynamic community
                       that combines the breadth and diversity of a major research uni-
                       versity with the dedication to teaching and individual attention of
                       a small liberal arts college. Our innumerable resources include
                       the unique residential college communities, a vast array of pro-
                       grams and facilities spanning all fields, small classes taught by a
                       world-class faculty, and many exciting, enriching pursuits out-
                       side the classroom. Indeed, the opportunities afforded the Yale
                       College student today for growth and learning in virtually every
                       dimension are unmatched anywhere else.

                            Yale is an especially exciting place to study engineering. Right
   Paul A. Fleury
 Dean of Engineering
                        from the start, our students are able to participate in research
                        and projects with other students and outstanding faculty from a
variety of disciplines. Renowned for over 300 years for its prowess in the arts and hu-
manities, Yale has a long and distinguished history in science and engineering as well.
In 1863, we granted the nation's first Ph.D. in engineering to J. Willard Gibbs. In 2002,
we are celebrating the Sesquicentennial [that's 150 years] of engineering at Yale. Engi-
neering and the sciences are an integral part of Yale's uniquely modern liberal educa-
tion--one grounded in fluency with the vitally important technologies and issues of mod-
ern society.

   We offer degrees in Biomedical, Chemical, Electrical, Environmental, and Mechanical
Engineering, each with many options. Students may also pursue engineering-related
majors in Applied Physics, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering/Computer Science,
and Applied Mathematics. Some students combine Engineering with other disciplines
and graduate with a double major, e.g., Engineering and Music, Economics, or Psychol-
ogy.

    Our students benefit from the strong liberal education for which Yale is renowned
and which instills awareness of the broad social, political, economic, and environmental
context for their engineering endeavors. They develop exceptional analytical, collabora-
tive, and communications skills, honed in classes taught by outstanding faculty who
provide ample individual attention to each student. Our faculty to student ratio is, in
fact, one of the country's best.

    We are proud of our highly collaborative and research-productive faculty [we were
ranked #1 nationally in the 1996-2000 citation index for impact of their published re-
search]. Many of our faculty have formal affiliations with other Yale departments as well
as professional Schools of Medicine, Forestry, and Management. Our two newest degree-
granting programs, Environmental Engineering and Biomedical Engineering, epitomize
this collaborative mode of operating, thinking, and performing research. Both our un-
dergraduate and graduate classes are taught by faculty, not graduate students.

   I can assure you that there is no better community in which to learn and grow and to
develop your potential as a scientist, engineer, citizen, and human being.




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       4
Choosing a Major and the Right Level of Concentration

Students can major in Applied Physics, Applied Mathematics, Biomedical Engineering,
Chemical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Electrical Engineering/Computer Science,
Environmental Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering. There are many options within
each major.
   Choosing a major may appear confusing at first but isn't, because all majors require
the same introductory math and science courses. That gives students time to sort out
which major responds best to their interests. Besides, students get help from a DUS
when selecting their courses. The DUS makes sure that every student selects the
courses that best correspond to their interests and that each student also includes the
courses that are required to satisfy the Distributional Requirements of Yale College.*
   The DUS’s also make sure that students build into their program some educational op-
tions, just in case their interests change (as they sometimes do).

Levels of Technological Concentration
There are three levels of technological concentration in the principal Engineering disci-
plines:

     The B.S. with ABET** accreditation is the most technically intense program. Its
   distinguishing features are breadth of knowledge in a technical field, depth in a par-
   ticular aspect of that field, engineering design, and acquiring communication skills.
     Students who are interested in the ABET accredited degree must take math and
   physics or chemistry during their freshman year. The choice of courses depends on
   Advanced Placement test results. Advanced students may take engineering courses
   in their freshman year.
     A student who graduates with an accredited B.S. degree is well prepared to prac-
   tice engineering or to pursue a Ph.D. in engineering.

     The B.S. in Engineering Sciences (specific area) requires fewer technical
   courses, allows a wider choice of non-engineering courses. Students who take this
   B.S. can choose to graduate with a double major in engineering and, for example,
   economics or psychology.
     A student who graduates with a B.S. in Engineering Sciences is prepared for a
   technical profession and for graduate study in engineering.

     The B.A. in Engineering Sciences (specific area) allows students more flexibility
   in the selection of technical courses and a wider choice of non-technical courses.
     The B.A. in Engineering Sciences may be appropriate for students who wish to
   combine an understanding of technological basics with a humanities major (for ex-
   ample, Engineering and Music). The B.A. in Engineering Sciences provides a techni-
   cal advantage for students going into business, government, journalism, or technical
   writing.




 * Yale College is the undergraduate part of Yale University
 ** ABET Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
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                                             5
The Double Major
There are many possible combinations of Engineering with other majors. Talk to the
DUS about available options.

Courses for Non-Science Majors
The Faculty of Engineering offers several courses for students who have not taken ad-
vanced mathematics:
   EENG 101a The Digital Information Age
   MENG 185b Mechanical Design Studio
   ENAS 111a Science Fiction and Science Fact
   ENAS 110b The Technological World

Some non-science majors who take these courses as Freshmen or Sophomores to sat-
isfy Distributional Requirements become so interested that they wish to switch to an
Engineering discipline. Students should discuss such an option with a DUS.

Taking Graduate Level Courses
If they receive permission from the instructor and the DUS, undergraduates may take
graduate       courses.      A     list    of     graduate     courses     is    at
www.eng.yale.edu/graduate/courses.html and available from the Engineering and Ap-
plied Science Graduate Studies Office, 432-4250.

Combined B.S.-Master's degree:
Students working toward a B.S. in Engineering or in Engineering Sciences may be eli-
gible for the Select Program in Engineering that leads to a Master of Science or a
Master of Engineering degree in the fifth year, see p. 37.




   An Electrical Engineering major explains to high school students how the solar car works.
   Since 1971, the Faculty of Engineering has been sponsoring the "Frontiers of Science and
   Engineering" annual lecture series for high school students interested in engineering, math,
   and science

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APPLIED PHYSICS www.eng.yale.edu/aphy/undergraduate.html
Director of Undergraduate Studies: Prof. Robert D. Grober


                    Applied Physics provides an essential link between physics and engi-
                    neering. This discipline uses the fundamental laws of physics to
                    understand phenomena that have engineering applications.
                        The Applied Physics major is based on three core courses:
                    Electro-magnetic Waves and Devices (APHY 322b), Statistical
                    Thermodynamics (PHYS 420a), and Quantum Mechanics (APHY
                    439a), as these subjects are the foundation of much of modern
                    engineering. After mastering the fundamentals, students choose a
                    technology and explore it in detail by taking related classes in
                    Applied Physics, Physics, and Engineering and by performing
                    independent research
    This major offers a variety of flexible programs. Students can also choose the level of
technological intensity at which they will pursue their degree. The level of technological
intensity determines the number of credits and whether the student will graduate with a
B.S. or a B.A. in Applied Physics.
    Students who are interested in the Applied Physics major should contact the DUS
not later than the end of the Sophomore year.

  B.S. in Applied Physics prepares students for a wide range of careers in industrial
and commercial fields that call for expertise in modern technology. The B.S. in Applied
Physics also provides an excellent preparation for graduate studies leading to a Ph.D.
degree in applied physics, physics, or engineering. This degree is also compatible with a
pre-med curriculum. The B.S. in Applied Physics offers the following programs of study:
        Solid State and Quantum Electronics concentrates on the basic science underly-
       ing electronic and optical devices. Examples include microelectronics, supercon-
       ductors, magnetic materials, surface physics, and laser diagnostics.
        Physics of Materials concentrates on the understanding of material properties in
       physical terms. The focus is on problems related to the theory of solids and on
       optical properties of materials, including biomaterials.
        Custom program of study: Students may also develop a custom program of study
       by selecting elective courses to focus on one of a wide range of fields based on the
       application of physics. Requires approval of the DUS.

  B.A. in Applied Physics is for students who are interested in Applied Physics and also
in non-technical fields. For example, students could graduate with a double major in
Applied Physics and Economics. The B.A. in Applied Physics prepares students for ca-
reers in a wide range of technical fields and also provides a major advantage in fields
such as patent law or technical writing.

Independent Research
Applied Physics majors who are pursuing the B.S. degree do at least two terms of inde-
pendent research (Special Projects, APHY 471a and 472b); those who are pursuing the
B.A. degree do at least one term. Special Projects may be started in the Junior year.
   Students may choose their research faculty advisers not only from Applied Physics
but also from Physics, Computer Science, all Engineering departments, or the Medical
School. Students should discuss their options with the DUS.




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                                             7
                                   Applied Physics Curricula
          B.S. in Applied Physics                                          B.A. in Applied Physics
     prerequisites and 10 more courses                                 prerequisites and 6 more courses

                                             Prerequisites: Math
   MATH 115a or b Calculus of Functions of One Variable
   MATH 120a Calculus of Functions of Several Variables or MATH 230 Vector Calculus and Linear Algebra
   MATH 222a or b Linear Algebra with Applications or MATH 225b Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory
   ENAS 194a or b Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations with Applications
     Possible substitutes for ENAS 194 and MATH 222: PHYS 301 Introduction to Mathematical Methods of Physics

                                           Prerequisites: Physics
                           PHYS 180a/180b Advanced General Physics
                           or PHYS 200a/201b Fundamentals of Physics
                           or PHYS 260a/260b Intensive Introduction to Physics
                           PHYS 205La or b and PHYS 206La or b Modern Physical Measurement
                           APHY 207a Introduction to Applied Physics: Computer Applications
                           or ENAS 130b Introduction to Computing for Engineers and Scientists

                                               Required Courses
                             APHY 322b Electromagnetic Waves and Devices
                             APHY 439a Basic Quantum Mechanics
                             PHYS 420a Statistical Thermodynamics
  APHY 471a and APHY 472b Senior Project             APHY 471a or APHY 472b Senior Project

                   B.S. Electives                                                   B.A. Electives
2 courses in the physical, mathematical, or engineering          2 courses in the physical, mathematical, or engineering
sciences, approved by DUS                                        sciences, approved by DUS
3 courses from one Track, below, or other courses ap-
proved by DUS
                            B.S. Tracks


        Solid State & Quantum                                      Physics of Materials Track
           Electronics Track
APHY 320a Semiconductor Device Fundamentals               APHY 448a Solid State Physics I
APHY 321b Semiconductor Silicon Devices                   APHY 449b Solid State Physics II
APHY 448a Solid State Physics I                           CHEM 227a Comprehensive Organic Chemistry II
APHY 449b Solid State Physics II                          CHEM 440a Molecules and Radiation I
EENG 325b Electronic Circuits                             MENG 480a Mechanics of Deformable Solids


Applied Physics Faculty Research at a glance
    Charles H. Ahn, Assistant Professor of Applied Physics and of Physics. Ph.D. Stanford Univer-
  sity
  Novel materials; molecular beam epitaxy; physics and technology of ferroelectric films, includ-
  ing nanofabrication and "writing" with atomic force microscopy; control of carrier density in su-
  perconductors and semiconductors with ferroelectric gates.

   Sean E. Barrett, Associate Professor of Physics and of Applied Physics. Ph.D. University of Illi-
  nois
  Experimental condensed matter physics; using OPNMR to study electron-doped GaAs quantum
  wells in the presence of large magnetic fields; studies of spins in semiconductors relevant to both
  quantum computation and spintronics. Director of Undergraduate Studies in Physics. Primary
  appointment is in Physics.




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  Richard K. Chang, Henry Ford II Professor of Applied Physics, Professor of Electrical Engineer-
ing and of Physics. Ph.D. Harvard
Experimental studies of laser and nonlinear interactions with solids and liquids/polymers with
various microstructure shapes; investigation of UV GaN microdisk lasers and application of op-
tical sources and wavelength sensitive filters for telecommunications and of laser diagnostics
for sprays, combustion, and environmental pollutants.
   Michel H. Devoret, Professor of Applied Physics. Ph.D. Université d'Orsay, France
Experimental solid state physics with emphasis on "quantronics," i.e., mesoscopic electronic ef-
fects in which collective degrees of freedom like currents and voltages behave quantum me-
chanically; investigations of quantum coherence in single Cooper pair devices for quantum com-
putation; superconductivity at the single molecule level.
  Joseph F. Dillon Jr., Professor Adjunct of Applied Physics. Ph.D. University of Virginia
Experimental solid state physics; magnetic materials and magneto-optical phenomena; magneto-
optical device physics.
  Paul A. Fleury, Frederick W. Beinecke Professor of Engineering and Applied Physics. Ph.D. MIT
Microscopic origin of physical phenomena in condensed matter systems; phase transformations
in ferroelectricity, magnetism, superconductivity, etc. Laser spectroscopy and nonlinear optics.
Dean of Engineering.
  Steven M. Girvin, Professor of Physics and of Applied Physics. Ph.D. Princeton
Theoretical condensed matter physics with emphasis on quantum computation, superconduct-
ing circuits, atomic physics and Bose-Einstein condensates, quantum magnetism, two-
dimensional electron gases, and the quantum Hall effect.
  Robert D. Grober, Barton Weller Associate Professor of Applied Physics and Associate Professor of Physics.
Ph.D. University of Maryland
Experimental studies of the optical properties of materials combining traditional optical spectro-
scopic tools with high spatial resolution optical microscopy; use of single quantum dots and sin-
gle fluorescent molecules as optical nanoprobes of materials. Director of Undergraduate Studies
in Applied Physics. More.
  Victor E. Henrich, Eugene Higgins Professor of Applied Science, Professor of Applied Physics
and of Physics. Ph.D. University of Michigan
Experimental studies of surface physics, chemisorption and interface properties, with emphasis
on metal oxides and their role in catalysis; electronic properties of metal oxides and the role of
electron correlation; defect properties of oxide surfaces; electronic properties of oxide-oxide and
oxide-metal interfaces.
  Pierre C. Hohenberg, Professor Adjunct of Applied Physics and of Physics. Ph.D. Harvard
Theoretical physics of condensed matter, phase transitions and critical phenomena, statistical
physics, hydrodynamic instabilities, non-equilibrium phenomena. Deputy Provost for Science and
Technology.
  Mark Kasevich, Professor of Physics and of Applied Physics. Ph.D., Stanford
Atom optics and interferometery and the study of quantum many-body effects in dilute atomic
vapors. Primary appointment is in Physics.
  Marshall B. Long, Primary appointment is in Mechanical Engineering.
  Tso-Ping Ma, Primary appointment is in Electrical Engineering.
  Simon G. Mochrie, Professor of Physics and of Applied Physics. Ph.D., MIT
Experimental studies of the phase behavior and phase transitions of soft matter, surfaces and
biomaterials, using high-resolution x-ray scattering methods.
  Janet L. Pan, Primary appointment is in Electrical Engineering.
  Daniel E. Prober, Professor of Applied Physics and of Physics. Ph.D. Harvard
Experimental solid state physics and superconductivity; electron localization and quantum
transport phenomena; superconducting microwave UV and x-ray detectors; nanostructure fab-
rication techniques. Director of Graduate Admissions for the Faculty of Engineering. Director of
the Select Program in Engineering.




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  Nicholas Read, Professor of Applied Physics and of Physics. Ph.D. University of London, Eng-
land
Theoretical condensed matter physics, including strongly interacting electron systems, quantum
Hall effect, random media and field theoretic methods.
 Mark A. Reed, Primary appointment is in Electrical Engineering.

  Subir Sachdev, Professor of Physics and of Applied Physics. Ph.D. Harvard
Theoretical condensed matter physics; quantum field theory and statistical mechanics; quantum
critical phenomena; strongly correlated and disordered electronic systems. Primary appointment
is in Physics.
  Robert J. Schoelkopf, Barton Weller Associate Professor of Applied Physics and Physics. Ph.D.
California Institute of Technology
Experimental solid-state physics; quantum-effect devices, nanostructures and mesoscopic phys-
ics, single-electron devices and single-charge dynamics and applications of these for photodetec-
tors and quantum computation.




                   Jeffrey Mascia '05, crew team member and Applied Physics major,
                            designing a sensor system to synchronize rowing

  R. Shankar, Professor of Physics and of Applied Physics. Ph.D. University of California at Berke-
ley
Theoretical condensed matter and statistical physics; problems in statistical mechanics and in
the quantum field theory of solids; random systems in which the interaction between the micro-
scopic degrees of freedom varies from point to point, quantum Hall effect. Chair, Physics De-
partment. Primary appointment is in Physics.

 Mitchell D. Smooke, Primary appointment is in Mechanical Engineering.

 Katepalli R. Sreenivasan, Primary appointment is in Mechanical Engineering.

  A. Douglas Stone, Professor of Applied Physics and of Physics. Ph.D. MIT
Theory of quantum transport phenomena; localization, mesoscopic physics, quantum dots;
quantum coherence and quantum computation in superconducting tunnel junction circuits;
chaos and quantum/wave chaos with applications to microelectronics, microcavity optics, and
laser physics. Chair, Department of Applied Physics.

  John C. Tully, Arthur E. Kemp Professor of Chemistry, Professor of Physics and of Applied
Physics. Ph.D. University of Chicago
Theories of they dynamics of chemical processes at surfaces, in the condensed phases and in
biological molecules. Primary appointment is in Chemistry.

  Werner P. Wolf, Raymond J. Wean Professor of Engineering and Applied Science and Professor
of Physics. D.Phil. University of Oxford, England
Experimental and theoretical solid state physics; magnetic materials; phase transitions. Policy
trends affecting research and education.

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Jerry M. Woodall, Primary appointment is in Electrical Engineering.




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                                            11
BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING www.eng.yale.edu/biomedical/undergraduate.html
Director of Undergraduate Studies: Prof. James S. Duncan

                         Biomedical Engineering addresses important biomedical problems,
                         from the imaging of physiological function to development of artifi-
                         cial organs and new biomaterials.
                             The major in Biomedical Engineering provides an understand-
                         ing of the common methods that underlie several disciplines; it
                         also teaches the student to develop detailed quantitative ap-
                         proaches in one of three biomedical engineering fields:

                                    Medical Imaging,
                                    Biomechanics,
                                    Biotechnology.

   The theoretical understanding and experimental experience provided by the BENG
major prepare the student for careers in biomedical engineering in industrial settings
that call for expertise in technology and biological fields, for example, development of
medical imaging equipment, designing prosthetic devices, or pharmaceutical research.
   This major also give students the foundation for graduate study in Biomedical Engi-
neering, the Engineering disciplines, Applied Physics, and, with some additional course-
work, Medicine.
    Students should discuss their proposed program with the DUS, because programs
are tailored to each student’s interests. If a student has Advanced Placement credits,
some basic courses may be omitted. Course substitutions are also permitted, if approved
by the DUS.




Prof. Duncan viewing images taken during a neurosurgery procedure. Prof. Duncan and his students
are using these images to help design algorithms that correct for positional errors due to brain shifts
that occur when using current-generation image-guided surgery systems. The algorithms are being
investigated for possible incorporation into future generations of these systems
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                                                  12
                           Biomedical Engineering Curriculum
                                    B. S. in Biomedical Engineering
                                       prerequisites and 9 more courses

                                           Prerequisites: Math
                          MATH 115a or b Calculus of Functions of One Variable
                          MATH 120a or b Calculus of Functions of Several Variables
                          ENAS 194a or b Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations with Applications

                           Prerequisites: Physics, Chemistry, Biology
             PHYS 180a/180b Advanced General Physics
             PHYS 205La or b and PHYS 206La or b Modern Physical Measurement
             CHEM 114 Comprehensive General Chemistry or 118a Quantitative Foundations of General Chemistry
             MCDB 120a Principles of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology

                                            Required courses
                                    BENG 350a Physiological Systems
                                    BENG 351a Biomedical Engineering I
                                    BENG 355b Biomedical Engineering II
                                    BENG 355La and 355Lb Biomedical Engineering Laboratory

                                          Senior Requirement
                                           BENG 480a Senior Seminar
                                           BENG 472b Senior Project

                                                 Electives
                                             choose one Track

   Biotechnology Track                    Biomechanics Track                   Medical Imaging Track
        choose 3 courses                     choose 3 courses                      choose 3 courses
CENG 210a Intro to Chemical Engi-     MENG 185b Design Studio                EENG 310a Signals and Systems
neering
CENG 354b Biotechnology               MENG 280a Strength & Deformation       BENG 421b Physics of Medical Im-
                                                                             aging
MENG 361a Fluid Mechanics             BENG 457b Biomechanics                 EENG 445a Digital Image Process-
                                                                             ing
EENG 226a Electronic Circuits and     MENG 361a Fluid Mechanics              EENG 455b Computer Vision
Devices
BENG 410a Physical & Chemical                                                CPSC 475b Computational Vision
Basis of Biosensing                                                          and Biological Perception

Students planning to apply to Medical School may take Biology Laboratory and Organic Chemistry
as Focused Electives.


Biomedical Engineering Faculty Research at a glance

This program involves faculty from many departments. Below are listed only those faculty mem-
bers who have a joint appointment in one of the departments of the Faculty of Engineering and
teach an undergraduate course in the Biomedical Engineering Program.
    Robert E. Apfel, Primary appointment is in Mechanical Engineering.

    Jacek Cholewicki, Associate Professor of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation and of Mechanical
  Engineering. Ph.D. University of Waterloo, Canada
  Biomechanics: Simulation and modeling of the lumbar spine in regard to tissue loads during
  heavy lifting, low back pain, and mechanical instability of the spine; muscle mechanics and elec-
  tromyography. Primary appointment is in Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation.
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  R. Todd Constable, Associate Professor in Diagnostic Radiology and Neurosurgery. Ph.D. Uni-
versity of Toronto, Canada
Development and application of Magnetic Resonance Imaging methods with emphasis on pulse
sequence design and functional brain imaging applications. Primary appointment is in Diagnostic
Radiology.
  James S. Duncan, Professor of Diagnostic Radiology and of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D. Uni-
versity of Southern California
Computer vision and image processing; optimization-based and distributed computational ap-
proaches to image analysis; applications of the above to medical images. Chair of the Biomedical
Engineering Program and Director of Undergraduate Studies in Biomedical Engineering. Primary
appointment is in Diagnostic Radiology.
 Csaba Horváth, Primary appointment is in Chemical Engineering.
  Fahmeed Hyder, Assistant Professor of Diagnostic Radiology and of Biomedical Engineering
Development of in vivo NMR methods for measuring tissue oxygen consumption; modeling oxy-
gen delivery in brain; high field animal models for functional MRI; biophysical basis of functional
MRI image contrast. Primary appointment is in Diagnostic Radiology.
 W. Mark Saltzman, Primary appointment is in Chemical Engineering.
  Steven S. Segal, Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology. Ph.D. University of Michigan
Microcirculation and mechanisms of blood flow control, with an emphasis on skeletal muscle;
cell-to-cell communication in resistance networks mediated through electrical, mechanical, and
chemical signals. Prof. Segal is an Associate Fellow at the John B. Pierce Laboratory.




 Abigail Lubow '02 continued her undergraduate research on avalanche photodiodes (APDs) as a graduate
student. She uses the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system to prepare test samples for her research project


  Fred J. Sigworth, Professor of Cellular and Molecular Physiology. Ph.D. Yale
Electrical recording (patch clamp) and signal processing of ion channel currents; studies of
structure and function of ion channel proteins; cryo electron microscopy methods for macromo-
lecular structure determination.
  Lawrence H. Staib, Associate Professor of Diagnostic Radiology and of Electrical Engineering.
Ph.D. Yale
Biomedical image processing, analysis and measurement; models for segmentation and non-
rigid registration with applications in neuroscience and cardiology. Primary appointment is in Di-
agnostic Radiology.
  Hemant D. Tagare, Associate Professor of Diagnostic Radiology and of Electrical Engineering.
Ph.D. Rice
Mathematical theory of non-rigid correspondence and non-rigid shape change with application
to heart motion analysis; indexing and rapid retrieval of images based on their content; image
segmentation with deformable contours; visual attention and its use in object recognition. Pri-
mary appointment is in Diagnostic Radiology.

 Steven Zucker, Primary appointment is in Computer Science. See Electrical Engineering.

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                                                   14
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING www.eng.yale.edu/chemical/index.html
Director of Undergraduate Studies: Prof. Michael Loewenberg

                           Chemical engineering has made significant contributions to a
                           wide range of scientific and technological developments, such
                           as drug delivery devices, enzyme design using biomimetics, mi-
                           crofluidic devices, environmental remediation, fuel cells, and
                           semiconductor processing. The far-reaching impact of chemical
                           engineering is due to a focus on basic principles from physics,
                           chemistry, and biology and a systematic approach to problem
                           solving and analysis.*

                             The Yale chemical engineering program is focused on fun-
                         damental engineering science. The curriculum provides a
                         strong background in basic science (mathematics, chemistry,
physics), and the analysis of experiments and problems in the chemical engineering sci-
ences (thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, fluid mechanics, and transport phenomena).
A special feature of the program is the accessibility of laboratory research. Most majors
participate in research with faculty members, which often leads to a refereed journal
publication.

    A major in chemical engineering prepares graduates for a wide choice of careers.
Recent Yale chemical engineering graduates have become professors, scientists at na-
tional laboratories, doctors, lawyers, managers, and policy makers.

  B.S. Degree in Chemical Engineering
This degree is ABET**-accredited and intended for students wishing to pursue a career
in chemical engineering. The objectives of the program are listed below.
     1. Graduates from our program will have an excellent engineering science back-
     ground for graduate study in chemical, biomedical, and environmental engineering
     programs as well as superior scientific and analytical preparation for medical school
     and law school. Specifically, our graduates will
          have in-depth scientific knowledge and mathematical skills,
         be able to formulate and solve chemical engineering problems,
          have an awareness of chemical engineering research frontiers through course,
         material, undergraduate research, and close interaction with the program fac-
         ulty,
         be able to enter top-ranked graduate engineering programs.
     2. Graduates from our program will be well prepared for a wide range of careers in
     industry or national laboratories. Specifically, our graduates will
         be able to design a chemical engineering process with desired specifications and
          constraints,
         have exposure to engineering economics, safety, and ethics,
         be able to pursue technical careers in industry or at national labs.
     3. Graduates from our program will have a broad general education including
         strong oral and written communication skills,
         the ability to communicate effectively to multidisciplinary audiences,
         the ability to work effectively as a member of a team,
         a broad awareness of contemporary social and environmental issues.




*   For more information, visit www.aiche.org/careers, www. pubs.acs.org/cen

                                         www.eng.yale.edu
                                                15
**   Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
Prerequisite courses
MATH 112a or b, 115a or b, and 120a or b; CHEM 114, 116L, or 118a; PHYS 180a,
181b.
Students with advanced high school preparation can skip prerequisite courses by enroll-
ing directly in upper-level mathematics and chemistry courses.

Requirements: 19 courses beyond the prerequisites:
    Mathematics: ENAS 194a or b; one advanced mathematics elective
        Chemistry*:        CHEM 225b, 227a, 332, 331L (fall term only)
        Engineering:       CENG 210a, 300a, 301b, 315b, 411a, 412b, 480a; ENAS 130b;
                           MENG 361a; two engineering or science electives
        Senior project: CENG 416b
        Below is an example of the required course sequence** for a student
        with advanced high school preparation in calculus:
                          Fall                 Spring
             Freshman MATH 120                 ENAS 194
                         PHYS 180              PHYS 181
                         CHEM 118
                         CENG 210

            Sophomore       CHEM 332                  CHEM 332
                            CHEM 331L                 ENAS 130
                            CENG 300                  CENG 301

                  Junior    MENG 361                  CENG 315
                                                      CHEM 225

                  Senior    CHEM 227                  CENG 412
                            CENG 411                  CENG 416
                            CENG 480
        Students entering chemical engineering in their Sophomore or Junior year can
        meet the program requirements by taking more courses in their Junior and Senior
        years.

        Students considering the chemical engineering major are encouraged to contact
        the DUS to learn more about the program and for help with their course schedule.

B.S. Degree in Engineering Sciences
This degree option is intended for students who require more flexibility for taking
courses outside of the major.

Requirements: 10 term courses beyond prerequisites, chosen in consultation with the
DUS. The standard program includes the following courses:
       Mathematics:        ENAS 194a or b
       Chemistry*:         CHEM 225b, 227a; or 332
       Engineering:        CENG 210a, 300a, 301b, 315b; ENAS 130b; MENG 361a
       Senior project: CENG 490 a or b



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                                                 16
*  May substitute CHEM 220a, 221b for CHEM 225b, 227a; may substitute CHEM 330 for CHEM
332
** Electives and distributional requirements not shown

Chemical Engineering Faculty Research at a glance
      Eric I. Altman, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania
    Dynamics of processes at surfaces using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and related
    techniques; the nucleation and growth of thin films; etching reactions at metal surfaces; oxide
    surfaces important to catalysis.

     Gaboury Benoit, Primary appointment is in Forestry and Environmental Studies. See Environ-
    mental Engineering.




                           Woolsey Hall is across the street from Engineering

      Donald M. Crothers, Sterling Professor of Chemistry, Professor of Molecular Biophysics and
    Biochemistry, and Professor of Chemical Engineering. Ph.D. University of California at San Diego
    Physical properties of nucleic acids and their interactions with other substances; mechanisms of
    structure formation in RNA’s using molecular biological, kinetic and NMR spectroscopic meth-
    ods; the mechanism of interaction of small molecules such as anti-tumor compounds and anti-
    biotics with DNA. Primary appointment is in Chemistry.

      Menachem Elimelech, Llewellyn West Jones Jr. Professor of Environmental Engineering and
    Professor of Chemical Engineering. Ph.D. Johns Hopkins
    Physical and chemical processes in environmental engineering; transport of microbial pathogens
    in subsurface environments; interaction of biocolloids with surfaces; dynamics of colloidal proc-
    esses in aquatic systems; membrane separations in aquatic systems. Chair, Environmental Engi-
    neering Program.

      Roger L. Ely, Assistant Professor of Environmental Engineering and of Chemical Engineering.
    Ph.D. Oregon State. P.E.
    Biological processes in environmental engineering; molecular-level fundamentals and modeling
    of microbial systems; application of molecular biology and microbiology tools; bioremediation;
    biodegradation of xenobiotics, toxic effects and stress responses in microorganisms. Director of
    Undergraduate Studies in Environmental Engineering.


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                                                  17
  Thomas E. Graedel, Primary appointment is in Forestry and Environmental Studies. See Envi-
ronmental Engineering.




                                     www.eng.yale.edu
                                           18
  Gary L. Haller, Henry Prentiss Becton Professor of Engineering and Applied Science and Profes-
sor of Chemical Engineering and of Chemistry. Ph.D. Northwestern University
Heterogeneous catalysis and electrocatalysis; surface chemistry and spectroscopic characteriza-
tion of surfaces using techniques such as infrared absorption, x-ray absorption spectroscopies,
and solid state NMR; and classical kinetics; chemisorption and physical adsorption. Master of
Jonathan Edwards College.

  William S. Hancock, Professor Adjunct of Chemical Engineering. Ph.D. University of Adelaide,
Australia
Analytical biotechnology. Application of high performance liquid chromatography, capillary elec-
trophoresis and mass spectrometry to characterization of biological macromolecules, such as in
the study of the human Genome and the corresponding protein products (the Proteome).

  Csaba Horváth, Roberto C. Goizueta Professor of Chemical Engineering. Ph.D. J.W. Goethe Uni-
versity Frankfurt (M), Germany
Biochemical engineering; bioseparations; chromatography and electrophoresis; nonlinear chro-
matography; displacement chromatography; rapid HPLC analysis and capillary zone electropho-
resis of biopolymers; theory and applications of capillary electrochromatography; electrokinetic
phenomena in porous media preparation and characterization of novel stationary phases; devel-
opment of capillary electrochromatography, a separation technique for biological substances.
  Michael Loewenberg, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. Ph.D. California Institute of
Technology
Complex fluids: flow and microstructure of concentrated emulsions, blood flow; colloidal phe-
nomena: electrokinetic effects, Marangoni motion, surfactant effects; aggregation and dispersion:
drop breakup and coalescence, particle flocculation and capture, hydrodynamic diffusion. Direc-
tor of Undergraduate Studies in Chemical Engineering.
  Lisa D. Pfefferle, Professor of Chemical Engineering and of Mechanical Engineering. Ph.D. Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania
Chemical reaction engineering; combustion kinetics, hydrocarbon pyrolysis, soot formation
mechanisms, incineration of toxic wastes; catalytically stabilized combustion; laser-based diag-
nostics for chemically reacting flow systems; synthesis of aligned carbon nanotubes.
  Joseph J. Pignatello, Primary affiliation is with the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station
in New Haven, CT. See Environmental Engineering.
  Daniel E. Rosner, Professor of Chemical Engineering and Professor of Mechanical Engineering.
Ph.D. Princeton University
Convective energy- and mass-transfer in chemically reacting and/or multiphase flow systems;
heterogeneous reactions at high temperatures; microparticle nucleation, growth, dispersion and
deposition; chemical vapor transport, combustion synthesis and materials processing.
  W. Mark Saltzman, Goizueta Foundation Professor of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering.
Ph.D. MIT/Harvard
Development of drug delivery systems for cancer, brain disease, and prevention of infectious dis-
ease; tissue engineering; new biomaterials for drug delivery and tissue engineering.
 James Saiers, Primary appointment is in the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. See
Environmental Engineering.
 Sheryl L. Stuart, see Environmental Engineering.
 James R. Wallis, Primary appointment is in Environmental Engineering.
  John Y. Walz, Professor of Chemical Engineering. Ph.D. Carnegie Mellon
Surface forces between colloidal particles and interfaces measured with total internal reflection
microscopy (TIRM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM); effects of surface roughness on colloidal
interactions; control of colloidal stability using non-adsorbing polymers; micro-manipulation of
colloidal particles using focused laser beams. Chair, Department of Chemical Engineering.
  Kurt W. Zilm, Professor of Chemistry and of Chemical Engineering. Ph.D. University of Utah
Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), development of new solid state NMR techniques, applica-
tions to heterogeneous catalysis and catalyst poisoning, geochemistry, oil exploration, drug de-
sign and structural biology. Primary appointment is in Chemistry.



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                                               19
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING www.eng.yale.edu/electrical/undergraduate.html
Director of Undergraduate Studies: Prof. Peter J. Kindlmann


                      Look around you. Almost everything that is designed has involved
                      Electrical Engineering.

                         Studying this very dynamic discipline will prepare you for a
                      wide range of research careers in industry, government, and
                      manufacturing, also in management (managers must be able to
                      explain to top executives which development the company should
                      support) and in consulting.

                           Students can choose the level of technical concentration of
                       their program. The technical concentration determines the num-
ber of credits, and the number of credits determines whether the student will receive a
B.S. or a B.A. at graduation.
   B.S. in Electrical Engineering, ABET*-accredited is the technically most compre-
hensive program and is recommended for students planning an engineering career. It
provides the best preparation for graduate study and for immediate entry into demand-
ing industrial engineering positions. Having completed our BSEE program, graduates
will
         have gained an in-depth appreciation of EE technological frontiers
       through close interaction with faculty,
         be able to enter highly selective graduate schools, or pursue technical
       careers in industry or national labs, or bring knowledge of technologies
       that will continue to be the key drivers of social productivity to their ca-
       reers as business, national, or global leaders,
         be able to apply knowledge in science and mathematics to formulating
       and solving electrical engineering problems qualitatively and quantita-
       tively,
         be able to communicate ideas effectively to multi-disciplinary audi-
       ences,
         be able to exhibit broad awareness of contemporary social and envi-
       ronmental issues.

   B.S. in Engineering Sciences (Electrical) requires fewer technical courses and,
therefore, makes it possible to choose courses from many relevant areas, e.g., econom-
ics, ethics, politics, technology management, even cognitive psychology. This degree pre-
pares students for an engineering career or graduate study in engineering and provides a
strong advantage in numerous related careers.

   B.A. in Engineering Sciences (Electrical) is for students whose primary major is
other than engineering, but in fields where a grasp of science and technology will provide
a significant advantage, e.g., medicine, business, law, or public service.




                                      www.eng.yale.edu
                                            20
*ABET Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology




                                       www.eng.yale.edu
                                             21
Electrical Engineering offers three tracks. Students have ample time to discuss with
the DUS and their instructors what each track has to offer, because they have until the
end of the Sophomore year to make their choice. All three tracks require the same intro-
ductory courses.
       Microelectronics and Photonics Track. The study of microelectronic and photonic
       materials, the design, fabrication, and characterization of electronic and photonic
       devices. Applications include microchip devices, fiber optics for modern digital
       communications, laser diodes, and ultrafast devices.
       Computer Engineering Track. The study and design of digital circuits and com-
       puter systems, computer architecture, computer networks, very large scale inte-
       grated (VLSI) circuit design, implementation, and testing. Applications include
       computer-aided design and manufacture, computer communications, and paral-
       lel computer systems.
       Signal Processing, Control, and Communications Track. The study of linear system
       models, automatic control systems, representation of information in signals,
       transmission and storage of information, and processing information by com-
       puters. Applications include bioengineering, digital signal processing, image
       processing, neural networks, robotics, sensors, and telecommunication systems.
Special Projects. All students must do a one-term research/design Senior project (Spe-
cial Projects, EENG 471a or 472b). Unusually qualified students work on Special Projects
for three or four terms, sometimes starting in the Freshman year. Students should
choose their subject before the term in which they plan to do their project and should
ask the Instructor to approve the subject before they file their project plan with the
DUS.
Faculty Adviser. EE majors choose a Faculty Adviser in their Freshman year. The Fac-
ulty Adviser will help students "tune" their evolving programs over the years. Students
are encouraged to seek advice from other faculty as well, so as to benefit to the fullest
from the expertise available to them. EE majors must ask the DUS to approve their pro-
gram.




                                     www.eng.yale.edu
                                           22
Student-built solar car




 www.eng.yale.edu
         23
                              Electrical Engineering Curricula
     B.S. Engineering Sciences              B.S. Electrical                   B.A. Engineering Sciences
            (Electrical)                  Engineering (ABET)                         (Electrical)
                                            Prerequisites
                                     Math 112a or b Calculus I
                                     Math 115a or b Calculus II
                                     CPSC 112a or b Intro to Programming
                                     or ENAS 130b Intro to Concepts for Engineers & Scientists
                                     Math 120a or b Calculus II, several variables
             PHYS 180a Advanced Physics or higher                           PHYS 150a General Physics
             PHYS 181b Advanced Physics or higher                           PHYS 151b General Physics or
                                                                            higher
                                            Required Courses
                            Math 222a or b Linear Algebra or Math 225b Linear Algebra Matrix Theory
                            ENAS 194a or b Differential Equations
                            EENG 226a Intro to Electrical Engineering: Electronic Circuits & Devices
                            EENG 228b Intro to Electrical Engineering: Signals & Systems
             EENG 227La Circuits & Electronics Lab
             EENG 229Lb Signals &Systems Lab
                                    EENG 310a Signals & Systems
                                     EENG 320a Semiconductor Device
                                     Fundamentals
                                     APHY 322b Electromagnetic Waves
                                     & Devices
                                     EENG 325b Electronic Circuits
                                     EENG 348a Digital Systems
                                      EENG 471a or 472b Senior Project
         B.S. Electives                      ABET Electives                        B.A. Electives
             6 credits                           5 credits                             3 credits
           consult DUS                         consult DUS                           consult DUS
             ENAS 335b Professional Ethics
             *
                                                                           EENG 227La Circuits&Electrncs Lb
             EENG 408a Electronic Materials                                EENG 229Lb Signals&Systems Lab
             EENG 425a Intro to VLSI System Design                         EENG 320a Semiconductor Device
                                                                           Fundamentals
            EENG 426a Instrumentation and Product Design                   EENG 348a Digital Systems
            EENG 436b Systems and Control                                  EENG 350b Embedded Systems
            EENG 444b Modern Communications Systems                        MENG 185b Mech. Design Studio
            EENG 445a Digital Image Processing
                             ENAS 323a Creativity and New Product Development
**
  EENG 320a Semiconductor Device    **
                                      ENAS 360a Measurement & Noise
Fundamentals                        or **ENAS 496b Probability & Sto-
                                    chastic Processes
**
  EENG 421b Silicon Devices &       EENG 421b Silicon Devices &
Technology                          Technology
**
  EENG 350b Embedded Systems        EENG 350b Embedded Systems
**
  EENG 348a Digital Systems         EENG 418a Heterojunction Devices
 EENG 449b Computer Systems
**
                                       EENG 449b Computer Systems
APHY 322b Electromagnetic Waves        EENG 455b Computer Vision
& Devices
CPSC 200a Second programming           EENG 462b Digital System Testing
course or CPSC 201a or b Intro to CS
MENG 185b Mech. Design Studio      EENG 397b Math Methods in Engg
                                   CPSC 200a Second programming
                                   course or CPSC 201 Intro to CS
                                   CPSC 223b Data Structures and Pro-
                                   gramming Techniques
                  ECON 159a Game Theory or ECON 161a or b Econometrics and Data Analysis
                           more Special Projects: EENG 235a/236b or 471a/472b

ABET requires an ethics component
*
                                               strongly recommended
                                              **



                                               www.eng.yale.edu
                                                      24
Electrical Engineering Faculty Research at a glance
  Andrew R. Barron, Professor of Statistics and of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D. Stanford
Statistical information theory, probability limit theorems, function estimation, neural networks.
Primary appointment is in Statistics.

 Richard K. Chang, Primary appointment is in Applied Physics.

  James S. Duncan, Primary appointment is in Diagnostic Radiology. See Biomedical Engineer-
ing.

  Daniel H. Friendly, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Computer Science.
Ph.D. University of Michigan at Ann Arbor
High performance computer design, microarchitecture for high performance superscalar proces-
sors, instruction fetch, trace caches, fill unit design, dynamic instruction optimization.

 Jung Han, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D. Purdue
Wide bandgap semiconductor materials and devices, optoelectronic and microelectronic devices,
nanoscale materials and devices, metal organic chemical vapor deposition.

  Peter J. Kindlmann, Professor Adjunct of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D. Yale
Design methods and philosophy of electronics for research and for industrial and consumer use;
study of the role of technology and information in teaching, organizations, and contemporary
culture. Director of Undergraduate Studies in Electrical Engineering.

  Roman Kuc, Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D. Columbia
Digital signal processing with applications to bioengineering, robotics and telecommunications;
inverse problems; intelligent sensors; modeling biological systems; embedded systems. Director
of Educational Affairs.

 Richard Lethin, Assistant Professor Adjunct in Electrical Engineering. Ph.D. MIT
VLIW architecture and compilers, multiprocessor architecture, dynamic architecture emulation,
network queuing analysis, and Java systems performance.

  Tso-Ping Ma, Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Applied Physics. Ph.D. Yale
Semiconductor materials and device physics; MOS science and technology; high-k gate dielec-
trics for advanced CMOS; Novel flash memory devices; ferroelectric thin films and memory de-
vices; SiC and GaN MOSFET's. Chair, Department of Electrical Engineering.

  Yiorgos Makris, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Computer Science. Ph.D,
University of California at San Diego
VLSI testing and reliability, hierarchical test approaches, testability analysis, design for test,
computer aided design.

  A. Stephen Morse, Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Computer Science. Ph.D. Purdue
Problems in the control of dynamical systems, adaptive control, modeling and control of hybrid
systems, logic based switching for control, vision-based feedback control, coordination and con-
trol of groupings of multiple autonomous agents.

  Kumpati S. Narendra, Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D. Harvard
Adaptive control using multiple models, switching, and tuning; stability of switching systems;
decentralized control; artificial neural networks for identification and control.

  Janet L. Pan, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Applied Physics. Ph.D. MIT
Physics of optoelectronic devices, design of long wavelength emitters and detectors, molecular
beam epitaxy.

  Mark A. Reed, Harold Hodgkinson Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Applied Physics.
Ph.D. Syracuse
Heterojunction and low dimensional device physics; tunneling; mesoscopic physics; quantum
devices; nanotechnology; molecular electronics, MEMS, BioMEMS.


                                       www.eng.yale.edu
                                              25
  Peter M. Schultheiss, Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D. Yale
Statistical communication theory; detection and estimation theory; signal processing; array
processing.

 Lawrence H. Staib, Professor of Diagnostic Radiology and of Electrical Engineering See Bio-
medical Engineering.

  Hemant D. Tagare, Associate Professor of Diagnostic Radiology and of Electrical Engineering.
Ph.D. Rice
Mathematical theory of non-rigid correspondence and non-rigid shape change with application
to heart motion analysis; indexing and rapid retrieval of images based on their content; image
segmentation with deformable contours; visual attention and its use in object recognition. Pri-
mary appointment is in Diagnostic Radiology.

  Sekhar Tatikonda, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D. MIT
Communication theory, information theory, stochastic control, distributed estimation and con-
trol, statistical machine learning and inference.

 J. Rimas Vaisnys, Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.
Ph.D. University of California at Berkeley
Dynamical behavior of ecological systems; dynamics of evolving systems; analysis of cardiac sig-
nals; physics of computation.




              Prof. Jerry Woodall, winner of the National Medal of Technology, is be-
              ing congratulated by President George W. Bush at the White House
              awards ceremony June 2002

 Jerry M. Woodall, C. Baldwin Sawyer Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D. Cornell
Exploratory compound semi-conductor materials and devices.

 Edmund M. Yeh, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D. MIT
Digital communication theory, information theory, queueing theory, wireless systems, data net-
works, signal processing.

  Steven W. Zucker, David and Lucile Packard Professor of Computer Science and Electrical En-
gineering. Ph.D. Drexel
Computational vision, computational neuroscience, biomedical image analysis. Joint appoint-
ment with Computer Science.


                                        www.eng.yale.edu
                                              26
ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING www.eng.yale.edu/environmental/index.html
Director of Undergraduate Studies: Prof. Roger L. Ely

                         Environmental engineers are involved with many aspects of so-
                         ciety's interaction with the environment. They provide scientific
                         assessment and develop engineering solutions that affect our
                         biosphere, land, water, and air quality.

                           Environmental engineers address concerns in drinking water
                         safety, groundwater protection, wastewater treatment, indoor
                         and outdoor air pollution, solid and hazardous waste disposal.
                         They work on remediation of contaminated sites and on wet-
                         land preservation. They also help prevent pollution by way of
                         designing product and processes.

  Environmental engineers must balance complex and often competing technical, social,
and legal issues concerning the use of environmental resources. Therefore, Yale provides
its environmental engineering students with an understanding not only of engineering
disciplines but also of chemistry, biology, geology, economics, and management.

  Students who graduate with a degree in environmental engineering will be ready for
leadership positions in industry and government agencies as well as for graduate study
in engineering, science, business, law, and medicine.

  Students pursue their degree at their chosen level of technological intensity. That level
determines the number of credits and also whether the student will receive a B.S. or a
B.A. at graduation:

  B.S. in Environmental Engineering is designed mainly for students who are inter-
ested in a career as practicing environmental engineers.

  B.S. in Engineering Sciences (Environmental) is intended for students who desire a
strong background in environmental engineering and wish to combine environmental
engineering with other fields. Students select a concentration in one of three tracks:

        Environmental Engineering Technology Track: Emphasis on technology

        Environmental Engineering Science Track: Emphasis on environmental and earth
       science

        Environmental Resource Management Track: Emphasis on environmental policy
       and management

   B.A. in Engineering Sciences (Environmental) is designed for students who are in-
terested in careers in which scientific and technological problems play an important role
and in which a background in environmental engineering will provide a major advantage,
for example, medicine, law, business, or public service.




                                      www.eng.yale.edu
                                            27
                              Environmental Engineering Curricula
    B.S. Environmental                       B.S. in Engineering                B.A. in Engineering
        Engineering                       Sciences (Environmental)           Sciences (Environmental)
                                                Prerequisites
             MATH 112 Single Variable Calculus I                             MATH 112 Sing Variable Calculus I
             MATH 115 Single Variable Calculus II                            MATH 115 Sing Variable Calculus II
             MATH 120 Multivariable Calculus                                 CHEM 114 Compreh Gen Chemistry
             ENAS 194 Differential Equations                                 PHYS 150a & 151b General Physics
             ENAS 130 Introduction to Computing
   CHEM 114 Comprehensive General Chemistry and CHEM 116L General
   Chemistry Lab or CHEM 118a Quantitative Foundations Gen Chem and
   CHEM 119La (AP students) or one term of CHEM 330 or 332 Physical
   Chem and one term of CHEM 331L Phys Chem Lab (AP students)
             Phys 180a and 181b (AP students only)
                                              Required Courses
          (10-11 credits)                      (5-6 credits)                          (3 credits)
                              ENVE 120a Introduction to Environmental Engineering
                              CENG 210a Introduction to Chemical Engineering
            CENG 300a Thermodynamics (not required after CHEM 118,        ENVE 371a Intro to Hydrology &
            330, or 332)                                                  Water Resources
            ENVE 270b Complex Problems
            CENG 315b Energy, Mass, & Momentum Transport
MENG 361a Fluid Mechanics
ENVE 371a Hydrol/Water Resources
ENVE 373b Air Pollution
ENVE 377b Water Quality Control
F&ES 344b Aquatic Chemistry
ENVE 490a or b Senior Project

   Electives (consult DUS)                 Electives (consult DUS)              Electives (consult DUS)
           At least 5 courses,                   At least 7 courses          Courses may be taken in any depart-
     at least 1 from each category                 from Tracks               ment, including in the Social Sci-
Statistics: For example, STAT 105a,                   (below)                ences and the Humanities
GEOL 359b, ENAS 496b
Earth Sciences: For example,                            ↓↓↓
GEOL 120b, 140a, 240b, 304a, 306b
Biological Sciences: For example,
EEB 122b, 220a, 370a, MBB 200a,
MCDB 120a, 150b, 290b
Sustainable Engineering: For exam-
ple, F&ES 300a, 301b, 372a

                                                      Tracks
                       ↓                                  ↓                              ↓
        Environmental Engineering           Environmental Engineering         Environmental Resource
              Technology Track                    Science Track                 Management Track,
        at least 2 technical courses &1      choose at least 1 from each     choose at least 1 from each
        each from all other categories                category                         category
       Technical: ENVE 371a, 373b,                                         Economics: for example,
       377b, CENG 411a                                                     ECON 115a or b, 116a or b,
                                                                           150a or b, 283a, 329b, 330a
       Earth Sciences: for example, GEOL 120b, 140a,       Management: for example,
       240b, 304a, 306b, 307a, 340b                        ENAS 320a, 335b, AMST 285, ANTH 382, 417,
                                                           486, MCDB 150b, PLSC 357, 406, STEV 466,
                                                           GEOL 307a
       Biological Sciences: for example, EEB 122b, 220a, 370a,
       MBB 200a, MCDB 120a, 150b, 290b
       General: For example, ECON 115a or b, ECON 116a or b,
       CHEM 220a, 221b, ENAS 333a, 335b, 340a, 341b, 391a, 397b
                           Sustainable Engineering: For example, F&ES 300a, 301b, 372a
                                                 www.eng.yale.edu
                                                        28
Environmental Engineering Faculty Research at a glance
  Ruth Blake, Assistant Professor Geology and Geophysics and of Environmental Engineering.
 Ph.D. University of Michigan
 Geomicrobiology      and    microbial geochemistry/biochemistry; low-temperature   aque-
 ous/experimental geochemistry; and stable isotope geochemistry.

   Gaboury Benoit, Professor, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and Professor of
 Chemical Engineering. Ph.D. MIT
 Aquatic chemistry; biogeochemistry of trace metals and radionuclides in natural waters, soils,
 sediments, and biota; transport and fate of chemical substances in fresh and marine aquatic en-
 vironments. Primary appointment is in Forestry and Environmental Studies

   Menachem Elimelech, Llewellyn West Jones Professor of Environmental Engineering and Pro-
 fessor of Chemical Engineering. Ph.D. Johns Hopkins
 Physical and chemical processes in environmental engineering; transport and fate of microbial
 particles in subsurface environments; dynamics of colloidal processes in aquatic systems; mem-
 brane separations in aquatic systems. Chair, Environmental Engineering Program.

   Roger L. Ely, Assistant Professor of Environmental and of Chemical Engineering. Ph.D. Oregon
 State. P.E.
 Biological processes in environmental engineering; molecular-level fundamentals and modeling
 of microbial systems; application of molecular biology and microbiology tools; bioremediation;
 biodegradation of xenobiotics, toxic effects and stress responses in microorganisms. Director of
 Undergraduate Studies in Environmental Engineering.

   Thomas E. Graedel, Professor, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and Professor of
 Chemical Engineering. Ph.D. University of Michigan
 Industrial ecology: material and energy flow networks, streamlined life-cycle assessment; corro-
 sion science; atmospheric science: chemical processes in aerosol particles and hydrometeors.
 Primary appointment is in Forestry and Environmental Studies.

  Lisa D. Pfefferle, Primary appointment is in Chemical Engineering.

   Joseph J. Pignatello, Professor Adjunct of Environmental and of Chemical Engineering. Ph.D
 University of California at Berkeley
 Organic pollutants in soils and sediments in underground and aquatic environments; transport;
 adsorption mechanisms and kinetics; bioavailability; methods for remediation of contaminated
 soils and water including advanced oxidation processes. Primary affiliation is with the Connecti-
 cut Agricultural Experiment Station in New Haven.

  Daniel E. Rosner, Primary appointment is in Chemical Engineering.

   James E. Saiers, Associate Professor, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and Pro-
 fessor of Chemical Engineering. Ph.D. University of Virginia.
 Hydrology: physical and chemical controls on contaminant migration within subsurface envi-
 ronments; colloid transport through geologic media; dynamics of groundwater and surface-water
 flow in wetlands. Primary appointment is in Forestry and Environmental Studies

   Sheryl L. Stuart, Lecturer and Senior Research Scientist in Environmental Engineering. Ph.D.
 Oregon State University
 Environmental engineering microbiology; biological processes in engineered and natural sys-
 tems; bioremediation of hazardous sites.

  James R. Wallis, Lecturer and Senior Research Scientist in Environmental Engineering.
 Ph.D. University of California at Berkeley
 Surface water hydrology; statistical modeling of environmental and water resources problems;
 Geographical Informations Systems (GIS).

  John Y. Walz, Primary appointment is in Chemical Engineering.



                                        www.eng.yale.edu
                                               29
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING www.eng.yale.edu/mechanical/undergraduate.html
Director of Undergraduate Studies: Prof. Mitchell Smooke

                              Mechanical Engineering is among the most diversified of the
                              traditional engineering disciplines. Mechanical engineers de-
                              sign and build machines and devices that enable humans to
                              accomplish their projects in space, in the air, on the ground,
                              and under water.
                                Mechanical Engineering majors acquire an understand-
                            ing of the fundamentals of mechanics and of the thermal en-
                            ergy sciences. They learn to perform interactive design tasks
                            using computers and to select the most appropriate materi-
                            als for building the specific applications. They become famil-
                            iar with the chemical and electrical sciences that are often
relevant to the design and realization of a mechanical system. Our mechanical engineer-
ing students also learn to keep the ecosystem in mind when designing solutions to tech-
nical problems.
     Mechanical engineers work with systems in thermal, wind, and hydroelectric power
plants; with internal and external combustion engines, aircraft, hovercraft, and satel-
lites; with heating, air-conditioning, and refrigeration; with hydraulic, magnetohydrody-
namical, and electromechanical equipment, including robots.
    Mechanical engineering students learn about the growing role of mechanical en-
gineers in the design of instrumentation for medical applications and biomaterials; they
also design prosthetic devices.
       Areas of Study in Mechanical Engineering:
        Solid Mechanics/Materials Science
        Fluid Mechanics/Energy Conversion
        Mechanical Design
  Students choose the level of technological intensity at which they will pursue their de-
gree. The level of technological intensity determines the number of credits which, in
turn, determines whether a student graduates with a B.S. degree or a B.A. degree in
Mechanical Engineering.

  B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, ABET*-accredited, is the most technically intensive
degree program. It is for students who intend to have a career as engineers in industry,
consulting firms, or government. This degree is also appropriate for students who plan to
be researchers or intend to pursue an advanced degree in engineering. This degree will
provide
         a comprehensive introduction to basic science and mathematics courses
       that provide the foundation of mechanical engineering,
         a thorough training in methods of analytical, experimental and data analy-
       sis, including problem formulation
         the fundamentals of the design process including project innovation, syn-
       thesis, and management both individually and in a team setting,
        both a technical and non technical program where oral and written com-
       munication skills are developed,
         and will instill in our students an understanding of their professional and
       ethical responsibilities that impact society and their profession.


   *ABET Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
                                           www.eng.yale.edu
                                                 30
                       The robot competition is about to begin


  B.S. in Engineering Sciences (Mechanical) is suitable for students who wish to
gain significant expertise in mechanical engineering and to combine it with related
disciplines. For example, while studying structural mechanics, a student might also
take courses in architecture or, when using computer graphics in computer-design,
a student might also take programming courses in computer science.

  B.A. in Engineering Sciences (Mechanical) is for students who plan to have ca-
reers where an understanding of the many-sided impact of science and technology
on a field or on society would provide a major advantage, e.g., business, law, medi-
cine, journalism, or public service. This degree is also recommended for students in-
terested in a double major, for example, Engineering Sciences/Economics, Engineer-
ing     Sciences/Architecture,    Engineering     Sciences/Art,  Engineering     Sci-
ences/International Studies.




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                                         31
                          Mechanical Engineering Curricula
    B.S. in Mechanical         B.S. in Engineering                                    B.A. in Engineering
    Engineering (ABET)       Sciences (Mechanical)                                   Sciences (Mechanical)
                    Prerequisites                                                        Prerequisites
MATH 112 Single Variable Calculus I                                            MATH 112 Single Variable Calc I
MATH 115 Single Variable Calculus II                                           MATH 115 Single Variable Calc II
MATH 120 Multivariable Calculus                                                PHYS 150 General Physics
PHYS 180 & 181 Adv. Gen Phys or PHYS 200 & 201 Fundamentals of Phys            PHYS 151 General Physics
PHYS 165L & 166L General Physics Lab or PHYS 205L & 206L Modern
Physics Measures or MENG 286L Solid Mechanics/Materials Science Lab
(for B.S. Mechanical Engineering Sciences majors only)
CHEM 113 Chem with Problem Solving or CHEM 114 Comprehensive Gen-
eral Chemistry or CHEM 118 Quantitative Foundations of General Chemistry

     Required Courses                                             Required Courses

          ABET: 13.5 credits                 B.S.: 11 term courses                      B.A.: 7 term courses
ENAS 130 Intro to Computing for.
Engineers & Scientists                 Solid Mechanics &           Fluid Mechanics &           Mechanical Design
ENAS 194 Ordinary & Partial Dif-       Materials Science           Energy Conversion                Track
ferential Equations                          Track                       Track                   Consult DUS
MENG 211 Thermodynamics                   Consult DUS                 Consult DUS
MATH 222 Linear Algebra              MENG 211, 280, 285,          MENG 211, 280, 361, 363,   MENG 185, 280, 361, 383,
EENG 226 and 227L                    289L, 361, 383, 389          383, 389                   489
MENG 280 Strength of Materials
                                     ENAS 194                     ENAS 194                   EENG 226 & 227L
MENG 285 Introduction to Materials
Science                              MATH 222                     MATH 222                   ENAS 194
MENG 286L Solid Mechanics & Ma-
terials Science Lab                  Choose 2.5 more credits      Choose 3.5 more credits    MATH 222
MENG 361 Fluid Mechanics             from:                        from:
MENG 363L Fluid Mechanics Lab                                     Advanced Fluids/Energy:    Choose 3 more credits
MENG 383 Dynamics                    Advanced Solids/Materials:   CENG 315,                  from:
MENG 389 Fluid & Thermal Energy      MENG 457, 480, 484, 485      ENAS 440, 441              MENG 285, 457, 400,
Science                                                           MENG 365, 463 466, 469     ENAS 130, 440
MENG 471 or MENG 472 Sr Project      Other Electives:
MENG 489 Mechanical Design:          MENG 185, 489                Other Electives:
                                     ENAS 130                     MENG 185, 489
Process & Implementation
                                                                  ENAS 130
                                     EENG 226, 227L
       ABET Electives
      Choose at least 3 credits                                   EENG 226, 227L
            Consult DUS
Fluids/Energy:                                          MENG 471 or MENG 472 Senior Project
CENG 315
ENAS 440, 441
MENG 365, 463, 469

Solids/Materials: MENG 457, 485,
486

Design: MENG 185, 400

General: ENAS 397, 496




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                                                        32
Mechanical Engineering Faculty Research at a glance
   Robert E. Apfel, Robert Higgin Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Visiting Professor of Ar-
 chitecture. Ph.D. Harvard
 The use of acoustic waves to probe the bulk and surface properties of liquids and biological ma-
 terials and to deform, manipulate, cavitate, and levitate such materials on earth and in space for
 applications ranging from materials characterization and combustion to particle separation;
 studies of the safety of diagnostic ultrasound and applications of therapeutic ultrasound to
 medicine.

   Beth Anne Bennett, Lecturer and Associate Research Scientist in Mechanical Engineering.
 Ph.D. Yale
 Development of time- and memory-efficient finite-difference solution-adaptive gridding tech-
 niques; applications to multidimensional laminar combustion phenomena and fluid dynamics.
   Ira B. Bernstein, Carl A. Morse Professor of Engineering and Professor of Physics. Ph.D. New
 York University
 Theoretical plasma physics, including problems of equilibrium, stability, transport, wave propa-
 gation; applications to controlled fusion, astrophysics, solar physics, and high power.
   Jerzy Blawzdziewicz. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Ph.D. University of War-
 saw, Poland
 Theory and numerical simulations for microstructural evolution and macroscopic transport
 phenomena in complex fluids such as colloidal suspensions, emulsions, foams, and polymeric
 solutions
   Boa-Teh Chu, Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Ph.D. Johns Hopkins
 Theory of radiation-induced cavitation phenomena; turbulent mixing theory; relaxation proc-
 esses in compressible flow; thermoacoustics; nonlinear acoustics; active noise control; control of
 combustion instability.
  Jacek Cholewicki, Primary appointment is in Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation. See Biomedical
 Engineering.
   Juan Fernández de la Mora, Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Ph.D. Yale
 Fluid dynamics; electrified liquid interfaces; properties, analysis and production of ultrafine
 aerosols; electrosprays; ion formation from charged liquid surfaces; electrical propulsion.
   Natalie Jeremijenko, Lecturer Convertible of Mechanical Engineering. B.S. Griffith University,
 Queensland, Australia, BFA Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Australia
 Engineering Design with emphasis on information and product design in a networked society,
 toy design, ecoinformatics, sensors and digital media.
   Alessandro Gomez, Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Ph.D. Princeton
 Combustion with emphasis on spray flames and micro-combustion; electrostatic atomization
 with applications (drug inhalation, production of pharmaceutical powders, material synthesis).
 Director of Graduate Studies for Engineering and Applied Science.
  Robert B. Gordon, Professor of Geophysics and of Applied Mechanics and of Mechanical Engi-
 neering. D.Eng Yale
 Rock mechanics; archaeometallurgy; industrial ecology. Primary appointment is in Geology and
 Geophysics.
   Amable Liñán, Professor Adjunct of Mechanical Engineering. Ph.D. Polytechnic University, Ma-
 drid, Spain
 Fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer, combustion theory; laminar and turbulent diffusion
 controlled combustion, premixed flame propagation in non-uniform mixtures, anchoring and lift-
 off of diffusion flames, analysis of NOx and CO emissions based on reduced kinetic schemes.
 Primary appointment is at the Polytechnic University, Madrid, Spain.
  Marshall B. Long, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and of Applied Physics. Ph.D. Yale
 Laser diagnostics of flames for temperature, species, and velocity distributions. Chair, Depart-
 ment of Mechanical Engineering.
   Corey S. O'Hern, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Ph.D. University of Pennsyl-
 vania
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                                               33
Statistical mechanics of nonequilibrium systems such as glasses and granular materials; Elas-
ticity theories for soft materials, e.g. liquid crystals and biological materials.
  Manohar M. Panjabi, Professor of Orthopaedics and of Mechanical Engineering. Ph.D. Chalmers
University of Technology, Sweden
Biomechanics of Spine: whiplash of cervical spine, burst fractures of lumbar spine, spinal fixa-
tion devices, and vertebroplasty. Experiments on injury mechanisms, and studies of resulting
injuries, diagnostic tests and treatment modalities. Director, Biomechanics Laboratory. Director,
Biomechanics Research Laboratory.
 Lisa D. Pfefferle, Primary appointment is in Chemical Engineering.
  Kailasnath Purushothaman, Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering and Associate Research Sci-
entist, Medical School. Ph.D. Yale.
Transport phenomena: turbulence, blood flow in cerebral arteries, perfusion patterns and capil-
lary transport properties in the myocardium, statistical theories for the pathogenesis of cerebral
aneurysms. Primary appointment is in Diagnostic Radiology, School of Medicine.
 Daniel E. Rosner, Primary appointment is in Chemical Engineering.
  Udo D. Schwarz, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Ph.D. University of Basel, Swit-
zerland
Atomic-scale investigations of surfaces, surface interactions and surface properties (nanome-
chanics); nanotribology (atomic mechanisms of friction); nanoelasticity.

  Ronald B. Smith, Professor of Geophysics and of Mechanical Engineering, Professor of Forestry
and Environmental Studies. Ph.D. Johns Hopkins
Theory and observations of atmospheric winds, turbulence, weather and climate. Storm struc-
ture from research aircraft. Satellite analysis of landscape changes. Isotopes of water. Primary
appointment is in Geology and Geophysics.
  Mitchell D. Smooke, Strathcona Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Professor of Mathemat-
ics, Professor of Applied Physics. Ph.D. Harvard
Numerical simulation of combustion dynamics; chemical vapor deposition; scattering theory;
applied mathematics. Director of Undergraduate Studies in Mechanical Engineering.
  Katepalli R. Sreenivasan, Harold W. Cheel Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Professor
of Physics and of Applied Physics. Ph.D. Indian Institute of Science
Fluid dynamics, turbulence.
  Wei Tong, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Ph.D. Brown University
Experimental micromechanics of materials and small-scale structures, characterization and reli-
ability of microelectronic packaging, deformation and fracture of thin sheet metals and thin film
coatings.
  George Veronis, Henry Barnard Davis Professor of Geophysics and Applied Science and Profes-
sor of Mechanical Engineering. Ph.D. Brown
Geophysical fluid dynamics, ocean circulation, double diffusion, inverse methods and thermal
convection. Primary appointment is in Geology and Geophysics.
  Glenn Weston-Murphy, Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering. B.S. Purdue, MBA University of
New Haven
Design theory and practice, societal implications and evaluation of design, universal design of
products, services and infrastructure.
  Forman A. Williams, Professor Adjunct of Mechanical Engineering. Ph.D. California Institute of
Technology
Flame theory, combustion in turbulent flows, mathematical methods in combustion, fire re-
search. Primary appointment is at the University of California at San Diego.
  David T. Wu, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Ph.D. Harvard
Materials theory: kinetics of phase transformations, including grain growth in metals; coarsen-
ing in soap froths; nucleation in alkanes and in computer simulations; diffusion and crystal
growth in semiconductors; glass transition.
 Bjong Wolf Yeigh, Assistant Professor Adjunct of Mechanical Engineering. Ph.D. Princeton.


                                       www.eng.yale.edu
                                              34
Stochastic mechanics with emphasis on stability and reliability. Computational methods in tribology (fric-
tion, lubrication and wear). Primary appointment is as Assistant Provost for Science and Technology.




                                           www.eng.yale.edu
                                                  35
Applied Mathematics, AMTH
Director of Undergraduate Studies: Prof. Joseph T. Chang

The Applied Mathematics major is appropriate for students who are drawn to the theo-
retical aspects of a natural or social science and for those who are interested in the ap-
plications of mathematical processes.

  In this major, mathematical models are used to study problems in fields as diverse as
theoretical physics, systems engineering, and business management. Applied Mathemat-
ics majors may take courses in Chemistry, Computer Science, Economics, Engineering,
Geology and Geophysics, Mathematics, Management Sciences, Operations Research,
Physics, or Statistics.

 Students can graduate with a B.S. degree or a B.A. degree in Applied Mathematics.

 Students should consult with the DUS when developing their major.

   Prerequisites for both the B.S. and the B.A. degree:
        Computer programming: CPSC 112a or b, or ENAS 130b/CPSC 130b
        Calculus through MATH 120 and 222b, or 225a or b, or 230

   Requirements:
      B.S. degree program: 14 term courses
        AMTH 251a, 252b, 244a
        STAT 241a, 242b, 230b or 361b or 251b
        AMTH 260b;
        choose one: ENAS 340a, 341b, or CPSC 440
        choose one: MATH or STAT (level 300 or higher) or EENG 436a or CPSC 365b
        Senior Project: AMTH 490b

       B.A. degree program: 11 term courses
         AMTH 251a, 252b, 244a
         STAT 241a, 242b, 230b or 361b or 251b
         Senior Project: AMTH 490b

   Distribution of courses:
    At least four courses in a field of concentration:
         at least three courses should concern the application of mathematics to that
        field
          at least two courses should be advanced courses.

Students can graduate with a double major by combining Applied Mathematics either
with Engineering Science or with Applied Physics.




                                     www.eng.yale.edu
                                           36
Computer Science, CPSC
Director of Undergraduate Studies: Prof. James Aspnes

Computer science is one of the most dynamic and progressive intellectual enterprises of
our age; and knowledge of computers is becoming essential for most areas of scholarly
work.
The Department of Computer Science is closely allied with the Faculty of Engineering
and faculty members and students interact in many ways. There is a joint major in Elec-
trical Engineering and Computer Science, and several Computer Science courses are
cross-listed with Electrical Engineering. For details on Computer Science programs, visit
www.cs.yale.edu/

  Students interested in computing have three choices:
     A major in Computer Science (B.S. or B.A.)
    An interdepartmental major involving Computer Science and either Electrical
   Engineering or Mathematics or Psychology
     An Engineering program with a track emphasizing computing

    When exploring these options, students should discuss their interests with the DUS
in Computer Science and with a DUS of one of the Engineering departments. The DUS's
will develop an academic program for each student taking his or her interests into ac-
count.

   Students can study robotics, computer vision, or computer engineering either by ma-
joring in Computer Science or in Electrical Engineering or choosing the interdepartmen-
tal EENG/CPSC (next page). The main difference is in the science and mathematics pre-
requisites:
     Engineering majors take calculus, linear algebra, differential equations, and phys-
   ics or chemistry.
     Computer Science majors have no mathematics or science prerequisites (individual
   courses may have such prerequisites).




                                     www.eng.yale.edu
                                           37
Morning at Silliman residential college




         www.eng.yale.edu
                38
Electrical Engineering/Computer Science, EENG/CPSC
Directors of Undergraduate Studies:      Prof. Peter J. Kindlmann (EENG)
                                         Prof. James Aspnes (CPSC)

The interdepartmental Electrical Engineering/Computer Science major is designed for
students who want to integrate work in these two fields. EENG/CPSC covers discrete and
continuous mathematics, algorithm analysis and design, digital and analog circuits, sig-
nals and systems, systems programming, and computer engineering; and provides co-
herence in its core program and flexibility in the choice of technical electives.

   Prerequisites:
     CPSC 112a or b
     MATH 112a or b, 115a or b, and 120a or b
     PHYS 180a, 181b or 200a, 201b (150a, 151b for students who must take MATH
      112)

   Requirements: 15 term courses.
    CPSC 201a or b, 202a, 223b, 323a, and 365b
    EENG 226a, 227La, 228b, 229Lb, and 348a (227La and 227Lb are half-credit
      courses)
    MATH 222a or b or 225a or b or 230b
    Senior Project: Either CPSC 490a or b or EENG 471a or 472b, depending on the
      faculty adviser’s department. The project must be approved by both DUS’s.

   Electives:
   Four 300- or 400-level courses: 2 in Electrical Engineering and 2 in Computer Sci-
   ence, all of which must be approved by the DUS in each department. Cross-listed
   courses count for either department.
   Advanced courses in other departments can count as electives, if approved by both
   DUS’s.
   The following courses may not be used as electives: CPSC 480a or b, 490a or b,
   EENG 471a or 472b.

   The entire program of an Electrical Engineering/Computer Science major must be
   approved by the DUS's in both departments.

   A typical program in Electrical Engineering/Computer Science for students who have
   taken the equivalent of one year of calculus in high school (equal to MATH 112a or b
   and MATH 115a or b) and who have some programming experience (equal to CPSC
   112a or b) would be:

     Freshman            Sophomore             Junior           Senior
     MATH 120a           EENG 226a             EENG 348a        Two Electives
     PHYS 180a           EENG 227La            CPSC 202a
                         CPSC 201a             CPSC 323a

     MATH 222b           EENG 228b             CPSC 365b        One Elective
     PHYS 181b           EENG 229Lb            One Elective     Senior Project
                         CPSC 223b




                                      www.eng.yale.edu
                                            39
Research and Teaching Facilities
Engineering instruction and research takes place in Becton Center, Dunham Laboratory,
Mason Laboratory, laboratories at the Medical School, Watson (jointly with Computer
Science), and Leet Oliver Memorial Hall (jointly with the Department of Mathematics).
  Undergraduates sometimes work on their research projects in faculty laboratories and
even participate in faculty research along with graduate students and postdoctoral re-
searchers.
  Undergraduates do research in chemical engineering labs, solid-state device fabrica-
tion labs, a state-of-the-art cleanroom, analog and digital electronic design labs, printed
circuit fabrication facilities, an intelligent sensors lab, fluid mechanics and acoustics
labs, and a materials science lab.
  Electrical Engineering has five undergraduate teaching labs, two of which are equipped
with 14 computer-controlled bench stations with an array of Hewlett Packard test equip-
ment. A resident Senior Engineer with more than 25 years of industrial design ex-
perience assists students with course-related experiments and special design projects.
The laboratories are located in the Morse Teaching Center (MTC) in Becton Center.
  A Design Studio, www.eng.yale.edu/medesignstudio/, has the latest development
technology, including rapid prototyping capability (students can "print" out their com-
puter-generated designs as 3-D objects). Recent additions and upgrades include a desk-
top CNC machining center and laser engraver. A Design Engineer with 20 years of di-
verse industry experience teaches design and assists students and faculty with their ex-
periments, designs, and project fabrication.
 Student projects are supported by a Prototype Fabrication Lab and a Mason Student
Machine Shop, managed and staffed by an experienced Resident Journeyman Toolmaker.
  A Media Lab is available to the Engineering community for processing analog and digi-
tal video for video presentations and for streaming audio or video over the Internet.
  Engineering students have access to specialized computer workstation clusters using
Linux and Windows NT2000. They also have an extensive choice of software tools, in-
cluding Mathematica, SolidEdge, Matlab, LabView, Fluent, and others.
  Undergraduates access computing facilities from their dormitory rooms through
Ethernet connections. PC's and Macintoshes are available at public computing areas in
the residential colleges and in computing clusters around campus. The main system for
campus e-mail is Pantheon, a cluster of Sun Unix systems, serving more than 15,000
users. A campus wireless network connects portions of the Engineering buildings and
several residential colleges.
  The Engineering and Applied Science Library in Becton Center offers an extensive re-
search-level collection of books and journals (Yale's 22 libraries hold one of the largest
library collections in the world) and provides access to numerous online databases and
full text resources. The Engineering library is also a convenient (and quiet) place to
study.
Research and Teaching Support Staff
Nicholas Bernardo, Director of the Mason Student Machine Shop, is a Journeyman Toolmaker with
  20 years of diverse industry and academic machining and fabrication experience. Mr. Bernardo's
  expertise includes prototyping and CNC machining.
Edward Jackson, Resident Senior Electronics Engineer and Administrator of the Morse Teaching
 Center, has more than 25 years of industrial experience. As Group Leader and Senior Project
 Engineer in industry, he had been responsible for software, hardware, and mechanical design in
 medical electronics products and in a wide range of factory automation. Mr. Jackson holds pat-
 ents for thermometers, infusion pumps, and other medical instruments.
Glenn Weston-Murphy, Director of the Mechanical Design Studio and Lecturer, has more than 20
  years of industry experience, including project engineering and troubleshooting at aerospace and
                                         www.eng.yale.edu
                                               40
industrial-product companies in the U.S. and abroad. Mr. Weston-Murphy has developed elec-
tromechanical, pneumatic, and hydraulic equipment for material handling, processing, and ma-
chining.




                                     www.eng.yale.edu
                                           41
Special Projects and the Senior Project, 471a or 472b

Engineering research and design projects are called Special Projects. Some students
work on their Special Project for a term, others for three or four terms.
  A DUS assists each student in identifying a Faculty Adviser. The Faculty Adviser, who
can be from any engineering or science department, helps the student define a suitable
research project, assists with securing research support, p. 42, and supervises the re-
search and the development of the project. The Special Project frequently develops into
the Senior Project, a requirement for graduation.
  The Senior Project in Engineering calls for designing an engineering solution to a real
problem and for implementing the design. Final Senior Projects presentations are open
to the public. Scientists and engineers from high-tech companies who come to presen-
tations ask "real life" questions and critique the proposed solutions and designs from
their marketplace experience. Senior Projects have resulted in marketable products.

2001-02 Special Projects and Senior Projects

  "Racial Differences in the Effects of Sex Hormones on Body Fluid Regulation." Adviser:
 Prof. Nina Stachenfeld.
  "Protein and mRNA Chip and other Protein/mRNA Separation Technologies." Adviser:
 Prof. Douglas Rothman.
  "Study of Breathing Induced Signal Changes in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging."
 Adviser: Prof. Adam Anderson.
  "Redesign the Folding Wheelchair & Stress Analysis of New Design." Adviser: Mr. Glenn
 Weston-Murphy.
   "Vascular Flow Mechanics." Adviser: Prof. Kailasnath Purushothaman.
  "Patch Clamp Technology Research." Advisers: Prof. Frederick Sigworth and Dr. James
 Klemic.
  "Characterization of pH Sensitivity of ASIC1 from Fish." Adviser: Prof. Cecilia Canessa and
 Prof. Frederick Sigworth.




                                         Competition

   "A Study of BME Programs in the U.S." Adviser: Prof. James Duncan.
  "Modulation of Platelet Membrane Adhesion Molecules Under Shear Stress." Adviser: Prof.
 Brian Smith.
  "Surface Modification of Polydimethylsiloxane PDMS for Planar Patch Clamp Recording."
 Advisers: Dr. James Klemic and Prof. Frederick Sigworth.

                                      www.eng.yale.edu
                                            42
 "Lower Back Analysis using New Backpack Attachment Prototype." Adviser: Prof. Jacek
Cholewicki.
 "Effects of Lumbar Orthoses on Trunk Muscle Response to Sudden Loading." Adviser: Prof.
Jacek Cholewicki.
 "Effects of Abdomen Plates in Conjunction with Backpacks." Adviser: Prof. Jacek Chole-
wicki.
 "Assessing Inter-vertebral Motion in the Lumbar Spine through Mathematical Compari-
son of Flexion and Extension X-rays." Adviser: Prof. Manohar Panjabi.
 "An Implantable Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor for Epilepsy." Adviser: Prof. Mark Reed.
 "Microfabrication of an Implantable Cortical Epilepsy Sensor." Adviser: Prof. Mark Reed.




                                            YES!

 "Molecular Beacons." Adviser: Dr. Paul Lizardi.
  "Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence: A comparison of Self-report and Electronic Monitor-
ing Methods." Adviser: Prof. John Gore.
 "Implementing an Embedded System with an EBX Form Factor PC System and PIC Mi-
crocontrollers." Adviser: Prof. Roman Kuc.
 "Local Sensing using Sonar Object Identification and Infrared Drop-off Detection on an
Autonomously Mobile Chassis." Adviser: Prof. Roman Kuc.
 "Designing a Dead Reckoning Positioning System." Adviser: Prof. Roman Kuc.
 "Intelligent Bumper Design for Collision Mitigation." Adviser: Prof. Roman Kuc.
 "Environmental Challenges in Specific Infrared Communication." Adviser: Prof. Roman
Kuc.
 "Interactive Display using Wireless Communication." Adviser: Prof. Roman Kuc.
 "Optoelectronic Properties of Radiation Hard, Gravimetric Efficient InP-Based Solar
Cells." Adviser: Prof. Jerry Woodall.
 "Studies of Minority Carrier Recombination Mechanisms in Be Doped GaAs for Optimal
High Speed LED Performance." Adviser: Prof. Jerry Woodall.
 "Using GaP Avalanche Photodiodes for Photon Detection." Adviser: Prof. Jerry Woodall.
 "Noise Characterization of the A/D Converter on a PIC Microcontroller." Adviser: Prof.
Robert Grober.

                                      www.eng.yale.edu
                                            43
  "Neural Networks for Function Approximation, Pattern Recognition, and Control." Ad-
viser: Prof. Kumpati Narendra.
 "Dynamic Optimizations and Their Impact across Compilers." Adviser: Prof. Daniel
Friendly.
 "Isolating and Eliminating True Data Dependencies through Dependent Instruction Pair
Analysis." Adviser: Prof. Daniel Friendly.

 "Building Bayesian Networks with Analog Subthreshold CMOS Circuits." Sam Luckenbill.
Adviser: Dr. Richard Lethin.

 "Nanotechnology: Understanding, Measuring, and Designing Molecular Scale Electronic
Devices." Adviser: Prof. Mark Reed.

 "Planar Molecular Chip Design: Nanoparticles." Adviser: Prof. Mark Reed.

 "Cryogenic Amplifiers For Photon Detection." Adviser: Prof. Daniel Prober

 "Optimal Pulse Filtering with Noise Removal." Adviser: Prof. Daniel Prober.

 "Macro-scale Self-Assembly using PDMS." Adviser: Prof. Mark Reed.

  "A Simple Model for Lead Resistance Effects in a Tunnel Junction Thermometer." Ad-
viser: Prof. Robert Schoelkopf.

 "Wall Street and the Langevin Equation." Adviser: Prof. Robert Grober.

  "Process Design for Polyether Synthesis." Advisers: Dr. Sandeep Verma, Mr. Peter Mon-
tagna.

 "Comanche Damper Model." Adviser: Mr. William Welsh (Sikorsky).

  "The John Lee: Design and Analysis of an Aerodynamic Solar Car Body." Adviser: Prof.
Mitchell Smooke.

   "Moment Application to Determine Cervical Spine Flexibility Before and After Whip-
lash." Adviser: Prof. Manohar Panjabi.

 "Open Source Robotics." Advisers: Prof. Roman Kuc, Ms. Natalie Jeremijenko.

  "Design of the John Lee: Solar Vehicle Optimization Through Finite Element Analysis."
Adviser: Prof. Mitchell Smooke.

 "Attendant Assist Device for Wheelchairs." Adviser: Mr. Glenn Weston-Murphy.

 "Experimental Investigation of Forming Limits." Adviser: Wei Tong.

 "Re-examining CAD Issues in Architectural Design." Ms. Natalie Jeremijenko.

  "The Household Power Meter and Effective Information Display." Adviser: Ms. Natalie
Jeremijenko.

  "Chair Design and Manufacturing." Adviser: Ms. Natalie Jeremijenko.
  "Solar-powered Hydrogen Generator/Water Treatment System for Developing Countries."

  "Cycling of Copper in Industry and Commerce."

  "Watershed Management in Upstate New York."

  "Characterization of Macroinvertebrates in a River as Impacted by Adjacent Land Uses."

  "Sustainable Agricultural Practices and Non-point Source Pollution."
                                     www.eng.yale.edu
                                           44
Select Program in Engineering     www.eng.yale.edu/select/
Director: Prof. Daniel Prober
Coordinator: Mrs. Jane Boone, Dunham Laboratory, Room 224

Students who dream of someday creating or managing technological innovation in busi-
ness or industry should consider the Select Program in Engineering. This program sup-
plements the regular requirements of the Bachelor degree, offers a special Master’s de-
gree, and provides industrial research experience, all of which positions graduates for
advanced entry placement in the corporate world.

 The Select Program in Engineering is open to Juniors and Seniors who major in Bio-
medical, Chemical, Electrical, Environmental, and Mechanical Engineering as well as in
Applied Physics, Computer Science, and Electrical Engineering/Computer Science.

 During the four years of the undergraduate program, the student fulfills the require-
ments for the B.S. major and also for the Select program. In the fifth year, which is the
Masters part of the Select program, the student takes courses in engineering, science,
and management.

 Students may pursue the undergraduate part of the Select program without continuing
with the Masters program. The Master's part of the program is restricted to students
who have completed the undergraduate part of the Select program.

  The DUS and the Director of the Select program will help you think through whether
the Select Program in Engineering is for you.

Requirements

Grade Point:
To be admitted to the B.S. or the Master's part of the program, the student must have
earned an overall B+ average in Group IV courses plus any courses required for the Se-
lect program.

Courses:
    -ENAS 335b/EP&E 204b, Professional Ethics (Group II)
    -ACCT 170a, Financial Accounting (Monday and Wednesday)
    -ENVE/CENG 120a, Introduction to Environmental Engineering. Computer Science
      majors may substitute CPSC 180a, Computers and the Law
    -ECON 115a or b, Introductory Economics

Design Experience:
Students in the ABET-accredited Chemical, Electrical, or Mechanical Engineering pro-
grams meet the Design Experience requirement as part of the accredited program (con-
sult the respective DUS). Students in the Engineering Sciences (non ABET-accredited)
programs must take two courses in one of the following:
      -Biomedical Engineering: BENG 471a or 472b and BENG 355
      -Chemical Engineering: CENG 480a and 416b
      -Electrical Engineering: choose 2 courses from among EENG 471 or 472, EENG
      350b,
        and EENG 426a
      -Environmental Engineering: CENG 480 and 416b
      -Mechanical Engineering: MENG 185b and 489a
      -Applied Physics: AP 471a and 472b, projects must have a significant design con-
      tent
      -Computer Science: CPSC 421a and 422b, advanced programming courses

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                                           45
Internship:
Select students must have two summers of research experience in industry. Most stu-
dents take their industry research internship after their Junior and Senior years, but
they may also meet this requirement earlier. Select program students receive assistance
with securing appropriate internships.

Deadlines:

 Juniors:
 -Friday, September 20: A completed Select Program application form and a copy of an
   up-to-date transcript are due at the Select program office, Dunham Laboratory,
   Room 224. Students will be notified in early October whether they were admitted to
   the undergraduate part of the program.

Seniors:
 -Friday, September 20: Students must submit to the Select program office 1) a written
   confirmation that they wish to participate in the Select program and 2) a copy of an
   up-to-date transcript. Upon submission of the above, students will receive an appli-
   cation form for the Master’s part of the program.

 -Friday, November 8: A completed graduate application with letters of recommendation
   is due at the Graduate School, and a complete copy of the application is due at the
   Select Program office. Seniors will be notified in early December whether they have
   been admitted to the Master’s part of the program. Note: Select program participants
   do not need to take the Graduate Record Exam, GRE.

Juniors and Seniors:
 -Friday, November 15: Résumés (in hardcopy and in electronic format) are due in the
   Select program office. The résumés will be feature in the Résumé Book that Select
   Partners in Industry consult when choosing candidates for summer internships.




                                    Mrs. Jane Boone

Direct your questions to Mrs. Jane Boone, Coordinator for Educational Affairs and for
the Select Program in Engineering, 432-4224, <jane.boone@yale.edu>




                                    www.eng.yale.edu
                                          46
*Distributional Requirements: The Literate Engineer
Professionals, whatever their field, must know much more than their area of specializa-
 tion. For this reason, Yale requires its undergraduates to take at least twelve courses
                           outside their area of major interest,
                  www.yale.edu/ycpo/ycps/chapters/chapter1a.html#2

Writing and Speaking in more than English
 All engineers must write reports, so it is to their advantage to write well. Students
 should choose courses that are identified as "Writing Intensive." The benefits will last a
 lifetime.

   Being able to speak effectively before a group is a big plus in any profession. En-
 gineering students make oral presentations of their research and design projects, but
 they should also look for extra-curricular activities that offer opportunities to make
 oral presentations.

   In the global marketplace, knowing several languages is a definite advantage.
 When students come to Yale, they must choose whether to become more proficient in
 the foreign language they have already studied or to start learning a new language. Ei-
 ther choice has advantages and disadvantages, and either choice will require about
 four semester courses.

Humanities
  Engineering decisions require consideration of many non-technical factors.

   In an increasingly complex and often litigious society, engineers must have a grasp of
 ethical issues. Engineering majors should take some courses that address ethical
 considerations, such as "Professional Ethics" (ENAS 335/EP&E 204), "Introduction to
 Ethics" (PHIL 120), or "Classics of Ethics, Politics and Economics" (EP&E 341). In ac-
 credited programs, students may meet this requirement in their engineering courses
 through discussion about ethical issues that come up in pursuing the engineering pro-
 fession.

   Preparing for a successful career in engineering should include courses such as "In-
 troduction to Environmental History" (HIST 120/EVST 120b), "International History of
 the United States in the 20th Century" (HIST 137), or "Introduction to Architecture"
 (ARCH 150).

Social Sciences
   Economics is at the heart of many high-tech management decisions. Engineering
 majors should consider taking "Microeconomics" (ECON 115), "Macroeconomics"
 (ECON 116), "Theory of Resource Allocation and its Applications" (ECON 150), or Fi-
 nancial Accounting" (ACCT 170).

   Psychology is a factor in workplace management and must also be kept in mind
 when developing policy. Engineering students should consider taking courses such as
 "History of Psychology" (PSYC 124), "Social Psychology" (PSYC 150), and higher-level
 courses in psychology.

   Sociology studies group interactions. Courses such as "Organization and Society"
 (SOCY 156), "Introduction to Social Policy Analysis" (SOCY 147), or "Economic Sociol-
 ogy" (SOCY 219) are a good start.

  Engineering graduates will practice their profession in a global context and should
 have some knowledge of political science. "Introduction to International Relations"
                                      www.eng.yale.edu
                                            47
(PLSC 111) or "Introduction to Comparative Politics" (PLSC 116) would be courses to
consider.




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                                       48
  Knowledge of the statistical significance of results is essential for interpreting
 quantitative studies. Every student in Engineering should pay special attention to data
 analysis in experimental lab courses and consider taking "Introduction to Statistics:
 Data Analysis" (STAT 106) or "Introduction to Data Analysis" (STAT 230).

  Another valuable course is "Creativity and New Product Design" (ENAS 323a), a
 Group III course on the many steps involved in creating and introducing a new
 product.

Reap the Full Benefits
 Look upon your undergraduate years as way more than a preparation for some specific
 career. Benefit to the fullest from the truly rich array of courses offered at Yale and ex-
 plore the amazing variety of creativity that surrounds you at this great university.

   Take some courses just because they sound interesting, even if they seem irrele-
 vant to the career you have in mind. A course that sounds interesting may open unex-
 pected paths for you or will connect you with people whom you would not have met
 otherwise and who will greatly enrich your life.




                Classmate? Roommate? Or an Engineering/Music double major?




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                                            49
Freshman Research

Some Freshmen are eager to do research right away, but most postpone doing research
until after they have adjusted to Yale.
  From time to time, some exceptionally motivated students with the right kind of prepa-
ration are able to undertake independent research projects during their first year. Ask
Prof. Peter Kindlmann, EE DUS, about Special Projects (EENG 235a or EENG 236b).
  First-year students with a strong background in science and mathematics may com-
pete for a slot in Science 198, "Perspectives on Science." This class meets once a week
during both the fall and spring terms, and students receive assistance with identifying a
faculty member who will accept them in their laboratory to do research the summer fol-
lowing the course. In 2002, students received a stipend of $3,200 for 10 weeks of sum-
mer research. The director of "Perspectives on Science" for 2002-03 is Prof. Charles Bal-
tay, professor of astronomy and physics.
 Students who wish to do an independent research project should discuss their idea
with a DUS.




          Engineering students join humanies majors for classes in Connecticut Hall, left,
         built between 1750 and 1753. Connecticut Hall was featured on a commemorative
          postcard issued by the U.S. Post Office in honor of Yale's 300th birthday in 2001

Summer Research Opportunities
After Freshman year, students may start a research project during the academic year
and continue working on it during the summer, or they may start their project in the
summer and finish it during the following academic year.
  In every case, students start by developing a research idea into a proposal and dis-
cussing the proposal with a DUS; DUS's know which faculty member will be interested
in the proposed research. It is then up to the student to persuade the particular faculty
member to accept him or her into the faculty member’s research group. Hint: Faculty
members tend to prefer students who, in addition to a desire to do research, know some
computer programming, are somewhat familiar with electronics, or have some experi-
ence with machine tools.


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                                               50
Some research groups provide a stipend, but others do not. Therefore, students should
ask about remuneration. If the lab does not provide a stipend, other research support
may be available. Ask the DUS.




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                                        51
Support for Undergraduate Research Projects
When an undergraduate's research project is carried out as part of a professor's research
program, research support will come from the Principal Investigator's (PI) grant or con-
tract. If a student works on an independent research project, he or she must find their
own support. Below are some possibilities:
   • Student research projects receive support from gifts made by alumni to their former
     departments. Contact the Chair of your department.
   • The Yale Science and Engineering Association, YSEA, supports undergraduate re-
     search projects with grants up to $1,000. Applications may be submitted through-
     out the year to Mr. Michael L. Rosenberg '72, MD, Chair of the YSEA Grants Com-
     mittee, <mrosenberg@solarishs.org> The application should include 1) a 2-4 page
     summary of the proposal, 2) a budget, and 3) a letter from the Faculty Adviser that
     he or she has approved the project and the budget.




                Charles Yawson '05, an Electrical Engineering major, is developing
               an autonomous robot with infrared sensors and a microcontroller brain

   • Other support sources at Yale, www.yale.edu/yser
   • Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society, provides 600 to $1,000 grants for stu-
     dent research. Application deadlines are March 15 and October 15. Get the Sigma
     Xi Grants-in-Aid application forms online at www.sigmaxi.org/giar/giar-form.htm
   • Depending on the project, grants may be available from industry. Ask your Faculty
     Adviser for suggestions about contacts to explore.

Summer Employment
A summer research job adds valuable experience to an engineering education. Students
should apply to more than one company and should discuss their choice with a DUS be-
fore accepting a job offer. February or March is a good time to start exploring the possi-
bilities for a summer research job in industry.
 When looking for summer employment, students should
   • Tell Mrs. Jane Boone, Coordinator for Educational Affairs, <jane.boone@yale.edu>,
     that you are looking for a summer job in industry. The Select Program in Engineer-
     ing is involved with securing summer research internships for students who are
     enrolled in the Select program, and Mrs. Boone may know of companies that are
     looking for someone with your background.
   • Look in your department’s file of summer internship announcements.
   • Check departmental bulletin boards for notices of summer jobs.
   • Talk to students who have held summer jobs in industry and ask them for con-
     tacts.
   • Watch the weekly Engineering Bulletin for announcements of summer internships.
                                       www.eng.yale.edu
                                             52
Organizations for Engineering Students

 • AIChE: The American Institute of Chemical Engineers is the professional society of
 chemical engineers. The Yale chapter, run by students, sponsors meetings and activi-
 ties focused on technical interests of its members and on professional opportunities for
 beginning engineers. Student members may participate in activities sponsored by the
 New Haven professional chapter. Membership is open to all undergraduates enrolled in
 an engineering program. The Chair for 2002-03 is You Jung Byon '03 <you-
 jung.byon@yale.edu> The Faculty Adviser is Prof. Michael Loewenberg, Chemical En-
 gineering.

 • ASME: The American Society of Mechanical Engineers has a membership of over
 100,000. ASME sets codes and standards for the mechanical engineering profession
 and is one of the largest technical publishing operations in the world. The Yale student
 chapter of ASME is educational and social in purpose. The Faculty Adviser is Mr.
 Glenn Weston-Murphy, Mechanical Engineering.

 • BMES: Organized in the spring of 2002, the Yale Chapter of the Biomedical Engineer-
 ing Society will use the fall semester to define its mission and is intent on attracting
 many members. The President is Peter Kops '03 <peter.kops@yale.edu> The Faculty
 Adviser is Prof. James Duncan, Diagnostic Radiology and Electrical Engineering.

 • IEEE: The Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers is the largest pro-
 fessional organization of its kind, with over 300,000 members worldwide. The IEEE
 Yale Student Branch involves students and faculty members and maintains a student
 lounge with project components, Sun workstations, and a reference library. Activities
 include bi-weekly meetings, guest speakers, participation in design projects, maintain-
 ing the only student-run Internet node on campus, and social gatherings. The Yale
 IEEE Student Branch received the Exemplary Student Branch Award for 1994-95 from
 the parent IEEE. Members receive IEEE publications at reduced rates. The Chair for
 2002-03 is Jennifer Michelstein '03 <jennifer.michelstein@yale.edu> The Faculty Ad-
 viser is Prof. Peter Kindlmann, Electrical Engineering.

 • NSBE-Yale: National Society of Black Engineers seeks to increase the number of cul-
 turally responsible black engineers who excel academically, succeed professionally,
 and have a positive impact on the community. Founded in 1975, NSBE has 15,000
 members in more than 300 chapters on U.S. and foreign college campuses and 80
 alumni chapters. The Yale chapter, founded in 1992, coordinates events on campus
 and attends NSBE-sponsored conferences that offer workshops focusing on academic
 excellence, professional development, and networking opportunities with NSBE mem-
 bers from other colleges and representatives from major corporations. NSBE-Yale wel-
 comes students regardless of discipline or ethnicity, because all students can benefit
 from NSBE's resources. For more information, visit www.yale.edu/nsbe The 2002-03
 Chair is Tiffanee Green '03 <tiffanee.green@yale.edu> The Faculty Adviser is Dr.
 Kailasnath Purushothaman, Mechanical Engineering.

 • TAU BETA PI: Tau Beta Pi, the national engineering honor society, admits Juniors in
 the top 1/8 of their class and Seniors in the top 1/5 of their class who are majoring in
 Applied Physics, Computer Science, Chemical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and
 Mechanical Engineering. The Tau Beta Pi Society provides merit-based fellowships for
 graduate study and scholarships for undergraduate study.
   Connecticut Alpha, established at Yale in 1923, was the first Tau Beta Pi chapter in
 Connecticut. Connecticut Alpha members and nominees organize guest lectures at Yale
 and tutoring programs for high school students. Connecticut Alpha teams compete in
 regional Tau Beta Pi design competitions. Some years, Connecticut Alpha compiles a
 student course critique (the critique is not submitted to the faculty for editing) that
                                    www.eng.yale.edu
                                          53
 Yale students consult before choosing their courses. Tau Beta Pi members have served
 on a student advisory committee to the Chairs of the Engineering Departments. The
 Tau Beta Pi chapter President for 2002-03 is Aryesh Mukherjeee '03 <ary-
 esh.mukherjee.@yale.edu> The Faculty Adviser is Prof. Roman Kuc, Electrical Engi-
 neering.

 • YSEA-Undergraduate Chapter: The Undergraduate Chapter of the Yale Science and
 Engineering Association, YSEA, seeks to enhance the quality of life for science and en-
 gineering majors at Yale. It sponsors a range of programs, from informal get-togethers
 for its members to lectures and dinners with science and engineering faculty. The par-
 ent YSEA supports chapter activities and provides funding for undergraduate research
 projects, see p. 42. The Chair for 2002-03 is Youjung Byon '03 < you-
 jung.byon@yale.edu> Faculty Adviser: Prof. Michael Loewenberg, Chemical Engineer-
 ing. The YSEA liaison to the Undergraduate YSEA chapter is Ruth Reiner '84 B.S.
 <ruthrei@aol.com> in Chicago.

 • Yale Scientific Magazine: YSM is the oldest college science journal in the country.
 The Yale Scientific reports on the science and engineering research being done at Yale
 (e.g., the discovery of a 10th planet, the technology behind sonar-controlled vehicles).
 It provides undergraduates with the opportunity to acquire experience in science writ-
 ing, editing, photography, graphics, magazine business, and production. The Editor-in-
 Chief for 2002-03 is Margaret Ebert '03 <margaret.ebert@yale.edu> and the publisher
 is Kamal Sidu '04. The Faculty Adviser is Prof. Sean Barrett, Physics. Contact:
 ysm@jove.eng.yale.edu, U.S. Mail: P.O. Box 209117, New Haven, CT 06520-9117, or
 visit www.yale.edu/scimag

 • YSEES: The Yale Society for Environmental Engineering was organized in the spring
 term 2002. The following officers were elected, Skye Gruen '03, Jessica Lawson '03,
 Gordon Gray '04, Kathryn Johnson '04, Philip Gerhardt '04; they will decide on their
 positions during the 2002 fall term. YSEES' first project will be defining its mission.
 The Faculty Adviser is Prof. Roger Ely.

 • Team Lux: Founded in 1994, Team Lux unites undergraduate solar racing enthusi-
 asts in designing, financing, building, and racing a solar vehicle every two years. Team
 Lux has completed "Lux Millennia," a concept vehicle to validate and test design pros-
 pects, and is constructing "The John Lee" to be raced in the 2003 American Solar
 Challenge. Yale's first solar car, "Lux Aeterna," came in 9th out of 36 university teams
 and was the top-finishing rookie team at Sunrayce '97. "Lux Perpetua" placed 15th out
 of 50 teams competing in the Washington, DC, to Orlando, FL, 1,300-mile Sunrayce
 '99. Contact: Team Lux president David Johnson SY'04, <david.m.johnson@yale.edu>
 also, see <solar.eng.yale.edu>

 Undergraduate organizations must register every year with the Coordinator of Undergraduate Organiza-
 tions, Yale College Dean’s Office, 432-2900, in order to receive information about student organizations’
 privileges and responsibilities.

Engineering Prizes
Each year, outstanding undergraduates in Engineering are considered for prizes consist-
ing of a certificate and an honorarium.
 • The Edward O. Lanphier Memorial Prize (established in 1922) is awarded to a Sen-
   ior who has exhibited superior accomplishment and initiative in research in a field
   related to electricity and its applications. This Prize is a gift of Robert C. Lanphier
   1897 Ph.D. and Mrs. Lanphier in memory of their son Edward O. Lanphier ’23 S, a
   major in Electrical Engineering, who died in his Senior year. It includes the scholar-

                                           www.eng.yale.edu
                                                  54
 ship prize money won at Yale by Edward O. Lanphier and the money he had earned
 during vacations.

• The Donald Warren McCrosky Memorial Prize (established in l963) is awarded to a
  Senior in Mechanical Engineering who, in the judgment of the faculty, is deserving of
  greatest distinction for scholarly achievement in fields related to mechanics and its
  applications. This Prize is a gift of Mrs. Josephine T. McCrosky in memory of Donald
  Warren McCrosky ’19 Ph.D., her son.

• The Henry Prentiss Becton Prize (established in l968) is awarded to a Senior in en-
  gineering for outstanding student performance. The Prize is awarded by the Dean of
  Engineering or by a committee designated by the Dean. This Prize was endowed by
  Henry Prentiss Becton ’37S whose generosity enabled the University to construct the
  Becton Center.

• The Charles A. Walker Prize (established in 1992) is awarded to a Senior for out-
  standing scholarship in the field of chemical engineering. This Prize was established
  by the late Raymond John Wean Professor Emeritus and Mrs. Charles A. Walker.

• The Harry A. Curtis Prize (established in 1992) is awarded to a Junior or Senior
  who, in the judgment of the chemical engineering faculty, has contributed most to
  the academic life of his or her class. This Prize was established by the late Raymond
  John Wean Professor Emeritus and Mrs. Charles A. Walker in memory of Harry A.
  Curtis, the first chemical engineer appointed to the Yale faculty.

• The Belle and Carl Morse Junior Prize in Engineering and Applied Science (es-
  tablished in 1994) is awarded to an undergraduate in Applied Physics, Biomedical
  Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Environmental Engineer-
  ing or Mechanical Engineering who has completed his/her Junior year and has dem-
  onstrated leadership to fellow students by outstanding scholarship and participation
  in extra curricular activities within the department. This Prize was established by
  Belle and Carl Morse whose generosity also enabled the University to establish the
  Morse Electrical Engineering Teaching Center in Becton Center.

• The Franz Tuteur Memorial Prize (established in 1994) is awarded to a Senior in
  Electrical Engineering who, in the judgment of the electrical engineering faculty, has
  presented the most outstanding Senior project. This Prize was established by former
  colleagues and students in memory of Franz Tuteur who had been a faculty member
  in the Department of Electrical Engineering.

• The Department of Chemical Engineering Junior Prize (established 1994) is
  awarded to a Junior for outstanding scholarship in the field of chemical engineering.
  This Prize is donated by Alumni and Alumnae.

• The Department of Applied Physics Prize (established in 1996) is awarded to a
  Senior in Applied Physics who, in the judgment of the Applied Physics faculty, has
  exhibited outstanding achievement, insight, and originality in independent research.
  The selection is based on a written nomination by the student’s adviser and on the
  recommendations of the faculty attending student presentations of research projects.

• The D. Allan Bromley Prize in Biomedical Engineering (established in 2000) is
  awarded to a Senior who, in the judgment of the faculty, has exhibited superior ac-
  complishment and scholarly achievement in Biomedical Engineering.

• The D. Allan Bromley Prize in Environmental Engineering (established in 2000) is
  awarded to a Senior who, in the judgment of the faculty, has exhibited superior ac-
  complishment and scholarly achievement in Environmental Engineering.

                                   www.eng.yale.edu
                                         55
Back cover: Take a look at the beaming 2002 Engineering Prizes winners and Dean Paul A. Fleury at
the Engineering Reception following the Commencement ceremonies of 2002




                                        www.eng.yale.edu
                                               56
Faculty Residential College Affiliation
Undergraduates live in residential colleges. Each of the twelve residential colleges has a
dining hall, common room, library, and other facilities (e.g., piano practice rooms, print-
ing or photography shops), athletic teams; they put on dramatic productions, musical
programs, invite visiting speakers, etc. A Master resides with his or her family in each
residential college.
  Every residential college also has a complement of faculty members, Fellows, from
various disciplines whom students can meet informally in the dining room and the com-
mon room. Some Fellows serve as Freshmen Advisers. Members of the Faculty of
Engineering are affiliated with the residential colleges as follows:
         Berkeley College                            Morse College
         Natalie Jeremijenko                         Joseph F. Dillon Jr.
         Janet Pan                                   Steven Girvin
                                                     Daniel E. Rosner
         Branford College                            Peter M. Schultheiss, Emeritus
         Andrew R. Barron                            Werner P. Wolf
         Menachem Elimelech
         Alessandro Gomez                            Pierson College
         George Veronis                              Thomas E. Graedel
                                                     Dana S. Henry
         Calhoun College                             Michael Loewenberg
         Jerzy Blawzdziewicz                         Yiorgos Makris
         James S. Duncan                             Subir Sachdev
         John B. Fenn, Emeritus                      Robert J. Schoelkopf
         Gene R. Gindi, Associate Fellow             Bjong (Wolf) Yeigh
         Arvid Herzenberg, Emeritus
         Csaba Horváth                               Saybrook College
         Simon Mochrie                               Charles Ahn
         Manohar Panjabi                             Robert E. Apfel
         John Y. Walz                                Roger Ely
         David T. Wu                                 Juan Fernández de la Mora
         Steven W. Zucker                            Daniel E. Prober
                                                     Nicholas Read
         Davenport College                           Mark A. Reed
         Eric I. Altman                              R. Shankar
         Ira B. Bernstein
         Pierre Hohenberg                            Silliman College
         Mark Kasevich                               William R. Bennett Jr., Emeritus
         Kailasnath Purushothaman                    Richard K. Chang
         Katepalli R. Sreenivasan                    Jung Han
         John Tully                                  Roman Kuc
         Peter P. Wegener, Emeritus                  Marshall B. Long
                                                     Ronald B. Smith
         Timothy Dwight College                      A. Douglas Stone
         D. Allan Bromley
                                                     Ezra Stiles College
         Boa-Teh Chu, Emeritus
                                                     Sean E. Barrett
         Richard Lethin
                                                     Daniel H. Friendly
         A. Stephen Morse
                                                     Robert D. Grober
         Kumpati S. Narendra
                                                     Peter J. Kindlmann
         Jerry Woodall
                                                     Kurt Zilm
         Felix Zweig, Emeritus
                                                     Trumbull College
         Jonathan Edwards College
                                                     Richard C. Barker, Emeritus
         Donald M. Crothers                          W. Jack Cunningham, Emeritus
         Robert B. Gordon                            Michel Devoret
         John C. Gore                                Paul A. Fleury
         Gary L. Haller, Master                      Victor E. Henrich
         Lisa D. Pfefferle                           Tso-Ping Ma
         Mitchell D. Smooke                          Stanley Mroczkowski, Associate
         J. Rimas Vaisnys
                                                     Wei Tong
         Robert G. Wheeler, Emeritus                 Edmund Yeh
                                       www.eng.yale.edu
                                             57
                                     Look for the Engineering buildings in the heart of Yale
                                            (near the pointed steeple in the distance)

Staying Informed
  Weekly Engineering Bulletin
   Published Fridays during the academic year, the Engineering Bulletin, keeps the En-
   gineering community informed about visiting speakers, student research presenta-
   tions, Engineering student organization meetings and election results, visiting re-
   cruiters, summer internships. The Bulletin reports on faculty honors and major re-
   search grants, graduate student research area examinations, faculty and staff ap-
   pointments, and many other items of relevance to members of the four departments
   and two programs of the Faculty of Engineering.
      The Engineering Bulletin is available by e-mail (contact <engineering@yale.edu>),
    on the web (<www.eng.yale.edu/news/bulletin.html>), and posted in the elevators of
    Becton Center, Dunham Lab, and Mason Lab as well as on the bulletin board near
    the second floor entrance to Dunham Lab and in the Engineering and Applied Sci-
    ence Library.
  News & Events
   Major Engineering events are announced at <www.eng.yale.edu/news/events.html>
  Engineering website
   The full picture of Engineering at Yale is at <www.eng.yale.edu>
  For information about all undergraduate academic programs at Yale College
   Visit <www.yale.edu/ycpo/ycps/>
  For information about much of everything else related to Yale undergraduates
   Visit <www.yale.edu/yalecol>




Editor: Elona Vaisnys
Production: Yale Reprographic & Imaging Services


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                                                   58
Undergraduate Courses given in 2002-03
Cross-listed courses are mentioned under their primary department or program
Courses in brackets and in italics will not be given in 2002-03

  APHY, Applied Physics DUS: Prof. Robert Grober
207a              Introduction to Applied Physics: Computer Applications, Schoelkopf
322b              Electromagnetic Waves and Devices, Devoret
417bG             Optical Properties of Semiconductors, Chang
PHYS 420a         Statistical Thermodynamics, Girvin
421bG/BENG 421bG      Physics of Medical Imaging, Anderson, Gore
439aG/PHYS 439aG Basic Quantum Mechanics, Prober
448aG/PHYS 448a Solid-State Physics I, Stone
449bG/PHYS 449bG Solid-State Physics II, Mochrie
471a and 472b     Special Projects. Consult DUS

  BENG, Biomedical Engineering DUS: Prof. James Duncan
350aG/MCDB 310aG     Physiological Systems, Aronson, Mohsenin, Neufer, Pieribone, Segal (in
charge)
351a/CENG 351a Biomedical Engineering I, Horváth
352b/EENG 352b Biomedical Engineering II, Duncan, Hyder, Tagare
355L             Biomedical Engineering Laboratory, Hyder, Staib
410a             Physical and Chemical Basis of Biosensing, Rothman, Sigworth
421bG            Physics of Medical Imaging, Constable
454bG/CENG 454bG Biotechnology, Horváth, Wilkins
457bG/MENG 457bG     Biomechanics, Cholewicki
471a and 472b    Special Projects, Consult DUS
480aG            Seminar in Biomedical Engineering, Staff

  CENG, Chemical Engineering DUS: Prof. Michael Loewenberg
120a/ENAS 120a/ENVE 120a Introduction to Environmental Engineering, Stuart
210a             Introduction to Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Haller
300a             Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, Loewenberg
301b             Chemical Kinetics and Chemical Reactors, Pfefferle
315b/MENG 315b Transport Phenomena, Elimelech
373a/ENVE 373a Air Pollution, Pfefferle
377b/ENVE 377b Water Quality Control, Stuart
411a             Separation and Purification Processes, Rosner
412b             Chemical Engineering Laboratory, Wikstrom
416b/ENVE 416b Chemical Engineering Process Design, Levitzky, Walz
471a or 472b     Independent Research, Consult DUS
480a             Chemical Engineering Process Control, Altman
490a or b        Senior Research Project, Consult DUS

  EENG, Electrical Engineering DUS: Prof. Peter Kindlmann
101a               The Digital Information Age, Kuc
226a               Introduction to Electrical Engineering: Electronic Circuits and Devices, Ma
227La              Circuits and Electronics Laboratory, Pan
228b               Introduction to Electrical Engineering: Signals and Systems, Narendra
229Lb              Signals and Systems Laboratory, Pan, Schultheiss
235a and 236b      Special Projects, Consult DUS
310a               Signals and Systems, Morse
320a/APHY 320a Semiconductor Device Fundamentals, Woodall
325b               Electronic Circuits, Kindlmann
348a/CPSC 338a Digital Systems, Makris
350b               Embedded Systems, Kuc
397b/ENAS 397b Mathematical Methods in Engineering, Vaisnys
408aG              Electronic Materials: Fundamentals and Applications, Han
410 bG             Physics and Devices of Optical Communication, Han
418aG/APHY 418aG Heterojunction Devices, Reed
421bG/APHY 321bG Semiconductor Silicon Devices and Technology, Ma
425aG              Introduction to VLSI System Design, Lethin

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                                               59
426aG            Instrumentation and Product Design, Kindlmann
[436             Systems and Control]
444aG            Modern Communications Systems, Yeh
445aG/BENG 445aG Digital Image Processing, Duncan, Staib
449bG/CPSC 439bG Computer Systems, Friendly
454b/STAT 364 bG Information Theory, Yeh
462bG            Digital Systems Testing and Design for Testability, Makris
471a and 472b    Advanced Special Projects. Consult DUS
475bG/CPSC 475bG Computational Vision and Biological Perception, Zucker

   ENAS, Engineering and Applied Science DUS: Prof. Roman Kuc
[110/APHY 110     The Technological World]
111a              Science Fiction and Science Fact, Reed
130b              Introduction to Computing for Engineers and Scientists, Staff
194a or b         Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations with Applications,
                  Ahn (fall), Smooke (spring)
320b/PHYS 320b Science, Technology, and Public Policy, Bromley
323a              Creativity and New Product Development, Bolanos
335b/EP&E 204b Professional Ethics, Carreras
360a/APHY 360a Measurement and Noise, Grober
381a/ARCG 465a/G&G 465a Archaeometallurgy, Gordon
391a              Dynamics of Evolving Systems, Vaisnys
440aG/MENG 440a Applied Numerical Methods I, Bennett
[441G/MENG 441    Applied Numerical Methods II]
496bG             Probability and Stochastic Processes, Staff

  ENVE, Environmental Engineering DUS: Prof. Roger Ely
270b             Complex Problems in Environmental Engineering, Ely
371a/ENAS 371a Introduction to Hydrology and Water Resources, Wallis
444bG/ENAS 444bG Geographic Information Systems in Environmental Engineering, Wallis
471a and 472b    Special Projects, Staff
490a or b        Senior Project, Staff

  MENG, Mechanical Engineering DUS: Prof. Mitchell Smooke
185b            Mechanical Design Studio, Jeremijenko
211b            Thermodynamics for Mechanical Engineers, Schwarz
280a            Mechanical Engineering I: Strength and Deformation of Mechanical Ele-
ments,
                Tong
285b            Introduction to Materials Science, Wu
286Lb           Solid Mechanics and Materials Science Laboratory, Tong
361a            Mechanical Engineering II: Fluid Mechanics, Smooke
363Lb           Fluid Mechanics Laboratory, Gomez
[365            Propulsion and Energy Conversion]
369b            Physics of Flying, Chance Jr.
383a            Mechanical Engineering III: Dynamics, de la Mora
389b            Mechanical Engineering IV: Fluid and Thermal Energy Science, Sreenivasan
400aG           Computer-Aided Engineering, Long
457bG/BENG457bG Biomechanics, Cholewicki
[463G           Theoretical Fluid Dynamics]
469a            Aerodynamics, Gomez
471a and 472b   Special Projects, Consult DUS
[480G           Mechanics of Deformable Solids]
[485G           Microstructural Development in Materials]
486aG           Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Wu
489aG           Mechanical Design: Process and Implementation, Jeremijenko




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                                              60

								
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