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Corel Draw 9 Manual

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Corel Draw 9 Manual Powered By Docstoc
					Table of contents
Chapter 1   Welcome to CorelDRAW®                              .       .        .       .        .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .    3
            Using Help . . .                   .       .       .       .        .       .        .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .    4
            CorelDRAW concepts .               .       .       .       .        .       .        .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .    6
            Exploring the work area            .       .       .       .        .       .        .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .    8
            Corel services and support     .       .  .            .       .        .       .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        14
               Before calling Corel Technical Support .            .       .        .       .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        15
               Telephone technical support options .               .       .        .       .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        15
               Other CorelDRAW support options . .                 .       .        .       .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        16
               Customer Service . . . . .                          .       .        .       .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        17
Chapter 2   Getting started        . . . . .                            .   .                .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .       21
            Creating and opening drawings . . .                        .   .                .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        22
            Saving and closing drawings . . .                          .   .                .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        24
            Archiving files . . . . . .                                .   .                .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        30
            Backing up your work . . . . .                             .   .                .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        32
            Setting up the Drawing page . . .                          .   .                .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        34
            Using consistent settings for new documents                .   .                .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        47
            Using the Scrapbook . . . . .                              .   .                .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        48
               Browsing files, clipart, and photos using the Scrapbook .                    .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        49
               Browsing the preset fills and outlines using the Scrapbook                   .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        50
                                                   .
               Browsing FTP sites using the Scrapbook .                    .        .       .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        52
            Using the rulers, grid, and guidelines .                       .        .       .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        54
                Using the rulers and grid . . . .                          .        .       .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        55
                Working with guidelines . . . .                            .        .       .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        62
            Viewing your work . . . . .                                    .        .       .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        69
                Zooming and panning . . . . .                              .        .       .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        69
                Using the View Manager . . . .                             .        .       .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        74
                Setting the view quality . . . .                           .        .       .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        76
                Using full-screen previews . . . .                         .        .       .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        78
            Viewing computer and document information                      .        .       .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        79
            Displaying warning messages . . .                              .        .       .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        80
Chapter 3   Drawing and shaping objects.                           .       .        .       .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        85
            Drawing basic objects .        .       .       .       .       .        .       .        .         .        .        .        .        .        .        .        85


                                                                                                              Table of contents                                                1
            Selecting objects . . . . . . .                               .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .    89
            Moving objects . . . . . . .                                  .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .    94
            Shaping basic objects . . . . . .                             .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .    98
            Drawing lines and curves . . . . .                       .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        103
            Drawing with the Natural Media tool . .                  .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        107
            Shaping lines, curves, and curve objects . .             .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        117
            Drawing dimension, connector, and flow lines.            .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        125
                Drawing dimension lines . . . . .                    .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        126
                Drawing Connector lines and Flow lines . .           .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        133
            Setting tool preferences . . . . .                       .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        136
Chapter 4   Working with styles and templates                   .    .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        143
            Working with styles .        .     .    .     .     .    .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        144
               Working with graphic and text styles .     .     .    .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        145
               Working with color styles . . .            .     .    .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        152
            Working with templates . . .                  .     .    .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        158
Chapter 5   Organizing objects        . . .               .     .    .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        165
            Undoing and redoing changes . .               .     .    .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        165
            Arranging objects . . . .                     .     .    .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        168
            Finding and replacing . . .                   .      .    .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .       173
            Changing the order of objects . .             .     .    .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        176
            Aligning and distributing objects .           .     .    .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        178
            Grouping and ungrouping objects .             .      .    .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .       181
            Combining and breaking apart objects          .     .    .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        183
            Locking and unlocking objects . .             .     .    .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        185
            Using the Object Manager . . .                .     .    .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        186
                Opening and setting up the Object Manager .     .    .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        187
                Editing objects using the Object Manager .      .    .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        189
                Using layers to organize your drawing . .       .    .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        193
                Setting layer properties . . . .                .    .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        196
            Creating an object database . . .                   .    .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        201
                Setting up the object database . . .            .    .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        202
                Assigning and editing object data     . .       .    .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        204
                Viewing, editing, and formatting an object data summary       .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        .        206



2           Table of contents
Chapter 6   Filling and outlining objects .                 .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .   211
            Filling objects .         .     .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .   211
                Working with basic fills .       .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    212
                Working with fountain fills .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    215
                Customizing fountain fills .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    219
                Working with PostScript textures .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    226
                Working with pattern fills . .        .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    227
                Working with texture fills . .        .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    233
                Customizing pattern and texture fills .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    235
                Creating Mesh Fill objects . . .           .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    241
            Outlining objects . . . .                      .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    246
                Working with outlines . . .                .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    247
                Applying and editing line-ending shapes    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    254
Chapter 7   Transforming objects           . . .                .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    261
            Finding and using the transformation tools          .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    262
            Undoing transformations . . . .                     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    265
            Applying transformations to duplicates .            .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    266
            Splitting and erasing portions of objects .         .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    267
            Positioning and moving objects. . .                  .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .   271
            Sizing and stretching objects . . .                 .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    274
            Scaling objects . . . . . .                         .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    278
            Rotating objects . . . . . .                        .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    282
            Skewing objects . . . . . .                         .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    287
            Mirroring objects . . . . .                         .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    290
            Welding, trimming and intersecting objects          .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    294
Chapter 8   Working with color        . . . . .                      .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    303
            Choosing colors . . . . . . .                            .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    306
            Working with Multiple On-Screen Color Palettes           .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    318
            Customizing Color Palettes . . . .                       .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    320
            Reproducing colors accurately . . . .                    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    325
Chapter 9   Working with text         . . . . . .                         .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    337
            Adding, converting, and selecting text . . .                  .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    337
            Adding graphics, symbols, and special characters .            .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    343


                                                                                    Table of contents                   3
            Editing text. .           .      .  .     .  .      .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    347
            Formatting text .         .      .  .     .  .       .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .   351
               Applying character properties .        .  .       .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .   351
               Specifying text spacing . .            .  .      .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    357
               Shifting and rotating characters .     .  .      .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    362
            Formatting Paragraph text .               .  .      .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    364
                 Adding columns to Paragraph text frames .      .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    364
                 Adjusting paragraph alignment . . .            .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    367
                 Applying drop caps to paragraphs . .           .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    368
                 Applying tabs to paragraphs . . .              .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    370
                 Specifying paragraph indentation     . .       .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    372
                 Adding bullets to paragraphs . . .             .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    374
                 Hyphenating text . . . . .                     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    376
            Managing Paragraph text frames . .                  .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    378
                 Linking Paragraph text frames . . .            .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    387
            Fitting text to a path. . . . .                     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    392
            Using the writing tools . . . .                     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    398
                 Using the automatic spell checker . .          .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    398
                 Working with the Spell Checker . . .           .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    401
                 Working with Grammatik . . . .                 .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    404
                 Working with user word lists . . .             .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    415
                 Using Type Assist . . . . .                    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    418
                 Using the Thesaurus . . . . .                  .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    419
                 Checking statistics . . . . .                   .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .   421
            Substituting unavailable fonts . . .                .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    422
            Setting preferences . . . . .                       .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    424
Chapter 10 Creating special effects              .    .    .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .   431
            Blending Objects          .      .   .    .    .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .   431
                Creating blends       .      .   .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    432
                Modifying the intermediate objects of a blend   .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    436
                               .
                Editing blends .             .   .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    440
            Distorting Objects .             .   .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    445
                Creating Push and Pull distortions    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    446
                Creating Zipper distortions .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    448
                Editing Zipper distortions   .   .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    451


4           Table of contents
               Creating Twister Distortions      .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    453
               Modifying distortions.     .      .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    455
           Working with envelopes .              .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    457
               Creating envelopes . .            .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    457
               Editing envelopes . .             .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    460
           Extruding objects . .                 .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    465
               Creating vector extrusions .      .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    465
               Editing vector extrusions .       .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    469
               Filling vector extrusions .       .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    476
               Lighting vector extrusions .      .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    479
               Creating bitmap extrusions .      .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    481
               Editing bitmap extrusions .       .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    483
               Filling bitmap extrusions .       .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    485
               Lighting bitmap extrusions .      .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    485
           Working with drop shadows             .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    488
               Creating drop shadows .           .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    488
               Editing drop shadows       .      .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    491
           Working with transparencies           .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    495
               Creating transparencies .         .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    496
               Editing transparencies .          .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    500
           Contouring Objects . .                .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    503
               Creating contoured objects .      .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    504
               Editing contoured objects .       .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    507
           Using lenses . . .                    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    509
               Creating lenses . . .             .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    510
               Editing lenses . . .               .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .   521
           Adding perspective to objects         .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    523
               Creating perspective . .          .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    523
               Editing an object’s perspective   .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    525
           Working with PowerClip .              .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    526
               Creating a PowerClip object       .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    527
               Editing a PowerClip object .      .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    528
Chapter 11 Working with bitmaps        .              .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    535
           Cropping bitmaps . . .                     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    535
           Working with linked bitmaps .              .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    538


                                                                                    Table of contents                   5
           Tracing bitmaps . . . .                  .    .    .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   541
           Coloring bitmaps . . .                   .    .    .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   544
           Adjusting the tones in images .          .    .    .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   548
           Resampling and editing bitmaps           .    .    .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   564
           Inflating bitmaps . . .                  .    .    .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   566
           Converting bitmaps . . .                 .    .    .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   566
               Converting vectors to bitmaps .      .    .    .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   567
               Converting images to the Paletted color mode   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   576
           Applying special effects to bitmaps .         .    .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   584
               Using bitmap effects . . . .              .    .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   584
               Applying 3D effects . . . .               .    .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   585
               Applying Art Strokes effects     . .      .    .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   592
               Applying Blur effects . . . .             .    .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   605
               Applying Color Transform effects . .      .    .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   612
               Applying Contour effects . . .            .    .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   616
               Applying Creative effects . . .           .    .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   619
               Applying Distort effects . . .            .    .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   634
               Applying Noise effects     . . .          .    .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   645
               Applying Sharpen effects . . .            .    .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   653
           Using plug-in filters . . . .                 .    .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   657
Chapter 12 Creating documents for the World Wide Web                      .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   661
           Creating HTML text . . . . . . .                           .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   661
           Inserting Internet objects . . . . . .                     .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   663
           Creating Hyperlinks . . . . . . .                          .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   665
           Checking your document for HTML object conflicts.          .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   671
           Publishing to the Internet . . . . . .                     .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   672
               Publishing documents to the Internet . . . .           .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   673
               Setting HTML export options . . . . .                  .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   674
Chapter 13 PRINTING         . . . . . . .                         .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   679
           Setting up a print job . . . . .                       .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   679
           Using imposition layouts . . . . .                     .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   687
           Previewing, sizing, and positioning a print job        .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   695
           Using PostScript to optimize a print job . .           .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   700
           Fine-tuning a print job . . . . .                      .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   708


6          Table of contents
            Using print merge .            .     .     .    .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    714
            Commercial printing .          .     .     .    .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    717
                Preparing a print job for a commercial press.     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    717
                Working with bitmaps and halftone screens .       .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    726
                Creating color separations . . . .                .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    729
                Color trapping . . . . . .                        .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    735
Chapter 14 Importing, exporting, and OLE                    .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    743
            Importing and exporting files .            .    .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    743
               Importing and opening files .           .    .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    745
                Exporting and saving files in nonnative file formats   .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    751
            Working with Kodak Photo CDs .                  .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    754
            Working with Encapsulated Postscript            .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    756
            Object linking and embedding . .                .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    763
               Linking (OLE) . . . . .                      .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    765
               Embedding (OLE) . . . .                      .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    768
Chapter 15 Publishing to PDF        .            .     .    .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    773
            Publishing a PDF file . .            .     .    .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    773
                Job ticketing . . .              .     .    .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    776
            Publishing PDF objects .             .     .    .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    777
            Setting image options .              .     .    .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    782
            Publishing PDF documents             .     .    .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    785
Chapter 16 Customizing Corel applications                    .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .   791
            Customizing workspace settings             .     .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .   791
            Customizing keyboard shortcuts            .     .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    792
            Customizing menus . . .                   .     .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    797
            Customizing a Color Palette .             .     .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    802
            Customizing toolbars. . .                 .     .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    804
            Customizing the Property Bar .             .     .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .   811
            Customizing the Status Bar .               .     .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .   813
            Customizing filters . . .                 .     .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    815
            Customizing file associations .           .     .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    816
            Customizing feedback sounds .              .     .     .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .    .   817




                                                                                      Table of contents                   7
Chapter 17 Automating application tasks             .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   821
            Creating and running scripts . .        .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   821
            Using Corel SCRIPT Editor. . .          .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   822
            Using Visual Basic for Applications .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   .   829




8           Table of contents
        WELCOME TO CORELDRAW®                                                1
        CorelDRAW® is a comprehensive vector-based drawing program that makes
        it easy to create professional artwork — from simple logos to intricate
        technical illustrations. CorelDRAW provides tools and effects that let you
        work efficiently to produce high-quality graphics. You can also deliver your
        artwork to a service bureau for printing or publishing your document to the
        Internet.
        Before you begin using CorelDRAW, there are some areas with which you
        should become more familiar. To assist you in using the application,
        CorelDRAW provides several types of Help. When using CorelDRAW, you
        may find it useful to know the difference between vectors and bitmaps.
        Furthermore, getting to know the various controls that appear in the
        application lets you work more effectively. Corel® also provides several
        support services that can assist you with the application.


About Corel Corporation
        Corel Corporation is recognized internationally as a world leader in the
        development of PC-based graphics and business application software.
        CorelDRAW is now available in more than 17 languages and has won more
        than 215 international awards from major trade publications.
        We pride ourselves on delivering high-quality graphics, productivity, and
        business application software by actively seeking your input. We use this
        feedback and respond quickly to you, the users of Corel products worldwide.
        For more information about Corel and our products, visit our web site at
        http://www.corel.com

        We want your feedback
        If you have any comments about the CorelDRAW documentation, you can
        email them to drawdoc@corel.ca or mail them to the address below.
        Unfortunately, we may not be able to respond to your message personally.
        Graphics Software Documentation Manager
        Corel Corporation
        1600 Carling Avenue
        Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
        K1Z 8R7




                                               Welcome to CorelDRAW®               3
Using Help
          CorelDRAW features a variety of electronic resources that provide on-screen
          assistance as you need it. The main form of assistance is the online Help,
          which, apart from a minimum of graphics, is an electronic version of the
          CorelDRAW manual. You can find information in online Help by
          double-clicking specially coded words, phrases, or icons that display the
          topic. In addition to the online Help you can also get help using
          PerfectExpert™. Context-sensitive Help is accessible from anywhere within
          CorelDRAW. You can access context-sensitive Help from the menus, dialog
          boxes, Docker™ windows, Property Bars, and all other toolbars in
          CorelDRAW. ToolTips describe individual features in the application, whereas
          the CorelDRAW tutorial guides you through basic tutorial procedures as you
          complete a range of tasks. The Online Hints window provides you with
          information about the tool you’re using, or the possible tasks or actions you
          can perform.

Accessing online Help
          Online Help connects you to an overview or a procedural topic when you
          choose a topic from the table of contents or the index. You can also search for
          a topic using keywords that describe a feature or task.

          To access online Help
          1 Click Help, Help Topics.
          2 Double-click a topic.

          To access an online Help topic using a word search
          1 Click Help, Help Topics.
          2 Click the Index tab.
          3 Type a word in the search box, and click the Search button.
          4 Choose a topic from the list, and click the Display button.

Printing online Help
          You can print entire sections of the online Help or only specific topics.

          To print an entire section
          1 Click Help, Help Topics.
          2 Click a book, and click the Print Topics button.




4         CorelDRAW: Chapter 1
          To print a topic
          1 Click Help, Help Topics.
          2 Click a topic, and click the Print Topic button.


          Ÿ You can also print an individual topic by clicking the Print button in the
            CorelDRAW Help window.


Accessing PerfectExpert
          CorelDRAW comes with its own built-in expert, which is ready to help you
          find the information on performing tasks.

          To access the PerfectExpert
          Ÿ Click Help, PerfectExpert.

Accessing context-sensitive Help
          The most common ways to access context-sensitive Help are as follows:

          To get help on ...           Do this ...
          Dialog boxes                 Click the Help button, or press F1.
          Menu commands                Click the Help button on the Standard toolbar, click a menu, and click a
                                       command.
                                       Or, press F1 when a command is highlighted.
          Tools and controls           Click the Help button on the Standard toolbar, and click the item for
                                       which you want help.
                                       Or, click Help, What’s This?


          Ÿ Use the Status Bar at the bottom of the Application Window to familiarize
            yourself with the tools. The Status Bar displays details of what buttons,
            controls, and menu commands do as you move the mouse cursor over
            them.


Accessing ToolTips
          ToolTips identify the icons and buttons that correspond to various features in
          CorelDRAW, such as toolbars, the Property Bar, and tool flyouts.



                                                         Welcome to CorelDRAW®                                 5
         To access ToolTips
         Ÿ Position the cursor over an icon or a button.

Accessing Online Tutors
         CorelTUTOR™ guides you through a series of practical lessons that give you
         a general idea of the application’s major capabilities. Although intended
         mainly for novices, the tutorial also offers helpful information for advanced
         users, and explores concepts that are common to many CorelDRAW
         operations.

         To access Tutors
         Ÿ Click Help, CorelTUTOR.

Accessing Online Hints
         The Online Hints relays information that applies to the action you’re
         performing with the active tool. When you select a different tool, the Online
         Hints window provides information about the new tool and its options.

         To access Hints
         Ÿ Click Help, Hints.


CorelDRAW concepts
         Computer imaging applications are based on creating either vector graphics
         or bitmap images. This section presents the basic concepts of a vector-based
         program, like CorelDRAW, and outlines the differences between vector
         images and bitmap images, such as ones you work with in Corel
         PHOTO-PAINT®.
         If you haven’t worked with drawing applications before, or if you’ve worked
         solely with paint or photo-editing (i.e., bitmap images) applications, you’ll
         find this section especially informative.


What is a vector image?
         Vector images, also called object-oriented or draw images, are defined
         mathematically as a series of points joined by lines. Graphical elements in a
         vector file are called objects. Each object is a self-contained entity, with
         properties such as color, shape, outline, size, and position on the screen
         included in its definition.




6        CorelDRAW: Chapter 1
An example of a
vector graphic.




                  Since each object is a self-contained entity, you can move and change its
                  properties over and over again while maintaining its original clarity and
                  crispness without affecting other objects in the drawing. These
                  characteristics make vector-based applications ideal for illustration, in which
                  the design process often requires individual objects to be created and
                  manipulated.
                  Vector-based drawings are resolution independent. This means that they
                  appear at the maximum resolution of the output device, such as your printer
                  or monitor. As a result, the image quality of your drawing is a higher quality
                  resolution if you print from a 600 dots per inch (dpi) printer than from a
                  300-dpi printer.
                  CorelDRAW allows you to incorporate bitmaps into your drawings and to
                  export bitmaps you create. For simple drawings, you can use the Autotrace
                  command or the Freehand tool to trace around the outline manually. For
                  more information, see “Tracing bitmaps” on page 541.


What is a bitmap image?
                  Photo-editing applications like Corel PHOTO-PAINT work with bitmap
                  images. When you work with bitmap images, you can refine small details,
                  make drastic changes, and intensify effects.
                  Bitmap images, also called raster or paint images, are made of individual dots,
                  called pixels (picture elements), that are arranged and colored differently to
                  form a pattern. When you zoom in, you can see the individual squares that
                  make up the total image. Increasing the size of a bitmap has the effect of
                  increasing individual pixels, making lines and shapes appear jagged.




                                                           Welcome to CorelDRAW®                7
An example of a
bitmap image.




                  However, the color and shape of a bitmap image appear continuous when
                  viewed from a greater distance. Because each pixel is colored individually,
                  you can create photorealistic effects, such as shadowing and intensifying
                  color.
                  Reducing the size of a bitmap distorts the original image, because pixels are
                  removed to reduce the overall image size. Also, because a bitmap image is
                  created as a collection of arranged pixels, its parts cannot be manipulated
                  (e.g., moved) individually.
                  You can open vector-based CorelDRAW files, which have been saved as CPT
                  file format, directly in Corel PHOTO-PAINT. Corel PHOTO-PAINT
                  automatically creates a bitmapped version of the original.


Exploring the work area
                  The large white portion of the CorelDRAW Application Window is the
                  Drawing Window. The rectangle in the center with the drop shadow is the
                  Drawing Page. Usually, only the part of your drawing that falls within the
                  Drawing Page is printed. You can use the remaining space, called the
                  Desktop layer, in the Drawing Window to keep your tools and pieces of your
                  drawing handy. For more information about the Desktop layer, see “Using
                  layers to organize your drawing” on page 193.
                  The CorelDRAW Toolbox contains tools for creating, filling, and modifying
                  objects interactively. The drawing tools let you design a variety of objects for
                  your drawing, and the shaping tools let you modify your drawing. The
                  Toolbox also contains tools that let you apply a number of effects
                  interactively.
                  Futhermore, the Toolbox contains flyouts which are toolbars that are
                  accessible through one tool in the Toolbox. A small black arrow at the bottom
                  right corner of a tool indicates that it is a flyout grouped with other tools. You
                  can separate flyouts from the Toolbox to display them as separate toolbars.




8                 CorelDRAW: Chapter 1
         The toolbars contain buttons that represent commands. Some are shortcuts
         to menu commands; others are commands that are available only as toolbar
         buttons.
         The Property Bar, whose appearance is similar to a toolbar, provides you with
         quick access to frequently used functions that are relevant to the active tool
         or the task you’re currently performing. For example, when you click the
         Text tool, the Property Bar contains only text-related commands.
         A Docker window contains the same type of controls as a dialog box, such as
         command buttons, options, and list boxes. However, unlike most dialog
         boxes, you can keep Docker windows open while working on a document to
         access the operations you use most frequently, or to experiment with
         different effects. Docker windows can be docked to any edge of the
         Application window, or you can undock them. Furthermore, you can minimize
         Docker windows so they don’t use up valuable screen real estate.
         With CorelDRAW you have the ability to create multiple workspaces. A
         workspace is a configuration of settings you specify which you can save and
         reapply. If several people are using a single version of CorelDRAW, or if you
         find you need different settings for different tasks, you can use workspaces to
         save the settings for each user or task.


         Ÿ The toolbars are optimized for 800 x 600 resolution. If you are working at
           a lower resolution, portions of toolbars may appear cut off.


Using the Toolbox
         This table describes all of the tools in the CorelDRAW Toolbox.

         Tool...                     Description...

                                     The Pick tool lets you select and transform objects.

                                     The Shape tool lets you edit the shape of objects.

                                     The Knife tool lets you cut through objects.

                                     The Eraser tool lets you remove areas of your drawing.

                                     The Free Transform tools lets you transform your object by using the Free
                                     Rotation, Angle Reflection, Scale, and Skew tools.




                                                       Welcome to CorelDRAW®                                9
                            The Zoom tool lets you change the magnification level in the Drawing
                            Window.

                            The Pan tool lets you move the display of the Drawing Window.

                            The Freehand tool lets you draw lines and curves.

                            The Bezier tool lets you draw curves using a connect-the-dots style of
                            drawing.

                            The Natural Media tool provides access to the Brush, Sprayer,
                            Calligraphic, and Pressure tools.

                            The Dimension tool lets you draw vertical, horizontal, slanted, or angular
                            dimension lines.

                            The Connector tool lets you join two objects with a line.

                            The Flow Chart tool lets you join two objects with a flow chart line.

                            The Rectangle tool lets you draw rectangles and squares.

                            The Ellipse tool lets you draw ellipses and circles.

                            The Polygon tool lets you draw polygons and stars.

                            The Spiral tool lets you draw symmetrical and logarithmic spirals.

                            The Graph Paper tool lets you draw a grid of lines similar to that on
                            graph paper.

                            The Text tool lets you type words directly on the screen as Artistic Text or
                            as Paragraph Text.

                            The Interactive Fill tool lets you apply various fills using the mouse.

                            The Interactive Mesh tool lets you apply a mesh grid to an object using
                            the mouse.

                            The Interactive Transparency tool lets you apply transparencies to objects
                            using the mouse.


10   CorelDRAW: Chapter 1
                                      The Interactive Blend tool lets you blend two objects.

                                      The Interactive Distortion tool lets you apply a Push or Pull distortion, a
                                      Zipper distortion, or a Twister distortion to an object.

                                      The Interactive Envelope tool lets you distort an object by dragging the
                                      nodes of the envelope that is placed on top of the object.

                                      The Interactive Extrude tool lets you apply a third dimension to objects.

                                      The Interactive Drop Shadow tool lets you apply a drop shadow to an
                                      object.

                                      The Interactive Contour tool lets you apply a contour to an object.

                                      The Eyedropper tool lets you select a fill from an object on the Drawing
                                      Window using the mouse.

                                      The Paintbucket tool lets you fill an object on the Drawing Window after
                                      selecting a fill using the Eyedropper tool.

                                      The Outline Tool opens a flyout that lets you set the outline properties.

                                      The Fill Tool opens a flyout that lets you set the fill properties.

Accessing flyouts
          You can access multiple tools from a flyout on the Toolbox. You can also
          display the flyout as a toolbar by separating it from the Toolbox.

          To access flyouts
          Ÿ Place the cursor on the tool, and hold down the mouse button.


          Ÿ You can also access flyouts by clicking the arrow on the tool.


          To display a flyout as a separate toolbar
          Ÿ Click outside the buttons area on the flyout, and drag the flyout from its
            host toolbar.




                                                         Welcome to CorelDRAW®                                    11
         Ÿ You can return the flyout to the Toolbox by closing the flyout.


Using the Property Bar
         You can customize your work area by displaying, hiding, or docking the
         Property Bar.

         To display the Property Bar
         1 Click Window, Toolbars.
         2 Enable the Property Bar check box.

         To hide the Property Bar
         1 Click Window, Toolbars.
         2 Disable the Property Bar check box.

         To dock the Property Bar
         Ÿ Drag the Title Bar of the Property Bar toward the menus at the top of the
           Application Window or to any of the other sides.


         Ÿ You can also customize the Property Bar. For more information, see
           “Customizing the Property Bar” on page 811.


Using toolbars
         You can customize your work area by displaying, hiding, sizing, or docking
         the toolbars. You can also dock a toolbar to any side of your screen.

         To display toolbars
         1 Click Window, Toolbars.
         2 Enable the check boxes beside the toolbars you want to display.

         To hide toolbars
         1 Click Window, Toolbars.
         2 Disable the check boxes beside the toolbars you want to hide.




12       CorelDRAW: Chapter 1
         To dock toolbars
         Ÿ Drag the Title Bar of the toolbar that you want to dock toward the menus
           at the top of the Application Window or to any of the other sides.

         To size floating toolbars
         1 Position the cursor over one of the toolbar’s edges and wait until it
           becomes a two-sided arrow.
         2 Drag until the toolbar is the shape you want.


         Ÿ You can size only floating toolbars. When you dock a toolbar, it becomes
           horizontal when placed on the top or bottom side of the Application
           Window or vertical when placed on the left or right side.


Using Docker windows
         The following lists common actions you can perform on a Docker window:
         To ...                      Do this ...
         Open a Docker window        Click Window, Dockers, and click the Docker window you want to open.
         Collapse a Docker window    Click the arrow button at the corner of the Docker window.
         Undock a Docker window      Drag the top of the Docker window away from the edge of the Application
                                     Window.
         Dock a Docker window        Drag the Docker window to the edge of the Application Window.
         Close a Docker window       Click the “X” button at the corner of the Docker window.
         Separate Docker windows     Undock the Docker windows, and drag a tab from the list of Dockers.

Using multiple Workspaces
         You can create multiple Workspaces for specific users or specific tasks and
         then apply them when required. You can also delete workspaces when they
         are no longer needed. For more information about using workspaces, see
         “Customizing workspace settings” on page 791.

         To create a Workspace
         1 Click Tools, Options.
         2 Click the New button.
         3 Type the name of the Workspace in the Name Of New Workspace box.



                                                      Welcome to CorelDRAW®                                13
       4 From the Base New Workspace On list box, choose an existing Workspace
         on which to base the new Workspace.
       5 Type a description of the Workspace in the Description Of New
         Workspace box, if you want to include a description of the Workspace.


       Ÿ The description that you type in the Description Of New Workspace box
         appears in the list of available workspaces.



       Ÿ You can enable the Set As Current Workspace check box to apply the new
         workspace immediately.


       To choose a Workspace
       1 Click Tools, Options.
       2 Choose a workspace from the Workspaces Available list.
       3 Click the Set As Current button.


       Ÿ You can choose from several preset Workspaces. Each preset Workspace
         is designed to provide a working environment tailored to your
         requirements. For example, if you are using a low-resolution monitor
         setting, you can use the preset workspace designed for such a setting.


       To delete a Workspace
       1 Click Tools, Options.
       2 Choose a Workspace from the Workspaces Available list.
       3 Click the Delete button.


Corel services and support
       Corel is committed to providing customers with high-quality technical
       support. The following sections describe the variety of support services
       available.




14     CorelDRAW: Chapter 1
Before calling Corel Technical Support
        Before calling Corel Technical Support, please have the following information
        available. This information assists the Technical Support representative to
        help you more quickly and efficiently:
        Ÿ A brief description of the problem, including the exact text of any error
          messages received, and the steps to recreate the problem.
        Ÿ The type of computer, monitor, pointing device (e.g., mouse, tablet),
          printer, and video card (display adapter) in use.
        Ÿ The version of Microsoft Windows and the Corel product in use. Choose
          the About Windows 95 command from the Help menu in Windows
          Explorer to find which version of Windows you are running.
        Ÿ A list of any programs loaded into RAM (e.g., Terminate and Stay
          Resident programs). Check the Startup folder in the Programs menu to
          determine if you are running any other programs.


        Ÿ For more information on getting Technical Support, to go the Technical
          Support Help found under the Help menu.


Telephone technical support options
        CorelDRAW users can use complimentary and fee-based telephone technical
        support options. Complete information about these options, including phone
        numbers, is available in the Technical Support online Help file. This online
        Help file explains the various levels of support available to you and your
        organization.

        Classic services
        Classic Service is designed to address the technical support needs of
        CorelDRAW such as a technical understanding of new product features and
        basic installation and configuration issues.

        Basic services
        Corel offers the following technical support options, most of which are
        available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. These services are useful if you
        prefer not to pay for support or encounter problems during off-hours.

        Priority services
        Priority service is a fee-based service for users that require the help of
        second-level technicians. Priority Service may be purchased by the minute,


                                                 Welcome to CorelDRAW®                15
       by the incident, or on a term basis. Options range from core business hour
       access for individual users, to around-the-clock access for multiuser
       environments.

Other CorelDRAW support options
       Corel offers the following technical support options, most of which are
       available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. These services are useful if you
       prefer not to pay for support or if you encounter problems during off-hours.

       Interactive Voice Answering Network (IVAN )
       The Interactive Voice Answering Network contains answers to commonly
       asked questions about Corel products and is available 24 hours a day, 365
       days a year. It is regularly updated with the latest information, tips, and
       tricks. You can also request that IVAN solutions be faxed to you. There is no
       charge for this service beyond the cost of the telephone call. To call IVAN dial
       (613) 728-7070.

       Automated FAX on Demand
       Technical Support maintains an automated FAX on Demand system of
       numbered documents that contain up-to-date information about common
       issues, tips, and tricks. This service is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a
       year.
       To use this service call:
       (613) 728-0826, extension 3080
       You will be asked for a document number and your fax number. The
       document you request is automatically sent to you. To fax a catalog of
       documents to yourself, call the Automated FAX on Demand system number
       and request document 2000.

       Bulletin Board System (BBS)
       If you have a modem and communications software package, you can access
       the Corel BBS. You can download files, including printer drivers,
       troubleshooting information, and utilities. You can also transfer problem files
       to Customer Support through the BBS. For an explanation of how to access
       and use the BBS, call:
       European BBS (++353)-1-7082700
       North American BBS (613) 728-4752




16     CorelDRAW: Chapter 1
CompuServe
         Interact with other users and Corel technicians to obtain product information
         and support. CompuServe is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week,
         including holidays. Corel representatives will respond from 8:30 A.M. to 5:00
          .M.
         P Eastern Standard Time, from Monday to Friday, excluding holidays.
         If you have a CompuServe membership, you can access Corel technical
         information by entering one of the following at the CompuServe prompt:
         Ÿ GO COREL (for English)
         Ÿ GO CORELGER (for German)
         Ÿ GO CORELFR (for French)
         Ÿ GO CORELNL (for Dutch)
         Ÿ GO CORELSCAN (for Scandinavian)

Technical Support on the World Wide Web
         The World Wide Web address for Corel products on the Internet is
         http://www.corel.com. At this location, you can quickly search Corel’s
         Searchable Knowledge Base. From the database you can read, print, or
         download documents that contain answers to many of your technical
         questions or problems. This site also contains files you can download.

         AnswerPerfect™
         Customers can now submit support incidents (questions) by email to Corel’s
         web site at a price of $14.95 U.S. per incident, payable by credit card for
         English language products only. Corel is committed to responding to
         AnswerPerfect™ support incidents within one business day.

         File Transfer Protocol (FTP)
         You can download updates, patches, and utilities by accessing our anonymous
         FTP site at ftp.corel.com.


         Ÿ The terms of Corel technical support offerings are subject to change
           without notice.


Customer Service
         Corel Customer Service can promptly and accurately provide you with
         information about Corel product features, specifications, pricing, availability,



                                                   Welcome to CorelDRAW®                17
     and services. You can access Customer Service support through the
     following avenues.

     World Wide Web
     You can access general customer service and product information through
     the World Wide Web at http://www.corel.com/support.

     Mail, fax, email
     You can send specific customer service questions to Corel Customer Service
     representatives by mail, fax, and email.
     Corel Corporation
     Corel Customer Service
     1600 Carling Avenue
     Ottawa, Ontario
     Canada
     K1Z 8R7
     Fax: 1-613-761-9176 or 1-613-761-1295
     Email: custserv2@corel.ca

     Telephone
     You can also telephone Corel Customer Service centers with your questions.
     In North America, you can reach Corel Customer Service by calling our
     1-800-772-6735 toll-free line. The hours of opertation are 9:00 a.m. to 9:00
     p.m., Eastern Time, Monday through Friday, and from 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
     on Saturday.
     Corel customers residing outside North America can contact Corel Customer
     Service representatives in Dublin, Ireland on a toll line at 353-1-706-3916 or
     by calling a local authorized Corel Customer Service Partner.
     To view a listing of Corel’s International Customer Service telephone
     numbers refer to the online Technical Support Help file under the Help menu
     or visit our web site at http://www.corel.com/support.




18   CorelDRAW: Chapter 1
                        GETTING STARTED                                                        2
                        Understanding the flexible, intuitive features offered by CorelDRAW for
                        setting up your drawings will make it easy for you to create a variety of
                        documents, from individual graphics to newsletters, pamphlets, business
                        cards and labels.
Let the advanced
tools and features of
CorelDRAW inspire
your creativity.




                        This chapter will help you start using CorelDRAW effectively. It describes
                        how to create new drawings or open existing files, as well as how to save,
                        close, archive, and back up documents. You will learn about the different
                        options associated with these commands, and when to use them. Using these
                        options properly will help you keep your files organized and find them faster.
                        Before you start creating drawings, you may want to know how to set up an
                        effective working environment. This chapter contains instructions on setting
                        up the Drawing Page, including page size, orientation, and background. It also
                        tells you how add and remove pages, and how to navigate multipage
                        documents.
                        You’ll also want to take advantage of the tools offered by CorelDRAW for
                        ensuring that objects are accurately drawn and placed. These include the
                        rulers, grid, and guidelines.
                        It’s a good idea to become familiar with the Scrapbook™ as an organizational
                        tool. The Scrapbook is a Docker window in which you can browse the folders
                        that store files, clipart, photos, preset fills and outlines, and File Transfer
                        Protocol (FTP) sites. The Scrapbook provides drag-and-drop access to these
                        folders and sites. It also lets you organize, store, and access your own
                        favorite designs, fills, and outlines.
                        The viewing and panning features of CorelDRAW let you view drawings in a
                        variety of ways according to your needs. This chapter contains information



                                                                           Getting started           21
         on how to magnify or reduce your view, save specific views for future use,
         and pan quickly through multipage documents.
         Finally, you’ll learn how to view information about your computer and your
         documents, and how to turn CorelDRAW warning messages on and off.


Creating and opening drawings
         After you start CorelDRAW, you have several choices. In addition to opening
         the CorelDRAW tutorial or touring the features that are new for CorelDRAW
         9, you can:
         Ÿ create a new drawing
         Ÿ open an existing drawing, even if it was created with a previous version of
           CorelDRAW
         Ÿ open the drawing you last worked on
         Ÿ create a new drawing from a template
         For a type of document you create frequently, such as newsletters or greeting
         cards, it is a good idea to base your new drawing on a template. You can also
         scan images into CorelDRAW or acquire them from a digital camera.
         For more information about templates, see “Working with Styles and
         Templates” on page 143.

Creating a new drawing
         Creating a new drawing causes a blank Drawing Window to appear. This
         Drawing Window contains the styles in the default template,
         CORELDRW.CDT. If you’re not planning to work with styles, you don’t need
         to be concerned with the concept of styles and templates. For more
         information on styles and templates, see “Working with Styles and
         Templates” on page 143.

         To create a drawing
         Ÿ Click File, New.


         Ÿ You can also create a new drawing by clicking the New button.


Creating a new drawing based on a template
         If there is a document type you create frequently, such as an advertising flyer,
         a brochure, or a newsletter, using a template will make creating your drawing
         easier. In CorelDRAW, the Template wizard guides you through the steps


22       CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
         involved in creating a document based on a template. You can use one of the
         templates supplied with CorelDRAW, or create one of your own. For easy
         access to custom templates saved in previous versions of CorelDRAW, add
         the templates to the Template wizard. For more information, see “Working
         with styles and templates” on page 143.

         To create a drawing based on a template
         1 Insert the CorelDRAW CD-ROM which contains the templates.
         2 Click File, New From Template.
         3 Enable one of the following buttons:
            Ÿ CorelDRAW Templates — to choose from a set of CorelDRAW
              templates
            Ÿ PaperDirect Templates, text and paper samples — to choose from a
              selection of PaperDirect text and paper templates
            Ÿ PaperDirect Templates, text only — to choose from a selection of
              PaperDirect text templates
         4 Click the Next button.
         5 Follow the instructions.
         6 Click the Finish button when you’re satisfied with your choices.
            To return to a previous option, click the Previous button.


         Ÿ To preview the contents of a template, enable the Open With Contents
           check box to display its thumbnail.


Opening a drawing
         Opening a file in CorelDRAW is easy. CorelDRAW lets you view a thumbnail
         of the file you are about to open. This allows you to save time by ensuring
         you are opening the file you want.

         To open a drawing
         1 Click File, Open.
         2 From the Look In list box choose the drive where the file is stored.
         3 Double-click the folder where the file is stored.
         4 Double-click the filename.



                                                            Getting started       23
                       To view a thumbnail of a file before opening it
                       Ÿ Enable the Preview check box in the Open dialog box.


                       Ÿ When you open a drawing, the bottom right corner of the Open Drawing
                         dialog box provides information about the version of the file and the
                         compression ratio with which it was last saved (e.g., 60% means the file
                         was 60% smaller after saving).
                       Ÿ If you try to open a drawing that is already open, and to which you have
                         made changes, a message box appears asking if you want to revert to the
                         saved version of the drawing. Click Yes to replace the open drawing with
                         the saved version. Click No to keep the changes you made.



                       Ÿ You can also open files by clicking the Open button.


Saving and closing drawings
                       CorelDRAW lets you save your files in the way that best suits your file
                       management needs. You can save only the selected objects of a drawing,
                       make a copy of a drawing by saving it with a different name, or save a
                       drawing in a format that is compatible with an earlier version of CorelDRAW.
                       There are also several vector formats you can choose from.
Save your files and
drawings in the way
that suits you best.




                       CorelDRAW offers advanced options that let you assign notes, keywords, and
                       thumbnails so you can find your files more easily in future sessions. You can
                       save fonts, textures, blends, and extrudes with the file, or save references to
                       them. These references reduce the size of your file, making it faster to open
                       and save.




24                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
          Before you close an active file, CorelDRAW asks whether or not you wish to
          save it. You can also close specific viewing windows, and close all open files
          or views using a single command.

Saving files
          You can specify a new filename for your drawing and a location in which to
          store it. If you want to save only parts of your drawing, select and save them
          under a filename that you specify.

          To save a new drawing
          1 Click File, Save As.
          2 From the Save In list box, choose the drive where you want to save the
            file.
          3 Double-click the folder in which you want to save the file.
          4 Type the filename in the File Name box and click Save.

          To save selected objects only
          1 Select the objects with the Pick tool.
          2 Click File, Save As.
          3 Enable the Selected Only check box.
          4 To keep the original drawing intact, type a different name in the File Name
            box or choose a different folder from the Save In list box.
          5 Click Save.


          Ÿ You can also use the Save As command to save a copy of an existing
            drawing. Saving a copy under a different name keeps the original intact.



          Ÿ You can also save a file by clicking the Save button.


Saving files using other options
          You can save your drawing in formats compatible with versions 5, 6, 7, or 8 of
          CorelDRAW; in vector formats other than .CDR; or with the fonts embedded.
          Embedding the fonts allows someone else to open the file without having the
          drawing’s fonts on their system.




                                                             Getting started           25
     Assigning keywords, notes, and thumbnails when you save a file can help you
     find files later without having to remember their names.

     To save a drawing in CorelDRAW 5, 6, 7, or 8 format
     1 Click File, Save As.
     2 Choose Version 5, 6, 7, or 8 from the Version list box.
     3 To keep the original drawing, type a different name in the File Name box
       or choose a different folder from the Save In list box.
     4 Click Save.


     Ÿ If you want to open your drawing in CorelDRAW version 5, 6, 7, or 8, but
       your drawing contains fonts not supplied with those versions, convert the
       text to curves using the Convert To Curves command before you save the
       file.


     To save a drawing in vector formats other than .CDR
     1 Click File, Save As.
     2 Choose one of the vector formats in the Save As Type list box.
     3 Click Save.

     To save a drawing with the fonts embedded
     1 Click File, Save As.
     2 Enable the Embed Fonts Using TrueDoc check box.

     To add notes and keywords to a file
     1 Click File, Save As.
     2 Type the information you want to record about the file in the Notes box.
        Type the keywords you want to assign to the file in the Keywords box,
        separating each keyword with a comma.
     3 Click Save.

     To set up the thumbnail of a file
     1 Do one of the following:
        Ÿ Click File, Save — saves the file for the first time



26   CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
             Ÿ Click File, Save As — changes the thumbnail of a file you saved
               previously
          2 Choose a thumbnail type from the Thumbnail list box.
          3 Click Save.


          Ÿ Keywords can contain a maximum of 37 characters.
          Ÿ By default, CorelDRAW adds a color thumbnail to a file when you save it.
            You can specify a monochrome thumbnail instead, or turn the thumbnail
            off.
          Ÿ If your drawing has more than one page, CorelDRAW uses objects from
            the active drawing page to create the thumbnail.


Saving files using Advanced Settings
          CorelDRAW lets you make your files smaller, more portable, or faster to
          open and save.
          You can save various elements of your drawing (such as textures, blends, or
          extrudes) with the drawing instead of saving a reference to them. Saving
          textures, blends, and extrudes with the drawing increases the file size, but
          causes complex drawings to open faster.

          To save a drawing using Advanced Settings
          1 Click File, Save As.
          2 Click the Advanced button.
          3 Enable one or both of the following check boxes:
             Ÿ Save Presentation Exchange (CMX) — makes the drawing readable by
               all applications that support the .CMX format. File size may increase.
             Ÿ Use Current Thumbnail — saves the drawing with the last thumbnail
               generated. This speeds up saving.
          4 In the File Optimization section, enable one or both of the following check
            boxes:
             Ÿ Use Bitmap Compression — compresses bitmaps in the drawing to
               reduce the file size
             Ÿ Use Graphic Object Compression — compresses graphic objects in the
               drawing to reduce the file size
          5 In the Textures section, enable one or both of the following check boxes:



                                                            Getting started         27
            Ÿ Save Textures With The File — allows complex drawings to open
              faster. This increases the file size.
            Ÿ Rebuild Textures When Opening The File — creates smaller files.
              Complex files may take longer to open.
         6 In the Blends And Extrudes section, enable one or both of the following
           check boxes:
            Ÿ Save Blends And Extrudes With The File — allows complex drawings
              to open faster. This increases the file size.
            Ÿ Rebuild Blends And Extrudes When Opening The File — creates
              smaller files. Complex files may take longer to open.


         Ÿ You can also access the Advanced Settings from the Options dialog box
           under Document, Save.


Creating swap disk space for temporary file storage
         You can store temporary files that are not currently in use in the swap disk
         space that you specify in CorelDRAW. If you have two hard drives or two
         partitions, you can use them to set up both a primary and a secondary swap
         disk. For best results, set the total amount of swap disk space two or three
         times larger than the size of your uncompressed open images.

         To create swap disk space for temporary file storage
         1 Click Tools, Options.
         2 In the Options dialog box, click Workspace, Memory.
         3 In the Swap Disk section, do the following:
            Ÿ From the Primary box, choose the drive letter that corresponds to the
              hard disk you want to use first to store temporary files.
            Ÿ From the Secondary box, choose the drive letter that corresponds to
              the second hard disk you want to use to store temporary files.
         4 You will need to restart CorelDRAW for the new settings to take effect.




28       CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
         Ÿ If you have customized the amount of swap disk space available, it is
           displayed in the Status Bar.
         Ÿ You can click File, Document Info to see an image’s size. The Document
           Info dialog box tells you whether the file size displayed is compressed.
           When you work with .CPT or .BMP images, the file size is always shown
           uncompressed.


Specifying how much RAM is used to store images
         You can choose how much of the available RAM on your computer is
         reserved for storing the images you open and edit. Set the amount of
         memory based on the type of work you perform and the number of
         applications you usually run simultaneously. If you increase the amount of
         memory reserved for images and find the application’s performance has
         decreased, you might need to reduce this amount so that more RAM is
         available to run CorelDRAW.

         To specify how much RAM is used to store images
         1 Click Tools, Options.
         2 In the Options dialog box, click Workspace, Memory in the list of
           categories.
            The Memory Usage section of the Memory page displays the total amount
            of memory available on your computer.
         3 In the Max box, type the percentage of the total memory you want to
           make available for images in CorelDRAW.
            The amount of memory this percentage corresponds to appears to the
            right of the Max box.
         4 You will need to restart CorelDRAW for the new settings to take effect.


         Ÿ The amount of memory allocated for images is displayed in the Status Bar.


Closing files and windows
         If you want to keep the changes made to a file, save it before closing it. If you
         try to close the file without saving, CorelDRAW asks if you want to save the
         changes before closing the file. If you don’t want to keep the changes, close
         without saving.




                                                             Getting started           29
                       The Close command on the Windows menu allows you to close the active
                       window or close all windows.

                       To close a file
                       Ÿ Click File, Close.

                       To close the active window
                       Ÿ Click Window, Close.

                       To close all windows
                       Ÿ Click Window, Close All.


Archiving files
                       Archiving is a method of saving successive versions of your drawings, and it
                       provides two main benefits: you can access previous versions of your files,
                       and you can do so without creating a large number of files that take up
                       valuable disk space.
Keep old versions of
your files and
drawings organized
by archiving them.




                       When are files archived?
                       Your files are archived when you choose to do so; archiving is not automatic.
                       You control which versions are archived, depending on how significant they
                       are to you.
                       You can archive a file as a temporary or a permanent version of the file.
                       Temporary versions are replaced by newer versions when the maximum
                       number of temporary versions for the file is reached. Permanent versions are
                       kept until you choose to delete them.




30                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
          Where do the archived files end up?
          CorelDRAW lets you designate a directory for storing archived files.
          Archived files have the same folder and filenames as your files.
          You can also keep archived files in the same directory as the original file. No
          matter where a file is archived (either to a local directory or to the versions
          directory), the filename is the same. The filename is the full path of the
          archived file, with special characters (backslash and colon) replaced with a $.

Archiving the current version of your file
          CorelDRAW lets you save successive versions of your drawings, including
          the one you are currently working on. This is called archiving, and it provides
          two main benefits: access to previous versions of your files, and more disk
          space. To archive files, you must first enable Version Control in your
          Windows Control Panel.

          To enable Version Control
          1 Click Start, Settings, Control Panel.
          2 Double-click Corel Versions.
          3 Enable the Enable Version Control check box.

          To archive the current version of your drawing
          1 Click File, Version Control, Archive Document.
          2 Enable one or more of the following check boxes:
             Ÿ Make First Version Permanent — preserves your first version as a
               permanent version. This is a useful option if the file is fairly complete;
               otherwise it is not necessary.
             Ÿ Use Compression — compresses your saved versions. This saves disk
               space, but adds to your retrieval time for larger files.
             Ÿ Archive To Single Location — saves the archive to the directory
               specified in the Corel Versions dialog box. If this box is not checked,
               CorelDRAW stores the archive in the same directory as the original
               file.
          3 Type the desired number in the Maximum Number Of Temporary
            Versions box.
             This number is not affected by the number of permanent versions you
             keep.




                                                             Getting started             31
          Ÿ When you enable the Make First Version Permanent check box, your file
            is kept until you choose to delete it.


          To set the default folder for archiving to a single location
          1 Click Start, Settings, Control Panel.
          2 Double-click Corel Versions.
          3 Click the Browse button.
          4 Double-click the folder where you want to archive your files.

Retrieving a previous version of the active file
          Opening previous versions of your archived files is easy.

          To retrieve a previous version of the active file
          1 Click File, Version Control, Retrieve From Current Archive.
          2 Select the version of the file you wish to retrieve from the Choose A
            Version To Retrieve list box.
          3 Click the Retrieve button.

          To retrieve a previous version of another archived file
          1 Click File, Version Control, Retrieve From Saved Archive.
          2 In the Look In list box, double-click the folder containing the archived file
            you wish to use.
          3 Click the filename.
          4 Click the Open button.
          5 Select a version of the file in the Choose A Version To Retrieve box.
          6 Click the Retrieve button.


Backing up your work
          It’s important to safeguard your work against power failures or system
          problems that can corrupt and destroy your files. CorelDRAW provides
          automatic saves and backup features that protect your files in case you forget
          to save them manually.




32        CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
         You can set values to specify automatic save intervals. CorelDRAW saves
         your file according to the time intervals that you set. This file is named
         BACKUP_OF_FILENAME, where Filename is the name of your file.
         Another way to safeguard your work is to instruct CorelDRAW to
         automatically create a backup copy of your image every time you save. This
         file is named AUTOBACKUP_OF_FILENAME, and is saved in the same
         folder as your CorelDRAW file.
         When a non-CorelDRAW file is opened, it opens in the CorelDRAW file
         format. This version of the file is then backed up.

Saving your images automatically
         To safeguard your work against accidents and system problems, save your
         images automatically as you work.

         To save images automatically
         1 Click Tools, Options.
         2 In the list of categories, click Workspace, Save.
         3 Enable the Auto-backup check box in the Auto-Backup section.
         4 Type a value in the Minutes box.
            The number that you type represents the time interval between
            auto-saves.
         5 Enable one of the following buttons:
            Ÿ Save Back-up To Same Folder As The CDR File
            Ÿ Always Back-up To: click the Browse button and choose a folder


         Ÿ Files created by the Auto-backup feature are named
           AUTOBACKUP_OF_FILENAME.


Creating backup copies of your images
         You can create a backup copy of an image each time you save it so that you
         always have another version of the file on your computer.

         To create backup copies of images
         1 Click Tools, Options.
         2 In the list of categories, click Workspace, Save.



                                                               Getting started        33
                        3 Enable the Make Backup On Save check box.
                           By default, CorelDRAW backs up files to the same folder in which you
                           save your document.


                        Ÿ Backup files are named BACKUP_OF_FILENAME.


Setting up the Drawing page
                        To start a drawing, you’ll need to know what page size and orientation you
                        want to use. You can change and customize the size, orientation, and layout of
                        the pages in your document according to your needs. There are also controls
                        that allow you to modify your view of the document, or modify background
                        properties such as bitmaps, color, printing options, and exporting options.
Use the page setting
options in the
Options dialog box to
adjust the
appearance of the
page.




                        You can also choose from nearly 40 predefined page sizes and orientations,
                        including standard legal and letter paper, envelopes, and slides. If you can’t
                        find the page size you require, you can create and save your own custom
                        page size.

                        Creating labels
                        CorelDRAW provides more than 800 label formats from some 40 label
                        manufacturers. You can choose a label and (in most cases) adjust it as needed.
                        You can also create and save your own original labels.
                        Each label you create should appear on a separate Drawing Page. Before you
                        print labels, however, check your printer’s warranty information. Some
                        manufacturers state that your warranty is invalidated if your labels damage
                        the printer.




34                      CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
         Setting the layout style
         CorelDRAW offers layouts for single-page documents as well as standard
         multipage publications like booklets and pamphlets. You work with the pages
         in sequential order on screen, and when you are ready to print them
         CorelDRAW automatically arranges them in the order required for printing
         and binding.
         For example, if you create a four-page newsletter using standard letter-size
         pages, you will work with the pages upright and in sequential order.
         However, the printer will need to work with printer spreads. In this example,
         printer spreads require that pages two and three be facing pages, while pages
         one and four are also facing pages. These sets of facing pages are printed on
         opposite sides of one tabloid-size sheet of paper, which is then folded in half
         to create the newsletter. But while you are still creating the newsletter, you
         can work with the pages one by one, upright and in sequential order.

Inserting, renaming, and deleting pages
         You can add, rename, and delete pages in your document. If you have a
         document with three or more pages, you can delete a range of pages.

         To insert a page
         1 Click Layout, Insert Page.
         2 Type the number of pages you want to add in the Insert Pages box.
         3 Click Before or After to specify where you want to add the page relative to
           the active page.
            In multipage documents, type a new page number in the Page box to
            change the relative page.

         To rename a page
         1 Click Layout, Rename Page.
         2 Type the name of the page in the Page Name box.

         To delete a page
         1 Click Layout, Delete Page.
         2 Type the number of the page you want to delete in the Delete Page box.

         To delete a range of pages
         1 Click Layout, Delete Page.



                                                            Getting started          35
         2 Type the number of the first page in the Delete Page box.
         3 Enable the Through To Page check box.
         4 Type the number of the last page in the box beside the Through To Page
           check box.

Setting the default page size for multipage documents
         CorelDRAW provides an array of preset page sizes to choose from, including
         standard North American and European sizes, and it also lets you create your
         own custom page sizes. You can use these settings to design a wide variety of
         publications, from small Internet graphics to newsletters or giant posters.
         In a multipage document, the page size you assign anywhere in your
         document becomes the default size for all pages. Any new pages you add to
         the document later are automatically assigned the same default page size.
         However, you can give individual pages a custom size within a multipage
         document without affecting other pages that are using the default. For
         instance, you can have a 10-page document containing letter-size pages; any
         pages you add to the document will assume the default page size (letter). But
         if you wish, you can change page two, or six, or any other individual page, to
         a different size — legal, for instance — without affecting the rest of the
         document.

         To set the default page size for a multipage document
         1 With your document open on any page, click the top of the Set Default or
           Current Page Size & Orientation button on the Property Bar.
         2 Choose a preset paper size from the Paper Type/Size list box on the
           Property Bar.

         To set the size of a single page within a multipage document
         1 On the page you want to change, click the bottom of the Set Default or
           Current Page Size & Orientation button on the Property Bar.
         2 Choose a preset paper size from the Paper Type/Size list box on the
           Property Bar.


         Ÿ Setting a page to a size that is not the default causes any Preset guidelines
           on that page to disappear.




36       CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
         Ÿ Mixed page sizes are unavailable if you have enabled the View Facing
           pages option, are creating labels, or have the document page layout set to
           anything other than full page.
         Ÿ The Set Default or Current Page Size & Orientation button is also used to
           set default and individual page orientations. For information on setting the
           default page orientation, see “Setting the default page orientation for
           multipage documents” on page 38.



         Ÿ You can also specify a single page’s size by clicking Layout, Resize Page.


Defining, saving and removing a custom page size
         If CorelDRAW doesn’t provide the page size you require, you can create your
         own. Custom page sizes are useful for creating Web graphics, icons, or
         buttons. You can create a page as large as 150 by 150 feet or as small as 1
         pixel by 1 pixel.
         Custom pages are displayed in the Paper Type/Size list box on the Property
         Bar.

         To define a custom page size
         1 Click Layout, Page Setup.
         2 Enable the Normal Paper button.
         3 Choose Custom from the Paper list box.
         4 Type the horizontal and vertical page dimensions in the Width and Height
           boxes.
         5 If required, choose a different unit of measurement from the list box that
           appears beside the Width box.
            The dimensions automatically convert when you change units.


         Ÿ You can also define a custom paper size by typing values in the Paper
           Width and Height boxes on the Property Bar.


         To save a custom page size
         1 Follow steps 1 to 4 from the previous procedure.




                                                           Getting started          37
                       2 Click the Save Custom Page button.
                       3 Type the name of the new page type in the Save Custom Page Type As
                         box.

                       To delete a custom page size
                       1 Click Layout, Page Setup.
                       2 Enable the Normal Paper button.
                       3 Choose the custom page size from the Paper list box.
                       4 Click the Delete Custom Page button, and click Yes to confirm the
                         deletion.

Setting the default page orientation for multipage documents
                       The default page orientation that you choose — landscape or portrait —
                       automatically applies to every page in a multipage document. Any new pages
                       you add after creating the document are automatically assigned the same
                       orientation.
You can set the page
orientation to
landscape or
portrait.




                       However, you can change the orientation of an individual page within a
                       multipage document without affecting the orientation of other pages using
                       the default. For instance, you can have a 10-page document using portrait
                       orientation as the default. Any new pages you add will assume the default
                       orientation (portrait). But you could change page two or six, or any other
                       individual page, to landscape orientation — without affecting the other pages.

                       To set the default page orientation for a multipage document
                       using the Property Bar
                       1 With your document open to any page, click the top half of the Set Default
                         or Current Page Size & Orientation button on the Property Bar.
                       2 Enable one of the following buttons on the Property Bar:



38                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
             Ÿ Landscape — if you want the horizontal dimension of the page to be
               greater than the vertical dimension
             Ÿ Portrait — if you want the vertical dimension of the page to be greater
               than the horizontal dimension


          Ÿ You can also set the default page orientation for a multipage document by
            clicking Layout, Switch Page Orientation.


          To set the orientation of a single page within a multipage
          document
          1 With your document open to the page whose orientation you wish to
            change, click the bottom half of the Set Default or Current Page Size &
            Orientation button on the Property Bar.
          2 Enable the Portrait button or the Landscape button on the Property Bar.


          Ÿ Setting a page to an orientation that is not the default will cause any
            Preset guidelines on that page to disappear.
          Ÿ Mixed page orientations are unavailable if you have enabled the View
            Facing pages option, are creating labels, or have the document page layout
            set to anything other than full page.
          Ÿ The Set Default or Current Page Size & Orientation button is also used to
            set default and individual page sizes. For information on setting the default
            page size, see “Setting the default page size for multipage documents” on
            page 36.


Matching page size and orientation to the current printer settings
          If the paper size and orientation don’t match the printer’s current settings, a
          message appears when you attempt to print the drawing. This message asks
          if you want CorelDRAW to match these settings automatically. You can click
          Yes, or use the following procedure to get the page properties you need.

          To match the page size and orientation to the current printer
          settings
          1 Click Layout, Page setup.
          2 In the list of categories, click Size.
          3 Enable the Normal Paper button.


                                                             Getting started           39
                      4 Enable one of the following buttons:
                         Ÿ Landscape — if you want the horizontal dimension of the page to be
                           greater than the vertical dimension
                         Ÿ Portrait — if you want the vertical dimension of the page to be greater
                           than the horizontal dimension


                      Ÿ Matching page size and orientation to the current printer settings will not
                        reorient or resize pages that were individually reoriented or resized in a
                        multipage document.


Navigating multipage documents
                      The Navigator lets you add and delete pages, and helps you view multipage
                      documents quickly without interrupting your work.
The Navigator helps
you flip through
multipage documents
quickly.




                      The Navigator appears in the bottom-left corner of the Drawing Window,
                      immediately to the left of the page tabs. It shows the total number of pages in
                      your drawing as well as the number of the active page.

                      To add, rename or delete a page, or change its size or orientation
                      Ÿ Right-click the page’s tab, and click a command.

                      To add a page at the beginning or end of the document
                      Ÿ Move to the first or last page, then click the Add Page button on the
                        Navigator.

                      To go to a specific page in the document quickly
                      Ÿ Click one of the following buttons on the Navigator:
                         Ÿ First Page button — moves you to the first page in the document


40                    CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
                          Ÿ Last Page button       — moves you to the last page in the document
                          Ÿ Forward One button — goes forward one page
                          Ÿ Back One button — goes back one page
                          Ÿ Page Number button — lets you choose a specific page number to go to

Setting the layout style
                       CorelDRAW offers layouts for single-page documents as well as standard
                       multipage publications like booklets and pamphlets. You work with the pages
                       in sequential order on screen, but when you are ready to print them,
                       CorelDRAW automatically arranges them in the order required for printing
                       and binding. Depending on the type of document you create, the printing
                       order may need to be different from the order you work in.
CorelDRAW
automatically prints
your documents to
match the layout
style you’re using.




                       The advantage of the layouts offered by CorelDRAW is that regardless of the
                       layout required to print your document, you can edit each page in upright
                       orientation in sequential order in the Drawing Window.

                       To set the layout style
                       1 Click Layout, Page Setup.
                       2 In the list of categories, click Layout.
                       3 Choose a layout style from the Layout list box.
                          Each layout style is accompanied by a short description and a graphical
                          example in the Preview window.

Viewing facing pages
                       You can display two consecutive pages on the screen at the same time. This
                       option lets you create objects that span two pages. You can specify whether
                       you want CorelDRAW to start the document on a right- or left-facing page.



                                                                           Getting started          41
          To view facing pages
          1 Click Layout, Page Setup.
          2 In the list of categories, click Layout.
          3 Enable the Facing Pages check box.

          To set the starting side of a multipage document
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
          2 Choose one of the settings from the Start On list box:
             Ÿ Left Side — starts the document on a left-facing page
             Ÿ Right Side — starts the document on a right-facing page


          Ÿ You will be unable to view facing pages if your document uses multiple
            page sizes and orientations, or a Tent Card or Top Fold Card layout style.
            The Left Side option is only available for the Full Page and Book layout
            styles.


Setting the rulers’ resolution
          When you change the resolution at which you plan to view or print your
          document, CorelDRAW adjusts the Horizontal and Vertical rulers to reflect
          the new resolution. The number of pixels equals the resolution multiplied by
          the page dimensions. For example, a document that is five inches by five
          inches at 72 dpi has 360 pixels. You can change the resolutions used by the
          Horizontal and Vertical rulers to configure the rulers.
          For information about using pixels as the unit for a drawing, see “Setting
          ruler units for Internet graphics” on page 58.

          To set the rulers’ resolution
          1 Click Layout, Page Setup.
          2 Enable the Normal Paper button.
          3 Choose a resolution from the Resolution list box.
             If required, choose Other, and type custom values in the Horizontal
             Resolution and Vertical Resolution boxes.




42        CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
Adding and removing a page background
                     You can color the background of the Drawing Page with a solid color or a
                     bitmap. You can also print and export backgrounds with your drawing. When
                     using a bitmap to create a background, specify the dimensions of the bitmap
                     and link the graphic to (or embed it in) your document.
You can add a page
background to
enhance the
appearance of a
document.




                     When you link a graphic to your document, your document automatically
                     reflects any changes you make to the source graphic. Embedded objects
                     remain the same. Remember to include any linked graphics when sending
                     the file to someone.

                     To color a page background using a solid color
                     1 Click Layout, Page Setup.
                     2 In the list of categories, click Background.
                     3 Enable the Solid button.
                     4 Choose the color you want from the list box.
                        If you don’t see an appropriate color, click the Other button. The Select
                        Color dialog box opens, allowing you to create a custom color or to choose
                        a color from any of the color models provided with CorelDRAW.

                     To color a page background using a bitmap
                     1 Click Layout, Page Setup.
                     2 In the list of categories, click Background.
                     3 Enable the Bitmap button.
                     4 Click the Browse button.
                     5 Choose the file format of the bitmap you want to import from the Files Of
                       Type box.




                                                                       Getting started         43
     6 Choose the drive and folder where the file is stored from the Look In list
       box.
     7 Double-click the folder and the filename.

     To link or embed the bitmap background
     1 Follow all of the steps from the previous procedure.
     2 Enable one of the following buttons:
        Ÿ Linked — links the bitmap externally
        Ÿ Embedded — adds the bitmap to your document

     To alter the size of the bitmap background
     1 Follow all of the steps from the “To color a page background using a
       bitmap” procedure.
     2 Enable the Custom Size button.
     3 Do one of the following:
        Ÿ Enable the Maintain Aspect Ratio check box — maintains the
          horizontal and vertical proportions of the bitmap
        Ÿ Disable the Maintain Aspect Ratio check box — specifies
          nonproportional height and width values
     4 Type values in the H (horizontal) and V (vertical) boxes to specify the
       background width.


     Ÿ You can set the size of a bitmap to its default size by enabling the Default
       Size button.

     To make the background printable and exportable
     1 Follow all of the steps from the “To color a page background using a
       bitmap” procedure.
     2 Enable the Print And Export Background check box.
        Disabling the check box allows you to use the background for display
        purposes only.

     To remove a page background
     1 Click Tools, Options.




44   CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
         2 In the list of categories, double-click Document, Page, and click
           Background.
         3 Enable the No Background button.

Hiding and displaying the page border and bleed
         The page border — the shadowed rectangle that appears in the Drawing
         Window — indicates the dimensions and orientation of the Drawing Page.
         Although displayed by default, you can hide the page border while you work.
         However, it’s a good idea to display the frame again before printing to ensure
         that your drawing fits on the page.
         A bleed is the extra bit of color, image or text that goes over the edge of the
         page so that after the printer cuts, binds, and trims it, there is no white space
         between the edges of your image and the edge of the paper. If you want a
         bleed, ensure that you draw your image so that it extends a few millimetres
         over the page borders. The bit extending over the borders is called the bleed,
         and CorelDRAW displays it with dotted lines along the page borders.

         To hide or display the page border
         1 Click Tools, Options.
         2 In the list of categories, double-click Document, and click Page.
         3 Do one of the following:
            Ÿ Disable the Show Page Border check box — hides the page border
            Ÿ Enable the Show Page Border check box — shows the page border

         To hide or display the bleed
         1 Click Tools, Options.
         2 In the list of categories, double-click Document, and click Page.
         3 Do one of the following:
            Ÿ Disable the Show Bleed Area check box — hides the bleed
            Ÿ Enable the Show Bleed Area check box — shows the bleed


         Ÿ Viewing the bleed on screen is not the same as setting a bleed limit for
           printing; the dotted line that indicates the bleed is a visual guideline only.
           You may also need to set a bleed limit in the Print dialog box when you
           prepare your drawing for printing. For more information on setting a bleed
           limit in the Print dialog box, see “Setting a bleed limit” on page 722.



                                                             Getting started          45
                        Ÿ You can display the bleed quickly by clicking View, Bleed.


Starting new documents with default options
                        You can begin new documents with default options of your choice, presetting
                        such features as guidelines, page size and orientation, grid, and rulers.

                        To start new documents with specific page layout options
                        1 Click Tools, Options, Document.
                        2 Enable the Save Options As Defaults For New Documents check box.

Creating labels
                        CorelDRAW offers more than 800 predesigned label formats from some 40
                        label manufacturers for you to choose from. The list uses a file and folder
                        setup (similar to Windows Explorer) and the label formats are arranged
                        alphabetically by manufacturer. You can preview the dimensions of the labels,
                        and see how they fit on a printed page. If CorelDRAW does not provide a
                        label style that meets your requirements, you can modify an existing style or
                        create and save your own original style. You can also remove any label style
                        from the list.
You can create labels
quickly and easily
using preset label
styles.




                        To use a preset label style
                        1 Click Layout, Page Setup.
                        2 In the list of categories, click Label.
                        3 Enable the Labels button.
                        4 Choose the manufacturer name from the list.
                        5 Choose the label style you want from the list.



46                      CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
       To add a custom label style
       1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
       2 Double-click the manufacturer name, and choose the label style closest to
         the one you want in the list.
       3 Click the Customize Label button.
       4 Adjust the label size, margins, gutters, and the number of labels appearing
         on each sheet by typing values in the boxes provided.
       5 Click the Add button.
       6 Type a name for the new label style in the Save As box.


       Ÿ You will be unable to create labels if your document uses multiple page
         sizes and orientations.


Using consistent settings for new documents
       When you close a CorelDRAW file, certain settings are automatically
       retained. These include all settings currently displayed in the Options dialog
       box, as well as all toolbar settings. CorelDRAW also remembers which
       Docker and Color Palette you were using when you closed the drawing.
       The Document page lets you save settings so that CorelDRAW always opens
       new drawings using them. The following table outlines each setting type and
       the individual settings it comprises.

       Setting type                  What CorelDRAW saves
       General options               The current general document settings
       Page options                  The current page size and orientation, label settings, print layout, page
                                     border, and page background settings
       Grid And Ruler options        The current grid, ruler, snap to grid, and scale settings
       Guideline options             The current guideline and snap to guideline settings
       Styles                        The current default fill, outline, fill settings, and text properties
       Save options                  The current advanced file saving settings, including thumbnail, file
                                     optimization, textures, blends, and extrusions (accessed by clicking the
                                     Advanced button in the Save Drawing dialog box)
       Publish To Internet options   The current publish to Internet settings




                                                                         Getting started                     47
Saving settings for new documents
                          You can create a basic work environment that will be the same every time
                          you start a new drawing or document. For example, if you most often display
                          inches on the rulers, enable the Snap To Grid command, and use a drawing
                          scale of 1:16, you can save these settings so that they are used by default for
                          all new documents.

                          To apply the settings of the active drawing to all new documents
                          1 Click Tools, Options.
                          2 In the list of categories, click Document.
                          3 Enable the Save Options As Defaults For New Documents check box.
                          4 Enable the check boxes that correspond to the settings you want to use
                            for each new document.


Using the Scrapbook
                          The Scrapbook allows you to browse your computer’s folders, view
                          collections of clipart and photographs, import files into your drawing, apply
                          your favorite fills and outlines, and browse File Transfer Protocol (FTP)
                          sites.
The Scrapbook is a
folder filled with
clipart, photos, fills,
outlines, FTP sites,
and other items you
can use in your
drawings.




                          The Scrapbook Docker window is divided into six pages: Browse, Clipart,
                          Photos, Favorite Fills And Outlines, 3D Models, and FTP Sites. To open the
                          Scrapbook to a specific page, choose that page from the Scrapbook submenu
                          in the Tools menu.
                          The Browse page lets you import items into your document from any folder
                          in your computer. The Clipart and Photos pages let you import clipart and
                          photo files into your document from the Clipart and Photo CD-ROMs. You
                          can drag items to the Browse page directly from your document.
                          The Favorite Fills And Outlines page lets you apply preset fills and outlines
                          to objects in your document. You can also save an object’s fill and outline


48                        CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
          properties so that you can apply them to other objects. The FTP Sites page
          lets you browse any FTP site and import or download files from those sites.

Browsing files, clipart, and photos using the Scrapbook
          The Scrapbook’s Browse page provides a searchable view of your computer’s
          folder and file hierarchy. This page serves two main functions: it allows you
          to search your computer for a file you want to import, and after you find the
          file, it allows you to drag it directly into your document. This function is
          especially useful for importing objects or files created using one of the
          applications in the CorelDRAW Graphics Suite or other compatible
          applications.
          The Clipart and Photo pages of the Scrapbook also allow you to search for the
          type of file you want and allow you to drag it into your drawing. The Browse,
          Clipart, and Photo pages let you do basic file management tasks.

Importing, opening, and printing files, clipart, and photos using the
Scrapbook
          The Scrapbook makes it easy to import, open, and print files, clipart, and
          photos from your computer’s hard drive or from the clipart CD-ROM
          included with CorelDRAW.

          To import files, clipart, or photos into your document
          1 Do one of the following:
             Ÿ Click Tools, Scrapbook, Browse — opens files stored on your computer
             Ÿ Click Tools, Scrapbook, Clipart — opens a clipart image or object
             Ÿ Click Tools, Scrapbook, Photos — opens a photograph
          2 Open the folder that contains the file you want.
          3 Drag the file’s icon from the Scrapbook to the Drawing Window.


          Ÿ You can also copy and paste into your document by using the commands in
            the right mouse button Context menu.


          To open a file, clipart, or photo file
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
          2 Do one of the following:




                                                               Getting started         49
             Ÿ Double-click the file’s icon.
             Ÿ Right-click the file’s icon, and click Open.

          To print a file, clipart, or photo
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the procedure “To import files, clipart, or
            photos into your document.”
          2 Right-click the file’s icon, and click Print.

Managing files, clipart, and photos using the Scrapbook
          After you use the Scrapbook’s Browse, Clipart, or Photos pages to find a file,
          you can cut, copy, delete, or rename it, create a shortcut to it, or view its
          properties.

          To rename a file, view its properties, or to cut, copy, delete, or
          rename it
          Ÿ Right-click the file’s icon, and click a command.

Browsing the preset fills and outlines using the Scrapbook
          The Scrapbook’s Favorite Fills And Outlines page offers preset fills and
          outlines that you can add to objects. You apply these fills and outlines to
          objects the same way you add items from the Browse, Clipart, Photos, and
          3D Models pages: by dragging them from the Scrapbook to your document.
          In this case, however, you drag the fill or outline to a specific object.
          The Favorite Fills And Outlines page also allows you to save your own
          favorite fills and outlines for future use. This allows you to apply the fills and
          outlines you use most without having to recreate them each time.
          For information about applying fills and outlines to objects, see “Filling and
          outlining objects” on page 211.

Saving a fill or outline on the Scrapbook’s Favorite Fills And Outlines
page
          The Scrapbook’s Favorite Fills And Outlines page allows you to save an
          object’s fill and outline properties so that you can apply them to other objects
          in your document. By saving a fill or outline, you won’t have to recreate it
          each time you want to apply it to an object.

          To save a fill or outline in the Scrapbook
          1 Click Tools, Scrapbook, Favorite Fills And Outlines.



50        CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
          2 Open the folder in which you want to save the fill or outline.
          3 Using the Pick tool, drag the object that has the fill or outline you want to
            the Scrapbook.
          4 In the Save A Favorite dialog box, enable or disable the check boxes to
            indicate the fill and outline properties you want to save.


          Ÿ You can also save a favorite fill and outline in the Scrapbook by dragging
            the object with the right mouse button to the Scrapbook.
          Ÿ To display the contents of a folder, double-click its icon. If you want to
            move up one level in the folder hierarchy, click the Up One Level button.


Applying a favorite fill or outline to an object
          The Scrapbook’s Favorite Fills And Outlines page offers access to preset fills
          and outlines provided by CorelDRAW, as well as fills or outlines that you’ve
          created and stored. You can apply these fills and outlines to any object you
          create in CorelDRAW. Fills appear in closed shapes only. For added
          convenience, the fill and outline icons display thumbnails for each file.

          To apply a favorite fill or outline to an object
          1 Click Tools, Scrapbook, Favorite Fills And Outlines.
          2 Open the folder that contains the fill or outline you want to apply.
          3 Drag the icon of your favorite fill or outline to the object.


          Ÿ You can also apply a favorite fill or outline by selecting an object with the
            Pick tool, then double-clicking the icon that represents the fill or outline.


Managing favorite fills and outlines using the Scrapbook
          After you use the Scrapbook’s Favorite Fills And Outlines page to find a file,
          you can use the right mouse button to access a full set of file management
          commands.

          To cut, copy, delete, or rename a file, or to create a shortcut or
          view its properties
          Ÿ Right-click the file’s icon, and click a command.




                                                               Getting started           51
Browsing FTP sites using the Scrapbook
         Using the Scrapbook, you can connect, either anonymously or by supplying a
         user name and password, to any File Transfer Protocol (FTP) site. After you
         connect to a site, you can browse its contents for files to include in your
         document. When you find a file you want to use, you can import it into your
         document or download a copy to your local drive. You can’t upload files from
         your document to the FTP Sites page.
         Initially, you connect to an FTP site by typing its address. After you connect
         to a site, you can create a shortcut to the site so that you don’t have to retype
         its address each time you visit. Creating shortcuts is the easiest way to
         access the sites you use most often. However, if you choose not to create a
         shortcut, you can connect to a site by retyping its address. CorelDRAW also
         maintains a history of the last eight sites to which you’ve connected.
         A shortcut to Corel’s FTP site (ftp.corel.com) is saved as your first favorite
         on the Scrapbook’s FTP Sites page.

Connecting to FTP sites
         Most FTP sites let you connect anonymously to the site by typing an address
         — for example, ftp.corel.com. However, some FTP sites are restricted and
         you cannot access them unless you supply a valid user name and password.
         After you connect to a site, you can create a shortcut to it so that you don’t
         have to retype the address each time you visit. Creating shortcuts is the
         easiest way to access the sites you use most often.

         To connect anonymously to an FTP site
         1 Click Tools, Scrapbook, FTP Sites.
         2 On the Scrapbook’s FTP Sites page, right-click a blank area, and click Go
           To Site.
         3 Enable the Perform an Anonymous Login check box.
         4 In the Enter FTP Site Name dialog box, do one of the following:
            Ÿ Type the address of the site to which you want to connect.
            Ÿ Choose an address from the list box.

         To connect to an FTP site by supplying a user name and password
         1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
         2 Disable the Perform An Anonymous Login check box.




52       CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
          3 Click OK.
          4 In the Enter Username And Password dialog box, type the appropriate
            information in the User Name and Password boxes.


          Ÿ To maintain the security of a restricted FTP site, your user name and
            password are not saved with the site if you save it as a favorite. You are
            required to type your user name and password each time you connect to a
            restricted FTP site.


          To create a shortcut to a favorite FTP site
          Ÿ Right-click a blank area in the favorite site, and click Save Site.
             The shortcut appears as a folder on the Scrapbook’s FTP Sites page.

          To connect to an FTP site using a shortcut
          1 Double-click a shortcut on the Scrapbook’s FTP Sites page.
          2 In the Enter Username And Password dialog box, perform an anonymous
            login or supply a user name and password.


          Ÿ If you choose not to create a shortcut, you can connect to a site by either
            retyping its address or choosing the address in the Enter FTP Site Name
            dialog box.
          Ÿ You can also log in by right-clicking a shortcut, then clicking Browse.


Obtaining files from FTP sites
          After you connect to an FTP site, you can browse the site for files to include
          in your document. When you find a file you want to use, you can import it
          into your document, download a copy to your local drive, or drag it to your
          document.

          To open a folder within an FTP site
          1 Click Tools, Scrapbook, FTP Sites.
          2 Connect to the FTP site you want to browse.
          3 Do one of the following:




                                                              Getting started         53
          Ÿ In the FTP site, double-click a folder.
          Ÿ Right-click a folder, and click Open.

       To import a file into your document from an FTP site
       1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
       2 Do one of the following:
          Ÿ Double-click the file.
          Ÿ Right-click the file, and click Import.

       To save a file to your local drive from an FTP site
       1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the procedure “To open a folder within an FTP
         site.”
       2 Right-click the file, and click Get File.
       3 In the Save As dialog box, select the drive and folder where you want to
         save the file.
       4 Type a name for the file in the File Name box.
       5 Choose the file format in which you want to save the file from the Save As
         Type list box.

       To drag a file to your document from an FTP site
       1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the procedure “To open a folder within an FTP
         site.”
       2 Drag the file from the Scrapbook to your document.


       Ÿ You can’t upload files from your document to the FTP Sites page.



       Ÿ You can drag a file using the right mouse button. When you release the
         mouse button, a pop-up menu appears, allowing you to click the Drop
         CorelDRAW Internet File Data command.


Using the rulers, grid, and guidelines
       The rulers, grid, and guidelines help you draw and arrange objects with
       precision. The rulers are adjustable and give you a sense of location and size
       in the Drawing Window. The grid is also adjustable and is superimposed on


54     CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
                        your drawing to help you draw and align objects precisely. Guidelines are
                        lines that you add to the Drawing Window to help you align objects. By
                        default, guidelines do not appear when you print your work; you can set them
                        to print using the controls in the Object Manager. For more information
                        about the Object Manager, see “Using the Object Manager” on page 186.
                        How and when to use the rulers, grid, and guidelines is up to you; you can
                        set the properties that control how these tools operate in your drawing. You
                        will probably find it helpful to ensure that the rulers, grid, and guidelines are
                        set up the way you want before you start adding objects to a drawing.
                        Although you can change their settings at any time — for instance, viewing
                        the grid as lines and then changing it to dots, or moving the guidelines
                        around the Drawing Window — you’ll probably find that you work more
                        quickly if you set up the rulers, grid, and guidelines first.

Using the rulers and grid
                        The on-screen rulers help you determine the size and position of objects in
                        your drawing. The rulers can be particularly effective when you use them to
                        position objects when dragging them with the mouse. As you move the
                        mouse pointer around the Drawing Window, the rulers find your current
                        position relative to their origin (the position where the rulers’ 0 points
                        intersect). The Status Bar displays the mouse pointer’s position by default.
                        The rulers can display the unit of measurement that best suits your drawing.
                        The grid works with the rulers to help you align and position objects
                        accurately. CorelDRAW displays the grid as a series of intersecting lines
                        spaced according to settings you specify. Displaying the grid is an easy and
                        accurate way to position objects relative to one another and to the Drawing
                        Page. In addition, you can snap objects to the grid to ensure they
                        automatically line up with the grid when you move them.
The grid and rules
work together to help
you set an object’s
size and position.




                        Setting a drawing scale
                        You can increase the effectiveness of the rulers and grid by establishing a
                        drawing scale that relates all distances in the drawing to distances in the real


                                                                             Getting started           55
                        world. For example, if you create a technical drawing in which you want to
                        show large objects on a small page, you can adjust the drawing scale
                        accordingly.

Setting ruler parameters
                        The rulers can help you determine the size and position of objects. Before
                        using the rulers, determine the position of the ruler origin — the place
                        where the rulers’ 0 points intersect. Putting the ruler origin exactly where
                        you want it on the Drawing Page ensures that the ruler coordinates begin
                        from the exact location you need.
Drag the ruler
intersection to the
Drawing Window to
reposition the ruler
origin.




                        In addition to positioning the ruler origin, you can move the rulers within the
                        Drawing Window so that you can use them most effectively. For example,
                        you can move the rulers over your drawing to create or move an object with
                        precision.
Reposition the rulers
to create or move
objects with
precision.




                        To set the ruler origin
                        1 Click Tools, Options.
                        2 In the list of categories, double-click Document, and click Rulers.
                        3 Type values in the Horizontal Origin and Vertical Origin boxes to set the
                          location of the origin.


56                      CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
          Ÿ The values you specify represent the position of the ruler origin relative
            to the bottom-left corner of the Drawing Page. For example, if you set 1.0
            as the horizontal coordinate and 5.0 as the vertical coordinate,
            CorelDRAW places the ruler origin 1 inch to the right and 5 inches up
            from the bottom-left corner of the Drawing Page.



          Ÿ You can also set the ruler origin by dragging the ruler intersection point
            onto the Drawing Window.


          To reposition the rulers
          Ÿ Do one of the following:
             Ÿ Hold down SHIFT, and drag the ruler to a new position.
             Ÿ Hold down SHIFT, and drag the ruler intersection point to move both
               rulers simultaneously.

          To return a ruler to its previous position
          Ÿ Hold down SHIFT, and double-click the ruler.


          Ÿ You can open the Rulers page in the Options dialog box by double-clicking
            either of the rulers in the Drawing Window.


Setting ruler units
          You can change the units of measurement displayed on the Horizontal and
          Vertical rulers. CorelDRAW provides an array of units, ranging from points,
          millimeters, and inches to larger units such as meters, kilometers, and miles.
          Use the unit setting that best suits the type and size of drawing you want to
          create.

          To set ruler units using the same units for the horizontal and
          vertical rulers
          1 Click Tools, Options.
          2 In the list of categories, double-click Document, and click Rulers.
          3 Enable the Same Units For Horizontal And Vertical Rulers check box, and
            choose a unit of measurement from the Horizontal list box and Vertical list
            box.


                                                             Getting started         57
          To set ruler units using different units for the horizontal and
          vertical rulers
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
          2 Disable the Same Units For Horizontal And Vertical Rulers check box, and
            choose units of measurement from the Horizontal list box and the Vertical
            list box.


          Ÿ When you change the ruler units, the grid frequency automatically
            converts to maintain the same relative distance between lines on the grid.
            For instance, if your preference is to have four lines per inch, and you
            change the ruler units to centimetres, CorelDRAW will automatically
            convert the grid frequency to the right number of lines per centimetre —
            in this case, one line every 1.6 centimetres.



          Ÿ Enable the Show Fractions check box if you want the rulers to display
            measurements in fractions instead of decimals.
          Ÿ You can also change the units of measurement on the rulers by choosing a
            unit of measurement for the Horizontal and Vertical rulers from the
            Drawing Units list box on the Property Bar.


Setting ruler units for Internet graphics
          When creating a graphic for Internet use, it is usually best to use pixels as
          your ruler unit. Using pixels and setting a horizontal and vertical resolution
          for your graphic ensures that it looks the same regardless of what application
          is used to display it.
          For more information, see “Setting up the Drawing page” on page 34.

          To display ruler measurements in pixels
          1 Click Tools, Options.
          2 In the list of categories, double-click Document, and click Rulers.
          3 Choose Pixels from the Horizontal list box.
          4 Enable the Same Units For Horizontal And Vertical Rulers check box.
          5 Click the Resolution button.
          6 Type a value in the Horizontal Resolution box.
          7 Do one of the following:


58        CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
             Ÿ To make the horizontal and vertical resolutions the same, enable the
               Identical Values check box.
             Ÿ To make the horizontal and vertical resolutions different from each
               other, disable the Identical Values check box, and type a value in the
               Vertical Resolution box.

Setting ruler precision marks
          You can choose how many precision marks appear between each full unit
          mark or “tick” on the Horizontal and Vertical rulers.

          To set the number of tick division marks
          1 Click Tools, Options.
          2 In the list of categories, double-click Document, and click Rulers.
          3 Choose the option you want from the Tick Divisions list box.

Setting the drawing scale
          You can set the scale for your drawing. In CorelDRAW, the scale represents a
          ratio between the drawing (page distance) and the real world (world
          distance). For example, if you choose a drawing scale of 1:10, one unit on the
          ruler corresponds to 10 units of “real” distance. Setting a drawing scale is
          particularly useful when creating a technical or architectural drawing in
          which you need to draw a large item on a relatively small page.
          You can choose from preset scales or create a custom scale to suit your
          needs.

          To choose a preset drawing scale
          1 Click Tools, Options.
          2 In the list of categories, double-click Document, and click Rulers.
          3 Click the Edit Scale button.
          4 Choose a drawing scale from the Typical Scales list box.

          To create a custom drawing scale
          1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
          2 Choose Custom from the Typical Scales list box.
          3 Type a value in the Page Distance box to set the part of the scale
            represented in the drawing.




                                                            Getting started             59
                      4 Choose a unit for the page distance from the list box.
                      5 Type a value in the World Distance box to set the distance you want
                        represented by each unit of page distance.


                      Ÿ If you want to change the World Distance units, change the Horizontal
                        ruler units.
                      Ÿ If the drawing scale is set to anything other than 1:1, the Vertical ruler
                        units will always be the same as the Horizontal ruler units. For more
                        information about changing ruler units, see “Setting ruler units” on page
                        57.


Setting grid parameters
                      You can set the spacing between grid lines using two options: frequency and
                      spacing. Frequency sets the distance between grid lines according to how
                      many grid lines you want per horizontal and vertical unit. Spacing sets this
                      distance by specifying the exact distance you want between each line. The
                      grid acts the same way no matter which option you choose.
                      By default, CorelDRAW displays the grid as lines resembling graph paper.
                      You can choose to display the grid as dots, which are not as noticeable. The
                      points where horizontal and vertical lines intersect represent grid dots. The
                      frequency or spacing settings you specify apply to both lines and dots.
Displaying the grid
as lines.




                      To set the distance between grid lines
                      1 Click Tools, Options.
                      2 In the list of categories, double-click Document, and click Grid.
                      3 Click one of the following buttons:




60                    CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
             Ÿ Frequency — sets the grid spacing as a number of lines per unit of
               measurement selected
             Ÿ Spacing — specifies the distance between each grid line
          4 Type values in the Horizontal and Vertical boxes.

          To display the grid as dots
          1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
          2 Click the Show Grid As Dots button.


          Ÿ Set high Frequency values or low Spacing values for added precision.


Using Snap To Grid
          The Snap To Grid feature helps you align objects precisely. When you enable
          Snap To Grid, objects you move or draw automatically snap to the grid so that
          they line up vertically and horizontally with the nearest grid marker.

          To have objects snap to the grid
          1 Click Tools, Options.
          2 In the list of categories, double-click Document, and click Grid.
          3 Enable the Snap To Grid check box.


          Ÿ You can also make objects snap to the grid by clicking the Snap to Grid
            button on the Property Bar, or by clicking View, Snap To Grid.


Displaying the rulers and the grid
          You can choose when and how you want to display the rulers and the grid. If
          screen space is limited, you might choose to hide the rulers and display them
          only when you need them. Or, if you want to view your drawing as it will
          appear when you print it, you can hide the grid and display it later. The rulers
          and grid maintain their settings even when you hide them.




                                                              Getting started          61
                      To display or hide the rulers
                      Ÿ Click View, Rulers.
                         If no check mark appears next to the command name, the rulers are
                         hidden. If a check mark appears, the rulers are displayed.

                      To display or hide the grid
                      Ÿ Click View, Grid.
                         If no check mark appears next to the command name, the grid is hidden. If
                         a check mark appears, the grid is displayed.

Working with guidelines
                      Guidelines are lines that you can place anywhere in the Drawing Window to
                      help you align and position objects. You can create any number of Horizontal,
                      Vertical, and Slanted guidelines and save them with your drawing. You can
                      also enable snapping to guidelines so that objects automatically align with the
                      guidelines when moved or drawn nearby.
Use guidelines to
help you create,
align, and position
objects in the
Drawing Window.




                      You can select, rotate, nudge, duplicate, and delete guidelines as you would
                      other objects. You can choose any color for your guidelines, but selected
                      guidelines always appear red. You can also hide the guideline layer using the
                      Object Manager. For information about the Object Manager, see “Using the
                      Object Manager” on page 186.
                      By default, guidelines do not appear in printed copies of your work. If you
                      want to print guidelines, you can do using the Object Manager. For more
                      information, see “Enabling and disabling the printing of a layer” on page 197.

Adding standard guidelines
                      You can set up precise Horizontal, Vertical, and Slanted guidelines. You set up
                      Horizontal and Vertical guidelines based on the horizontal or vertical distance
                      from the 0 point on the appropriate ruler. Conversely, you set up Slanted


62                    CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
                         guidelines based on two specific ruler coordinates or one coordinate and an
                         angle. You can align objects along a guideline visually or have them snap to
                         the guideline for exact positioning.
You can create
horizontal and
vertical guidelines by
dragging from a
ruler to the Drawing
Window




                         For more speed than precision, use the mouse to add guidelines to your
                         drawing. You can create Horizontal and Vertical guidelines by dragging from a
                         ruler to the Drawing Window. To create Slanted guidelines, rotate a
                         Horizontal or Vertical guideline.
                         Any guidelines you add appear on every page of a multipage document
                         except for individually resized or reoriented pages.
                         You can begin all new documents with the same preset guidelines if you
                         choose.

                         To add a Horizontal or Vertical guideline
                         1 Click View, Guidelines Setup.
                         2 In the list of categories, choose Horizontal or Vertical.
                         3 Type a location for the guideline (relative to the 0 point on the Horizontal
                           or Vertical ruler) in the box.
                         4 Choose a unit from the Units list box.
                         5 Click the Add button.


                         Ÿ To place a guideline below or to the left of the 0 point (for Horizontal or
                           Vertical guidelines, respectively), type negative numbers in the boxes.



                         Ÿ You can also add a guideline by clicking on the Horizontal or Vertical ruler
                           and dragging onto the Drawing page.




                                                                             Getting started             63
         To add a Slanted guideline
         1 Click View, Guidelines Setup.
         2 In the list of categories, choose Slanted.
         3 Choose a method of setting the guideline from the Specify list box.
            Set two coordinates or one coordinate and an angle. For example, if you
            choose Angle And 1 Point, you must set coordinates in the X and Y boxes
            and an angle in the Angle box. The guideline you create passes through
            that coordinate at the angle you set.
         4 Type the endpoint coordinates relative to the 0,0 point on the rulers in the
           X and Y boxes.
         5 If you’re using the Angle And 1 Point option, type an angle value in the
           Angle box.
         6 Click the Add button.


         Ÿ You can turn an existing horizontal or vertical guideline into a slanted
           guideline by clicking on the guideline twice so the rotation and skewing
           handles appear.


         To begin all new documents with preset guidelines
         1 In the Tools menu, click Options, Document.
         2 Enable the Save Options As Defaults For New Documents check box.
         3 Enable the Guideline Options check box.
         4 Disable the checkboxes beside options you do not want.


         Ÿ Double-clicking a guideline opens the Guidelines Setup page of the
           Options dialog box.


Adding preset guidelines
         Preset guidelines make it easy to apply frequently used guidelines to your
         drawings. You can create your own presets, and you can apply those presets
         to all new documents. If you resize or reorient the page after applying a
         preset, the guidelines regenerate in the appropriate places.




64       CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
          Preset guidelines are available only on default pages in multipage documents,
          and not on individually resized or oriented pages. For information about
          setting up documents, see “Setting up the Drawing Page” on page 34.

          To add preset guidelines
          1 Click View, Guidelines Setup.
          2 In the list of categories, choose Preset.
          3 Enable one of the following buttons:
             Ÿ Corel Presets — lets you choose one or more of the different presets
               offered by CorelDRAW
             Ÿ User Defined Presets — lets you define your own presets
          4 Enable the check boxes beside the options you want.
             If you’re using User Defined Presets, type the values you want in the
             Margins, Columns and Grid boxes.
          5 Click the Apply Presets button.

Positioning guidelines
          You can move guidelines to positions that better suit your needs after you’ve
          begun drawing. There are two ways to position guidelines that have already
          been set: visually, by selecting them and dragging them with the mouse; or
          with greater precision, using the Options dialog box.

          To position Horizontal or Vertical guidelines using the mouse
          Ÿ Click on the guideline and drag it anywhere in the Drawing Window.

          To position a Slanted guideline using the mouse
          Ÿ Double-click it, and rotate it as you would any other object until you get
            the angle you want.

          To position Horizontal or Vertical guidelines precisely
          1 Click View, Guidelines Setup.
          2 In the list of categories, choose Horizontal or Vertical.
          3 Choose a guideline from the list at the left side of the dialog box.
          4 Type a new location relative to the 0 point on the Horizontal or Vertical
            ruler.




                                                              Getting started           65
            If you want to move the guideline to the left of or below the 0 point (for a
            Vertical or Horizontal guideline, respectively), type a negative number.
         5 Choose a unit from the units list box, if required.
         6 Click the Move button.

         To position a Slanted guideline
         1 Click View, Guidelines Setup.
         2 In the list of categories, choose Slanted.
         3 Choose a guideline from the list.
         4 Choose a method of moving the guideline from the Specify list box.
         5 Type the endpoint coordinates relative to the 0,0 point on the rulers in the
           X and Y boxes.
         6 If you’re using the Angle And 1 Point option, type an angle value in the
           Angle box.
         7 Click the Move button.


         Ÿ Repositioning a preset guideline changes it into a standard guideline.
           Resizing or reorienting the page causes the original preset guideline to
           regenerate.
         Ÿ Selected guidelines are always red.


Using Snap To Guidelines
         The Snap To Guidelines feature helps you align objects precisely. When you
         enable Snap To Guidelines, objects you move or draw near a guideline
         automatically snap so that they line up with the guidelines. Objects snap to
         guidelines in two ways. With Horizontal and Vertical guidelines, the edges of
         an object’s selection box snap to the guidelines. With all types of guidelines,
         the point you click on in the object when dragging it will snap to guidelines.

         To use Snap To Guidelines
         1 Click View, Guidelines Setup.
         2 Enable the Snap To Guidelines check box.




66       CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
                     To centre objects on guidelines
                     1 Click View, Snap to Guidelines, and make sure there is a check mark
                       beside Snap to Guidelines.
                     2 Select an object and move it over a guideline until its center of rotation
                       snaps to the guideline.


                     Ÿ Objects also snap to the point where two guidelines intersect.



                     Ÿ You can also snap objects to guidelines by clicking the Snap To Guidelines
                       button on the Property Bar, or by clicking View, Snap to Guidelines.


Displaying guidelines
                     You can alter how guidelines are displayed in a drawing at any time. You’ll
                     find it best to have guidelines showing when you’re drawing and positioning
                     objects. However, you might find it useful to hide them when you want your
                     drawing to look like it will when you print it.
You can change the
way guidelines are
displayed on the
page by coloring,
repositioning, or
hiding them.




                     You can change the colors of both default guideline and new guidelines you
                     create.

                     To display or hide guidelines
                     Ÿ Click View, Guidelines.


                     Ÿ You can also display guidelines by enabling the Show Guidelines check
                       box on the Guidelines page in the Options dialog box.




                                                                        Getting started             67
         To change the color of a guideline
         Ÿ Do one of the following:
            Ÿ Drag a color from the Color Palette onto the guideline.
            Ÿ Select the guideline and right-click on a color in the Color Palette.
            You have to deselect the guideline to see the new color, since selected
            guidelines are always red.

Locking guidelines
         Locking a guideline prevents it from being selected, moved, or deleted
         accidentally. You can unlock locked guidelines if you decide to move or delete
         it.

         To lock a guideline
         1 Select the guideline.
         2 Click Arrange, Lock Object.

         To unlock a guideline
         1 Select the guideline.
         2 Click Arrange, Unlock Object.


         Ÿ You can also lock and unlock a guideline by right-clicking it, and clicking
           Lock or Unlock Object.


Deleting standard guidelines
         You can delete guidelines by selecting them with the Pick tool, then pressing
         DELETE. If you remove a guideline from a multipage document, it is
         removed from all pages.

         To delete a guideline
         1 Click View, Guidelines Setup.
         2 In the list of categories, click Horizontal, Vertical, or Angle.
         3 Choose the guideline.
         4 Click the Delete button.




68       CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
          To delete all Horizontal, Vertical, or Slanted guidelines
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
          2 Click the Clear All button.

          To delete a locked guideline
          Ÿ Right-click the guideline, and click Unlock Object.


          Ÿ You can select multiple guidelines by holding down SHIFT while selecting
            them.
          Ÿ You can also use the Guidelines dialog box to delete one, some, or all of
            the guidelines in the active document.


Deleting preset guidelines
          You must delete preset guidelines using the Guidelines page of the Options
          dialog box. If you delete a preset guideline any other way, the guideline
          regenerates when you resize or reorient the page.

          To delete a preset guideline
          1 Click View, Guidelines Setup.
          2 In the list of categories, click Presets.
          3 Disable all the check boxes in the list of Corel Presets, and click OK.


Viewing your work
          The view controls in CorelDRAW let you view your drawing according to
          your needs. These controls consist of the Zoom flyout and View Manager as
          well as commands available from toolbars and menus. You can use these
          controls to change the way CorelDRAW displays objects, to magnify or
          reduce your view, or to save specific views for future use.

Zooming and panning
          CorelDRAW gives you quick access to tools that let you reduce or magnify
          the view of your drawing. You can zoom in for a more detailed view, or out for
          a broader view. You can also change your view by moving your drawing
          around in the Drawing Window.
          You’ll also find zoom controls on the Property Bar, the Zoom toolbar, and the
          Standard toolbar. Using the Property Bar, you can zoom to any level of


                                                             Getting started          69
                       magnification. You can also choose from preset zoom levels to revert to a
                       specific magnification percentage quickly.
                       Zooming and panning do not affect your drawing — only your view of it.

Changing your view using the Zoom flyout
                       The Zoom and Pan tools make it easy to change your view of a drawing. The
                       Zoom tool lets you zoom in to get a closer look at an area of your drawing, or
                       out to get a view of a larger area. The Pan tool lets you move the Drawing
                       Page around to get the view you want. Using the Pan tool is much like using
                       your hand to move a piece of paper on a desk.
To zoom in on a
specific object, use
the Zoom tool to
enclose an object in
a marquee box.




                       CorelDRAW supports the Microsoft IntelliMouse. You can zoom and pan
                       using the wheel. Every notch you encounter on the wheel increases the
                       magnification level by 10 or 50 per cent. When you zoom between 1 per cent
                       and 100 per cent, the zoom level increases and decreases in 10 per cent
                       increments. When the magnification level is above 100 per cent, the zoom
                       increments increase to 50 per cent.
Use the pan tool to
move around the
Drawing Window
quickly.




70                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
To zoom in on an area of the drawing
1 Open the Zoom flyout and click the Zoom tool.
2 Click and drag diagonally in the Drawing Window to create a marquee box
  around the area you want to magnify.

To zoom out
1 Open the Zoom flyout, and click the Zoom tool.
2 Right-click inside the Drawing Window.

To move a drawing in the Drawing Window
1 Open the Zoom flyout and click the Pan tool.
2 Drag the document to place it within the Drawing Window.

To zoom in or out using IntelliMouse
1 Point the mouse over an object.
2 Do one of the following:
  Ÿ Rotate the wheel forward (toward the monitor) to zoom in on the
    object.
  Ÿ Rotate the wheel back (away from the monitor) to zoom out from the
    object.

To pan using IntelliMouse
1 Click the Wheel button.
2 Point the mouse in the direction you want to move the Drawing Page.
  To increase the panning rate, move the cursor away from the origin mark.
3 Click the wheel button to stop panning.


Ÿ To zoom in on part of a page quickly — zoom to fit — , simply double-click
  the Zoom tool, or click anywhere in the Drawing Window when the Zoom
  tool is selected.
Ÿ If you hold down SHIFT while left- or right-clicking the mouse, you
  reverse the actions of the Zoom tool.




                                                   Getting started       71
Changing your view using the Property Bar
         When you click the Zoom or Pan tool (found in the Toolbox), the Property
         Bar displays a new set of controls. These controls include the Zoom and Pan
         tools, as well as tools for changing your view. You can open the View
         Manager to save and delete specific views.
         These controls are visible on the Property Bar only when you select the
         Zoom tool or Pan tool.

         To change your view using the Property Bar
         To see ...                        Do this (on the Property Bar) ...
         A magnified view of the drawing   Click the Zoom In button.
         More of the drawing               Click the Zoom Out button.
         Objects at actual size            Click the Zoom Actual Size button.
         All selected objects              Click the Zoom To Selected button.
         All objects                       Click the Zoom To All Objects button.
         The entire Drawing Page           Click the Zoom To Page button.
         The width of the Drawing Page     Click the Zoom To Page Width button.
         The height of the Drawing Page    Click the Zoom To Page Height button.
         The View Manager                  Click the View Manager button.

Changing your view using the Zoom and Standard toolbars
         You can display the Zoom toolbar so that you always have zoom controls
         available, regardless of what other tool you’re using. The Zoom toolbar
         provides all the tools you need to get the view you want. These tools work
         the same way as their counterparts on the Property Bar and in the View
         Manager. For information about using these tools, see “Changing your view
         using the Property Bar” on page 72 and “Changing your view using the View
         Manager” on page 75.
         You can jump to a preset magnification level in one step, or jump to a specific
         magnification level. If the value you type exceeds the maximum
         magnification level, CorelDRAW reverts to the maximum level. If you specify
         high magnification levels (for example, 100000 per cent), CorelDRAW
         displays the closest possible magnification level. You can also name and save
         the magnification level you specify, using the Standard toolbar. For more
         information, see “Saving user-defined zoom levels” on page 73.




72       CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
         To display the Zoom toolbar
         1 Click Window, Toolbars.
         2 Enable the Zoom check box.

         To jump to a specific magnification level
         Ÿ Do one of the following:
            Ÿ Choose a magnification level from the Zoom Box control on the
              Standard toolbar.
            Ÿ Type a value in the Zoom Box control.

Saving user-defined zoom levels
         You can save a zoom level so that you can jump to it quickly. Once you have
         zoomed in on an area of a Drawing Page, you can name and save it. After you
         save it, you can remagnify any area by choosing that zoom level.
         User-defined zoom levels are page specific. For example, if you name and
         save a user-defined zoom level on page 1 of a multipage document, the zoom
         level is only available when you display page 1.
         If you rename the user-defined zoom level, the View Manager reflects the
         new name.You must use the View Manager to delete a user-defined zoom
         level. For more information, see “Saving, using, and deleting specific views”
         on page 75.

         To save a user-defined zoom level
         1 Click in the Zoom Levels list box on the Standard toolbar.
         2 Type a name for the zoom level, and press ENTER.

Setting Zoom tool defaults
         You can customize the Zoom tool default settings to have it respond a certain
         way when you right-click it with the mouse button. You can choose between
         having the Zoom tool automatically zoom out by a factor of two, or display a
         menu of commands that let you quickly choose from a variety of other zoom
         levels.

         To establish default settings for the Zoom tool
         1 Right-click the Zoom tool on the Zoom flyout, and select Properties.
         2 To specify what you want the Zoom tool to do when you right-click on it in
           the Drawing Window, enable one of the following buttons:



                                                           Getting started          73
            Ÿ Zoom Out — zooms out by a factor of two
            Ÿ Context Menu — displays a menu of commands that you can choose
              from to zoom to a specific level

         To establish default settings for the Pan tool
         1 Right click the Pan tool on the Zoom flyout, and select Properties.
         2 To specify what you want the Pan tool to do when you right-click on it in
           the Drawing Window, enable one of the following buttons
            Ÿ Zoom Out — zooms out by a factor of two
            Ÿ Context Menu — displays a menu of commands that you can choose
              from to zoom to a specific level

Matching real-world distance to screen distance
         You can specify that one inch on your screen equals one inch of “real”
         distance. You’ll find this tool particularly useful if you are drawing in 1:1
         Zoom mode, as it lets you work using real world distances as opposed to
         relative distances that depend on screen resolution.
         Before you can perform this procedure, you need a clear plastic ruler for
         comparing real-world and on-screen distances. This ruler should use the
         same unit of measurement you set for the grid and rulers. For more
         information, see “Using the rulers and grid” on page 55.

         To match on-screen distance to real-world distance
         1 Right-click the Zoom tool on the Zoom flyout, and select Properties.
         2 Click the Calibrate Rulers button.
         3 Place your plastic ruler under the on-screen Horizontal ruler.
         4 Click the Up or Down Arrow on the Horizontal box to match one unit of
           measurement on the on-screen ruler with one unit of measurement on the
           actual ruler.
         5 Place your ruler beside the on-screen Vertical ruler.
         6 Click the Up or Down Arrow button on the Vertical box to match one unit
           of measurement on the on-screen ruler with one unit of measurement on
           the actual ruler.

Using the View Manager
         The View Manager serves two functions. It provides a set of tools for
         adjusting your view so that you see your drawing the way you want; and it



74       CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
          lets you save any view of a specific Drawing Page so that you can revert to it
          whenever you want.

Changing your view using the View Manager
          The View Manager provides tools that let you change your view of a drawing.
          For example, you can use the Zoom In and Zoom Out tools to get a better
          view of an area, or use the Zoom To Selected or Zoom To Page Width tools to
          look at a specific area.

          To open the View Manager
          Ÿ Do one of the following:
             Ÿ Click Tools, View Manager.
             Ÿ If you have selected the Zoom tool or Pan tool, click the View Manager
               button on the Property Bar.

          To see a magnified view of the drawing
          Ÿ Click the Zoom In button as many times as necessary.

          To see a magnified view of a specific area of the drawing
          Ÿ Click the Zoom One Shot button, then drag a marquee around the area you
            want to magnify.

          To see more of the drawing
          Ÿ Click the Zoom Out button as many times as necessary.

          To see all selected objects
          Ÿ Click the Zoom To Selected button.

          To see all objects
          Ÿ Click the ZoomTo All Objects button.

Saving, using, and deleting specific views
          The View Manager lets you save different views of a document so that you
          can switch easily between them. For example, you can save a 230%
          magnification level on page 2 of a document and revert to that page and view
          at any time.
          If you no longer need a saved view, you can remove it from the list.



                                                             Getting started         75
        To save a view
        1 Click Tools, View Manager.
        2 Use the Zoom tools on the View Manager to get the view you want.
           For example, use Zoom In to get a closer look at an object.
        3 Click the Add Current View button.
           The new view is given a default name, for example, View 1.
        4 To give the view a new name, click the default name and type a new name.

        To switch to a saved view
        1 Click Tools, View Manager.
        2 Choose the view from the View Manager.

        3 Click     , Switch to View.

        To delete a saved view
        1 Click Tools, View Manager.
        2 Click the view you want to delete.
        3 Click the Delete Current View button.


        Ÿ When working with multipage documents, use the page and magnifying
          glass icons to change the way you use a saved view. If you disable the
          page icon beside a saved view, CorelDRAW reverts to the magnification
          level only — not the page. Similarly, if you disable the magnifying glass
          icon, CorelDRAW reverts to the page only — not the magnification level.

        Ÿ Use the flyout in the View Manager Docker (accessed by clicking    ) to
          access additional commands for adding, deleting, and renaming views, as
          well as a command for hiding and showing the View Manager’s toolbar.


Setting the view quality
        You can change the view quality — the way CorelDRAW displays the objects
        in a drawing. For example, you can display objects using only outlines, or
        using fills, outlines, and bitmaps.




76      CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
The view quality
settings control how
you view objects in
the Drawing Window.




                       Choose this view...          If you want to...
                       Simple Wireframe             Hide fills, extrusions, contours, and intermediate blend shapes; display
                                                    only the outline of any objects; and display bitmaps in monochrome
                       Wireframe                    Hide fills; display extrusions, contours, and intermediate blend shapes;
                                                    and display bitmaps in monochrome
                       Draft                        Show uniform fills, low-resolution bitmaps, and fountain fills as solid
                                                    colors
                       Normal                       Display all fills except PostScript fills and high-resolution bitmaps
                       Enhanced                     Use 2X oversampling to show the best possible display, including
                                                    PostScript fills

                       In Draft view, CorelDRAW represents fountain fills by a blend of the first and
                       last fill colors. The Draft view displays unique patterns to represent fills. The
                       checkerboard pattern represents two-color fills; the two-way arrow pattern
                       represents full color fills; the hatched line pattern represents bitmap fills; and
                       the PS pattern represents PostScript fills.

Choosing a view quality
                       The View menu gives you quick access to the five view qualities available in
                       CorelDRAW, letting you choose how CorelDRAW displays a drawing on the
                       screen. If you have a fast computer or want to see the closest approximation
                       to what a drawing will look like when it’s printed, use the Normal or
                       Enhanced view. If you have a slower computer or just want to speed up
                       redrawing of a complex drawing, you may find the Simple Wireframe or
                       Wireframe view most effective.
                       Changing the view quality does not affect the drawing’s content or the way it
                       will print; it affects only the way it displays on the computer screen.

                       To view a document in Simple Wireframe view
                       Ÿ Click View, Simple Wireframe.


                                                                                      Getting started                       77
         To view a document in Wireframe view
         Ÿ Click View, Wireframe.

         To view a document in Draft view
         Ÿ Click View, Draft.

         To view a document in Normal view
         Ÿ Click View, Normal.

         To view a document in Enhanced view
         Ÿ Click View, Enhanced.

Using full-screen previews
         You can display a full-screen preview of a page from your drawing. You can
         preview all objects on the active page using the Normal or Enhanced view
         quality (depending on the view quality currently selected). You can also see a
         full-screen preview of only the objects you select.

Previewing a drawing
         You can see what your drawing will look like when you print it. You can also
         set the view quality of the full-screen preview to Normal or Enhanced, and
         display PostScript fills.

         To set the full-screen preview view quality
         1 Click Tools, Options.
         2 In the list of categories, click Workspace, Display.
         3 Enable one of the following:
            Ÿ Use Normal View button — specifies the Normal view quality
            Ÿ Use Enhanced View button — specifies the Enhanced view quality
            Ÿ Use Enhanced View button and the Show PostScript Fills In
              Enhanced View check box — displays PostScript Fills

         To view a full-screen preview of the current page
         Ÿ Click View, Full-Screen Preview.




78       CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
         To view a full-screen preview of selected objects only
         1 Select the objects you want to preview.
         2 Click View, and enable the Preview Selected Only command.
         3 Click View, Full-Screen Preview.

         To return to the Drawing Window from any full-screen preview
         Ÿ Right-click or press any key.


         Ÿ Although you can draw anywhere in the Drawing Window, only objects
           positioned in the Printable Area are printed. To display the Printable Area,
           click View, Printable Area.


Viewing computer and document information
         You can view information about your computer as well as information about
         CorelDRAW itself. For example, you can view details about your computer’s
         setup. You can view detailed information about your system, display and
         printing properties, Corel .EXE and .DLL files, and system .DLL files.
         CorelDRAW information consists of the program name, version number,
         serial number, and user name. This information doesn’t change. You’ll find
         this information particularly useful if you need help from Corel Technical
         Support Services.
         You can also view information about your CorelDRAW document and other
         details, including the number of pages it contains, the number of layers, and
         the number of graphics and text objects.

Viewing system information
         You can view the following types of information in terms of the current state
         of your computer: system, display, printers, Corel .EXE and .DLL files, and
         system .DLL files. This feature is useful, for instance, to find out how much
         memory you have on the drive to which you want to save a file. Save any
         system information in a text file called SYSINFO.TXT.

         To view system information
         1 Click Help, About CorelDRAW.
         2 Click System Info.
         3 Choose a category from the Choose A Category list box.



                                                            Getting started           79
         Ÿ Use the Save button to store system information for printing. System
           information is saved as SYSINFO.TXT. A message box tells you where the
           file is saved.


Viewing document information
         CorelDRAW displays detailed information about the contents of your
         document and the objects it contains. You can print and save this information
         for future reference.

         To view document information
         1 Click File, Document Info.
         2 Enable the check boxes beside each object you want to display.

Saving and Printing document information
         You can save document information in a text file that can be opened by other
         applications, such as word processing software. You can also print document
         information.

         To save document information
         1 Click File, Document Info.
         2 Click the Save As button.
         3 Double-click the folder where you want to save the file.
         4 Type a filename in the File Name box.
         5 Click the Save button.

         To print document information
         1 Click File, Document Info.
         2 Click the Print button.


Displaying warning messages
         You may encounter warning messages while working in CorelDRAW.
         Warning messages explain the consequences of an action you are about to
         perform, and inform you of permanent changes that might result from that
         action.




80       CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
You can decide
whether or not you
want to view warning
messages before
continuing with
certain operations.




                       Although the warnings are helpful, you may not want to view them after you
                       become familiar with the software. Avoid disabling warning messages until
                       you are comfortable with the application and familiar with the results of the
                       commands you use.

Enabling and disabling warning messages
                       You can enable or disable any warning message.

                       To enable or disable warning messages
                       1 Click Tools, Options.
                       2 In the Options dialog box, click Workspace, Warnings in the list of
                         categories.
                       3 Enable or disable one or more of the check boxes.




                                                                         Getting started          81
82   CorelDRAW: Chapter 2
         DRAWING AND SHAPING
         OBJECTS                                                                  3
         Once you have opened and formatted your drawing page, you are ready to
         start drawing. To create your drawing, you will need to know how to create
         geometrical shapes, straight lines, curves, and irregular shapes. This chapter
         describes how to use the basic drawing tools available in CorelDRAW for
         creating these types of objects.
         The chapter also describes how to use the specialized drawing tools, such as
         the Natural Media. The Natural Media tool is a powerful drawing tool you use
         to apply different effects to a line. For example, you can use the tool in Brush
         mode to apply text or graphics to a curve. The Natural Media tool has five
         drawing modes: Preset, Brush, Object Sprayer, Calligraphic, and
         Pressure-sensitive.
         As well as the Natural Media tool, CorelDRAW also has tools for creating
         dimension, connector, and flow line.
         Once you have created a shape or line, you can move and shape the object to
         create the effect you want. Some types of objects, such as rectangles and
         ellipses, can only be shaped in specific ways. For example, you can round one
         or more corners of a square or create a pie-shape or arc from a circle. Lines
         and curves — including Natural Media strokes — can be formed into any
         shape by dragging the curve’s nodes or moving the control lines.
         If you want to make more extensive changes to a rectangle, ellipse, or
         polygon, you can convert the object to a curve. For example, you can create a
         trapezoid from a rectangle by converting the rectangle to a curve object and
         then dragging the corners using the Shape tool.


Drawing basic objects
         CorelDRAW provides drawing tools for drawing basic shapes, such as
         rectangles, ellipses, polygons, stars, grids, and spirals. To draw a shape with
         one of these tools, drag diagonally in any direction until the shape is the size
         you want. For each tool, the Status Bar displays the dimensions of the shape
         as you draw it.

Drawing a rectangle or square
         The Rectangle tool lets you draw rectangles and squares.




                                                Drawing and shaping objects            85
          To draw a rectangle
          1 Click the Rectangle tool.
          2 Position the cursor where you want the rectangle to appear.
          3 Drag diagonally to draw the rectangle.

          To draw a square
          Ÿ Hold down CTRL and drag diagonally.


          Ÿ If you hold down SHIFT, CorelDRAW creates the rectangle or square from
            the center outward as you drag.
          Ÿ Double-clicking the Rectangle tool creates a rectangle covering the entire
            drawing page. This is useful if you want to create a background for the
            drawing.


Drawing an ellipse or a circle
          The Ellipse tool lets you draw ellipses and circles.

          To draw an ellipse
          1 Click the Ellipse tool.
          2 Position the cursor where you want the ellipse to appear.
          3 Drag diagonally to draw the ellipse.

          To draw a circle
          Ÿ Hold down CTRL and drag diagonally.


          Ÿ If you hold down SHIFT, CorelDRAW creates the ellipse or circle from the
            center outward as you drag.


Drawing a polygon or star
          The polygon tool lets you draw polygons and stars. A polygon is a closed
          shape having from three to 500 sides. Stars have from three to 500 points.




86        CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
                       To draw a polygon
                       1 Open the Object flyout, and click the Polygon tool.
                       2 Position the cursor where you want the polygon to appear.
                       3 Drag diagonally to draw the polygon.
                       4 If you want to change the number of sides on the polygon, type the
                         appropriate number in the Number Of Points On Polygon box on the
                         Property Bar, then press ENTER.

                       To draw a star
                       1 Follow all the steps from the previous procedure.
                       2 Click the Polygon/Star button on the Property Bar.

                       To draw a symmetrical polygon
                       Ÿ Hold down CTRL and drag diagonally.


                       Ÿ If you hold down SHIFT, CorelDRAW creates the polygon or star from the
                         center outward as you drag.


Drawing spirals
                       The Spiral tool lets you draw spiral shapes. There are two types of spirals:
                       symmetrical and logarithmic. In a symmetrical spiral, the distance between
                       each revolution of the spiral is constant. In a logarithmic spiral, this distance
                       increases as the spiral progresses outward.
A symmetrical spiral
(left) and a
logarithmic spiral
(right).




                       To draw a symmetrical spiral
                       1 Open the Object flyout, and click the Spiral tool.


                                                              Drawing and shaping objects             87
         2 Type a number in the Spiral Revolutions box on the Property Bar to
           indicate the number of revolutions you want for the spiral.
         3 Click the Symmetrical Spiral button on the Property Bar.
         4 Position the cursor where you want the spiral to appear.
         5 Drag diagonally to draw the spiral.

         To draw a logarithmic spiral
         1 Open the Object flyout and click the Spiral tool.
         2 Type a number in the Spiral Revolutions box on the Property Bar to
           indicate the number of revolutions you want for the spiral.
         3 Click the Logarithmic Spiral button on the Property Bar.
         4 Move the Spiral Expansion Factor slider adjust the amount by which the
           spiral expands as it moves outward.
            Move the slider to the right to increase this amount; move it to the left to
            decrease this amount.
         5 Position the cursor where you want the spiral to appear.
         6 Drag diagonally to draw the spiral.

         To draw a spiral with equal horizontal and vertical dimensions
         1 Do one of the following:
            Ÿ Follow steps 1 to 4 of the “To draw a symmetrical spiral” procedure to
              draw a symmetrical spiral
            Ÿ Follow steps 1 to 5 of the “To draw a logarithmic spiral” procedure to
              draw a logarithmic spiral
         2 Hold down CTRL, drag diagonally to draw the spiral.


         Ÿ If you hold down SHIFT, CorelDRAW creates the spiral from the center
           outward as you drag.


Drawing grids
         The Graph Paper tool lets you draw a grid pattern. This pattern is formed by
         a series of grouped rectangles arranged in rows and columns.




88       CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
                          To draw a grid
                          1 Open the Object flyout, and click the Graph Paper tool.
                          2 Type the number of columns you want in the column number box in the
                            Graph Paper Columns And Rows box on the Property Bar.
                          3 Type the number of rows you want in the row number box in the Graph
                            Paper Columns And Rows box on the Property Bar.
                          4 Position the cursor where you want the spiral to appear.
                          5 Drag diagonally to draw the grid.

                          To draw a square grid
                          1 Follow steps 1 to 4 of the previous procedure.
                          2 Hold down CTRL and drag diagonally.


                          Ÿ If you hold down SHIFT, CorelDRAW creates the grid from the center
                            outward as you drag.


Selecting objects
                          Before you can move or shape an object, you must select it. When you select
                          an object, a selection box appears around the object. A selection box appears
                          as an invisible rectangle having eight black squares, called selection handles,
                          arranged at the corners and midpoints, and a small “x” in the center.
When you select an
object, eight selection
handles appear
around the object.
The center of the
selection box is
marked by a small
“x”.




                          If necessary, you can perform actions on more than one object by selecting all
                          the objects you want. When you select multiple objects, a single selection
                          box encloses all the objects and the “x” appears in the center of the selection
                          box. You can select objects using the mouse, keyboard, or menu commands.




                                                                Drawing and shaping objects           89
          You can select objects on any unlocked layer as long as the Edit Across
          Layers option is enabled in the Object Manager. If this option is disabled,
          then you can only select objects on the active layer. For more information
          about layers, see “Using layers to organize your drawing” on page 193.
          If you select a locked object, the selection handles appear as padlocks. You
          cannot edit a locked object. To make changes, you must first unlock the
          object. For more information, see “Locking and unlocking objects” on page
          185.

Selecting an object
          You must select an object before you can make changes to it. If the Treat All
          Objects As Filled option is enabled, you can select objects without fills by
          clicking anywhere within the outline. If the option is disabled, you must click
          on the object’s outline to select it.
          If you are working with unfilled and filled objects that overlap, you may find it
          useful to select objects by their outline.

          To select an object
          Ÿ Click the object with the Pick tool.


          Ÿ To choose the Pick tool, you can press either the SPACEBAR or, if the
            Text tool is selected in edit mode, CTRL + SPACEBAR.
          Ÿ You can press TAB to select the next object, or press SHIFT + TAB to
            select the previous object.


          To enable or disable the Treat All Objects As Filled option
          1 Click a blank space in the Drawing Window to deselect any objects.
          2 Do one of the following:
             Ÿ Enable the Treat As Filled button to select unfilled objects by clicking
               within the outline
             Ÿ Disable the Treat As Filled button to select unfilled objects by clicking
               on the outline
             The button is disabled when it appears raised.




90        CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
          Ÿ You can also change the Treat All Objects As Filled option by
            right-clicking the Pick tool and enabling or disabling the check box.


Selecting all objects
          You can select all objects in the active page. You can also select all text
          objects, guidelines, or nodes.

          To select all objects
          Ÿ Click Edit, Select All, Objects.


          Ÿ Guidelines are excluded when you choose the Select All, Objects option.



          Ÿ You can also select all the objects in the active page by double-clicking the
            Pick tool.


          To select all text
          Ÿ Click Edit, Select All, Text.
             Any Paragraph text or Artistic text becomes selected.

          To select all guidelines
          Ÿ Click Edit, Select All, Guidelines.

          To select all nodes of a selected object
          Ÿ Click Edit, Select All, Nodes.


          Ÿ You can also select all nodes by double-clicking the Shape tool.


Marquee selecting objects
          If you want to select several objects, you can drag a marquee box around
          them. You can also select objects without completely enclosing them with a
          marquee box.




                                                  Drawing and shaping objects           91
          To marquee select several objects
          Ÿ Using the Pick tool, drag the mouse diagonally until a marquee box
            encloses all objects.

          To marquee select objects without entirely surrounding all
          objects
          1 Click the Pick tool.
          2 Hold down ALT, and drag diagonally until the marquee box touches the
            objects you want to select.


          Ÿ If the objects you want to select are arranged so you cannot use the
            marquee selection method, you can hold down SHIFT and use the Pick
            tool to select each of the objects you want in turn.


Selecting objects in a group
          You can select an object that is part of a group or nested group. This
          eliminates the need to ungroup a group in order to make changes to one or
          more of them.

          To select an object in a group
          1 Click the Pick tool.
          2 Hold down CTRL, and click the object.

          To select an object in a nested group
          1 Click the Pick tool.
          2 Hold down CTRL, and double-click the object.


          Ÿ When you select an object that is part of a group, the handles on the
            selection box appear as circles instead of squares.


Selecting hidden objects
          If you have overlapping objects on a page, you can select a hidden object
          within a series or within a group without having to move or reorder the other
          objects.



92        CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
          You can also select multiple hidden objects within a series. When you select
          the bottom-most object, the cursor moves to the top-most object in the
          series. You may find it useful to refer to the Object Manager to see which
          objects are selected. For information on using the Object Manager, see
          “Using the Object Manager” on page 186.
          The cursor must be positioned over the bottom-most and top-most objects
          for them to be included in the selection.

          To select an object hidden below a series of objects
          Ÿ Hold down ALT, and click the top-most object using the Pick tool until the
            object you want is selected.
             As you click, CorelDRAW displays the selection box for each selected
             hidden object.

          To select multiple objects hidden below a series of objects
          1 Using the Pick tool, click the top-most object in the series you want to
            include in the selection.
          2 Hold down ALT + SHIFT, and click to add the next object to the
            selection.
          3 Click until you add all the objects you want to your selection.

          To select a hidden object within a group
             Ÿ Hold down CTRL + ALT, and click the top-most object with the Pick
               tool until the object you want is selected.


          Ÿ The Simple Wireframe view or Wireframe view makes it easier to identify
            the objects you select.
          Ÿ You can also select hidden objects with the drawing tools using the same
            method.


Selecting locked objects
          When an object is locked the selection handles appear as small locks.
          Selecting multiple locked objects is the quickest way to unlock objects in
          order to modify them.

          To select locked objects
          Ÿ Select the locked object with the Pick tool.


                                                Drawing and shaping objects            93
          To select hidden locked objects
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
          2 Click ALT to select the locked object hidden under other objects.
             The locked object has selection handles that appear as locks.

          To select multiple locked objects
          1 Select the locked objects with the Pick tool.
          2 Click SHIFT to select additional objects.


          Ÿ You cannot marquee select locked objects.


Deselecting objects
          Deselect an object when you are finished modifying it.

          To deselect all objects
          Ÿ Click a blank space in the Drawing Window.


          Ÿ You can also press ESC to deselect all objects.


          To deselect an object from several selected objects
          Ÿ Hold down SHIFT, and click anywhere on the object’s fill or outline.


          Ÿ If you’re not sure which object is selected, refer to the Status Bar or the
            Object Manager.


Moving objects
          The easiest way to move and position objects in your drawing is to drag and
          drop the object using the pick tool or a drawing tool. To drag an object using a
          drawing tool, you must position the cursor over the small “x” at the center of
          the selection box.
          When you drag an object, CorelDRAW indicates the new position of the
          selected object as you drag by displaying the object in either outline,



94        CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
          transparent fill, or opaque fill. By displaying the new position of the object,
          CorelDRAW lets you position objects exactly where you want them.
          You can also move objects with precision by entering new coordinates for the
          object or by “nudging” the object incrementally into place.

Moving objects by dragging and dropping
          By dragging an object, you can move it to a new location quickly. While you
          are dragging an object, CorelDRAW displays an outline, transparent fill, or
          opaque fill of the object to indicate the new position.

          To move an object by dragging and dropping
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
          2 Drag the object to a new place in your drawing.


          Ÿ When you drag an object, the values in the Object(s) Position box on the
            Property Bar indicate the new coordinates of the object.



          Ÿ You can constrain the object to horizontal or vertical movements by
            holding down CTRL as you drag the object.
          Ÿ To position an object exactly where you want it, you can choose to snap
            the object to a grid, guideline, or other object. For information on snapping
            objects to grids, guidelines, and objects, see “Using the rulers, grid, and
            guidelines” on page 54.


Displaying an object while positioning it
          You can display an object in one of three different forms while positioning it.
          You can display the object in its outline, opaque fill, or transparent fill forms.
          By displaying the new position of the object, CorelDRAW lets you position
          objects exactly where you want them.




                                                  Drawing and shaping objects             95
When dragging an
object, you can
display either its (1)
outline, (2)
transparent fill, or
(3) opaque fill.




                         For very complex illustrations that would take too long to redraw,
                         CorelDRAW indicates the new position while you drag by displaying a
                         rectangle with a dashed border. You can choose to have CorelDRAW redraw
                         the object’s outline if you pause while dragging. By default, CorelDRAW
                         displays a rectangle when you drag complex objects.

                         To select a display mode while positioning an object
                         1 Using the Pick tool, position the cursor over an object.
                         2 Click and hold the left mouse button until the cursor changes to a
                           four-way cursor.
                         3 Press TAB to switch between the three display forms of the object:
                           outline, transparent fill, or opaque fill.
                         4 Choose a display form and drag the object in this form to the desired
                           location.

                         To enable the Redraw Complex Objects option
                         1 Right-click the Pick tool, and click Properties.
                         2 Enable the Redraw Complex Objects check box to display the outline of
                           complex objects when you pause while dragging the object.
                         3 Type a value in the Delay box to specify the delay time from the moment
                           you pause to the moment CorelDRAW redraws the outline.
                            CorelDRAW draws the outline of a complex object when you pause while
                            positioning it.




96                       CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
Moving objects in increments
         You can use the Arrow keys on the keyboard to move an object in
         increments. By using the arrow keys, you can nudge an object up, down,
         right, or left. By default, objects move in 0.1-inch increments. You can also
         use the super nudge feature to nudge an object using a larger increment.
         You can set the Nudge and Super Nudge values to suit your needs. The
         Super Nudge value is based on the Nudge value.

         To nudge an object
         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
         2 Press the Arrow key(s).

         To move an object in larger increments (super nudge)
         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
         2 Hold down SHIFT, and press the Arrow key(s).


         Ÿ As you nudge an object, you can leave a copy of it by pressing + on the
           numeric keypad before pressing the Arrow key.


         To set the nudge or super nudge distance
         1 Click Tools, Options.
         2 From the tree, click Edit under Workspace.
         3 Type a nudge distance in the Nudge box.
         4 Type a value in the Super Nudge box.
            The value you type is multiplied by the nudge distance to determine the
            super nudge distance.
         4 Choose a unit of measurement from the Units list box.


         Ÿ You can also specify the nudge distance by deselecting all objects, and
           typing a value in the Nudge Offset box on the Property Bar.




                                               Drawing and shaping objects               97
Shaping basic objects
                   Once you have created basic objects, you can use a number of tools, buttons,
                   and commands to change the shape of the object. For example, you can use
                   the Shape tool to round the corners of a rectangle or shape an ellipse into an
                   arc or a pie-shape.
                   To shape a polygon or star, you can use the Polygon/Star button to switch
                   from polygon to star and from star to polygon. You can use the Sharpness
                   slider to adjust the sharpness of a star. You can also use the Shape tool to
                   drag nodes on the object. Nodes cannot be moved individually. Instead, when
                   you drag a node on a polygon or star, other nodes of the same type move in
                   the same way. For example, if you drag a corner node counterclockwise, all
                   other corner nodes move counterclockwise. This form of editing is referred
                   to as mirror editing.
                   For example, a pentagon has 10 nodes — one at each corner and one on each
                   side. All the corner nodes are associated and all the side nodes are
                   associated. If you drag a side node towards the center, all the side nodes
                   move towards the center. Also, if you add a node to a pentagon, five nodes are
                   added (one on each side).
Mirror editing a
polygon.




                   To shape a grid, you can ungroup the grid and then shape each rectangle
                   individually.
                   If you want more freedom to change the shape of an object, you can convert it
                   to a curve object. Once you convert an object to a curve object, you can drag
                   nodes independently. For example, you can create an irregular four-sided
                   object by converting a rectangle to a curve and then dragging the corner
                   nodes independently.



98                 CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
                       If you want to edit a grid as a curve, you must first ungroup the grid before
                       you can convert it to curves. Spirals are curved objects when created and can
                       be edited as such.

Rounding the corners of a rectangle
                       You can use the Shape tool to round one or more of the corners of a rectangle
                       or square. A rectangle has a node at each corner. When you round the
                       corners of a rectangle, CorelDRAW splits each corner node in two and draws
                       an arc between each of these two new nodes. You can control the size of this
                       arc by moving any of the corner nodes. The amount of rounding is displayed
                       on the Property Bar.
You can round one or
more corners of a
rectangle.




                       To round the corners of a rectangle
                       1 Select the rectangle with the Shape tool.
                       2 Drag one of the four corner nodes along the outline of the rectangle or
                         square.
                          Each corner node splits into two nodes joined by an arc. As you drag the
                          node away from the corner along the outline, the corners of the rectangle
                          become rounder.

                       To round a single corner of a rectangle or square
                       1 Select the rectangle with the Shape tool.
                       2 Click a corner node to deselect the other three corner nodes.
                       3 Drag the corner node along the outline of the rectangle or square.
                          The corner node splits into two nodes joined by an arc. As you drag the
                          node away from the corner along the outline, the corner of the rectangle
                          becomes rounder.




                                                            Drawing and shaping objects            99
                        Ÿ You can also round the corners of rectangles using the Pick tool or any of
                          the basic drawing tools.
                        Ÿ You can round the corners of a rectangle with precision by entering values
                          in the Rectangle Corner Roundness boxes on the Property Bar. To round
                          only one corner, unlock the Round Corners Together button.


Changing an ellipse to an arc or a pie shape
                        You can use the Shape tool to turn an ellipse or circle into an arc or a pie
                        shape. A simple ellipse has one node, but when you create an arc or pie
                        shape, CorelDRAW splits this node in two.
                        You control the appearance of the arc or the pie shape by moving these two
                        new nodes. You can also change the direction in which CorelDRAW draws
                        arcs and pie shapes.
An ellipse (left), an
arc (top right), and
a pie-shape (bottom
right).




                        To create an arc or pie shape from an ellipse
                        1 Select the ellipse with the Shape tool.
                        2 Drag the node along the outline of the ellipse.
                        3 Do one of the following:
                           Ÿ Drag with the cursor outside the perimeter of the ellipse to create an
                             arc.
                           Ÿ Drag with the cursor inside the perimeter of the ellipse to create a pie
                             shape.

                        To change the direction in which arcs or pie shapes are drawn
                        1 Select the arc or pie shape with the Shape tool.
                        2 Click the Clockwise/Counterclockwise Arcs or Pies button on the Property
                          Bar.


100                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
                      Ÿ You can also change ellipses to arcs and pie shapes using the Pick tool or
                        any of the basic drawing tools. Simply position the cursor over the node
                        (the cursor changes to the Shape tool cursor) and drag as necessary.
                      Ÿ When dragging nodes you can constrain the their position to 15-degree
                        increments by holding down CTRL.
                      Ÿ You can quickly convert between ellipses, arcs, and pie shapes by
                        selecting the shape and clicking the Ellipse, Pie or the Arc button on the
                        Property Bar.


Changing the properties of a polygon or star
                      You can change the properties — such as number of points — of a polygon or
                      star. You can also use the Shape tool or Pick tool to change the shape of the
                      polygon or star.
A polygon (top), a
star (right), and a
star shaped polygon
(left).




                      You can control which points of a star are connected to which others by
                      adjusting the sharpness level. As you increase the sharpness level, the points
                      on the star become more pronounced.
                      If you want the changes you make to one node to be reflected on all
                      associated nodes, you can mirror edit the polygon or star. When mirror
                      editing, you can move, add, and remove segments and nodes. Nodes can be
                      changed to smooth, cusped, or symmetrical, and segments can be straight or
                      curved. For more information about editing nodes and segments, see
                      “Shaping lines, curves, and curve objects” on page 117.

                      To change a polygon to a star or a star to a polygon
                      1 Select the polygon or star with the Pick tool.
                      2 Click the Polygon/Star button on the Property Bar.




                                                            Drawing and shaping objects         101
          To change the number of sides of a polygon or points on a star
          1 Select the polygon or star with the Pick tool.
          2 Type a number in the Number Of Points On Polygon box on the Property
            Bar, then press ENTER.

          To mirror edit a star or polygon
          1 Select the polygon or star with the Pick tool.
          2 Hold the Pick tool over a node until it changes into the Shape tool cursor.
          3 Click and drag the node.

          To change the sharpness of a star
          1 Select the star with the Pick tool.
          2 Move the Sharpness slider on the Property Bar to adjust the sharpness of
            the star.
             Move the slider to the right to increase the sharpness; move it to the left
             to decrease it.


          Ÿ To access the Sharpness slider, a star must have at least seven points. The
            sensitivity of the slider increases with the number of points.



          Ÿ You can also adjust the sharpness of polygon objects by right-clicking the
            Polygon tool, clicking Properties and adjusting the Sharpness slider on the
            Polygon tool page. You can only adjust the sharpness of a star or a polygon
            as star but not a regular polygon.


Shaping parts of a grid
          The grid is a set of grouped rectangles created using the Graph Paper tool. A
          grid object must be ungrouped before you can make changes to its shape.
          Once you ungroup the grid object, it becomes a set of individual rectangles.
          For more information about shaping the corners of a rectangle, see
          “Rounding the corners of a rectangle” on page 99.

          To ungroup a grid
          1 Select the grid with the Pick tool.
          2 Click Arrange, Ungroup.


102       CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
Changing objects to curves
         To shape an object without restriction, you must first convert it to a curve
         object. When you convert an ellipse or rectangle to a curve object, you can
         shape it by editing its nodes or segments.
         To shape a polygon or star without mirror editing, you must first convert it to
         a curve object. When you convert a polygon or star to a curve object, you can
         shape it by editing each node and segment individually.
         The grid, created by the Graph Paper tool, is formed with a series of grouped
         rectangles. It must be ungrouped before it can be converted to a curve object.

         To convert an ellipse, rectangle, polygon, or star to a curve
         object
         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
         2 Click Arrange, Convert To Curves.

         To convert a grid to a curve object
         1 Select the grid with the Pick tool.
         2 Click Arrange, Ungroup.
         3 Click Arrange, Convert To Curves.


         Ÿ Objects created with the Spiral tool are curve objects. Once you create a
           spiral, you can edit each node and segment individually.



         Ÿ You can also convert an object into a curve object by selecting the object
           and clicking the Convert To Curves button on the Property Bar when the
           Pick tool is selected.


Drawing lines and curves
         Besides the tools for drawing basic shapes, CorelDRAW also includes two
         tools for drawing simple lines and curves. These are the Freehand tool and
         the Bezier tool. Once you have drawn a line or curve, you can apply various
         effects using the Natural Media tool. For more information on the Natural
         Media tool, see “Drawing with the Natural Media tool” on page 107.




                                                 Drawing and shaping objects        103
The same glass
drawn using the
Freehand (left),
Bezier (center), and
Natural Media tool
(right).




                       The Freehand tool lets you draw a line or curve by dragging the mouse
                       cursor across the page like a pencil on paper. If the resulting curve is rougher
                       than desired, you can smooth out the line by adjusting the Drawing settings
                       or by editing the curve after you have drawn it. For more information, see
                       “Shaping lines, curves, and curve objects” on page 117.
                       The Bezier tool lets you draw smooth, precise curves by placing nodes and
                       adjusting the curvature of the line between the nodes. When you draw a line
                       or curve using the Bezier tool, you place nodes by each click of the mouse.
                       Each node is connected to the previous node by a segment. To control the
                       curvature of the segment you are drawing, position the node’s control points.
                       The control points are black boxes connected to the node by dotted lines. By
                       using control points and by placing each node individually, you can create
                       precise lines and curves.

Drawing lines and curves with the Freehand tool
                       The Freehand tool lets you draw lines and curves by dragging the mouse like
                       a pencil on paper. You can format lines and curves as you do outlines. For
                       example, you can choose a line width, a line style, as well as start and end
                       arrowheads for the line. For more information, see “Outlining objects” on
                       page 246.

                       To draw a curve with the Freehand tool
                       1 Open the Curve flyout, and click the Freehand tool.
                       2 Click the Freehand Smoothing box and move the pop-up slider to select a
                         smoothness setting.
                          Move the slider to the right for maximum smoothing; move the slider to
                          the left for no smoothing.
                       3 Position the cursor where you want the curve to start.
                       4 Drag to draw the curve.



104                    CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
To draw a straight line with the Freehand tool
1 Open the Curve flyout, and click the Freehand tool.
2 Click where you want the line to begin.
3 Click where you want the line to end.

To draw a curve or straight line connected to another curve or
line
Ÿ Position the Freehand tool over the node at the end of the existing line or
  curve, then draw a new line or curve.


Ÿ You must click within five pixels of the end point to join the two curves.
  You can adjust this five-pixel threshold by changing the Freehand tool’s
  Auto-join setting. Access this setting by right-clicking the Freehand tool
  and clicking Properties.


To erase a portion of a curve as you draw with the Freehand tool
Ÿ Without releasing the mouse button, hold down SHIFT and drag
  backwards along the portion of the curve you want to erase.
   When you are finished erasing, you can resume drawing your line by
   releasing the SHIFT key and continuing to drag the mouse.

To draw a closed shape with the Freehand tool
1 Open the Curve flyout, and click the Freehand tool.
2 Click the Freehand Smoothing box and move the pop-up slider to select a
  smoothness setting.
   Move the slider to the right for maximum smoothing; move the slider to
   the left for no smoothing.
3 Draw a curve or a series of connected straight lines that begins and ends
  at the same point.
   If you’re drawing a series of connected straight lines, double-click to
   create a node and click the starting point to close the shape. If you’re
   drawing a curve, drag over the starting point and release to close the
   shape.




                                      Drawing and shaping objects             105
          Ÿ You can draw lines that have both straight and freehand sections with the
            Freehand tool by using TAB to toggle between straight and freehand
            mode as you drag the mouse.
          Ÿ To constrain the angle of a straight line to 15-degree increments, you
            must hold down CTRL before placing the end of the line. You can specify a
            different angle using the controls in the Options dialog box. For more
            information. see “Controlling the behavior of the Freehand and Bezier
            tools” on page 137.


Drawing lines and curves with the Bezier tool
          The Bezier tool lets you draw lines and curves by placing each node with the
          mouse. As you place each node, it is connected to the previously placed node
          by a line or curve. The Bezier tool lets you create complex, irregular shapes
          quickly and easily and gives you precise control over the position and number
          of nodes that form a curve.
          You can format lines and curves as you do outlines. For example, you can
          choose a line width, a line style, as well as start and end arrowheads for the
          line. For more information, see “Outlining objects” on page 246.

          To draw a curve with the Bezier tool
          1 Open the Curve flyout, and click the Bezier tool.
          2 Click where you want to place the first node and drag the control point in
            the direction you want the curve to bend.
          3 Position the cursor where you want to place the next node and drag the
            control point to create the curve you want.
             The position and angle of the control points affects the shape of the
             segment you’ve just created and the next segment you add (if you add
             one).
          4 Repeat step 3 to add nodes to the curve.
          5 Press SPACEBAR to finish the curve.

          To draw a straight line with the Bezier tool
          1 Open the Curve flyout, and click the Bezier tool.
          2 Click where you want to place the first node.
          3 Click where you want to place the next node.




106       CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
       4 Repeat step 3 for each node you want to add.
       5 Press SPACEBAR to finish the curve.

       To draw a closed shape with the Bezier tool
       1 Follow steps 1 to 4 of the “To draw a curve with the Bezier tool”
         procedure or the “To draw a straight line with the Bezier tool” procedure.
       2 Position the cursor over the first node and click once.


       Ÿ Hold down CTRL as you position the control points to move in 15 degree
         increments. You can specify a different angle of constraint using the
         controls in the Options dialog box. For information, see “Controlling the
         behavior of the Freehand and Bezier tools” on page 137.
       Ÿ Holding down ALT while drawing with the Bezier tool lets you drag to
         reposition the last node created. Holding down C changes the last node to
         a cusp node, while holding down S changes the last node to a smooth
         node.


Drawing with the Natural Media tool
       The Natural Media tool lets you apply various effects to a curve. For
       example, you can create curves that look like strokes from a calligraphic pen
       or a pressure-sensitive pen. As well, you can apply text, shapes, or images to
       a curve using the Natural Media tool. If you need to change the position or
       shape of the curve, you can edit the Natural Media stroke’s control path. For
       more information, see “Shaping lines, curves, and curve objects” on page
       117.
       The Natural Media tool has five modes:
       Ÿ Preset mode — draws curves that change thickness based on preset line
         shapes you can choose from a list box on the Property Bar.
       Ÿ Brush mode — applies text or shapes to the curve when you draw it.
       Ÿ Object sprayer mode — applies a series of images to a curve when you
         draw it.
       Ÿ Calligraphic mode — draws curves that change thickness based on the
         direction of the curve. This creates an effect similar to that of a
         calligraphic pen.
       Ÿ Pressure-sensitive mode — draws curves that change thickness based on
         feedback from a pressure-sensitive pen or a keyboard.




                                            Drawing and shaping objects          107
                         You can select the type of Natural Media stroke you want to use by clicking
                         the appropriate button on the Property Bar. You must first click the Natural
                         Media tool to display its Property Bar controls.


                         Ÿ You can draw lines that have both straight and freehand sections with the
                           Natural Media tool by using TAB to toggle between straight and freehand
                           mode as you drag the mouse. Holding down CTRL constrains the line to
                           15-degree increments.
                         Ÿ If you change any of the Property Bar settings for the Natural Media tool,
                           while nothing is selected, then these settings become the default tool
                           settings.
                         Ÿ Using the Arrange, Separate command you can separate the Natural
                           Media stroke from the control path, allowing you to shape the Natural
                           Media stroke independently of the control path.


Drawing curves in Preset mode
                         The Preset mode allows you to draw curves in one of a number of preset
                         shapes. The preset shapes are closed paths that follow the curve you draw.
                         Because the presets are closed paths, you can apply different kinds of fills
                         and change the outline style and color.
A hat drawn using
the Bezier tool (left)
and the same hat
after applying preset
curves using the
Natural Media tool
(right).




                         To draw a curve in Preset mode
                         1 Open the Curve flyout, and click the Natural Media tool.
                         2 Click the Preset button on the Property Bar.
                         3 Click the Freehand Smoothing box and move the pop-up slider to select a
                           smoothness setting.
                            Move the slider to the right for maximum smoothing; move the slider to
                            the left for no smoothing.


108                      CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
                       4 Type a width in the Natural Media tool Width box on the Property Bar,
                         then press ENTER.
                         The width you set here represents the curve’s maximum width.
                       5 Choose a preset curve shape from the Preset list box.
                       6 Position the cursor where you want the curve to start.
                       7 Drag to draw the curve.

Drawing curves in Brush mode
                       The Brush mode allows you to apply shapes or text to a curve. You can select
                       a preset brush from the Brush list box or save a graphic or text object as a
                       brush stroke.
An object applied to
a curve using the
brush mode of the
Natural Media tool.




                       To draw a curve in Brush mode
                       1 Open the Curve flyout, and click the Natural Media tool.
                       2 Click the Brush button on the Property Bar.
                       3 Click the Freehand Smoothing box and move the pop-up slider to select a
                         smoothness setting.
                         Move the slider to the right for maximum smoothing; move the slider to
                         the left for no smoothing.
                       4 Type a width in the Natural Media tool Width box on the Property Bar,
                         then press ENTER.
                         The width you set here represents the curve’s maximum width.



                                                           Drawing and shaping objects           109
         5 Select a brush from the Brush list box.
         6 Place the cursor where you want the curve to start.
         7 Drag to draw the curve.

         To create a brush stroke
         1 Open the Curve flyout, and click the Natural Media tool.
         2 Click the Brush button on the Property Bar.
         3 Select the graphic or text object you want to use as a brush with the
           Natural Media tool.
         4 Click the Save button from the Property Bar.
         5 In the Save As dialog box, type a name for the brush stroke in the File
           Name box, and click Save.


         Ÿ You can also create a brush stroke by selecting the graphic or text object,
           clicking the Save button in the Natural Media docker, and enabling the
           Brush button.


         To delete a brush stroke
         1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
         2 Select the brush stroke you want to delete from the Brush list box, and
           click the Delete button.

Drawing curves using the Object Sprayer
         The Object Sprayer mode allows you to “spray” a series of objects along a
         curve. Besides graphic and text objects, you can import bitmaps and spray
         them along a curve. Of course, the more complex the object you want to
         spray, the more system resources you use, the longer CorelDRAW takes to
         produce the curve, and the larger your file size.




110      CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
A series of objects
“sprayed” along a
curve using the
Object Sprayer.




                      The Object Sprayer has a number of features that allow you to control how
                      the spray appears on the curve. For example, you can adjust the spacing
                      between the objects, vary the order of the objects in the curve, adjust the
                      Sprayer to rotate the objects along the curve, and offset the objects from the
                      curve you draw.
                      All settings are saved to a spraylist. If you make changes to a spraylist, you
                      can either reset the spraylist to its saved settings, or save the new settings
                      to the spraylist. You can choose to spray some or all the objects in the
                      spraylist. The series of objects selected for the spray is referred to as the
                      “playlist.”

                      To draw a curve using the Object Sprayer
                      1 Open the Curve flyout, and click the Natural Media tool.
                      2 Click the Sprayer button on the Property Bar.
                      3 Click the Freehand Smoothing box and move the pop-up slider to select a
                        smoothness setting.
                         Move the slider to the right for maximum smoothing; move the slider to
                         the left for no smoothing.
                      4 Type a percentage value in the Size of Objects to be Sprayed box on the
                        Property Bar, then press ENTER.
                         The value you set here represents the size of the sprayed object as a
                         percentage of the original. If you want the objects to increase of decrease
                         along the curve, click the Incremental Scaling button to enable the
                         Incremental Scaling box, type a percent value, and then press ENTER.



                                                            Drawing and shaping objects            111
      5 Select a spray from the Spraylist File list box.
      6 Place the cursor where you want the curve to start.
      7 Drag to draw the curve.

      To adjust the dabs setting for the Spraylist
      1 Select the Spraylist you want to adjust.
      2 Type the number of objects you want placed at each spacing point.
         For example, if you type “4”, CorelDRAW places four objects at each
         spacing point on the curve.

      To adjust the spacing between dabs on a curve
      Ÿ Type the distance you want between the centers of each object on the
        curve, then press ENTER.

      To adjust the rotation of objects to be sprayed
      1 Select the Spraylist you want to adjust.
      2 Click the Rotation button on the Property Bar.
      3 Type a value between 0 and 360 in the Angle box.
         For example, to rotate all objects in the spray by 45 degrees, type “45” in
         the Angle box.
      4 If you want each object in the spray to rotate incrementally, enable the
        Use Increment check box and type a value in the Increment box.
      5 Do one of the following:
         Ÿ Enable the Path Based button to rotate objects in relation to the curve.
         Ÿ Enable the Page Based button to rotate objects in relation to the page.

      To offset objects from the curve
      1 Select the Spraylist you want to adjust.
      2 Click the Offset button on the Property Bar.
      3 Enable the Use Offset check box to offset objects from the curve.
         If you want the objects to follow the curve, disable the check box.
      4 If you want to adjust the offset distance, type a new value in the Offset
        box.




112   CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
5 Choose an offset direction from the Offset Direction list box.
   For example, if you want to alternate between the left and right of the
   curve, choose Alternating.

To create a new Spraylist
1 Choose New Spraylist from the Spraylist File list on the Property Bar.
2 Select the object you want to add to the Spraylist, then click Add to
  Spraylist.
3 Repeat step 2 for each object you want to add.
4 Click the Save button and type a name for the Spraylist in the File name
  box.

To create or edit a Playlist
1 Choose the Spraylist from the Spraylist File list box.
2 Click the Spraylist Dialog button on the Property Bar.
3 From the Create Playlist, do the following as necessary:
   Ÿ To add an image to the Playlist, choose the image from the Spraylist
     list box and click Add.
   Ÿ To remove an image from the Playlist, choose the image from the
     Playlist list box and click Remove.
   Ÿ To change the order of the Playlist, choose an image from the Playlist
     and click the Up or Down arrow.
   Ÿ To reverse the order of the Playlist, click the Reverse Order button.
   Ÿ To clear the Playlist, click Clear.

To delete a Spraylist
Ÿ From the Property Bar, choose the Spraylist you want to delete and click
  the Delete button.

To reset a Spraylist to its saved settings
1 Choose the Spraylist you want to reset from the Spraylist File list box.
2 Click the Reset Values button on the Property Bar.
3 Click Yes to save the new values to the Spraylist, or No to reset the
  Spraylist to its saved settings.




                                       Drawing and shaping objects           113
                         Ÿ You can also create a Spraylist by selecting the graphic or text object,
                           clicking the Save button in the Natural Media Docker, and enabling the
                           Object Sprayer button.


Drawing curves in Calligraphic mode
                         The Calligraphic mode allows you to simulate the effect of using a
                         calligraphic pen. Curves drawn in calligraphic mode vary in thickness
                         according to the direction of the line and the angle of the pen nib.
Lines drawn using
the Calligraphic
mode vary in width
according to the
direction of the line.




                         To draw a curve in Calligraphic mode
                         1 Open the Curve flyout, and click the Natural Media tool.
                         2 Click the Calligraphic button on the Property Bar.
                         3 Click the Freehand Smoothing box and move the pop-up slider to select a
                           smoothness setting.
                            Move the slider to the right for maximum smoothing; move the slider to
                            the left for no smoothing.
                         4 Type a width in the Natural Media tool Width box on the Property Bar,
                           then press ENTER.
                            The width you set here represents the curve’s maximum width.
                         5 Type an angle in the Calligraphic Angle box on the Property Bar, then
                           press ENTER.




114                      CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
                           The Calligraphic Angle box controls the angle of the pen nib. For example,
                           type “0” if you want narrow horizontal lines and thick vertical lines or
                           “90” if you want thick horizontal lines and narrow vertical lines.
                         6 Place the cursor where you want the curve to start.
                         7 Drag to draw the curve.

Drawing curves in Pressure-sensitive mode
                         The Pressure-sensitive mode allows you to use a pressure-sensitive pen to
                         create curves of varying thickness. You can also use the mouse and keyboard
                         to simulate the effect of a pressure-sensitive pen.
Lines drawn using
the pressure-sensitive
mode vary in width
according to the
pressure applied.




                         To draw a curve in Pressure-sensitive mode
                         1 Open the Curve flyout, and click the Natural Media tool.
                         2 Click the Pressure button on the Property Bar.
                         3 Click the Freehand Smoothing box and move the pop-up slider to select a
                           smoothness setting.
                           Move the slider to the right for maximum smoothing; move the slider to
                           the left for no smoothing.
                         4 Type a width in the Natural Media tool Width box on the Property Bar,
                           then press ENTER.
                           The width you set here represents the curve’s maximum width.
                         5 Position the cursor where you want the curve to start.
                         6 Drag to draw the curve.


                                                             Drawing and shaping objects           115
         Ÿ If you are using the mouse, press the Up Arrow or Down Arrow to vary
           the pen pressure. The Up Arrow increases the pressure effect, making the
           curve wider; the Down Arrow decreases this effect. To set the maximum
           width of the curve, type a value in the Natural Media tool Width box.


Applying strokes using the Natural Media Docker
         A powerful feature of the Natural Media tool is the ability to apply Natural
         Media strokes to existing objects. The outline of the object will be used as
         the control path for the Natural Media stroke. To make it easier to apply
         Natural Media strokes, you can open the Natural Media Docker and either
         drag and drop Natural Media strokes or choose strokes and apply them to
         selected objects.
         When you apply a Natural Media stroke, the stroke appears in the Last Used
         list box. This makes it easier to find frequently used Natural Media strokes.

         To apply Natural Media strokes to existing objects
         1 Click Effects, Natural Media.
         2 Choose the folder with the strokes you want from the Group list box.
            To find another folder, click the Browse button.
         3 Using the Pick tool, select the object you want to apply the Natural Media
           stroke to.
         4 From the Docker, choose a stroke either from the Last Used or from the
           Group list box, then click Apply.

         To delete a Natural Media stroke
            Ÿ Choose the stroke from the Group list box, then click the Delete
              button.

         To specify which types of strokes are displayed in the Natural
         Media Docker
         1 Click     .
         2 Enable one or more of the following options:
            Ÿ Preset — to display Preset strokes
            Ÿ Brushes — to display Brush strokes
            Ÿ Object Sprayer — to display Spraylists
            A check mark appears beside enabled options.


116      CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
                        Ÿ You can also drag and drop Natural Media strokes by dragging the stroke
                          from the list box on the Docker to the object on your Drawing Page.


Shaping lines, curves, and curve objects
                        The Shape tool lets you change the shape of all curve objects by editing their
                        nodes and segments. You can also select and edit curves using the Pick tool.
                        A curve object is a line, curve, or shape created using the Freehand tool, the
                        Bezier tool, the Natural Media tool, or the Spiral tool. Rectangles, ellipses,
                        polygons, or text objects become curve objects when you use the Convert To
                        Curves command.
A control point (item
1), a node (item 2),
and a subpath (item
3).




                        Segments
                        A segment is the part of a curve lying between two nodes. Segments are of
                        two types: curved or straight. You can bend a curved segment by dragging it
                        with the Shape tool or by dragging the control points of the nodes on either
                        end of it. If you want to bend a straight segment, you must convert it to a
                        curved segment.

                        Nodes
                        A node is a small square on a line, curve, or object outline you use to edit the
                        object. When you select a curve object with the Shape tool, CorelDRAW
                        displays all the object’s nodes. You can shape a curve object by moving a
                        node or by moving the control points attached to a node.
                        Control points determine the curve of a segment as it passes through a node.
                        You can control the curve of a segment by varying the control point’s angle
                        and its distance from the node. Each node has a control point for each curved
                        segment connected to it. A node at the end of a curved segment has one
                        control point, while a node between two segments has two control points.




                                                              Drawing and shaping objects            117
         Since straight segments cannot bend, a node at the end of a straight segment
         does not have a control point for that segment.
         You can add nodes to a path if you can’t shape the path the way you want by
         moving the existing nodes. If, on the other hand, you want to smooth the
         shape of an object, you can remove unwanted nodes.

         Subpaths
         A single curve object can consist of more than one curve or shape. Each of
         these curves or shapes is referred to as a subpath. For example, when you
         convert text to curves, you often create subpaths. Once converted to a curve,
         the letter “O” appears as two ellipses. Each of these ellipses is a subpath.


         Ÿ When you edit a Natural Media stroke, you edit the control path of the
           stroke. The stroke itself is a closed path following the control path. When
           you shape the control path, the stroke shifts according to how you edit the
           control path. If you want to edit the closed path directly, you must first
           separate it from the control path.


Selecting nodes and segments
         You must select a node or a segment before you can make changes to the
         curve. When you select a node attached to a straight segment, the node
         appears as an unfilled square. If the node is attached to a curve segment, it
         appears as a solid square. The Status Bar indicates the type of node (smooth,
         cusp, or symmetrical) and segment (line or curve) selected.
         To select a segment, you must use the Shape tool. To select a node, you can
         use the Shape tool, Pick tool or any of the basic drawing tools.

         To select a node or segment on a curve object
         Ÿ Click the node or segment with the Shape tool.

         To select multiple nodes
         1 Select the curve object with the Shape tool.
         2 Hold down SHIFT, and click the nodes with the Shape tool.


         Ÿ You can also drag a marquee box around the nodes to select them.




118      CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
         To select all nodes of a selected object
         Ÿ Click Edit, Select All, Nodes.


         Ÿ If the selected curve has too many nodes to display, Pick tool node editing
           is automatically disabled.



         Ÿ You can also select all nodes by holding down CTRL + SHIFT, and
           clicking a node on the object with the Shape tool.
         Ÿ To select the first or last node in a curve object, you can select the object
           with the Shape tool and then press HOME to select the first node, or
           END to select the last node.
         Ÿ Double-clicking a curve with the Pick tool puts you in full node edit mode.


Deselecting nodes
         Deselect nodes when you are finished shaping the curve.

         To deselect one or more nodes
         1 Select the curve object with the Shape tool.
         2 Hold down SHIFT, and click the nodes with the Shape tool.


         Ÿ You can also hold down SHIFT and drag a marquee box around the nodes
           you want to deselect. This method also selects any nodes inside the
           marquee box that are not selected.
         Ÿ To deselect all nodes on an object, you can also click a blank space in the
           Drawing Window.


Adding nodes
         You can add nodes to a curve object if you more nodes to create the curve
         you want.

         To add a node to a curve object
         1 Click the Shape tool.
         2 Double-click the curve where you want to add the node.



                                               Drawing and shaping objects           119
         To add several nodes to a curve object
         1 Using the Shape tool, select the nodes between which you want to add
           nodes.
         2 Click the Add Node(s) button on the Property Bar.


         Ÿ You can also use the Shape tool to add a single node to a curve object by
           clicking the curve and then clicking the Add Node(s) button on the
           Property Bar.


Removing nodes
         Removing nodes from an object reduces redraw and printing time and can
         also make the object appear smoother. You can select the nodes you want to
         remove yourself, or you can use the Curve Smoothness slider to remove
         unnecessary nodes automatically. The higher the setting on the slider, the
         more nodes that will be removed.

         To remove a node from a curve object
         1 Click the Shape tool.
         2 Double-click the node you want to remove.

         To remove several nodes from a curve object
         1 Using the Shape tool, marquee select the nodes you want to remove.
         2 Click the Delete Node(s) button on the Property Bar.

Joining nodes
         You can close an open path by joining its two end nodes. You can also join end
         nodes on separate paths if the paths are all subpaths of the same object. You
         cannot join nodes of two separate objects. If you want to join nodes from
         separate curve objects, you must first combine them into a single curve
         object, then join the two end nodes.

         To join two nodes
         1 Using the Shape tool select the nodes you want to join.
         2 Click the Join Two Nodes button on the Property Bar.
            A joined node is placed between the positions of the original two nodes.




120      CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
         To join two nodes with a line
         1 Using the Shape tool, select the nodes you want to join.
         2 Click the Extend Curve To Close button on the Property Bar.

         To close an open path
         1 Using the Pick tool or the Shape tool, select the object.
         2 Click the Auto-Close button on the Property Bar.

Shaping nodes and segments
         You can change the shape of a curve object by moving its segments, nodes
         and control points. Normally, you move the segments and nodes to make
         coarse adjustments, then fine tune the shape by moving the control points of
         the nodes. By holding down CTRL as you drag a node or control point, you
         can force it to move on a straight horizontal or vertical path.
         You can edit a curve object’s nodes using the Pick tool or any drawing tool.
         To edit a curve object’s segments and control points you must select it with
         the Shape tool.

         To shape a curve object by moving its curved segments
         1 Select the curve object with the Shape tool.
         2 Drag a curved segment to reshape it.

         To shape a curve object by moving its nodes
         1 Select the curve object with the Pick tool or any drawing tool.
         2 Drag a node to reshape the curve.
            As you drag, the segments on either side of the node move. If the node is
            on a curved segment, the control points also move so that the angles at
            which the curve enters and leaves the node remain unchanged.

         To shape a curve object by moving several nodes at once
         1 Hold down SHIFT, and click the nodes you want to select with the Shape
           tool.
         2 Drag any of the selected nodes.

         To shape a curve object by moving its control points
         1 Select a node with the Shape tool.



                                                Drawing and shaping objects        121
             Control points only extend from the selected node and from those nodes
             on either side of the selected node if it is on a curved segment.
          2 Drag a control point to reshape the curve.
             The control points move differently depending on whether the node they
             are associated with is smooth, cusp, or symmetrical. This, in turn, affects
             the shape of the curve.


          Ÿ To move a control point hidden under its node, deselect all nodes on the
            curve object, hold down SHIFT, and drag the control point out from under
            the node.


Aligning nodes and control points
          You can align two or more nodes on the same curve object. You can also align
          the control points associated with these nodes. Nodes and control points can
          be aligned horizontally or vertically.

          To align nodes and control points
          1 Select the curve object with the Shape tool.
          2 Hold down SHIFT, and select the nodes you want to align.
          3 Click the Align Nodes button on the Property Bar.
          4 Disable any options you do not want.

Transforming parts of a curve object
          You can change the shape of an object by applying basic geometric
          transformations (such as scaling) to selected nodes. You might want to do
          this if, for example, you need to enlarge a portion of an object.

          To stretch or scale parts of a curve object
          1 Select the curve object with the Shape tool.
          2 Select the nodes along the curve you want to transform.
          3 Click the Stretch And Scale Nodes button on the Property Bar.
             Eight sizing handles appear.
          4 Drag the corner handles to scale the selected nodes, or drag the side
            handles to stretch the selected nodes.




122       CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
                       To rotate or skew parts of a curve object
                       1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
                       2 Click the Rotate And Skew Nodes button on the Property Bar.
                          Eight rotating/skewing handles appear.
                       3 Drag the corner handles to rotate the selected nodes, or drag the side
                         handles to skew the selected nodes.

Changing a node’s properties
                       There are three types of nodes: cusp, smooth, and symmetrical. The control
                       points of each node type behave differently.
A symmetrical node
(item 1), a smooth
node (item 2), and a
cusp node (item 3).




                       Node type                   Properties
                       Cusp                        The control points of a cusp node move independently from one another.
                                                   A curve that passes through a cusp node can bend at a sharp angle.
                       Smooth                      The control points of a smooth node are always directly opposite each
                                                   other. When you move one control point, the other moves also. The
                                                   control points of a smooth node may be of different lengths. Smooth
                                                   nodes produce a smooth transition between line segments.
                       Symmetrical                 The control points of a symmetrical node are always directly opposite
                                                   each other. Also, the control points are always equal lengths.
                                                   Symmetrical nodes produce the same curvature on both sides of the
                                                   node.

                       Unless a curve changes direction sharply as it passes through a node,
                       changing the node type will not noticeably affect the curve’s shape. It will,
                       however, affect the way you can reshape a curve.

                       To make a node smooth, cusp, or symmetrical
                       1 Select the curve object with the Shape tool.



                                                                 Drawing and shaping objects                          123
         2 Click the node you want to change.
            If you select more than one node, you can change all the nodes
            simultaneously.
         3 Click the Cusp, Smooth, or Symmetrical button on the Property Bar.

Changing a segment’s properties
         here are two types of segments: straight and curved. If you click on a node
         with the Shape tool, the Status Bar displays the type of segment entering the
         node and the node type itself, for example, Selected Node: Curve Smooth.
         The Convert Line To Curve and Convert Curve To Line buttons make it easy
         to turn segments from straight to curved and from curved to straight.
         You can also change the direction of a curve and smooth out a curve using
         buttons on the Shape tool Property Bar.

         To make a segment straight or curved
         1 Select the curve object with the Shape tool.
         2 Click the segment you want to change.
            If you select several segments at once, you can change them
            simultaneously.
         3 Do one of the following:
            Ÿ Click the Convert Curve To Line button on the Property Bar to make a
              segment straight
            Ÿ Click the Convert Line To Curve button to make a segment curved

         To reverse the direction of a curve
         Ÿ Select the curve with the Shape tool, and then click the Reverse Curve
           Direction button.

         To smooth out a curve
         1 Marquee select the curve with the Shape tool.
         2 Click the Curve Smoothness box and move the pop-up slider to select a
           smoothness setting.
            Move the slider to the right for maximum smoothing; move the slider to
            the left for no smoothing.




124      CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
Breaking a path
         You can turn a closed curve object into an open one by breaking its path at
         any point. You can also break an open path into one or more subpaths or into
         separate objects.
         When you break a path, any subpaths and nodes that are created remain a
         part of the original object.

         To break a path
         1 Select the curve object with the Shape tool.
         2 Click where you want to break the path.
            Select multiple nodes to break the path at several different places.
         3 Click the Break Curve button on the Property Bar.
            Two superimposed nodes appear at each break.

         To extract a path from an object
         1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
         2 Using the Shape tool, select a segment, node, or group of nodes that
           represents the portion of the path you want to extract.
         3 Click the Extract Subpath button on the Property Bar.


         Ÿ When you break a path in an object it still remains as one object. When
           you extract a subpath, you create two separate objects.


Drawing dimension, connector, and flow lines
         Dimension lines
         Dimension lines let you show the size of objects or the distance between
         objects. Dimension lines are extremely useful for creating technical
         diagrams, floor plans, or any drawing where exact measurements and scale
         are important. A dimension line can be attached to an object so that when the
         object is moved, the dimension line moves with it. This feature makes
         dimension lines very flexible, especially when combined with dynamic
         dimensioning.




                                               Drawing and shaping objects         125
                        Connector and flow lines
                        The Connector Line tool and the Flow Line tool let you connect two objects
                        with a line. If you move either or both of the objects, the connector or flow
                        line is adjusted accordingly.

                        Linking dimension, connector, and flow lines to objects
                        For dimension, connector, and flow lines to be effective, they must be linked
                        to the objects you label. When you use the Dimension tool, the Connector
                        tool, or the Flow Line tool, special points on each object, called snap points,
                        are activated. When the mouse passes over a snap point, the point becomes
                        visible. Dimension, connector, and flow lines can only be linked to objects at
                        these snap points.
                        Basic objects and curve objects generally have snap points at each node and
                        at the center of the object.
An object showing
the position of snap
points for dimension,
connector, and flow
lines.




                        Ÿ For snap points to be visible the Show Snap Location Marks check box
                          must be enabled. To access the check box, click Tools, Options, then, in
                          the list of categories, click Workspace, Display.


Drawing dimension lines
                        Dimension lines let you show the size of objects or the distance between
                        objects. Dynamic dimensioning automatically displays the length of the
                        dimension line, ensuring you use accurate measurements in your drawing.
                        Also, dynamic dimension lines automatically change as you change your


126                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
                        drawing. If you prefer to type in your own approximate measurements or
                        other text, you can disable the dynamic dimensioning feature.
You can use
dimension lines to
indicate the distance
between two points
in your drawing.




                        When you use dimension lines to label objects, you can set the scale of your
                        drawing to reflect the actual size of the objects you are labeling. By default,
                        the scale is 1:1; therefore, one inch in your drawing equals one inch in the
                        real world. However, if you want to create an office floor plan, a scale of 1:12
                        (one inch equals one foot) might be more appropriate.

                        Callout lines
                        The Callout tool lets you draw lines that point to and label objects in a
                        drawing. When you draw a callout line, a text cursor appears at the end of the
                        line. This cursor indicates where to type a label for the object. You can format
                        this text as you would format Artistic text. You can also alter the format of
                        the callout line as you would format an outline.

                        Dimension Text
                        When you have finished measuring an object using the Dimension tool, a text
                        block displays the object’s measurement units and value. This text block is
                        called the dimension text and CorelDRAW lets you customize its display
                        options.
                        You can choose the style, font, and position of the dimension text. You can
                        also choose a unit of measurement and specify the number of decimal places
                        for the measurement.
                        You can add a prefix and suffix to the dimension text to help you keep track of
                        the various measurements of your drawing. You can also select the
                        dimension text and type custom text.

Drawing dimension lines
                        The Dimension tool lets you draw vertical, horizontal, slanted, and angular
                        dimension lines. Vertical and horizontal dimensions are restricted to the
                        vertical and horizontal axes; slanted dimensions can be drawn at any angle.


                                                               Drawing and shaping objects           127
      Angular dimension lines measure angles. An angular dimension consists of
      two lines extending from a single point. An arc and label between the two
      lines indicate the angle between the two lines in degrees, gradians, or
      radians.

      To draw a vertical, horizontal, or slanted dimension line
      1 Open the Curve flyout, and click the Dimension tool.
      2 Click one of the following from the Property Bar:
        Ÿ Vertical Dimension tool
        Ÿ Horizontal Dimension tool
        Ÿ Slanted Dimension tool
      3 Click where you want to begin measuring.
        If you want the dimension line to be linked to an object, click on one of the
        object’s snap points.
      4 Click where you want to finish measuring.
      5 Click where you want to place the dimension text.
        The dimension text appears where you clicked, provided you have not
        specified a default dimension text location on the Property Bar.
        The dimension text value is expressed in the same units as the horizontal
        ruler, unless you have specified another unit on the Property Bar.

      To draw a dimension line using the Auto Dimension tool
      1 Open the Curve flyout, and click the Auto Dimension tool.
      2 Click where you want to begin measuring.
        If you want the dimension line to be linked to an object, click on one of the
        object’s snap points.
      3 Press TAB to toggle the Auto Dimension tool from vertical to horizontal
        or slanted dimension lines.
      4 Click where you want to finish measuring.
      5 Click where you want to place the dimension text.


      Ÿ If you are drawing a slanted dimension line, hold down CTRL while you
        drag to constrain the angle to 15-degree increments, or to the value you
        specified for the Constrain Angle setting in the Options dialog box.




128   CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
          To draw angular dimension lines
          1 Open the Curve flyout, and click the Dimension tool.
          2 Click the Angular Dimension Tool button on the Property Bar.
          3 Click where you want the two lines that measure the angle to intersect.
          4 Click where you want the first line to end.
             If you are measuring an angle between two objects and you want the
             dimension line to change when the objects move, place the end of each
             line on a snap point.
          5 Click where you want the second line to end.
          6 Click where you want the angle’s label to appear.

Drawing callouts
          The Callout tool lets you create callouts for labeling your drawing. For
          callouts to be effective, they must be linked to the objects they are labeling.
          To link callouts, use the object’s snap points.
          CorelDRAW lets you customize the text in callouts in the same way you
          format and edit text in CorelDRAW. For more information, see “Working with
          text” on page 337.

          To draw a two-segment callout
          1 Open the Curve flyout, and click the Dimension tool.
          2 Click the Callout button on the Property Bar.
          3 Click where you want the first callout segment to start.
          4 Click where you want the first segment to end and where you want the
            second segment to start.
          5 Click where you want to place the callout text.
          6 Type the callout text.

          To draw a one-segment callout
          Ÿ Follow steps 1 to 3 in the previous procedure, then double-click where
            you want to place the callout text.

Linking dimension lines to objects
          When dimension lines are linked to objects, operations performed on these
          objects will affect the dimension lines. The following is a list of common
          operations and the effects each operation has on linked dimension lines:


                                                 Drawing and shaping objects          129
         When you...                an object, the...
         Rotate                     horizontal and vertical dimension lines remain horizontal and vertical
                                    regardless of the object’s orientation. Slanted dimension lines rotate with
                                    the objects that they label. If you plan to rotate an object, you may find
                                    the slanted dimension lines more useful than the horizontal and vertical
                                    dimension lines.
         Skew                       linked dimension line does not get skewed. CorelDRAW updates the
                                    dimension text to reflect changes in measurement.
         Stretch                    dimension line is also stretched. CorelDRAW updates the dimension text
                                    to reflect the new measurement.
         Delete                     the dimension line attached to a deleted snap point is also deleted.
         Duplicate                  dimension line linked to the object does not get duplicated. To duplicate
                                    both the object and any linked dimension lines, you must select the
                                    object and the dimension lines before duplicating.
         Clone                      dimension line linked to the object does not get cloned. To clone both the
                                    object and any linked dimension lines, you must select the object and the
                                    dimension lines before cloning.
         Separate                   link between the dimension line and the object is broken. Once
                                    separated, a link can only be reestablished by clicking Edit, Undo.
         Node edit                  dimension lines connected to the edited node are affected.

Changing dimension text
         You can change the units for dimension text and add a prefix and a suffix to
         the text. If you want to change what the dimension text says you can turn off
         dynamic dimension lines and type a custom label. To restore the true
         dimension, select the dimension line and enable the Dynamic Dimensioning
         button on the Property Bar.

         To specify how dimension units are displayed
         1 Select the dimension line with the Pick tool.
         2 If you want the units displayed next to the value on the dimension line,
           enable the Show Units For Dimension button on the Property Bar.
         3 Choose a style from the Dimension Style list box on the Property Bar.
            You can choose from Decimal, Fractional, U.S. Engineering, or U.S.
            Architectural style. (This option is not available with Angular Dimension
            lines.)




130      CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
         4 Choose the precision level from the Dimension Precision list box on the
           Property Bar.
         5 Choose a unit of measurement from the Dimension Units box on the
           Property Bar.

         To add a prefix or a suffix to dimension text
         1 Select the dimension line with the Pick tool.
         2 Type text in the Prefix For Dimension or Suffix For Dimension box on the
           Property Bar.

         To type custom text on a dimension line
         1 Select the dimension line with the Pick tool.
         2 Disable the Dynamic Dimensioning button on the Property Bar.
         3 Select the text you want to change with the Text tool, and type in new text.

         To change the default settings
         1 Press ESC, or click on blank space, to deselect all objects in your drawing.
         2 Open the Curve flyout, and click the Dimension tool.
         3 Change the settings on the Property Bar.


         Ÿ You can change the default settings by accessing the Options dialog box.



         Ÿ You cannot change the default for dynamic dimension lines. Whenever you
           create a dimension line, it is dynamic unless you change it.


Changing the dimension text font
         You can change the font and size of dimension text after you have created the
         dimension line.

         To change the point size and font of dimension text
         1 Select the dimension text with the Pick tool.
            If the dimension line is already selected, click a blank space on the
            Drawing Window before you try to select the dimension text.




                                               Drawing and shaping objects          131
         2 Type the size in the Font Size list box on the Property Bar.
         3 Choose a font from the Font list box on the Property Bar.

Positioning dimension text
         You can specify how dimension text is positioned relative to the dimension
         line, and you can move the text to a different position on the page.

         To specify the position of dimension text relative to the
         dimension line
         1 Select the dimension line with the Pick tool.
         2 Click the Text Position Drop Down button on the Property Bar.
         3 Specify where you want to place the dimension text relative to the
           dimension line.


            Ÿ Click             to place it above the line.


            Ÿ Click             to place text within the line.


            Ÿ Click             to place it below the line.


            Ÿ Click             to have the text placed horizontally.
            This option places the text horizontally even if the dimension line is
            diagonal or vertical. If you don’t choose this option, CorelDRAW places
            the dimension text at the same angle as the dimension line.


            Ÿ Click             to have the text centered relative to the dimension
              line.
            This option centers the text on the dimension line. If you don’t choose the
            Center option, CorelDRAW places the dimension text where you last
            clicked when you drew the dimension line.

         To change the position of dimension text
         Ÿ Select the dimension text with the Pick tool and drag it to a new location.
            The dimension line changes accordingly.




132      CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
Drawing Connector lines and Flow lines
                      The Connector Line and Flow Line tools let you dynamically connect two
                      objects with a line. A line drawn with one of these tools is attached to both
                      objects so that if you move one or both of the objects, the line is repositioned
                      to maintain the connection. If only one end of a line is connected to an object,
                      the other end is fixed to the page.
                      The Connector Line tool draws straight lines at any angle. For example, if
                      you connect two objects where one is above and two the right of the other,
                      the Connector Line tool draws a straight, diagonal line between the objects.
                      Connector lines can be set either to remain attached to the nodes you choose
                      or to shift to the closest nodes on the two connected objects. You can only
                      reposition a connector line by moving the objects it is attached to.
                      The Flow Line tool makes it easy to create flowcharts and organizational
                      charts. Unlike the Connector tool, the Flow Line tool draws lines with only
                      vertical and horizontal segments. If you connect two objects where one is
                      above and to the left of the other, the Flow Line tool draws alternating
                      vertical and horizontal line segments in a step-like fashion. Flow lines remain
                      attached to the nodes you choose when the objects are moved. You can
                      detach a flow line from an object freely.
An organizational
chart showing lines
drawn with the
Connector Line and
Flow Line tools.




                      You can customize the style, thickness and end points of connector and flow
                      lines using the Property Bar.

Drawing connector lines
                      The Connector Line tool lets you draw lines that connect objects in your
                      drawing. For connector lines to be effective they must be linked to the
                      objects they are labeling. To link objects, use the object’s snap points. When


                                                            Drawing and shaping objects           133
         a connector line is linked to an object, it moves when you move the object.
         You can only move connector lines by moving either or both of the objects
         they connect.
         You can change the outline of connector lines as well as customize connector
         line styles and arrowheads. For more information, see “Filling and outlining
         objects” on page 211.

         To draw a connector line between two objects
         1 Open the Curve flyout, and click the Connector Line tool.
         2 Click a snap point on the first object.
            When the mouse is over a snap point, the snap point is highlighted.
         3 Click a snap point on the second object.


         Ÿ By default, the Lock To Connector Node button is disabled. When the
           button is disabled, the connector line will always draw the shortest line
           between the two objects it connects. When enabled, the connector line
           remains fixed to the nodes to which it was originally attached.
         Ÿ You can access the connector line settings by clicking Tools, Options and
           selecting the Connector Line tool in the list of categories.


Drawing flow lines
         The Flow Line tool lets you draw flow lines that connect objects in your
         drawing. For flow lines to be effective they must be linked to the objects they
         are labeling. To link objects, use the object’s snap points. When a flow line is
         linked to an object, it moves when you move the object, and will redraw to
         reflect the change in position.
         You can change the outline, line styles and arrowheads of flow lines. For
         more information, see “Filling and outlining objects” on page 211.

         To draw a flow line between two objects
         1 Open the Curve flyout, and click the Flow Line tool
         2 Click a snap point on the first object.
            When the mouse is over a snap point, the snap point is highlighted.
         3 Drag to a snap point on the second object.




134      CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
Editing flow lines
          You can make some changes to flow lines using the Shape tool. Nodes on the
          line can be dragged horizontally or vertically, but not both. This means that
          all angles in a flow line will be right angles.
          If you move one of the objects the flow line is connected to, the line will be
          redrawn and any edits you have made may be lost.

          To edit a flow line
          1 Select the flow line with the Shape tool.
          2 Click and drag the node you want to move.

Linking connector and flow lines to objects
          When connector and flow lines are linked to objects, operations performed on
          these objects will affect the lines. The following is a list of common
          operations and the effects each operation has on linked connector and flow
          lines:

          When you...                 an object, the...
          Rotate, skew, or stretch    connector or flow line will be redrawn to reflect the change to the
                                      object’s position. Connector lines which are not locked to the connection
                                      node will jump to whichever two nodes of the objects are closest together,
                                      while connector lines which are locked to the connection line will remain
                                      attached to the same node.
          Delete                      connector line or flow line attached to the deleted object is also deleted.
          Duplicate                   connector or flow line linked to the object does not get duplicated. To
                                      duplicate both the object and any linked connector or flow lines, you
                                      must select the line and both of the objects it is connected to before
                                      duplicating.
          Clone                       connector or flow line linked to the object does not get cloned. To clone
                                      both the object and any linked connector or flow lines, you must select
                                      the line and both of the objects it is connected to before cloning.
          Separate                    link between the connector or flow line and the object is broken. Once
                                      separated, a link can only be reestablished by clicking Edit, Undo. If you
                                      exceed the maximum number of Undo levels available, you must delete
                                      and reconstruct the line.
          Node edit                   connector line or flow line attached to the edited node are redrawn.




                                                    Drawing and shaping objects                              135
Setting tool preferences
          CorelDRAW lets you control the default settings of your drawing tools. The
          options of the Freehand and Bezier tools such as Auto-join, Freehand and
          Autotrace tracking, Corner and Straight Line Threshold, can be preset only
          through the Options dialog box. The Auto-join option determines how close
          two end nodes must be to join automatically.
          The Freehand Tracking option determines how closely a freehand curve
          matches the movement of the mouse. The Autotrace Tracking sets the
          accuracy of the Freehand and Bezier tools’ bitmap autotrace function.
          The Corner Threshold option sets the limit at which a corner node is cusped
          (as opposed to smooth). Through the Straight Line Threshold option, you can
          set the amount at which a line can deviate from a straight path and still be
          treated as straight.
          CorelDRAW also gives you options that help you pay attention to the details
          of your drawing. It lets you measure your values up to six decimal places. You
          can preset the constrain angle at which the object turns per rotation. When
          using dimension lines in your drawing, you can set the scale to measure
          distances that represent real world distance values.

Changing the default settings of a drawing tool
          The default settings of a drawing tool determine its behavior when you use it
          to create an object. If you want a drawing tool to behave differently, you can
          change its default settings.
          If no objects are selected and you select a tool, any changes you make to the
          settings on the Property Bar become the default settings. Otherwise, the
          changes you make are applied to the selected object. If you want to deselect
          all objects while a drawing tool is active, press ESC.

          To change the default settings of a drawing tool using the
          Options dialog box
          1 Click Tools, Options.
          2 In the list categories, double-click Toolbox, and click the tool you want to
            change from the list.
          3 Change the settings.

          To change the default settings of a drawing tool using the
          Property Bar
          1 Click the drawing tool you want to change.




136       CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
          2 Press ESC to ensure that no objects are selected.
          3 Change the settings on the Property Bar.

Controlling the behavior of the Freehand and Bezier tools
          You can change the way that the Freehand tool and Bezier tool behave by
          changing their properties on the Toolbox page in the Options dialog box.

          To set Freehand and Bezier tool properties
          1 Click Tools, Options.
          2 In the list of categories, double-click Toolbox, and click Freehand/Bezier
            Tool in the list of tools.
          3 Change any of the following property settings by typing a value (in pixels)
            in the appropriate box. In each case, you can set a value from 1 to 10.
             Ÿ Freehand Smoothing determines how closely a freehand curve will
               match the movement of the mouse. Lower numbers produce more
               accurate matches; higher numbers produce less accurate matches.
             Ÿ Autotrace Tracking sets the accuracy of the Freehand and Bezier tools’
               bitmap autotrace function. Lower values produce more accurate
               tracing; higher values produce less accurate tracing.
             Ÿ Corner Threshold sets the limit at which a corner node is cusped (as
               opposed to smooth). A node is more likely to be cusped if the value is
               lower.
             Ÿ Straight Line Threshold sets the amount a line can deviate from a
               straight path and still be treated as straight. If you set the threshold to
               a high value, you don’t need to be as accurate in your freehand drawing
               to produce a straight line.
             Ÿ Auto-join determines how close two end nodes must be to join
               automatically.


          Ÿ Double-click the Freehand tool or the Bezier tool to display the Toolbox
            page in the Options dialog box.
          Ÿ By default, the Fill Open Curves check box is disabled. When it is enabled,
            you can apply fills to open curves. To enable the Fill Open Curves check
            box, you must open the Options dialog box, and then click Document,
            General.




                                                Drawing and shaping objects           137
Setting the constrain angle
          The Options dialog box provides the controls you need to change the
          constrain angle. The constrain angle represents the increment by which
          control points, lines, and objects rotate when you hold down CTRL as you
          use the mouse to draw or rotate them. For example, if you set the constrain
          angle to 14 degrees, an object will rotate in 14-degree increments if you hold
          down CTRL as you drag one of the object’s rotation handles.

          To set the constrain angle
          1 Click Tools, Options.
          2 In the list of categories, click Workspace, Edit.
          3 Type the number of degrees in the Constrain Angle box.

Setting measurement precision for a drawing
          You can specify the number of decimal places displayed in measurements and
          coordinates by changing the drawing precision. This setting does not affect
          the drawing itself, it only affects how the numbers are displayed in dialog
          boxes, on the Property Bar, and on the Status Bar.

          To set drawing precision
          1 Click Tools, Options.
          2 In the list of categories, click Workspace, Edit.
          3 Type the desired number of decimals in the Drawing Precision box.

Drawing dimensions to scale
          If you are using dimension lines to measure distances, you will probably need
          to set the scale in CorelDRAW. It is necessary to set the scale when
          distances in your drawing represent greater or lesser distances in the real
          world. For example, if you want to illustrate the size of the head of a pin, you
          may want a centimeter in your drawing to represent one thousandth of a
          centimeter in the real world.

          To choose a preset drawing scale
          1 Click Tools, Options.
          2 In the list of categories, double-click Document, and click Rulers.
          3 Click the Edit Scale button.
          4 Choose a drawing scale from the Typical Scales list box.



138       CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
To set a custom drawing scale
1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
2 Choose Custom from the Typical Scales list box.
3 Type a value in the Page Distance box.
4 Choose a unit for the page distance from the list box provided.
5 Type a value in the World Distance box to set the actual distance you want
  represented by each unit of page distance.


Ÿ If you want to change the World Distance units, change the Horizontal
  ruler units. If the drawing scale is set to anything other than 1:1, the
  Vertical ruler units will always be the same as the Horizontal ruler units.
  For more information about changing ruler units, see “Setting ruler units”
  on page 57.




                                     Drawing and shaping objects         139
140   CorelDRAW: Chapter 3
                       WORKING WITH STYLES AND
                       TEMPLATES                                                              4
                       This chapter describes how to use styles and templates to help you format
                       drawings and documents in CorelDRAW.
                       A style is a set of formatting settings that simplifies the task of formatting
                       objects in your drawings. When you apply a style to an object, all the settings
                       of the style are applied to that object in one step. Styles can save you
                       considerable time if you need to apply the same formatting to many different
                       objects. For example, you can create a graphic style for quickly formatting
                       certain objects in your drawing.
You can use a style
to apply the same
formatting to many
different objects in
your drawing.




                       By using styles, you also make it easier to change your drawing. To change
                       the fill for the graphics objects in your drawing, you can simply edit the
                       graphic style to update all the objects using this style.
                       A template is a set of styles and page layout settings that govern the layout
                       and appearance of a drawing or document. You can use the default template
                       (CORELDRW.CDT) or choose one of a wide variety of other templates
                       available on the CorelDRAW CD-ROM.
                       You can also create your own templates to suit your needs. For example, if
                       you regularly put together a newsletter, you can save the newsletter’s page
                       layout settings and styles to a template. You can also save drawing objects to
                       your template. As with the above example, you can save the newsletter’s
                       banner with the template. When you create a new drawing using the
                       template, CorelDRAW formats the page using the page layout settings and
                       loads the styles saved with the template.




                                                       Working with styles and templates          143
Working with styles
                        With CorelDRAW, there are three types of styles you can save and apply in
                        your drawings: graphic, text, and color styles.
                        A graphic style is a combination of fill and outline settings. For more
                        information on creating fills and outlines, see “Filling and outlining objects”
                        on page 211.
                        A text style is a set of text settings including font, point size, and font style.
                        Text styles also include fill and outline settings. For example, you can create
                        a style that applies a texture fill to 72 point Wide Latin font. There are two
                        types of text styles: Artistic and Paragraph styles.
                        A color style is a color you save and apply to objects in your drawing. Since
                        there are millions of colors available in CorelDRAW, color styles can make it
                        easier to find and apply the exact color you want. One powerful feature of
                        color styles is that you can create a series of shades based on a color style.
                        The original color style is referred to as the “parent” color; and the shades,
                        as “child” colors. For most of the available color models and palettes, child
                        colors share the same hue as the parent but have different saturation and
                        brightness levels. With the Pantone Matching System, Pantone Hexachrome,
                        and UserInks palettes, child and parents share a common ID but have
                        different tint levels.
                        You can create child colors if you need to apply lighter and darker shades to
                        an object. If you later need to change the color of the object, you can edit the
                        parent color, and CorelDRAW will automatically adjust the child colors. For
                        example, if you change a parent color from red to yellow, CorelDRAW
                        converts the child colors of the red parent to shades of yellow.
When you change the
parent color,
CorelDraw
automatically adjusts
all the child colors.




144                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 4
          With CorelDRAW, when you change the settings of a style, all the objects
          using this style are automatically updated. This allows you to make design
          changes to your drawing in one step.
          By creating and applying styles, you can significantly reduce layout time and
          also ensure a consistent look for your drawings.

Working with graphic and text styles
          This section describes how to create and apply graphic and text styles. To
          make it easier to use these styles, CorelDRAW includes a Graphic and Text
          Styles Docker. You can use this Docker to drag and drop styles into your
          drawing. You can also use the Docker to create, edit, apply, and delete styles.
          Every CorelDRAW template includes default styles for graphics, artistic text,
          and paragraph text. When you create graphics or text, CorelDRAW
          automatically applies the appropriate default style. For example, if you have
          the Default Artistic Text style set to format text in 24 point AvantGarde, any
          artistic text you create will have these properties.
          Once you have created an object, you can apply a new style or change the
          settings of the default style to update your object. You cannot delete a default
          style.
          When you create a style, the new style is saved to the current drawing. To
          use the style in another drawing, you can copy the style to the new drawing
          or save the save the style in a template. For more information on creating
          and loading templates, see “Working with templates” on page 158.

Creating a style
          The Graphic And Text Styles Docker displays all the styles available in the
          current drawing or template. You can use this Docker to create a new
          graphics or text style. Once you have created a style, you can change the
          properties of the style.
          You can define styles for graphics, Artistic text, and Paragraph text.

          To create a style
          1 Click Tools, Graphic And Text Styles.

          2 Click     , New.
          3 Enable one of the following:
             Ÿ Graphic Style — creates a new Graphic style based on the Default
               Graphic style
             Ÿ Artistic Text Style — creates a new Artistic Text style based on the
               Default Artistic Text style


                                           Working with styles and templates          145
             Ÿ Paragraph Text Style — creates a new Paragraph Text style based on
               the Default Paragraph Text style
          4 Choose the new style from the list in the Graphic And Text Styles Docker.

          5 Click     , Properties.
          6 Click the Edit button beside the property you want to change.
          7 Adjust the Text, Fill, or Outline properties where necessary.

          To create a style from a graphic or text object
          1 Right-click the object using the Pick tool.
          2 Click Styles, Save Style Properties.
          3 Do one of the following:
             Ÿ Type a name for the style in the Name box.
             Ÿ Leave the name of the style unchanged to overwrite the existing style.
          4 Enable any of the following:
             Ÿ Text — to use the text properties of the object for the new style
             Ÿ Fill — to use the fill settings of the object for the new style
             Ÿ Outline — to use the outline settings of the object for the new style.


          Ÿ When you create a style based on an object, CorelDRAW does not
            automatically apply the style to the object. If you want the object to use
            the style, you must apply the style.



          Ÿ You can also create a new style based on an object by dragging the object
            from the drawing window to the Graphic and Text Styles Docker. By
            default, the new style is named “New Graphic”, “New Artistic Text”, or
            “New Paragraph Text” depending on the type. If a style with this name
            exists, CorelDRAW numbers the new style to distinguish it from the
            existing style.


Editing a style
          With CorelDRAW, you can edit the properties of a style either by changing
          the style’s properties in the Options dialog box, or by saving the properties of
          a selected object to the style.



146       CorelDRAW: Chapter 4
          To edit a style
          1 Click Tools, Graphic And Text Styles.
          2 Choose the style from the list in the Graphic And Text Docker.

          3 Click     , Properties.
          4 Click the Edit button beside the property you want to change.
          5 Adjust the Text, Fill, or Outline properties as desired.

          To edit a style based on changes to an object
          1 Make the desired changes to the object.
          2 Right-click the object.
          3 Click Styles, Save Style Properties.
          4 Type the name of the style you want to update in the Name box.
          5 Enable or disable the Text, Fill, or Outline boxes as desired.


          Ÿ You can also edit a style by copying object properties from an object to a
            style. You do this by dragging the object from the drawing window over
            the style in the Graphic and Text Styles Docker. You can also copy object
            properties by choosing the style, and then using the Copy Properties
            From command from the Docker menu.


          To rename a style
          1 Click Tools, Graphic And Text Styles.
          2 Right-click the style, and click Rename.
          3 Type the new name, and press ENTER.

Deleting a style
          You can delete any custom style from a template. You can’t delete any of the
          default styles: Default Paragraph Text, Default Artistic Text, and Default
          Graphic.

          To delete a style
          1 Click Tools, Graphic And Text Styles.




                                          Working with styles and templates        147
          2 Choose the style you want to delete.

          3 Click     , Delete.

Applying a style
          When you apply a style to an object, CorelDRAW overrides the existing text
          or graphic properties with the properties of the selected style.

          To apply a style to an object
          1 Click Tools, Graphic And Text Styles.
          2 Using the Pick tool, select the object you want to apply a style to.
          3 Choose a style from the list in the Graphic And Text Styles Docker.

          4 Click     , Apply Style.


          Ÿ You can also apply a style to an object by right-clicking the object with the
            Pick tool, selecting Styles, Apply, and then selecting a style from the
            submenu.
          Ÿ You can also apply a style by either selecting the object and
            double-clicking the style or by dragging the style over the object in the
            Drawing Window.
          Ÿ You can apply text styles from the Text property bar. Select the text with
            the Text tool or the Pick tool. Choose an appropriate style from the Style
            List box on the Text property bar.


Reverting to an object’s style
          The Revert To Style command allows you to undo changes made to an
          object’s properties after applying a style.

          To revert to an object’s style
          1 Right-click the object using the Pick tool.
          2 Click Styles, Revert To Style to reapply the style to the object.

Using styles from other drawings or templates
          If you want to use a style from another drawing or template, you must either
          copy the style to the new drawing or load the template containing the style.
          To copy a style, you must copy an object using the style or import the
          drawing containing the style. If you copy or import a style with the same


148       CorelDRAW: Chapter 4
          name as an existing style, CorelDRAW renames the styles by adding a
          number to the style name.

          To load styles from another template
          1 Click Tools, Graphic And Text Styles.

          2 Click     , Template, Load.
          3 Choose the drive where the template file is located from the Look In List
            box.
          4 Click the name of the template you want.
          5 Click Open.
             The styles from the loaded template appear in the Graphic and Text Styles
             Docker.

Changing a default style
          When you create a new graphic or text object, CorelDRAW applies the
          default graphic or text style. You can edit the default styles as you would any
          style. CorelDRAW saves the new default style properties with the drawing.
          If you want to use the new default style properties for new drawings, you
          must save the new settings. For information on saving default styles for
          future CorelDRAW sessions or documents, see “Using consistent settings
          for new documents” on page 47.

          To change the fill for a default graphic or text style
          1 Click a blank space in the Drawing Window to deselect any objects.
          2 Choose a color from the Color Palette.
          3 Enable any of the following check boxes:
             Ÿ Graphic — changes the fill color for new graphic objects
             Ÿ Artistic Text — changes the fill color for new Artistic text objects
             Ÿ Paragraph Text — changes the fill color for new Paragraph text objects

          To change the outline for a default graphic or text style
          1 Click a blank space in the Drawing Window to deselect any objects.
          2 Do one of the following:
             Ÿ Right-click a color in the Color Palette to change the default outline
               color



                                          Working with styles and templates           149
             Ÿ Click the Outline tool and choose a outline width from the flyout to
               change the default outline width
          3 Enable any of the following check boxes:
             Ÿ Graphic — changes the outline color for new graphic objects
             Ÿ Artistic Text — changes the outline color for new Artistic text objects
             Ÿ Paragraph Text — changes the outline color for new Paragraph text
               objects

          To change a default text style
          1 Click a blank space in the Drawing Window to deselect any objects.
          2 Click Text, Format Text.
          3 Choose the properties you want to assign as the new defaults and click
            OK.
          4 Enable one or both of the following boxes to indicate which default styles
            you want to change:
             Ÿ Artistic Text
             Ÿ Paragraph Text


          Ÿ You can also change the default text or graphic style by dragging a text or
            graphic object over either the Default Graphic, Default Artistic Text, or
            Default Paragraph Text style.


Finding objects assigned a selected style
          The Find command in the Graphic And Text Docker lets you find any object
          using a given style. For example, you can use this command to find all objects
          that use the Default Graphic style. You can find these objects in the active
          drawing only.

          To find objects assigned a specific style
          1 Click Tools, Graphic And Text Styles.
          2 Click the style assigned to the objects you want to find.

          3 Click     , Find.
             A selection box appears around the first object with the specified style.

          4 Click     , Find Next to find the next object that uses the style.


150       CorelDRAW: Chapter 4
Assigning a shortcut key to a style
          You can assign a shortcut key combination to any style in CorelDRAW. When
          you press the shortcut key combination, CorelDRAW applies the style to the
          selected object. For example, you could assign the key combination ALT + H
          to a paragraph text style for headings. The shortcut key combination can use
          up to four different keystrokes.
          If the shortcut key combination you enter is already in use, you can override
          the existing setting and assign the combination to the style.
          You can also use the Customize dialog box to assign a shortcut key. For more
          information, see “Assigning and deleting keyboard shortcuts” on page 793.

          To assign a shortcut key to a style
          1 Click Tools, Graphic And Text Styles.
          2 Choose the style you want to assign a shortcut key to.

          3 Click     , Edit Hot Key.
          4 Click the Press New Shortcut Key box.
             The Current Shortcut Keys box lists any shortcut keys currently assigned
             to that style.
          5 Press the combination you want to assign to the style, and click the
            Assign button.

          To assign an existing shortcut key to a style
          1 Follow steps 1 to 4 from the previous procedure.
          2 Enable the Delete Conflicts Shortcut check box.
          3 If you want to assign a new shortcut key to the style or command you are
            overriding, enable the Navigate To Conflict check box.
          4 Click the Assign button.

Customizing the display of the Graphic And Text Docker
          You can choose what types of styles — graphic, artistic text, or paragraph
          text — are displayed in the Graphic And Text Styles Docker. You can also
          customize the Graphic And Text Docker to display only the styles you can
          apply to a selected object. For example, when you select artistic text, only
          artistic text styles appear in the Graphic And Text Styles Docker. If you are
          using a lot of styles to format your document, displaying only the styles
          applicable to the selected object makes it easier to find the style you want. As




                                          Working with styles and templates           151
          you move from graphic objects to text objects, CorelDRAW automatically
          refreshes the Docker and displays only the relevant styles.

          To specify which styles are displayed in the Graphic And Text
          Styles Docker
          1 Click Tools, Graphic And Text Styles.

          2 Click     , Show.
          3 Enable any of the following options:
             Ÿ Graphic Styles — to display Graphic styles
             Ÿ Artistic Text Styles — to display artistic text styles
             Ÿ Paragraph Text Styles — to display paragraph text styles
             A check mark appears beside enabled options.

          To set CorelDRAW to display only the styles you can apply to a
          selected object
          1 Follow steps 1 to 2 from the previous procedure.
          2 Enable the Auto-View option.

Working with color styles
          This section describes how to create and apply color styles. To make it easier
          to use these styles, CorelDRAW includes a Color Styles Docker. You can use
          this Docker to drag and drop color styles into your drawing. You can also use
          the Docker to create and edit parent and child colors, as well as delete color
          styles you do not need.
          When you create a color style, the new style is saved to the current drawing.
          To use the style in another drawing, you can open the other drawing and drag
          the color style from one drawing folder to another in the Docker.
          CorelDRAW also has an Auto-Create feature for creating color styles from
          selected objects. When you create color styles from an object, CorelDRAW
          automatically applies the new styles to this object. When you use the
          Auto-Create feature, you can choose to create few or many parent color
          styles. Once you convert all colors to color styles, you can, for example, use
          one parent color to control all your red objects, or many parents, one for each
          shade of red in the drawing.

Creating a color style
          The Color Styles Docker allows you to create styles and link colors together
          in a “parent-child” relationship. You can create color styles by opening the


152       CorelDRAW: Chapter 4
          New Color Style dialog box and selecting a color. The New Color Style dialog
          box is identical to the Uniform Fill dialog box. For more information on
          creating uniform fills, see “Applying a uniform fill” on page 212. For
          information on color models, mixers, fixed and custom palettes, see
          “Choosing colors” on page 306.
          You can also quickly by dragging colors from the color palette or from your
          drawing to the Docker.

          To create a color style using the New Color Style dialog box
          1 Click Tools, Color Styles.
          2 Click the New Color Style button.
          3 Select a color using the New Color Style dialog box.

          To create a color style from the Color Palette
          1 Click Tools, Color Styles.
          2 Drag a color from the Color Palette to the Color Styles Docker.

          To create color style from an object
          1 Click Tools, Color Styles.
          2 Drag the object with the fill or outline color you want to the Color Styles
            Docker.

Creating a child color
          You can create child colors based on a color style by selecting the style and
          adjusting the saturation, brightness, or tint of the child. You can create child
          colors one at a time or you can create multiple child colors automatically.
          If you change the parent color, all child colors change as well.

          To create a child color
          1 Click Tools, Color Styles.
          2 Choose the color style you want to link a child color to.
          3 Click the New Child Color button.
          4 From the Create A New Child Color dialog box, choose a color by clicking
            in the rectangular Color Palette provided.
          5 Type a name in the Color Name box.




                                           Working with styles and templates            153
         Ÿ You can also create a child color by right-clicking a color style, and clicking
           Create a Child Color.
         Ÿ You can also choose a child color by typing values in the Saturation and
           Brightness boxes of the Create A New Child Color dialog box.


         To create a series of child colors
         1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
         2 Click the Create Shades button.
         3 Type a number from 1 to 20 in the Create box.
         4 Enable one of the following:
            Ÿ Lighter Shades — creates child colors that are lighter than the parent
            Ÿ Darker Shades — creates child colors that are darker than the parent
            Ÿ Light and Darker Shades — creates an equal number of light and dark
              child colors
         5 Move the Shade Similarity slider to determine the similarity of the child
           colors to the parent color.
            Move the slider to the left to create very different shades; move the slider
            to the right to create very similar shades.


         Ÿ You can also create a series of child colors by right-clicking a color style,
           and clicking Create Shades.


Creating parent and child colors from an image
         You can easily create parent and child colors from colors in your drawing
         using the Auto-create Color Styles feature. You can choose to create a
         number of unrelated color styles, or you can group related colors together in
         a parent-child relationship.
         When creating child colors, colors added from a color-matching system are
         converted to CMYK so that they can be grouped into appropriate parent-child
         groups automatically. Once you have converted colors to CMYK, they cannot
         be converted back to their original format.

         To create parent and child colors from an image
         1 Click Tools, Color Styles.



154      CorelDRAW: Chapter 4
          2 Select the image or group of objects with the Pick tool.
          3 Click the Auto Create Color Styles button.
          4 Enable any of the following:
             Ÿ Use Fill Colors — to create color styles based on the fill colors in the
               selected image
             Ÿ Use Outline Colors — to create color styles based on the outline colors
               in the selected image
          5 Enable the Automatically Link Similar Colors Together check box to link
            similar colors together under their appropriate parent colors.
             If you disable this check box, CorelDRAW does not group similar colors
             under a parent color.
          6 If you enable the Automatically Link Similar Colors check box, move the
            Parent Creation Index slider to determine the number of parent colors
            created.
             Moving the slider to the right creates only a few parent colors; moving the
             slider to the left creates many parent colors. To test different slider
             values, click the Preview button.
          7 Enable or disable the Convert Child Palette Colors To CMYK check box.
             When enabled, colors added from a color-matching system are converted
             to CMYK so that they can be grouped under an appropriate parent color.
             When disabled, all colors added from a color-matching system are made
             into separate color styles.

Editing color styles
          You can edit both parent and child colors in CorelDRAW. For most of the
          available color models and palettes, child colors share the same hue as the
          parent but have different saturation and brightness levels. With the Pantone
          Matching System, Pantone Hexachrome, and UserInks palettes, child and
          parents share a common ID but have different tint levels.
          When you change the hue of a parent color, all related child colors are
          updated, based on the new hue and the original saturation and brightness
          values. For color styles using the Pantone Matching System, Pantone
          Hexachrome, and UserInks palettes, if you change to the color ID of the
          parent, all child colors are updated, based on the new ID and the original tint.

          To edit a parent color
          1 Click Tools, Color Styles.
          2 Choose the parent color you want to edit.


                                           Working with styles and templates          155
          3 Click the Edit Color Style button.
          4 Select a color from the Edit Color Style dialog box.
             For more information on uniform fills, see “Applying a uniform fill” on
             page 212.


          Ÿ You can also edit a parent color by right-clicking the parent color and
            clicking Edit Color.


          To edit a child color
          1 Click Tools, Color Styles.
          2 Choose the child color you want to edit.
          3 Click the Edit Color Style button.
          4 Select a color from the Edit Child Color dialog box.


          Ÿ You can also edit a child color by right-clicking the child color and clicking
            Edit Color.


          To rename a color style
          1 Click Tools, Color Styles.
          2 Right-click the color style you want to rename and click Rename.
          3 Type a new name for the color, then press ENTER.


          Ÿ You can also rename a color style by clicking twice on the color style you
            want to rename, typing the new name, and pressing ENTER.


Applying color styles
          Once you create a color style, you can apply it to objects in your drawing
          using the Color Styles Docker.

          To apply a color style
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.




156       CorelDRAW: Chapter 4
          2 Click Tools, Color Styles.
          3 Double-click the name of the style you want to apply.

          To apply a color style using drag and drop
          Ÿ Drag a color style from the Color Styles Docker to an object.
             As the mouse pointer moves over the object, the mouse pointer changes
             shape to indicate whether the color will be applied as a fill or an outline.

Deleting color styles
          You can delete color styles from the Color Styles Docker if you find that you
          no longer need them.

          To delete a color
          1 Click Tools, Color Styles.
          2 Right-click the color style you want to delete and click Delete.

Sorting colors
          You can sort your color styles in alphabetical order, or you can have all parent
          colors with child colors listed first.

          To sort colors by name
          Ÿ Right-click the drawing folder you want to reorder, and click Sort, By
            Names.
             This sorts the colors in the drawing alphabetically.

          To sort colors by links
          Ÿ Right-click the drawing folder you want to reorder, and click Sort, By
            Color Styles With Children.
             This moves all parent colors with child colors to the top of the drawing
             list.

Moving a color style under another parent
          You can copy a color style (parent or child) and make that style a child of
          another parent. If the color style has child colors, both the parent and its child
          colors become child colors of the selected color style. When you move a child
          color to another parent, the child color changes color based on the new hue
          or color ID and the original saturation, brightness, or tint levels.



                                           Working with styles and templates           157
       To move a child color from one parent to another
       1 Click Tools, Color Styles.
       2 Right-click the color style you want to move and click Make Child Of An
         Existing Color.
       3 Using the right arrow, click the color style you want to make the parent of
         the selected color.
          Press ESC or click outside the Color Styles Docker to cancel this action.

       To drag a child color from one parent to another
       1 Click Tools, Color Styles.
       2 Select the color with the Pick tool.
       3 Drag a child color over a child color under the parent color you want.

       To copy a color style from one drawing to another
       1 Open both the drawing with the color style and the drawing you want to
         copy the style to.
       2 Click Tools, Color Styles.
          The Color Styles Docker displays folders for every open drawing.
       3 Drag the color style to another drawing folder to copy the style to that
         drawing.


Working with templates
       A template is a set of styles and page layout settings that determine the
       appearance of a drawing or document.
       When you create a new drawing, CorelDRAW automatically loads the default
       template (CORELDRW.CDT). This template has one graphics style, one
       Artistic text, style, and seven Paragraph text styles.
       In addition to the default template, CorelDRAW provides a wide variety of
       preset templates to help create drawings. You can find the preset templates
       on the CorelDRAW CD-ROM or by running the Template Wizard.
       If desired, you can modify any of these templates and then save it as a new
       template. For example, if you like a template but want to make it more
       versatile, you can add styles that you’ve created or that you’ve taken from
       another template.




158    CorelDRAW: Chapter 4
You can use preset or
custom templates to
control the
appearance of your
documents.




                        If none of the preset templates meets your needs, you can create your own
                        template based on your own styles or styles taken from other templates. You
                        can also create a template from any drawing you create in CorelDRAW. If
                        desired, you can even save graphics or text objects with the template. When
                        you save objects with a template, you can choose to include these objects
                        when you create a new drawing using the template.
                        Templates can be applied at any time during a CorelDRAW session. For
                        example, you can use the New From Template command (in the File menu)
                        to open the Template wizard, which will help you find the template you want.
                        If you’ve already created a drawing, you can apply a template to it using the
                        Load command (in the Graphic And Text Styles Docker).
                        If you want, you can save templates to the Template folder on your hard
                        drive. You can also make your templates available when open a template
                        using the Template wizard.

Creating a template
                        You can create a template using custom styles or styles from another. To save
                        a template, you can use the Graphic And Text Styles Docker or the Save
                        Drawing dialog box. If you have objects on the Drawing Page, you can save
                        them along with the styles, so that when you load the template, you can add
                        the objects to your page. Also, if you altered the page layout, you can save
                        the page settings along with the styles. When you use the Save Drawing
                        dialog box, CorelDRAW automatically saves objects on the Drawing Page
                        with the template.

                        To create a template from the Graphic And Text Styles Docker
                        1 Click Tools, Graphic And Text Styles.
                        2 Do any of the following:
                           Ÿ Create text and graphics, and use them to create the styles you want.




                                                       Working with styles and templates          159
            Ÿ Use the Clipboard to add objects with the styles you want to save in
              your new template.
            Ÿ Load an existing template with the styles you want, and apply them to
              objects on the page.

         3 Click     , Template, Save As.
         4 Type a name in the File Name box to save the template in the current
           drive and folder.
         5 Do one of the following:
            Ÿ Enable the With Contents check box to include page settings and
              objects on the active page.
            Ÿ Disable the With Contents check box to save only the styles.
         6 Click the Save button.


         Ÿ You can also save a template using the Save Drawing dialog box by
           clicking File, Save As, and saving the file in the CorelDRAW Templates
           folder as a CorelDRAW Template (CDT) file.


Opening a template for editing
         If you want to edit a template, simply open the template and make changes to
         the styles, page layout settings, or objects. For information on setting page
         layout options, see “Setting up the Drawing page” on page 34.

         To open a template for editing
         1 Click File, Open.
         2 Choose the drive where the template file is located from the Look In List
           box.
         3 Choose CorelDRAW Template (CDT) from the Files Of Type list box.
         4 Double-click the template you want.
            The Open Template dialog box appears.
         5 Enable the Open for Editing check box.

Loading a template
         Each drawing you create using the New command uses the default
         CORELDRW.CDT template. If you want to use another template, you can
         use the New From Template or the Open command from the File menu. The


160      CorelDRAW: Chapter 4
         New From Template command opens the Template wizard, which helps you
         find the CorelDRAW or the PaperDirect template you want. For more
         information about adding custom templates to the Template wizard, see
         “Adding templates to the Template wizard” on page 162.
         When you load a template, you can also choose to load just the styles or to
         load styles, page layout settings, and objects.

         To start a drawing using a template from the Template wizard
         1 Insert the CorelDRAW CD-ROM in your computer’s CD-ROM drive.
         2 Click File, New From Template.
         3 Follow the Instructions in the Template wizard to find the template you
           want.

         To load a template using the Open Drawing dialog box
         1 Click File, Open.
         2 Choose the drive where the template file is located from the Look In List
           box.
         3 Choose CorelDRAW Template (CDT) from the Files Of Type list box.
         4 Double-click the template you want.
            The Open Template dialog box appears.
         5 Enable the New from Template check box.
         6 Do one of the following:
            Ÿ Enable the With Contents check box to load the template’s styles, page
              settings and objects.
            Ÿ Disable the With Contents check box to load only the styles.

Assigning a new template to the drawing
         When you’ve already started a drawing and want to change templates, use
         the Load command from the Graphic And Text Styles Docker menu.
         If objects in your drawing use styles with the same names as those in the
         new template, CorelDRAW prompts you to indicate whether you want to
         apply the new styles to those objects.

         To assign a new style template using the Graphic And Text Styles
         Docker
         1 Click Tools, Graphic And Text Styles.



                                        Working with styles and templates            161
         2 Click    , Template, Load.
         3 Choose the drive where the template file is located from the Look In List
           box.
         4 Click the template you want to load.
         5 Click the Open button.


         Ÿ When you use the Load command, only the styles are loaded. CorelDRAW
           does not use the template’s page layout settings and does not add objects
           saved with the template to your page.


Adding templates to the Template wizard
         The Template wizard helps you find templates in the Template folder of the
         CorelDRAW CD-ROM. If you have custom templates or templates from
         previous versions of CorelDRAW, you can still make them accessible from
         the Template wizard. To do this, you need to run the TempWiz script from
         the Script And Preset Manager. This script provides easy-to-follow
         instructions to guide you through the task of adding templates to the
         Template wizard’s list.

         To add templates to the Template wizard’s list
         1 Click Tools, Corel SCRIPT, Script And Preset Manager.
         2 From the Script and Preset Manager Docker, double-click the Scripts
           folder.
         3 Double-click the TempWiz icon.
         4 Follow the instructions provided to select the templates you want to add.


         Ÿ You can also rename and remove templates from the Template wizard’s
           list.




162      CorelDRAW: Chapter 4
       ORGANIZING OBJECTS                                                      5
       CorelDRAW provides powerful tools for arranging and organizing objects in
       your drawings. You can accomplish tasks that range from simple operations
       like copying, grouping, and combining objects, to more advanced operations,
       such as using the Object Manager to organize an entire document.
       You can control the vertical order of objects in a drawing, and align or
       distribute objects on the page. The object arrangement tools can help you
       expand the scope of your creativity and increase your efficiency.
       This chapter also provides information on finding and replacing object and
       text properties, grouping and ungrouping objects, duplicating and cloning
       objects, and using layers to organize your drawing.
       For people in charge of creating or supervising large projects, there is also a
       section on using the Object Data Manager. The Object Data Manager is an
       advanced feature of CorelDRAW that helps you track expenses, deadlines,
       assignments, progress and other project-related tasks you need to organize.


Undoing and redoing changes
       CorelDRAW gives you the freedom and flexibility to experiment and be
       creative without worrying about permanently altering your drawings or
       having to start over. If you make a change to your document, then wish you
       hadn’t, you can undo the change.
       You can:
          Ÿ undo the last few actions performed
          Ÿ change the number of undo levels, up to a number limited only by your
            system’s memory configuration
          Ÿ undo a series of changes from a chosen point, and redo them if you
            choose — regardless of how many times you have already saved your
            drawing
          Ÿ undo all changes since you last saved, and revert to the last saved
            version of your drawing
          Ÿ repeat commands and copy object properties from one object to
            another
       The ability to repeat commands and copy object properties means you can
       apply the same properties to several objects without having to recreate them
       each time.


                                                        Organizing objects         165
Undoing the last change
         You can undo the last several actions you performed.

         To undo the last change
         Ÿ Click Edit, Undo.

Changing the number of undo levels
         You can undo 99 actions by default. You can increase or decrease this default
         number to suit your needs.

         To change the number of undo levels
         1 Click Tools, Options.
         2 In the list of categories, click Workspace, General.
         3 Type a value in the Regular box in the Undo Levels section.
            The number of undo levels is limited only by your system’s memory
            configuration.


         Ÿ The higher the undo value, the greater the demand on your system
           resources will be.


Undoing a series of changes
         You can view a chronological list of the last several actions performed and
         choose the point from which to undo them. The action you choose, and all
         those that follow it, are reversed.

         To undo a series of changes
         1 Click the Undo List button on the Standard toolbar.
         2 Choose a command from the Undo list.


         Ÿ Use this option to undo some or all changes since your last save.
         Ÿ File Open, File New, and File Save do not appear in the Undo list because
           they can’t be undone.




166      CorelDRAW: Chapter 5
          Ÿ You can undo changes regardless of how many times you have saved your
            document.


Undoing all changes since you last saved
          You can revert to the last saved version of your file. This function is useful if
          you tend to save your file whenever you are satisfied with the latest changes
          in your drawing.

          To undo all changes since you last saved
          Ÿ Click File, Revert.

Redoing a series of changes
          You can view a chronological list of each action undone and choose the point
          from which to redo the undone actions. The action you choose, and all those
          that follow it, are redone.

          To redo a series of changes
          1 Click the Redo List button on the Standard toolbar.
          2 Choose a command from the Redo list.

Repeating commands
          You can repeat commands in CorelDRAW. For example, you can fill one
          object, then select another and fill it with the same fill.

          To repeat a command
          1 Select an object with the Pick tool and apply one of the following
            commands:
             Ÿ Fill
             Ÿ Outline
             Ÿ Move
             Ÿ Scale
             Ÿ Skew
             Ÿ Nudge
             Ÿ Rotate
             Ÿ Duplicate


                                                           Organizing objects          167
            Ÿ Copy Attributes From
         2 Select another object with the Pick tool, and click Edit, Repeat [command
           name].


         Ÿ The command name in the Edit menu changes depending on the
           command you’re repeating, for example, Repeat Move, Repeat Skew, etc.


Copying object properties
         When you apply a fill or outline to an object, you can copy the same
         properties to another object.

         To copy another object’s fill properties
         1 Using the Pick tool, select the object to which you want to copy the
           properties.
         2 Click Edit, Copy Properties From.
         3 Enable one or more of the following check boxes:
            Ÿ Outline Pen — copies outline pen attributes from one object to another
            Ÿ Outline Color — copies outline color attributes from one object to
              another
            Ÿ Fill — copies fill attributes from one object to another
            Ÿ Text Properties — copies text attributes from one text object to
              another
         4 Click OK. The cursor changes to a large arrow.
         5 Click the object that contains the properties you want to copy.


Arranging objects
         You can use many basic editing functions to arrange objects in your drawing.
         You can manipulate objects by using the Clipboard to cut, copy, and paste
         them. The Clipboard is a temporary storage area used to transfer text and
         graphics between applications, as well as within or between CorelDRAW
         files.




168      CorelDRAW: Chapter 5
The various editing
functions in
CorelDRAW let you
arrange your
drawing any way you
want.




                      CorelDRAW also offers advanced features such as cloning and duplicating.
                      Cloning copies selected objects directly on screen, creating a connection
                      between the original object (the “master”) and the new object (the “clone”).
                      This connection means that any changes made to the master object are also
                      applied to the clone. For example, if you change the master’s fill, the clone’s
                      fill also changes.
                      Duplicating places a copy of the initial object directly on screen, offsetting it
                      slightly from the original object. The duplicate takes on all of the original
                      object’s attributes, but has no lasting connection to the original object.
                      CorelDRAW lets you change the offset for duplicated and cloned objects to
                      suit your needs.
                      You can also delete objects. When you delete an object instead of cutting it,
                      CorelDRAW does not place it on the Clipboard. Delete an object (rather than
                      cutting it) only when you are sure you will not use it again.

Using the Clipboard to copy objects
                      You can copy or cut an object and place it on the Clipboard. Then you can
                      paste it from the Clipboard back onto the Drawing Window.

                      To copy an object
                      1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                      2 Click Edit, Copy.

                      To cut an object
                      1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                      2 Click Edit, Cut.




                                                                        Organizing objects          169
                         To paste an object from the Clipboard
                         Ÿ Click Edit, Paste.
                            If the object was cut or copied from CorelDRAW, it is placed at the same
                            location from which it was cut or copied.


                         Ÿ You can also access the Cut, Copy and Paste commands by right-clicking a
                           selected object in the Drawing Window.


Duplicating objects
                         Duplicating objects is the quickest way to create copies of them. When you
                         duplicate an object, CorelDRAW creates a copy of it and places it above and
                         to the right of the original object, with a default offset of 0.25 inches (or the
                         equivalent in other units of measurement). For information about changing
                         the offset distance, see “Changing the offset for duplicates and clones” on
                         page 172.
The quickest way to
create a copy of an
object is to duplicate
it.




                         After you move the duplicated object, you can duplicate it again to create
                         another copy. The new duplicate is placed the same distance from the first
                         duplicate as the first duplicate was from the original. This type of duplicate is
                         called smart duplicate.

                         To duplicate an object
                         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                         2 Click Edit, Duplicate.

                         To duplicate an object using smart duplication
                         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                         2 Click Edit, Duplicate.


170                      CorelDRAW: Chapter 5
          3 Select the duplicate with the Pick tool, and move it to another position on
            the Drawing Page.
          4 Click Edit, Duplicate.


          Ÿ Smart duplication settings revert to the default after you deselect the
            object, select another object, or change tools. The smart duplicate
            maintains the relative stretch, skew, and rotation attributes of the last
            duplicate.



          Ÿ To make many duplicates of an object quickly, select the object with the
            Pick tool and move it around the Drawing Window while holding down the
            SPACEBAR.


Cloning objects
          Cloning creates an offset copy of an object that remains linked to the original
          object. When you clone an object, the changes you make to the original object
          (the master) are automatically applied to the copy (the clone).

          To clone an object
          1 Select the original object with the Pick tool.
          2 Click Edit, Clone.

          To determine a clone’s master object
          Ÿ Right-click the clone, and click Select Master.

          To determine a master’s clones
          Ÿ Right-click the master, and click Select Clones.

          To revert to a clone’s master
          1 Select the modified clone with the Pick tool.
          2 Right-click the clone, and click Revert to Master.
          3 In the Revert To Master dialog box, enable one or more of the following
            check boxes:
             Ÿ Clone Fill — restores the master fill attributes
             Ÿ Clone Outline — restores the master outline attributes


                                                             Organizing objects         171
             Ÿ Clone Path Shape — restores the master shape attributes
             Ÿ Clone Transformations — restores the master shape and size
               attributes
             Ÿ Clone Bitmap Color Mask — restores the master color settings
             You can only enable options that have changed from the master object’s
             properties. Features that have not changed are dimmed.


          Ÿ The Select Clones option is available only when a clone and master are on
            the same page.
          Ÿ If you select a clone and change one of its attributes, that attribute is no
            longer dependent upon the master.



          Ÿ For more information about special effects and cloning, see “Creating
            special effects” on page 431.


Changing the offset for duplicates and clones
          You can specify the offset distances for duplicates and clones. Positive values
          result in offsets right and upward; negative values result in offsets left and
          downward.

          To change the offset for duplicated and cloned objects
          1 Click Tools, Options.
          2 In the list of categories, click Workspace, Edit.
          3 In the Duplicate Placement section, type offset values in the Horizontal
            and Vertical boxes.


          Ÿ You can also use the Property Bar to change the default clone and
            duplicate offset.


Deleting objects
          When you delete an object, you remove it from the Drawing Window without
          placing a copy of it on the Clipboard. The only way to retrieve a deleted
          object is using the Undo command.




172       CorelDRAW: Chapter 5
                       To delete an object
                       1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                       2 Click Edit, Delete.


                       Ÿ If you may need to retrieve a deleted object later, cut it and place it on the
                         Clipboard instead of deleting it.


Finding and replacing
                       The CorelDRAW Find and Replace wizards let you search for objects with
                       specific properties and replace those properties with new ones. For instance,
                       you can search for 16-point bold text and replace it with 10-point plain text.
                       The Find and Replace wizards also allow you to search for specific words and
                       replace them with others. For instance, you can search for all instances of the
                       word “walking,” and replace them with “running.”
The Find and Replace
wizards let you
update your
drawings quickly and
easily.




                       The Find wizard takes you step by step through the process of finding objects
                       in your drawings that fit the criteria you specify. The Replace wizard takes
                       you through the steps of replacing colors, palettes, outline pen properties,
                       text properties (such as font, weight, or size), words, and other properties.

Finding objects
                       The Find wizard identifies graphical and text objects that match the search
                       criteria you specify.

                       To find objects
                       1 Click Edit, Find And Replace, Find Objects.
                       2 Enable one of the following buttons:
                          Ÿ Begin A New Search — begins a new search


                                                                        Organizing objects         173
            Ÿ Load A Search From Disk — loads a preset search or one you’ve
              previously saved
            Ÿ Find Objects That Match The Currently Selected Object — finds
              objects whose properties match those of the currently selected object
         3 Click Next.
         4 Follow the instructions until you reach the end of the search.
            CorelDRAW searches your drawing for words or objects that match your
            search criteria. It then displays the first match it finds, or displays a
            message indicating that none were found.


         Ÿ You can search for objects that match the criteria of a selected object in
           your drawing — for instance, rectangles with individually rounded
           corners.
         Ÿ You can change your search criteria in the middle of a search.


Replacing object properties
         The Replace wizard searches for the properties you specify and replaces
         them with other properties. For example, you can search for specific outline
         pen properties and replace them with different outline pen properties.

         To replace object properties
         1 Click Edit, Find And Replace, Replace Objects.
         2 Enable one of the following buttons:
            Ÿ Replace A Color
            Ÿ Replace A Color Model Or Palette
            Ÿ Replace Outline Pen Properties
            Ÿ Replace Text Properties
         3 Enable the Apply To Currently Selected Objects Only check box.
         4 Click the Next button.
         5 Specify Find and Replace properties as required.
         6 Click the Finish button.




174      CorelDRAW: Chapter 5
             If the Replace wizard cannot find properties that match your search
             criteria, it displays a message that no object was found.
          7 Click the Find Previous, Find Next, Find All, Replace, or Replace All
            buttons on the Find and Replace toolbar until your search is finished.

Finding and replacing text objects
          In CorelDRAW, you can search for text objects with specific properties. You
          can also search and replace specific characters.

          To find text
          1 Click Edit, Find and Replace, Find Text.
          2 Type the text you want to find in the Find What box.
          3 To find only words whose case matches the text you typed into the Find
            box, enable the Match Case check box.
          4 Click the Find Next button.

          To find and replace text
          1 Click Edit, Find And Replace, Replace Text.
          2 Type the text you want to replace in the Find What box.
          3 Type the replacement text in the Replace With box.
          4 To find only words whose case matches the text you typed into the Find
            and Replace boxes, enable the Match Case check box.
          5 Enable one of the following buttons:
             Ÿ Replace — replaces the first occurrence of the text specified in the
               Find What box
             Ÿ Replace All — replaces all occurrences of the text specified in the Find
               What box
             Ÿ Find Next — finds the next occurrence of the text specified in the Find
               What box
             Ÿ Close — ends the search




                                                          Organizing objects          175
                        Ÿ You can also search for text objects with specific properties and replace
                          those properties with different ones. For information about finding text
                          objects with specific properties, see “Finding objects” on page 173.
                        Ÿ For information about replacing text properties, see “Replacing object
                          properties” on page 174.


Changing the order of objects
                        At its most basic level, a CorelDRAW drawing consists of a series of objects
                        stacked on top of each other. The vertical order of these objects — the
                        stacking order — helps determine the appearance of the drawing. You can
                        organize these objects using invisible planes called layers. Each of these
                        layers has its own internal stacking order.
The stacking order is
most obvious when
you have objects that
overlap.




                        The stacking order is most evident in drawings that contain overlapping
                        objects with contrasting properties. If the objects do not overlap, the stacking
                        order may not be evident. In all cases, however, the stacking order is
                        determined by the order in which you add objects to the drawing. Until you
                        rearrange them, the first object you draw occupies the lowest position,
                        whereas the last object you draw occupies the top position.
                        You can change the stacking order of objects within any layer, sending them
                        to the front or back, or behind or in front of another object. For example, if
                        you select the bottom object on a layer and move it to the front, CorelDRAW
                        places the object on top of all other objects on the layer. The top object
                        becomes the second object, the second becomes the third, and so on.




176                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 5
          You can also place objects at precise positions in the stacking order. For
          example, if you have 10 overlapping objects, you can place the top object
          behind the third object. In addition, you can select multiple objects and
          reverse their relative stacking order.

Changing the order of objects on a layer
          You can change the stacking order of objects on a layer. Before using any of
          the following commands, select the object you wish to move with the Pick
          tool.

          To move the selected object to the front of its layer
          Ÿ Click Arrange, Order, To Front.

          To move the selected object to the back of its layer
          Ÿ Click Arrange, Order, To Back.

          To move the selected object forward one position
          Ÿ Click Arrange, Order, Forward One.

          To move the selected object back one position
          Ÿ Click Arrange, Order, Back One.

          To move the selected object in front of a specific object
          Ÿ Click Arrange, Order, In Front Of, then click the appropriate object.

          To move the selected object behind a specific object
          Ÿ Click Arrange, Order, Behind, then click the appropriate object.

          To reverse the stacking order of objects on a layer
          1 Using the Pick tool, hold down SHIFT to select more than one object.
          2 Click Arrange, Order, Reverse Order.


          Ÿ The Reverse Order command applies to only the selected objects; other
            objects in the drawing are not affected.




                                                          Organizing objects           177
                         Ÿ The To Front and To Back commands are also available on the Property
                           Bar when an object is selected.


Aligning and distributing objects
                         The ability to align objects precisely can be an important requirement for
                         virtually any type of drawing. CorelDRAW provides controls that allow for
                         the exact alignment of any series of objects.
You can use the Align
feature to line
objects up
horizontally or
vertically.




                         You can specify whether you want objects to line up horizontally or vertically
                         (or both), using their edges or center points. When you’ve indicated how you
                         want to align the objects, you indicate where you want to line them up: the
                         edge of the page or the center of the page. For maximum precision, you can
                         also choose to align the objects to the grid line nearest to the alignment point
                         you selected.
                         To line up objects, CorelDRAW uses the imaginary boxes — selection boxes
                         — that surround selected objects. When you select an object using the Pick
                         tool, its frame and handles become visible, allowing you to manipulate the
                         object.
You can use the
Distribute feature to
create equal
horizontal or vertical
spacing of objects.




                         By distributing objects, you can give your drawing a polished, professional
                         look. You can arrange objects so that their center points or specific edges (for


178                      CorelDRAW: Chapter 5
          example, top or right) are separated at equal intervals. You can also
          distribute objects so that they sit an equal distance apart. Once you’ve
          indicated how you want to distribute the objects, you can choose the area
          over which you want to distribute them. In each case, you can choose to
          distribute the objects to the extent of the length or width of the selection box
          that surrounds them, or to the length or width of the Drawing Page.
          Snapping objects forces them to line up with the grid, guideline, or other
          objects in your drawing, depending on what you specify. For information on
          aligning objects using snapping, see “Using the rulers, grid, and guidelines”
          on page 54.

Aligning objects horizontally and vertically
          You can align a series of objects horizontally or vertically. You can choose
          how you want the objects to line up in relation to each other, which is
          different from specifying where you want them to line up on the page. For
          example, enabling the Right check box in the Align and Distribute dialog box
          aligns the right edges of the objects’ selection boxes with each other — not
          necessarily on the right side of the page.

          To align a series of objects horizontally
          1 Select the objects with the Pick tool.
          2 Click Arrange, Align and Distribute.
          3 To indicate how you want the objects to line up with each other, enable
            one of the following check boxes:
             Ÿ Top
             Ÿ Center
             Ÿ Bottom
          4 To indicate where on the page you want alignment to occur, enable one of
            the following check boxes:
             Ÿ Edge Of Page — aligns objects with the edge of the page
             Ÿ Center Of Page — centers objects on the page
             Ÿ Align To Grid — aligns objects with the nearest grid line

          To align a series of objects vertically
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
          2 To indicate how you want the objects to line up with each other, enable
            one of the following check boxes:



                                                          Organizing objects          179
             Ÿ Left
             Ÿ Center
             Ÿ Right
          3 To indicate where on the page you want alignment to occur, enable one of
            the following check boxes:
             Ÿ Edge Of Page — aligns objects with the edge of the page
             Ÿ Center Of Page — centers objects on the page
             Ÿ Align To Grid — aligns objects with the nearest grid line


          Ÿ You can use the Preview button to view the alignment settings in the
            Drawing Window.



          Ÿ To make alignment occur at the target object, leave the Edge Of Page,
            Center Of Page and Align To Grid check boxes disabled.
          Ÿ You can also align objects by selecting them and clicking the Align button
            on the Property Bar.


Distributing objects horizontally and vertically
          You can distribute a series of objects or guidelines evenly, either horizontally
          or vertically.

          To distribute a series of objects horizontally
          1 Select the objects with the Pick tool.
          2 Click Arrange, Align and Distribute.
          3 Click the Distribute tab.
          4 To specify how you want to distribute the objects, enable one of the
            following check boxes:
             Ÿ Left
             Ÿ Center
             Ÿ Right
          5 To indicate the area over which you want to distribute the objects, enable
            one of the following check boxes:




180       CorelDRAW: Chapter 5
          Ÿ Extent Of Selection
          Ÿ Extent Of Page

       To distribute a series of objects vertically
       1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
       2 To specify how you want to distribute the objects, enable one of the
         following check boxes:
          Ÿ Top
          Ÿ Center
          Ÿ Spacing
          Ÿ Bottom
       3 To indicate the area over which you want to distribute the objects, enable
         one of the following check boxes:
          Ÿ Extent of Selection
          Ÿ Extent of Page


       Ÿ You can also distribute objects by selecting them and clicking the Align
         button on the Property Bar.
       Ÿ You can use the Preview button to view the alignment settings in the
         Drawing Window.


Grouping and ungrouping objects
       Grouping objects binds them together so that you can manipulate them as a
       single unit. This is particularly effective for protecting and maintaining
       connections and spatial relationships between objects. For example, you can
       group all the objects that make up the background or framework of a drawing,
       and move them without disturbing their relative positioning.
       You can break a complex object down into its component objects by
       ungrouping it. This is useful when you need to make changes to some of the
       individual objects that comprise a grouped object.
       After you have grouped several objects together, you can still select a single
       object within the group.




                                                       Organizing objects           181
Grouping objects
                    When you group multiple objects, each object in the group maintains its
                    original properties. You should group objects together when you want to
                    prevent accidental changes to the relationships between objects. The Group
                    command also lets you create nested groups — groups composed of several
                    objects or groups of objects (or both). Nested groups are particularly effective
                    for drawings that contain many complex elements.
Grouping objects
creates a single
object based on
multiple objects.




                    Grouping is useful when you want to apply the same formatting, properties,
                    or other changes, such as resizing or mirroring, to multiple objects.

                    To group objects
                    1 Select the objects with the Pick tool.
                       Hold down SHIFT to select multiple objects.
                    2 Click Arrange, Group.

                    To create a nested group
                    1 Using the Pick tool, select two or more groups (or one or more groups and
                      one or more individual objects).
                       Hold down SHIFT to select multiple objects.
                    2 Click Arrange, Group.
                       This forms a single group composed of two or more nested groups,
                       depending on the number of groups you selected in step 1.


                    Ÿ You can also group objects using the Group button on the Property Bar.
                    Ÿ You can select a single object that is part of a larger grouped object by
                      holding down CTRL while selecting.



182                 CorelDRAW: Chapter 5
Ungrouping objects
                     You can break a grouped object into its component objects.

                     To ungroup objects
                     1 Using the Pick tool, select a grouped object.
                     2 Click Arrange, Ungroup.

                     To ungroup all objects
                     Ÿ Click Arrange, Ungroup All.


                     Ÿ If you have nested groups (groups inside a group), repeat the ungrouping
                       process until you get to the group level you want.
                     Ÿ You can also use the Ungroup All command on the Property Bar.


Combining and breaking apart objects
                     In CorelDRAW, you can fuse multiple curves, lines, and shapes to create a
                     new shape with common fill and outline attributes. If the original objects
                     overlap, the overlapping areas are removed to create clipping holes that allow
                     you to see what’s underneath. If the objects don’t overlap, they still become
                     part of a single object, but maintain their spatial separation.
                     When you combine rectangles, ellipses, polygons, stars, spirals, graphs, or
                     text, CorelDRAW converts them to curves before converting them to a
                     single curve object. When text is combined with other text, however, the text
                     objects are not converted to curves; they are converted into larger blocks of
                     text. To change the shape of an Artistic text object, make the text a curve
                     object first. For more information see “Converting Artistic text to curves” on
                     page 341.
The Combine
command creates
new shapes with
common attributes
by fusing multiple
curves, lines and
objects.




                                                                       Organizing objects      183
         You can break apart combined objects. This feature is particularly useful for
         modifying clipart created by combining several independent objects. When
         you break apart Clipart (or any combined object), you can change the
         attributes and properties of its individual components.
         Combining objects can create clipping holes and joining line or curve
         segments. In all cases, the object produced is a curve that can be manipulated
         just like any other curve in CorelDRAW.

Combining two or more objects
         You can combine two or more objects to create one object.

         To combine objects
         1 Select the objects with the Pick tool.
         2 Click Arrange, Combine.


         Ÿ You can’t convert Paragraph text to curves.
         Ÿ If you place a combined object on top of another object, you can see
           another object through the clipping holes by placing the combined object
           on top. For information about the vertical stacking order of objects, see
           “Changing the order of objects” on page 176.



         Ÿ You can also combine objects using the Combine button on the Property
           Bar.


Breaking apart combined objects
         You can break apart any object that has been combined.

         To break apart combined objects
         1 Select the combined object with the Pick tool.
         2 Click Arrange, Break Apart.




184      CorelDRAW: Chapter 5
                    Ÿ If you break apart an object that has been created by combining Artistic
                      text, the text breaks apart into lines first, then into words. Paragraph text,
                      on the other hand, breaks into separate paragraphs. Both Artistic and
                      Paragraph text can be recombined.



                    Ÿ You can also break apart combined objects using the Break Apart button
                      on the Property Bar.
                    Ÿ You can break apart Artistic text by converting the text to curves first. For
                      more information, see “Converting Artistic text to curves” on page 341.


Locking and unlocking objects
                    Locking anchors an object in a specific location and prevents you from
                    accidentally moving, sizing, transforming, cloning, filling, or modifying it. You
                    can lock single, multiple, or grouped objects. To modify a locked object,
                    unlock it first.
When objects
arelocked you are
unable to modify
them.




Locking objects
                    You can lock an object, multiple objects, and grouped objects.

                    To lock an object
                    1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                    2 Click Arrange, Lock Object.

                    To lock multiple objects or groups of objects
                    1 Hold down SHIFT, and select the objects with the Pick tool.
                    2 Click Arrange, Lock Object.


                                                                     Organizing objects          185
                      Ÿ When an object is locked, the Status Bar and Object Manager will indicate
                        Locked Object on Layer.


Unlocking objects
                      You can unlock the anchor on an object, multiple objects, and grouped objects
                      to make changes.

                      To unlock an object
                      1 Select the locked object with the Pick tool.
                      2 Click Arrange, Unlock Object.

                      To unlock multiple objects or groups of objects
                      1 Select the locked objects with the Pick tool.
                      2 Click Arrange, Unlock All Objects.


Using the Object Manager
                      The Object Manager displays the vertical structure — the stacking order —
                      of objects, layers, and pages in your document. For each object, the Object
                      Manager displays a small icon and a brief description indicating its basic fill
                      and outline properties. You can set the display options for the pages, layers,
                      and objects using the Object Manager.
The Object Manager
keeps complex
drawings organized
by displaying the
stacking order of
objects, layers and
pages in your
document.




                      You can modify the objects in your drawing using the features and controls in
                      the Object Manager. The Object Manager lets you arrange objects (within
                      layers as well as between layers on the same page), edit outline and fill
                      colors, drag-and-drop styles (color, graphics, and text), and group and
                      ungroup objects.




186                   CorelDRAW: Chapter 5
        Using the Object Manager, you can create, rename, and edit layers to
        organize your drawing. Setting the layer properties can assist you with
        managing the display, printing, and editing of objects on layers.
        When you select an object in the Drawing Window it is automatically
        highlighted in the Object Manager, and vice versa. Changes to objects (for
        example, fills and outlines) are reflected in both places.
        If you prefer a simpler view of the Object Manager, you can switch to Layer
        Manager view. The Layer Manager view lists all the layers in your document,
        but does not show sublevels or objects. It is the most basic view available,
        and is an easy way to switch between layers or move objects between layers.
        It is also the only view in which you can access the Move To and Copy To
        commands in the Object Manager flyout.

Opening and setting up the Object Manager
        Understanding the Object Manager’s basic functions will help you use its
        more powerful features. You can begin by learning how to open the Object
        Manager, as well as how to add, delete and rename pages.

        To open the Object Manager
        Ÿ Click Tools, Object Manager.

        To add pages in your drawing
        Ÿ Right-click a Page name, and click Insert Page After or Insert Page
          Before.

        To delete pages from your drawing
        Ÿ Right-click a Page name, and click Delete Page.

        To rename pages in your drawing
        1 Right-click a Page name, and click Rename.
        2 In the Rename Page dialog box, type a new name.


        Ÿ You can apply the rename, delete, or add pages functions by right-clicking
          on any page in the Object Manager except the Master Page.




                                                       Organizing objects         187
Using the display options in the Object Manager
         The Object Manager displays the hierarchical structure of the pages, layers,
         and objects in the active document. Buttons in the Object Manager toolbar
         let you add layers, show or hide details, and edit across layers.

         To display object properties
         Ÿ Click the Show Object Properties button.
            Click the button again to hide object properties.

         To display pages only
         Ÿ In the Object Manager Docker, click        , Show Pages.

         To display the layer summary
         Ÿ In the Object Manager Docker, click        , Show Layers.

         To display pages and layers
         Ÿ In the Object Manager Docker, click        , Show Pages and Layers.

         To expand the Object Manager upon object selection
         Ÿ In the Object Manager Docker, click        , Expand To Show Selection.


         Ÿ You can also access the Show Object Properties, Show Pages, Show
           Layers, and Show Layers and Pages commands by right-clicking in the
           white space of the Object Manager.



Using the Layer Manager view
         The Layer Manager view lists all the layers in your document, without
         displaying sublevels or objects. It is the simplest view available, and is an
         easy way to switch between layers or move objects between layers.

         To select Layer Manager view in the Object Manager
         Ÿ Click the Layer Manager icon.
            The different pages in your document, and any objects on them, disappear
            from your list, leaving only the names of the layers.



188      CorelDRAW: Chapter 5
         Ÿ Switching to Layer Manager view causes all other views to be disabled.
           Options such as Show Pages, Show Layers, or Show Pages and Layers
           become unavailable.
         Ÿ The Layer Manager view is the only one in which you can access the
           Move To and Copy To functions in the Object Manager flyout.


Editing objects using the Object Manager
         The Object Manager lets you edit objects the same way that you would in the
         Drawing Window. Before you can edit an object you must select it.
         CorelDRAW lets you select, group, copy, move, delete, lock, and replace
         object properties quickly using the Object Manager.
         When you’ve selected an object in the Object Manager, you can change its
         properties. For example, you can select an object and change its fill or outline
         just as you do when you’re working in the Drawing Window. You can also
         complete more advanced operations, such as coloring objects and creating
         PowerClip™ objects.

Selecting objects using the Object Manager
         Just as you do in the Drawing Window, you must select objects in the Object
         Manager before you can manipulate, format, or edit them. You can select any
         object or group of objects using the mouse.

         To select one object or group of objects
         Ÿ Click the object or group name tag.

         To select multiple objects or groups of objects on a single layer
         Ÿ Hold down CTRL, and click each of the name tags of the objects or groups
           of objects you want to select. Hold down SHIFT to select a series of
           objects.

         To select multiple objects or groups of objects on multiple layers
         Ÿ Ensure that the Edit Across Layers button is enabled, then hold down
           CTRL and select objects on the same layer or different layers.




                                                         Organizing objects         189
         Ÿ You can only select objects on different layers when the objects are on the
           same page (or on the Master Page and any other page). You cannot, for
           example, select multiple objects on different layers of pages 1 and 3 of a
           document.


Moving and copying objects between layers
         You can move or copy selected objects to a new layer. To do so, you must be
         in Layer Manager view.
         When you move or copy an object to a layer below its current layer, the
         object becomes the top object on its new layer. Similarly, when you move or
         copy an object to a layer above its current layer, the object becomes the
         bottom object.

         To move or copy an object to another layer in Layer Manager
         view
         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
         2 In the Object Manager Docker, click Move To Layer or Copy To Layer on
           the flyout.
            A large black arrow appears.
         3 Drag the arrow to the layer to which you want to move or copy the object,
           and click.

         To move an object to another layer using the mouse in any view
         Ÿ Select the object with the Pick tool and drag to a new layer.


         Ÿ You can only use the Move To Layer and Copy To Layer commands when
           you are in Layer Manager view. In all other views, these commands are
           disabled. To move or copy objects in any other view, use the mouse.



         Ÿ In Layer Manager view, you can right-click in a white space in the Object
           Manager to access the Move To Layer and Copy To Layer commands.
           When using these commands, remember which layer you are moving or
           copying from.
         Ÿ You can hold down CTRL to select multiple objects or SHIFT to select a
           series of objects.




190      CorelDRAW: Chapter 5
Ordering and copying object properties using the Object Manager
                      The Object Manager lets you move objects behind or in front of other objects
                      on the same layer. You can also copy the fill and outline attributes from one
                      object to another located on the same layer.

                      To place an object behind or in front of another object
                      1 In the Object Manager Docker, right-click and begin to drag the object
                        name that you want to move.
                         The cursor changes to a dashed rectangle.
                      2 Drag over another object and click Move In Front Of or Move Behind.

                      To copy an object’s properties to another object
                      1 In the Object Manager Docker, right-click and begin to drag the object
                        name that you want to copy from.
                         The cursor changes to a dashed rectangle.
                      2 Drag over the object you want to copy to and click one of the following
                        options:
                         Ÿ Copy Fill Here
                         Ÿ Copy Outline Here
                         Ÿ Copy All Properties

Creating PowerClip objects using the Object Manager
                      You can create PowerClip objects using the Object Manager. When you create
                      a PowerClip, you place one object inside a second object, called the container
                      object. For information on PowerClip objects, see “Creating a PowerClip
                      object” on page 527.
You can create
PowerClip objects
easily by using the
Object Manager.




                                                                     Organizing objects           191
         To create PowerClip objects using the Object Manager
         1 In the Object Manager Docker, right-click and begin to drag the name of
           the object that you want to place inside a container to create the
           PowerClip.
            The cursor changes to a dashed rectangle.
         2 Without releasing the mouse, drag the dashed rectangle over the name of
           a second object in the same layer that you want to use as the container
           object.
         3 Release the mouse and click PowerClip Inside.

         To edit or extract the contents of a PowerClip object
         Ÿ In the Object Manager Docker, right-click the PowerClip object name and
           click Extract Contents or Edit Contents.

Grouping objects using the Object Manager
         The Object Manager lets you group objects on one layer quickly. You can also
         add or remove objects from groups.

         To group objects on the active layer
         Ÿ In the Object Manager Docker, click the object name that you want to
           group, and drag it over another object.
            The cursor changes to show that the objects will be grouped. Repeat this
            step to add more objects to the group.

         To group objects on the active layer using the menu command
         1 In the Object Manager Docker, right-click the object name that you want
           to group.
         2 Drag it over another object and click Add to Create Group.
            Repeat this procedure to add more objects to the group.

         To add or remove an object to or from a group
         Ÿ Click the name of the object and drag it into or out of an existing group on
           the active layer.




192      CorelDRAW: Chapter 5
                        Ÿ The Object Manager lists the objects that are grouped. To remove an
                          object from a group, drag the object to the active layer.
                        Ÿ You can select objects from different layers and group them. However,
                          once grouped, the objects will reside on the same layer. Objects cannot
                          remain grouped across layers.


Using layers to organize your drawing
                        The layering feature of CorelDRAW gives you added flexibility for organizing
                        and editing the objects in your drawings. You can divide a drawing into
                        multiple layers, each containing a portion of the drawing’s contents. For
                        example, using layers could help you organize an architectural plan for a
                        building. You could organize the building’s various components (plumbing,
                        electrical, structural, etc.) by placing them on separate layers. You could then
                        use the Object Manager to view, print, or edit specific layers or combinations
                        of layers. Together, layers act as a hierarchy that helps determine the vertical
                        arrangement of a drawing’s components. In this arrangement (the stacking
                        order), objects on the top layer always overlay objects on the layer below.
You can use layers to
separate and
organize different
elements in a
complex drawing.




                        Each new file, regardless of how many pages it contains, has one master
                        page. This master page controls four default layers: the Grid, Guides, and
                        Desktop layers, plus one Layer (called Layer1) for drawing. The Grid,
                        Guides, and Desktop layers are containers for the grid, guidelines, and any
                        objects outside the borders of the Drawing Page. The Desktop layer is a
                        useful place to create experimental drawings you may want to use later. You
                        can easily drag an object from the Desktop layer to an active layer on the
                        Drawing Page when you decide to keep or print it. You can also create an
                        Internet Layer by inserting an Internet object. For more information about
                        layer properties, see “Setting layer properties” on page 196.




                                                                        Organizing objects          193
Creating a layer
          In the Object Manager, you can add new layers to help you organize the
          objects in your drawing.

          To add a new layer using the menu command
          Ÿ In the Object Manager Docker, click      , New Layer.
             The new layer becomes the active layer.

          To add a new layer using the New Layer button
          Ÿ In the Object Manager Docker, click the New Layer button.


          Ÿ By default, each new layer has its editing, printing, and display properties
            enabled and its master layer property disabled. You can change these
            properties using the controls provided in the Layer Properties dialog box.
            For more information about layer properties, see “Setting layer
            properties” on page 196.


Renaming a layer
          You can assign a new name to any layer you create in the Object Manager.
          You might want a layer’s name to indicate its contents, position in the
          stacking order, or relationship with the drawing’s other layers.

          To rename a layer
          1 In the Object Manager Docker, right-click the layer name and click
            Rename.
          2 Type a new name for the layer and press ENTER.

          To rename a layer using the layer properties
          1 In the Object Manager Docker, right-click a layer name and click
            Properties.
          2 In the Layer Properties dialog box, type a new name in the Layer Name
            box.


          Ÿ You can’t rename the Grid, Guides, Desktop or Internet layer.




194       CorelDRAW: Chapter 5
Changing the active layer
          To use a layer in the drawing — for example, to add objects to it — you must
          first make the layer active. Once active, a layer is ready to receive any new
          objects you draw, import, or paste onto it. In the Object Manager, the active
          layer appears highlighted in red. When you start a drawing, the default layer
          (Layer 1) is the active layer.

          To change the active layer
          Ÿ In the Object Manager Docker, click the name of the layer you want to
            activate.


          Ÿ You highlight a layer to change its basic settings so that you can view,
            print, or edit it. Note that highlighting a layer is different from activating
            it, which enables you to add objects to it in the drawing. For more
            information about layer settings, see “Setting layer properties” on page
            196.


Reordering layers
          The Master Page layer list in the Object Manager shows the order in which
          layers are stacked in the active drawing. The first layer in the list is the top
          layer; the last layer is the bottom layer.

          To change a layer’s position in the stacking order
          Ÿ In the Layers list, drag the layer’s name tag to the desired position.
             As you drag, a position line indicates the layer’s current position.


          Ÿ It is easiest to reorder layers in Layer Manager view. You can switch to
            Layer Manager view by clicking the Layer Manager View button in the
            Object Manager.
          Ÿ You can change the vertical order of layers in the drawing. When you do
            so, each layer’s contents move to reflect changes in this order.


Deleting a layer
          The Delete command removes the current layer highlighted in the Object
          Manager.




                                                            Organizing objects          195
         To delete a layer
         1 In the Object Manager Docker, click the name of the layer you want to
           delete.

         2 Click      , Delete Layer.
         3 If a layer contains objects on other pages, click OK to confirm that you
           want to delete the layer.


         Ÿ You can’t delete a locked layer or any of the three special default layers of
           the Master Page (Grid, Guides, or Desktop).
         Ÿ When you delete a layer, you also delete all of the objects on it. If you
           want to keep certain objects on the layer you’re deleting, move them to a
           different layer first.


Setting layer properties
         CorelDRAW lets you use layers to organize your drawings. You can view,
         edit, or make a layer printable, or place a layer’s contents onto every page of
         a multipage document. You can also lock layers to prevent accidental
         changes, or override the full-color view of a layer so that its contents display
         as outlines of a specific color.
         By hiding certain layers, you make it easier to identify and edit the objects on
         other layers. You also reduce the time CorelDRAW needs to refresh your
         illustration when you edit it. This setting is particularly effective in
         illustrations with many objects on multiple layers.

Showing and hiding a layer
         You can show or hide any layer in your drawing.

         To show a layer
         1 In the Object Manager Docker, click the layer name.
         2 Right-click the layer, and click Properties.
         3 Enable the Visible check box.

         To hide a layer
         1 In the Object Manager Docker, click the layer name.
         2 Right-click the layer, and click Properties.
         3 Disable the Visible check box.


196      CorelDRAW: Chapter 5
          Ÿ You can also show or hide a layer by clicking its Eye icon. An Eye icon
            appears beside each layer name in the Object Manager. When a layer is
            hidden, its Eye icon and the objects on that layer are dimmed.


Locking and unlocking a layer
          Locking a layer prevents accidental changes to its contents. When a layer is
          locked, objects on it can’t be selected or edited. When you unlock the layer,
          you can change any object it contains as long as the object is not locked.

          To lock a layer
          1 In the Object Manager Docker, click the layer name.
          2 Right-click the layer, and click Properties.
          3 Disable the Editable check box.

          To unlock a layer
          1 In the Object Manager Docker, click the layer name.
          2 Right-click the layer, and click Properties.
          3 Enable the Editable check box.


          Ÿ You can also lock or unlock a layer by clicking its Pencil icon. A Pencil icon
            appears beside each layer name in the Object Manager. When a layer is
            locked, its Pencil icon is dimmed and the objects on that layer are also
            dimmed.
          Ÿ You can lock and unlock individual, multiple, or grouped objects using the
            Arrange menu. For more information, see “Locking and unlocking
            objects” on page 185.
          Ÿ You can’t lock or unlock the Grid layer. Its Pencil icon is always grayed
            out.


Enabling and disabling the printing of a layer
          CorelDRAW allows you to print selected layers of your drawing. If you enable
          a layer’s print setting, the layer and its contents appear in printed copies of
          the drawing. If you disable a layer’s print setting, the layer and its contents
          won’t appear when you print the drawing.




                                                           Organizing objects        197
                        To enable printing for a specific layer
                        1 In the Object Manager Docker, click the layer name.
                        2 Right-click the layer, and click Properties.
                        3 Enable the Printable check box.

                        To disable printing for a specific layer
                        1 In the Object Manager Docker, click the layer name.
                        2 Right-click the layer, and click Properties.
                        3 Disable the Printable check box.


                        Ÿ If printing is disabled for a layer, its contents do not display in full-screen
                          previews. For information about full-screen previews, see “Using
                          full-screen previews” on page 78.



                        Ÿ You can also enable or disable the printing of a layer by clicking its Printer
                          icon. A Printer icon appears beside each layer name in the Object
                          Manager. When printing is disabled for a layer, its Printer icon appears
                          dimmed.


Creating a master layer
                        Master layers are layers whose contents appear on each page of a multipage
                        document. Master layers are particularly useful if you have an object (such as
                        a corporate logo) that you want to appear on each page of a document.
Create a master layer
if you want certain
objects displayed on
all pages of a
document.




198                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 5
                         To create a master layer
                         Ÿ Right-click a layer name, and click Master.

Working with multiple layers simultaneously
                         You can edit objects on any unlocked layer. You can also move and copy
                         objects between any layers that are unlocked, as long as they are on the same
                         page (or on the Master Page and another page).
                         If you disable the Edit Across Layers function, you can work only on the
                         active layer and the Desktop layer — you can’t select or edit objects on
                         inactive layers.

                         To allow editing of all layers
                         Ÿ In the Object Manager Docker, click      , Edit Across Layers.

                         To allow editing of the active layer only
                         Ÿ In the Object Manager Docker, click      , then disable the Edit Across
                           Layers command.

                         To enable or disable the Edit Across Layers option
                         Ÿ Enable or disable the Edit Across Layers button on the Object Manager.

Identifying objects on a layer using color override
                         You can display the contents of a selected layer as colored outlines. Changing
                         to outlines — using color override — doesn’t affect the objects’ true
                         appearance; it only affects the way they appear on-screen. This function is
                         useful for identifying objects on different layers — for example, in a complex
                         technical diagram — or even for changing the colors of the grid and
                         guidelines.
You can use the
Overrride Full-color
View option to view
full-color objects (1)
as colored outlines
(2). This can help
you to distinguish
between objects on
different layers.




                                                                         Organizing objects          199
         To override layer fill and outline attributes
         1 In the Object Manager Docker, click the layer name.
         2 Right-click the layer, and click Properties.
         3 Enable the Override Full Color View check box.
         4 Click the Layer Color picker.
         5 Choose a color for the objects on the selected layer.

         To restore layer fill and outline attributes
         1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
         2 Disable the Override Full Color View check box.

         To change a layer color on a specific page
         1 In the Object Manager Docker, double-click the layer color swatch.
         2 Choose a color from the list.

         To apply color override on a single page
         1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the “To override layer fill and outline
           attributes” procedure.
         2 Enable the Apply Layer Changes To The Current Page Only check box.

         To change a layer color on all pages
         1 In the Object Manager Docker, double-click the layer color swatch on a
           master page.
         2 Choose a color from the list.


         Ÿ In Wireframe or Simple Wireframe, the object’s outline always appears
           using the color override.


Defining Master layer setup options
         The Grid and Guides layers on the Master Page allow you to modify the
         settings for these master layers.

         To set the Grid on the Master Page
         1 In the Object Manager Docker, click the Grid layer on the Master Page.


200      CorelDRAW: Chapter 5
                      2 Right-click the layer, and click Properties.
                      3 Click the Setup button.
                      4 Modify the settings as desired.

                      To set the Guidelines on the Master Page
                      1 In the Object Manager Docker, click the Guides layer on the Master Page.
                      2 Right-click the layer, and click Properties.
                      3 Click the Setup button.
                      4 Modify the settings as desired.


                      Ÿ For more information about rulers, grids and guidelines, see “Using the
                        rulers, grid and guidelines” on page 54.


Creating an object database
                      The Object Data Manager is an advanced feature that is particularly useful as
                      a project management tool when you create or supervise a large project. The
                      Object Data Manager is like having a small spreadsheet program within your
                      graphics program. Like Corel® Quattro® Pro or Microsoft Excel, it lets you
                      track expenses, deadlines, assignments, progress, or anything else you need
                      to organize. You can enter many types of data about individual objects or
                      groups of objects.
The Object Database
Manager is a
powerful project
management tool.




                      You create the database by entering information about specific objects in the
                      Object Data Docker. This information is set up on a datasheet called the
                      Object Data Manager. Categories of information are organized in columns. If
                      you’re creating a technical drawing, for example, you might include
                      component names in one column, part numbers in another, cost in a third,




                                                                       Organizing objects       201
          and so on. For each component in the drawing, you enter the same
          categories of information.
          After you have created your database, you can view information on any object
          in either list or datasheet form. The Object Data Docker displays a list of all
          the information you’ve assigned; the Object Data Manager displays this
          information in a formatted datasheet that resembles a spreadsheet.
          CorelDRAW also provides basic functions for formatting and manipulating
          the information you add to the database. For example, you can add and delete
          columns, indent rows to show hierarchical relationships, and summarize data
          for selected objects. You can print the entire database or only parts of it.
          Using the Clipboard, you can copy data to different locations within the
          datasheet or between datasheets for different CorelDRAW documents. You
          can also use the Clipboard to copy data to and from other Windows database
          or spreadsheet programs, such as Corel Quattro Pro and Microsoft Excel.

Setting up the object database
          Before you assign data to objects in a drawing, you need to know what
          information you want to display. By default, CorelDRAW creates four data
          fields: Name, Cost, Comments, and CDRStaticID. The first three fields are
          for your convenience, and can be edited or deleted as required. The
          CDRStaticID field is used by CorelDRAW to identify objects, and can’t be
          edited or deleted.
          If you require custom fields, you can define their formats using the controls
          in the Format Definition dialog box. This dialog box gives you access to four
          basic field formats: General, Date/Time, Linear/Angular, and Numeric. Each
          of these formats provides a series of common settings. You can use these
          formats or create your own.
          You can create and assign as many data fields as you want, as long as they use
          permitted format variables.

Adding new object data fields
          If the preset formats in CorelDRAW don’t provide the information you want
          in your data summary, you can create your own custom formats using the
          variables available for the format type you’re using. The field format you
          select is used for all objects in the active drawing.

          To add a field that uses a preset format
          1 Click Tools, Object Data Manager.
          2 In the Object Data Docker, click      , Field Editor.
          3 Click the Create New Field button.


202       CorelDRAW: Chapter 5
          4 Type a name for the field in the box.
          5 Click the Change button (unless you want to keep the format displayed
            beside the Current label).
          6 In the Format Type box, enable the format type you want to create.
          7 Choose a format from the list box and press ENTER.
          8 Click the Add Selected Field(s) button.

          To add a field that uses a custom format
          1 Follow steps 1 to 6 from the previous procedure.
          2 In the Create box, type the format you want to create and press ENTER.
          3 Click the Add Selected Field(s) button.


          Ÿ Enable the List Of Default Fields check box to add the new field to the list
            of default fields. This field is then applied to all new documents you
            create.
          Ÿ Enable the All Objects check box to apply the field to objects that have
            already been created in addition to those you will be creating.


Editing object data fields
          You can change any object data field by giving it a preset or custom format.
          For example, you can change a numeric field to display more or fewer
          decimal places, or to display numbers in thousands.

          To change a field’s format
          1 Click Tools, Object Data Manager.

          2 In the Object Data Docker, click        , Field Editor.
          3 Click the field name.
          4 Click the Change button.
          5 In the Format Type box, enable the format type you want to create.
          6 Do one of the following:
             Ÿ Choose a format from the list box and press ENTER.
             Ÿ In the Create box, type a format to create and press ENTER.




                                                            Organizing objects      203
Renaming, reordering, and deleting object data fields
          You can change the name of any field to better suit your object data summary.
          You can also change the location of fields to make them appear in a logical
          order on the data summary.
          You can delete any data field except for CDRStaticID. When you delete a
          field, you also delete all data entered for that field in the active document.

          To rename a data field
          1 Click Tools, Object Data Manager.

          2 In the Object Data Docker, click       , Field Editor.
          3 Choose the name of the data field you want to change from the list.
          4 Type a new name in the box and press ENTER.

          To reorder data fields
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
          2 Reorder the names of the fields in the list box by dragging to get the order
            you want.
             As you drag, the cursor changes to indicate the field’s position in the list.

          To delete a data field
          1 Click Tools, Object Data Manager.

          2 In the Object Data Docker, click       , Field Editor.
          3 Choose the field’s name from the list box at the left side of the dialog box.
             To choose multiple fields, hold down SHIFT as you choose the field
             names.
          4 Click the Delete Field(s) button.


          Ÿ You can access the Object Data Field Editor dialog box by double-clicking
            a field name in the Object Data Docker.


Assigning and editing object data
          After creating all the data fields you want for your drawing, you can create
          your database. The Object Data Docker and the Object Data Manager provide
          all the commands and features you need to add and edit object information.


204       CorelDRAW: Chapter 5
         The Object Data Docker is best for entering data for single objects. It lets
         you add, edit, and delete object data.
         The Object Data Manager, in contrast, is best for entering and editing data for
         multiple objects. It provides many of the editing features available in popular
         spreadsheet applications.

Assigning data
         The Object Data Docker makes it easy to assign data to objects one at a time.
         To assign data to several objects at the same time, use the Object Data
         Manager. Using the Object Data Manager helps speed up the data entry
         process and lets you look at the data summary as it begins to take shape.

         To assign data to an object
         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
         2 Click Tools, Object Data Manager.
         3 In the Field/Value list, click a data field name.
         4 Type the data you want in the text box at the top of the Object Data
           Docker.
         5 Repeat steps 3 to 4 to add data to other fields.

         To assign data to multiple objects
         1 Select the objects using the Pick tool.
         2 Click Tools, Object Data Manager.
         3 Click the Object Data Manager button.
         4 In the Object Data Manager, click a cell.
         5 Type the appropriate data.
         6 Press ENTER to assign your entry to the cell, the fields, and the objects.

Copying data between objects
         The Copy Data From command lets you use one object’s data entries to
         update another object’s data entries. This command does not replace an
         object’s data entries; rather, it appends fields and data where appropriate.

         To copy data from one object to another
         1 Select the object to which you want to copy data.
         2 Click Tools, Object Data Manager.


                                                          Organizing objects        205
         3 In the Object Data Docker, click        , Copy Data From.
         4 Click the object from which you want to copy data.

Viewing, editing, and formatting an object data summary
         The Object Data Manager provides the commands and functions you need to
         edit and format your object data summary. For example, you can add and
         delete columns, indent rows to show hierarchical relationships, and
         summarize data for selected objects. You can also print part or all of the
         database.

Viewing an object data summary
         The Object Data Manager summarizes the information you’ve assigned to
         the objects in your drawing. While it can be used to view and edit data
         associated with a single object, its main purpose is to help you manage large
         amounts of data associated with multiple objects contained in various groups
         in a drawing.

         To view an object data summary for one object
         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
         2 Click Tools, Object Data Manager.
         3 In the Object Data Docker, click the Object Data Manager button.

         To view an object data summary for multiple objects
         1 Select the objects with the Pick tool.
         2 Click Tools, Object Data Manager.
         3 In the Object Data Docker, click the Object Data Manager button.

         To view an object data summary for an entire document
         1 Click Edit, Select All.
         2 Click Tools, Object Data Manager.
         3 In the Object Data Docker, click the Object Data Manager button.

Displaying data for grouped objects
         You can place a two-space indent before data relating to objects in groups to
         create a visible distinction between groups in a column.
         You can also display individual group subtotals for fields sharing multiple
         groups. Use this command when more than one group of objects is displayed


206      CorelDRAW: Chapter 5
         in a datasheet. This command applies only to fields with numeric formats.
         For more information about viewing summaries in the Object Data Manager,
         see “Viewing an object data summary” on page 206.

         To indent all groups in a column
         1 In the Object Data Manager, select the column to which you want to apply
           indents.
         2 Click Field Options, Show Hierarchy.

         To show group subtotals
         1 In the Object Data Manager, select the column in which you want to show
           group subtotals.
         2 Click Field Options, Summarize Groups.

Showing the sum of values in a column
         The Object Data Manager can automatically sum the values in the selected
         column. It displays the sum at the bottom of the column.

         To show the sum of the values in a column
         1 In the Object Data Manager, select the column.
         2 Click Field Options, and click Show Totals.

         To hide the sum of values in a column
         1 In the Object Data Manager, select the column.
         2 Click Field Options, and click Show Totals.


         Ÿ For information about viewing summaries in the Object Data Manager, see
           “Viewing an object data summary” on page 206.


Printing an object data summary
         The Object Data Manager gives you access to all of the application’s printing
         capabilities. This gives you the option to print quickly or print using specific
         settings.

         To print an object data summary
         1 In the Object Data Manager, click File, Print.


                                                          Organizing objects         207
      2 Choose a printer from the Name list box.
      3 Type the number in the Number of Copies box.


      Ÿ For information about viewing summaries in the Object Data Manager, see
        “Viewing an object data summary” on page 206.
      Ÿ For more information about the printing capabilities of CorelDRAW, see
        “Printing” on page 679.




208   CorelDRAW: Chapter 5
                       FILLING AND OUTLINING
                       OBJECTS                                                                      6
                       When you add an object to a drawing, CorelDRAW gives it a default outline
                       attribute, a default fill attribute, or both. The object’s outline is the line that
                       surrounds the object. The fill is the color or pattern contained in the object.
                       You can change these attributes using the Outline and Fill flyout tools. For
                       information about changing the default fill and outline see, “Changing a
                       default style” on page 149.
Using the Fill and
Outline flyout tools
you can define
objects.




                       With CorelDRAW you can apply a fill and outline to objects. Text objects are
                       closed objects, so you can specify a fill and an outline. Normally, text objects
                       are filled but have no outline properties. You can assign additional properties
                       to text, including font and style, point size, and inter-line spacing. For more
                       information see, “Working with text” on page 337.


Filling objects
                       You can change the appearance of an object by using a fill. To fill an object,
                       you apply colors or patterns inside its borders. If you leave an object without
                       a fill or remove its fill, the object is transparent. CorelDRAW includes
                       Uniform fills, Fountain fills, Pattern fills, Texture fills, and PostScript fills.
                       You can apply fills to specific objects or set defaults so that every object you
                       draw has the same fill. You can also customize Fountain fills, Pattern fills, and
                       Texture fills. You can also apply a mesh fill to an object.


                                                                 Filling and outlining objects          211
Working with basic fills
          CorelDRAW lets you apply uniform fills, which are even-colored and solid.
          You can choose from color models, palettes, and color mixers to fill objects
          with solid colors. The default display is the CMYK color model and the
          custom Color Palette. By setting the Fill Open Curves option, you can apply a
          fill to any curve object. You can also make an object transparent by removing
          its fill.

Applying a uniform fill
          You can apply uniform fills using the Uniform Fill dialog box, the Interactive
          Fill tool, or the on-screen Color Palette. The Uniform Fill dialog box lets you
          exercise more control over the fill. The other on-screen methods let you
          apply color more quickly and easily. You can also mix colors in a solid fill by
          using the Interactive Fill tool in conjunction with the on-screen Color Palette.
          To select a color from a specific color model, see “Working with color” on
          page 303.

          To apply a uniform fill using the Uniform Fill dialog box
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
          2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Fill Color Dialog.
          3 Choose a color model from the Model list box.
          4 Click a color from the Color Bar and from the visual selector.


          Ÿ You can also enter the color components of a color in the appropriate
            boxes.


          To apply a uniform fill using the Interactive Fill tool
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
          2 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Fill tool.
          3 On the Property Bar, choose Uniform Fill from the Fill Type list box.
          4 Choose a color model from the Uniform Fill Type list box.
          5 Adjust the color by typing values in the appropriate boxes, then press
            ENTER.




212       CorelDRAW: Chapter 6
          To apply a uniform fill using the Color Palette
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
          2 Click the color you want from the on-screen Color Palette.


          Ÿ You can also drag a color from the Color Palette to any object. As the
            mouse pointer moves over the object, it changes shape to show where the
            color will be applied. Holding down SHIFT while you drag over an object
            applies only the fill attributes to the object.
          Ÿ You can display multiple Color Palettes on-screen to access swatches
            quickly.


          To mix a color using the Color Palette
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
          2 Hold down CTRL, and click a color from the Color Palette. Release the
            mouse button before releasing CTRL.

Managing fills
          CorelDRAW lets you copy and paste fill and outline colors from one object to
          another using the Eyedropper and Paintbucket tools.

          To copy a fill or outline to another object
          1 Open the Eyedropper flyout, and click the Eyedropper tool.
          2 Click one of the following buttons to set the selection area:
             Ÿ Fill/Outline — lets you select the fill or outline
             Ÿ 1X1 — lets you select the color in a 1X1 area
             Ÿ 3X3 — lets you select the color in a 3X3 area
             Ÿ 5X5 — lets you select the color in a 5X5 area
             Ÿ Selection — lets you marquee select an area
          3 Click on the object whose fill you want to copy.
          4 Open the Eyedropper flyout, and click the Paintbucket tool.
          5 Select the object I which you want to paste the fill.




                                                 Filling and outlining objects     213
          Ÿ Fills that are copied may not be representative of the original fill. In some
            cases, the closest equivalent RGB colors appear when you paste a fill.
          Ÿ If you select the Paintbucket tool before you choose a color with the
            Eyedropper tool, the default is no fill.



          Ÿ You can switch from the Eyedropper tool to the Paintbucket tool by
            holding down the SHIFT key.


Setting the Fill Open Curves option
          CorelDRAW lets you fill open curves. By enabling and disabling the Fill Open
          Curves option you can define the default fill for curves.

          To enable the Fill Open Curves setting
          1 Click Tools, Options.
          2 In the list of categories, double-click Document, and click General.
          3 Enable the Fill Open Curves check box.

          To disable the Fill Open Curves setting
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
          2 Disable the Fill Open Curves check box.

Removing fills
          You can remove an object’s fill so that objects behind it show through.

          To remove an object’s fill using the Color Palette
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
          2 Click No Color on the Color Palette.

          To remove an object’s fill using the Fill Tool flyout
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
          2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click No Fill.




214       CorelDRAW: Chapter 6
Working with fountain fills
                      A fountain fill causes two or more colors to flow into each other smoothly,
                      letting you add depth and color to your drawing. The fill can flow in a straight
                      line across the object (Linear), in concentric circles from the center of the
                      object (Radial), in rays from the center of the object (Conical), or in
                      concentric squares from the center of the object (Square).
Fountain fills can
follow a linear,
radial, conical, or
square path.




                      There are two types of fountain fills: two-color and custom. Two-color
                      fountain fills have a direct blend from one color to another. Custom fills let
                      you create a cascade of many colors. You can customize fountain fills by
                      changing the direction of the fill, adding intermediate colors, or changing the
                      angle of the fill.

Applying a two-color fountain fill
                      A fountain fill — also known as a gradient fill or a ramp fill — is a progression
                      of colors through the Color Wheel that follows a linear, radial, conical, or
                      square path. CorelDRAW provides preset fountain fills that you can use to
                      simulate the appearance of neon tubes, metal cylinders, and other real-life
                      objects.

                      To apply a two-color fountain fill using the Fountain Fill dialog
                      box
                      1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                      2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Fountain Fill Dialog.
                      3 In the Color Blend section, enable the Two Color button.



                                                                Filling and outlining objects     215
      4 From the Type list box, choose one of the following fountain fill types:
         Ÿ Linear
         Ÿ Radial
         Ÿ Conical
         Ÿ Square
      5 Open the From color picker, and click the color you want at the start of the
        color progression.
      6 Open the To color picker, and click the color you want at the end of the
        color progression.
      7 Move the Mid-Point slider to set the mid-point between the two colors.
      8 Click one of the following buttons to set the direction:
         Ÿ Direct — determines the intermediate fill colors according to hue and
           saturation changes along a straight line, beginning at the From color
           and continuing across the Color Wheel to the To color
         Ÿ Clockwise Color Path — blends colors along a clockwise path around
           the Color Wheel
         Ÿ Counterclockwise Color Path — blends colors along a counterclockwise
           path around the Color Wheel


      Ÿ You can see how your fill appears in the Preview window of the Fountain
        Fill dialog box.
      Ÿ The Color Wheel displays the fountain fill direction.


      To apply a fountain fill using the Interactive Fill tool
      1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
      2 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Fill tool.
      3 On the Property Bar, choose Fountain Fill from the Fill Type list box.
      4 On the Property Bar, click one of the following buttons:
         Ÿ Linear
         Ÿ Radial
         Ÿ Conical
         Ÿ Square




216   CorelDRAW: Chapter 6
                      5 Click the First Fill picker, and click a color on the palette.
                      6 Click the Last Fill picker, and click a color on the palette.

                      To apply a preset fountain fill
                      1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                      2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Fountain Fill Dialog.
                      3 Choose a preset fountain fill from the Presets list box.

Creating and saving custom fountain fills
                      You can customize fountain fills by adding intermediate colors. You can also
                      specify where you want the intermediate colors to appear by moving the
                      markers that appear above the Preview Ribbon, or by entering a value in the
                      Position box. You can add as many as 99 intermediate colors to a fountain fill.
                      You can also save the fill to use it again.
You can customize a
fountain fill by
adding intermediate
colors.




                      To create a custom fountain fill
                      1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                      2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Fountain Fill Dialog.
                      3 In the Color Blend section, enable the Custom button.
                      4 Double-click the Preview Ribbon to add a color marker.
                      5 Type a placement value for the marker in the Position box.
                      6 Do one of the following to select a color:
                         Ÿ Click a color from the Color Palette to assign to the marker.
                         Ÿ Click the Others button and create a custom color.
                      7 Repeat steps 4 to 6 until you achieve the desired effect.




                                                                Filling and outlining objects    217
      Ÿ You can move existing markers by dragging them along the Preview
        Ribbon and delete them by double-clicking.


      To create a custom fountain fill using the Interactive Fill tool
      1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
      2 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Fill tool.
      3 On the Property Bar, choose Fountain Fill from the Fill Type list box.
      4 Click one of the following button on the Property Bar:
         Ÿ linear
         Ÿ radial
         Ÿ conical
         Ÿ square
      5 Drag a color from the Color Palette to any spot along the line that appears
        inside the object.
         As the mouse pointer moves over the line that represents the fill’s
         direction, a plus sign appears to indicate where the color is applied.
      6 Move existing colors by dragging them along the vector inside the object
        and delete them by right-clicking the color.


      Ÿ You can also adjust the color position for custom fountain fills by using the
        Node Position box on the Property Bar.


      To save a custom fountain fill
      1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
      2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Fountain Fill Dialog.
      3 Type a name for the new fountain fill in the Presets box.
      4 Click the Add button to save the custom fountain fill.
         New patterns are added to the pattern list and placed in alphabetical order.

      To remove a custom fountain fill
      1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.




218   CorelDRAW: Chapter 6
          2 Select the preset that you want to remove from the list.
          3 Click the Delete button.

Customizing fountain fills
          Customizing fountain fills can affect how they appear on screen and how they
          print. There are a number of ways to determine how fountain fills print and
          display. You can improve the appearance of fountain fills by controlling the
          printing, by adjusting the overall quality of the fountain fill, or by changing
          the default display.
          Printing proofs of a drawing with fountain fills can take less time if you
          reduce the number of steps the printer uses to create them. For information
          about setting fountain fill steps for printing see, “Printing” on page 679.
          You can also change a fountain fill’s color, center point, mid-point, angle,
          direction, and edge pad. These options vary depending on the type of
          fountain fill.

Changing a fountain fill’s quality
          When you create a fountain fill, the space required to blend the colors is
          divided by the number of fountain steps displayed in the Steps box. By
          default, CorelDRAW displays each object with the same number of fountain
          steps, making small objects seem more detailed than larger ones. Unlocking
          the Steps option overrides all other settings. You can then increase the
          number of steps used in larger objects, making them appear the same as fills
          displayed in smaller objects. The number of steps specified in the Fountain
          Fill dialog box overrides the number of steps in the Options and Print dialog
          boxes.

          To change the quality of a fountain fill
          1 Select a fountain fill object with the Pick tool.
          2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Fountain Fill Dialog.
          3 To unlock the Steps box, click the Padlock icon that appears to the right of
            the Steps box.
          4 Type a value in the Steps box to change the number of steps used to
            display and print the fountain fill.

          To change the quality of a fountain fill using the Property Bar
          1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Fill tool.
          2 Select a fountain fill.



                                                   Filling and outlining objects         219
                       3 On the Property Bar, click the Fountain Step Lock/Unlock button to unlock
                         the Steps box. (The Steps box is unlocked when the button appears
                         pressed.)
                       4 Type a value in the Fountain Step box to change the number of steps used
                         to display and print the fountain fill.


                       Ÿ When the Steps box is locked, the fill prints with the number of steps
                         specified in the Print dialog box and displays on screen with the number of
                         steps specified in the Options dialog box.


                       To change the default display of fountain fills
                       1 Click Tools, Options.
                       2 In the list of categories, click Workspace, Display.
                       3 Type the number of steps in the Preview Fountain Steps box.

Changing colors in a two-color fountain fill
                       Once you have created a two-color fountain fill, you can change the
                       appearance of a two-color fountain fill without altering its pattern. You can
                       change its appearance by changing the colors used to create the fountain fill.
                       When using the Fountain Fill dialog box, you can preview your fill in the
                       Preview window.
You can modify a
fountain fill’s
appearance by
changing the colors.




                       To change the colors of a two-color fountain fill
                       1 Select a two-color fountain fill with the Pick tool.
                       2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Fountain Fill Dialog.




220                    CorelDRAW: Chapter 6
3 Open the From color picker, and click a color for the start of the fountain
  fill’s color progression.
4 Open the To color picker, and click a color for the end of the fountain fill’s
  color progression.


Ÿ You can click the Other button to create or choose a custom color.


To change the colors of a two-color fountain fill using the
Interactive Fill tool
1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Fill tool.
2 Select a two-color fountain fill.
3 To change the color used for the start of the color progression, do one of
  the following:
   Ÿ Drag a color from the Color Palette to the start fill handle that appears
     at the beginning of the fountain fill.
   Ÿ Click the First Fill picker on the Property Bar, and click a color on the
     palette.
4 To change the color used for the end of the color progression, do one of
  the following:
   Ÿ Drag a color from the Color Palette to the end fill handle box that
     appears at the end of the fountain fill.
   Ÿ Click the Last Fill picker on the Property Bar, then click a color on the
     palette.

To mix colors in a two-color Fountain Fill using the mouse
1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
2 Hold down CTRL, and click a color from the on-screen Color Palette.
  Release the mouse button before releasing CTRL.
   You can apply a mix to a single color swatch by holding down CTRL and
   dragging a color from the Color Palette to a color swatch.


Ÿ To change the color of custom fountain fills see, “Creating and saving
  custom fountain fills” on page 217.




                                         Filling and outlining objects       221
Changing a fountain fill’s center point
                      Offsetting the center point horizontally or vertically lets you alter the
                      appearance of the fountain fill. Most fountain fills radiate from a point that
                      appears in the center of the fill. Radial and square fountain fills progress in a
                      series of concentric circles or squares from the center of the object outward.
                      Conical fountain fills progress in a circular path from the center of the object
                      outward. Linear fountain fills do not have a center point.
Adjusting the
center-point alters
the appearance of
radial, square and
conical fills.




                      To change the center point
                      1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                      2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Fountain Fill Dialog.
                      3 Choose the type of fountain fill you want from the Type list box.
                         You can choose a radial, conical, or square fountain fill.
                      4 Type a value in the Horizontal and Vertical boxes.


                      Ÿ Negative values shift the center point to the left; positive values shift the
                        center point to the right. For example, a value of -50% places the center
                        point on the left edge of the object; a value of 50% places the center point
                        on the right edge.


                      To change the center point using the mouse
                      1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Fill tool.
                      2 Select a fountain fill object.
                      3 Drag the start point of the vector inside the object to change the center of
                        the fill.




222                   CorelDRAW: Chapter 6
Changing a fountain fill’s mid-point
                        The mid-point is an imaginary line between two colors in a fountain fill. The
                        value of the mid-point represents its position in relation to two fountain fill
                        colors. By changing this value, you can set the point at which two colors in a
                        fountain fill converge.
Adjusting the
mid-point of a
fountain fill adjusts
the point at which
two colors in a
fountain fill
converge.




                        For example, in a two-color fountain fill using the colors black and white, a
                        value of 50 positions the mid-point in the center of the fill so that half of the
                        fill is black and half is white. Increasing the mid-point value to 99 results in a
                        fountain fill dominated by black. Decreasing the mid-point value to 1 results
                        in a fountain fill dominated by white.

                        To change the mid-point
                        1 Using the Pick tool, select a two-color fountain fill object.
                        2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Fountain Fill Dialog.
                        3 Move the Mid-point slider to change the start and end color proportions.

                        To change the mid-point using the Interactive Fill tool
                        1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Fill tool.
                        2 Select a two-color fountain fill object.
                        3 Move the Fountain Fill MidPoint slider on the Property Bar.

                        To change the mid-point using the mouse
                        1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
                        2 Drag the mid-point slider that appears inside the object.




                                                                 Filling and outlining objects        223
Changing a fountain fill’s angle
                       You can change the angle of linear, conical, and square fountain fills. Changing
                       the angle of gradation affects the slant of the fountain fill. Radial fountain fills
                       progress in a series of concentric circles, so you can’t change their angle.
Adjusting the angle
of gradation affects
the slant of linear,
conical, and square
fountain fills.




                       To change the angle
                       1 Using the Pick tool, select a fountain fill object.
                       2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Fountain Fill Dialog.
                       3 Type a value in the Angle box.

                       To change the angle using the Interactive Fill tool
                       1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Fill tool.
                       2 Select a fountain fill.
                       3 On the Property Bar, type a value in the top portion of the Fountain Fill
                         Angle and Edge Pad box, and press ENTER.


                       Ÿ Positive values rotate the fill counterclockwise; negative values rotate it
                         clockwise.


                       To change the angle using the mouse
                       1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
                       2 Drag one of the end point handles of the vector inside the object in a
                         circular direction.




224                    CorelDRAW: Chapter 6
Changing a fountain fill’s edge pad
                         You can change the edge pad of linear, radial, and square fountain fills. The
                         edge pad value determines how long the beginning and end colors remain
                         solid before they start blending with the next color in the fountain fill.
                         Conical fountain fills progress in rays, so you can’t change their edge pad.
Adjusting the edge
pad value determines
how long the
beginning and ending
colors remain as
solid colors before
they start blending
with the next color in
linear, radial, and
square fountain fills.




                         To change the fountain fill edge pad
                         1 Using the Pick tool, select a fountain fill object.
                         2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Fountain Fill Dialog.
                         3 Type a value in the Edge Pad box to set the amount of the fill taken up by
                           the progression’s beginning and end colors.

                         To change the edge pad using the Interactive Fill tool
                         1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Fill tool.
                         2 Select a fountain fill object.
                         3 On the Property Bar, type a value in the bottom portion of the Fountain
                           Fill Angle and Edge Pad box, and press ENTER.


                         Ÿ Higher values let the colors remain solid longer before blending, causing
                           the colors to spread more quickly. Lower values result in a smooth
                           transformation between the two colors.


                         To change the edge pad using the mouse
                         1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
                         2 Drag one of the end point handles of the vector inside the object in an
                           inward or outward direction.



                                                                  Filling and outlining objects      225
Working with PostScript textures
                         A PostScript texture is a texture fill designed using PostScript language.
                         Some textures are very complex, and large objects that contain PostScript
                         texture fills may take time to print or to update on screen. Therefore,
                         CorelDRAW represents PostScript fills on screen with the letters “PS,”
                         rather than the actual texture (unless you are in Enhanced view). You can
                         enable or disable the Show PostScript fills to display the fill.
Choose from a
variety of Postscript
texture fills included
with CorelDRAW.




                         For more information on viewing PostScript fill see, “Setting the view
                         quality” on page 76.

Applying a PostScript texture pattern
                         PostScript textures are fills that you can change by altering a set of variables.
                         These patterns don’t appear on screen. Instead, you see a pattern that
                         contains the letters “PS” (unless you are in Enhanced view).
                         You can use the PostScript Texture dialog box or the Interactive Fill tool to
                         apply PostScript texture fills. The PostScript Texture dialog box lets you
                         choose a texture, adjust options, and view the effects in the Preview window.
                         PostScript textures created in CorelDRAW can be exported in Encapsulated
                         PostScript (.EPS) format for use in other applications. For more information
                         see “Importing, exporting, and OLE” on page 743.

                         To apply a PostScript texture fill
                         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                         2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click PostScript Fill Dialog.
                         3 Choose a texture from the list.
                         4 In the Parameters section, adjust the various settings to customize the
                           texture as required.




226                      CorelDRAW: Chapter 6
          5 Enable the Preview Fill check box to preview the texture with the current
            settings.
          6 Click the Refresh button to update the image.

          To apply a PostScript texture fill using the Interactive Fill tool
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
          2 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Fill tool.
          3 On the Property Bar, choose PostScript Fill from the Fill Type list box.
          4 Choose a texture from the PostScript Fill Textures list box.


          Ÿ The settings listed in the Parameters section of the PostScript Texture
            dialog box vary depending on the type of PostScript texture fill you
            choose.


Working with pattern fills
          In CorelDRAW you can choose from a two-color, full-color, or bitmap pattern
          fill. A two-color pattern is a simple picture composed of only “on” and “off”
          pixels. The only colors included in the bitmap are the two that you assign. A
          full-color pattern is a picture composed of lines and fills, instead of dots of
          color like a bitmap. These vector graphics are smoother and more complex
          than bitmap images and are easier to manipulate. A bitmap pattern is a
          regular color picture (like you might get with an electronic photograph).
          These bitmaps vary in complexity, and it is best to use less complex bitmaps
          for fill patterns, because complex ones are memory-intensive and slow to
          display. The complexity of a bitmap is determined by its size, resolution, and
          bit depth.
          CorelDRAW provides preset pattern fills. You can also create a pattern using
          the Bitmap Pattern Editor, or import your own 1-bit bitmap.

Applying a two-color pattern fill
          You can fill an object with a pattern composed of repeating bitmap images.
          CorelDRAW provides a collection of black-and-white bitmap patterns that
          you can use as is or customize. You can set the foreground and background of
          a pattern and change the size of the tiles. Using the Interactive Fill tool in
          conjunction with the Property Bar, you can apply two-color pattern fills
          quickly, as well as mix the colors in the pattern.




                                                   Filling and outlining objects     227
Choose from a
variety of two-color
pattern fills included
with CorelDRAW.




                         To apply a two-color pattern fill
                         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                         2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Pattern Fill Dialog.
                         3 Enable the 2-color button.
                         4 Click the Pattern picker, and click the pattern.
                         5 Open the Front color picker, and click a color for the bitmap pattern’s
                           foreground.
                         6 Open the Back color picker, and click a color for the bitmap pattern’s
                           background.

                         To apply a two-color pattern fill using the Interactive Fill tool
                         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                         2 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Fill tool.
                         3 On the Property Bar, choose Pattern Fill from the Fill Type list box.
                         4 Click the Two-color Bitmap Pattern Fill button.
                         5 Click the First Fill picker, and click a pattern you want from the list.
                         6 Open the Front Color picker, and click a color for the bitmap pattern’s
                           foreground.
                         7 Open the Back Color picker, and click a color for the bitmap pattern’s
                           background.

                         To mix colors in a two-color pattern fill using the Color Palette
                         1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Fill tool.




228                      CorelDRAW: Chapter 6
                        2 Select a two-color pattern fill.
                        3 Hold down CTRL, and click a color on the Color Palette. Release the
                          mouse button before you release CTRL.

Applying a full-color pattern fill
                        You can fill objects with a pattern composed of repeating vector images.
                        CorelDRAW provides a large selection of full-color pattern fills that you can
                        use.
Choose from a
variety of full-color
pattern fill included
with CorelDRAW.




                        To apply a full-color pattern fill
                        1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                        2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Pattern Fill Dialog.
                        3 Enable the Full Color button.
                        4 Click the Pattern picker, and click a pattern from the list.

                        To apply a full-color pattern fill using the Interactive Fill tool
                        1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                        2 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Fill tool.
                        3 On the Property Bar, choose Pattern Fill from the Fill Type list box.
                        4 Click the Full-color Pattern Fill button.
                        5 Click the First Fill picker, and click a pattern from the list.

Applying a bitmap pattern fill
                        You can fill objects with a pattern composed of repeating bitmap images.
                        CorelDRAW provides a large selection of bitmap pattern fills that you can use
                        as is or customize.



                                                                  Filling and outlining objects    229
Choose from a
variety of bitmap
pattern fills included
with CorelDRAW.




                         To apply a bitmap pattern fill
                         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                         2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Pattern Fill Dialog.
                         3 Enable the Bitmap button.
                         4 Click the Pattern picker, and click a pattern from the list.

                         To apply a bitmap pattern fill using the Interactive Fill tool
                         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                         2 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Fill tool.
                         3 On the Property Bar, choose Pattern Fill from the Fill Type list box.
                         4 Click the Bitmap Pattern Fill button.
                         5 Click the First Fill picker, and click a pattern from the list.

Creating a two-color pattern fill
                         You can create your own pattern from scratch. New patterns are added to the
                         end of the list of preset patterns.

                         To create a two-color pattern fill
                         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                         2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Pattern Fill Dialog.
                         3 Enable the 2-color button.
                         4 Click the Create button.
                         5 To set the resolution of a pattern, enable one of the following Bitmap Size
                           buttons:



230                      CorelDRAW: Chapter 6
            Ÿ 16 X 16 — changes the resolution of the Edit Grid to 16 x 16 squares
            Ÿ 32 X 32 — changes the resolution of the Edit Grid to 32 x 32 squares
            Ÿ 64 X 64 — changes the resolution of the Edit Grid to 64 x 64 squares
         6 To determine how many squares in the drawing area are filled when you
           click with the mouse, enable one of the following buttons:
            Ÿ 1 X 1 — changes the pen size to a 1-grid square
            Ÿ 2 X 2 — changes the pen size to a 2 x 2 square
            Ÿ 4 X 4 — changes the pen size to a 4 x 4 square
            Ÿ 8 X 8 — changes the pen size to an 8 x 8 square
         7 To create a pattern, do one or both of the following:
            Ÿ Click with the left mouse button over the grid to fill squares.
            Ÿ Click with the right mouse button over the grid to erase squares.

Creating a pattern fill using the Create Pattern command
         You can create two-color and full-color pattern fills based on an area in your
         drawing using the Create Pattern command. CorelDRAW lets you marquee
         select an area, which then becomes a pattern fill.

         To create a two-color pattern using the Create Pattern command
         1 Click Tools, Create, Pattern.
         2 Enable the Two-Color button.
         3 Specify a resolution by enabling one of the following buttons:
            Ÿ Low — creates a low-resolution, two-color pattern
            Ÿ Medium — creates a medium-resolution, two-color pattern
            Ÿ High — creates a high-resolution, two-color pattern
         4 Click OK. The cursor changes to cross hairs.
         5 Drag a marquee box around the graphic or area of the graphic that you
           want to make into a pattern.
            The new pattern appears at the bottom of the Pattern picker list.

         To create a full-color pattern using the Create Pattern command
         1 Click Tools, Create, Pattern.
         2 Enable the Full Color button.



                                                Filling and outlining objects        231
          3 Click OK. The cursor changes to cross hairs.
          4 Drag a marquee box around the graphic or area of the graphic that you
            want to make into a pattern.
          5 Click OK in the Create Pattern message box.
          6 Type a name for the pattern in the File Name box, and click the Save
            button.
             The new pattern appears at the bottom of the Pattern picker list.


          Ÿ You can also access the Create Pattern dialog box by clicking the Select
            Pattern button on the Property Bar.


Importing pattern fills
          You can import a graphic to use as a pattern fill. Imported patterns are added
          to the end of the list of preset patterns. The graphic is then tiled to form a
          pattern in a path to which it is applied.

          To create a pattern fill from an imported image
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
          2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Pattern Fill Dialog.
          3 Enable one of the following buttons:
             Ÿ Two-Color
             Ÿ Full Color
             Ÿ Bitmap
          4 Click the Load button.
          5 Choose the file that you want to import from the Import dialog box, and
            click Import.

Removing a pattern fill
          You may want to remove a pattern fill to conserve disk space or to shorten
          the list of two-color, full-color, or bitmap pattern fills.

          To remove a pattern fill
          1 Select a pattern filled object with the Pick tool.
          2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Pattern Fill Dialog.


232       CorelDRAW: Chapter 6
                           3 Enable one of the following buttons:
                              Ÿ Two-color
                              Ÿ Full-color
                              Ÿ Bitmap
                           4 Click the Pattern picker, and click the pattern you want to remove from
                             the list.
                           5 Click the Delete button.

Working with texture fills
                           A texture fill is a random, fractally-generated fill that you can use to give
                           your objects a natural appearance. Texture fills increase the size of a file and
                           the time it takes to print. Therefore, you may want to use these fills
                           sparingly, especially with larger objects.
Choose from a
variety of texture fills
included with
CorelDRAW.




                           You can use colors from any color model or palette for texture fills. Since
                           texture fills can only hold RGB colors, however, this can cause a color shift
                           when you display or print the files.

                           Corel TEXTURE™
                           Corel TEXTURE™ lets you design bitmap texture fills and modify preset
                           textures. You can recreate the natural textures of wood, clouds, stone,
                           ripples, waves, and wrinkles, or create artificial patterns such as checkers,
                           dots, lines, and swirls. Corel TEXTURE lets you control lighting, design,
                           color combinations, and gradations. The Texture wizard guides you through
                           the process, or you can start with a blank texture.


                                                                   Filling and outlining objects        233
Applying a texture fill
          Texture fills are fills that look like clouds, water, gravel, minerals, and other
          natural and artificial substances. CorelDRAW provides preset textures, and
          each texture has a set of options that you can change. The Texture Fill dialog
          box and the Interactive Fill tool let you apply texture fills and create custom
          textures.

          To apply a texture fill
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
          2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Texture Fill Dialog.
          3 Choose the library containing the texture you want from the Texture
            Library list box.
          4 Choose a texture from the Texture list box.
             The Preview window in the dialog box displays the fill attributes that are
             assigned to the selected object.
          5 Adjust the style options to customize the texture as required.
          6 Click the Options button to adjust the bitmap resolution and texture size.


          Ÿ Click the Preview button to see the results of your modifications.


          To apply a texture fill using the Interactive Fill tool
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
          2 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Fill tool.
          3 On the Property Bar, choose Texture Fill from the Fill Type list box.
          4 Choose the library containing the texture from the Texture Library list.
          5 Click the First Fill picker, and click a texture from the list.
          6 Click the Texture Options button to adjust the bitmap resolution and
            texture size limit.
          7 Click the Regenerate Texture button to regenerate the texture fill.

Creating, saving, and deleting custom texture fills
          When you create a custom texture fill, you can save it to use it again. You
          can’t save or overwrite textures in the Styles library. You can, however,
          modify a texture in the Styles library and save it to another library.



234       CorelDRAW: Chapter 6
           To create a custom texture fill
           1 Select a texture fill with the Pick tool.
           2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Texture Fill Dialog.
           3   Modify the texture settings in the Texture Style Name section. Use the
               Preview button to view your changes before saving a custom texture fill.

           To save a custom texture fill
           1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
           2 Click the Add button.
           3 Type a name in the Texture Name box.
           4 Do one of the following to specify the Library Name:
               Ÿ From the Library Name List, choose a sample library in which you
                 want to save the texture.
               Ÿ Type the name of a new library in the Library Name box.

           To delete a custom texture fill
           1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the “To create a custom texture fill” procedure.
           2 Select a Texture Library from the list.
           3 Select the Texture you want to delete from the Texture List box.
           4 Click the Delete button.

Customizing pattern and texture fills
           You can rotate, skew, adjust the tile size, and change the center of the pattern
           or texture to create a custom fill. You can adjust the pattern or texture fill
           using the on-screen fill tiling vector. The Transform Fill With Object option
           lets you perform transform an object and fill simultaneously.

Changing a fill’s tile size
           You can change the dimensions of the pattern or texture tile used to fill an
           object. Decreasing the size of a pattern or texture tile, increases the pattern
           or texture density. You can resize a pattern fill or texture fill manually using
           the tiling handles, or more precisely, using the dialog box.




                                                   Filling and outlining objects        235
You can change the
appearance of your
tile by adjusting the
size.




                        To change the size of pattern tiles
                        1 Select the pattern fill with the Pick tool.
                        2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Pattern Fill Dialog.
                        3 In the Size section, type a value in the Width and Height box.

                        To change the size of pattern tiles using the Interactive Fill tool
                        1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Fill tool.
                        2 Select the pattern fill.
                        3 On the Property Bar, type a value in the top and bottom portion of the Edit
                          Tiling of Pattern box, and press ENTER.


                        Ÿ To change the size of pattern tiles quickly, enable the Small (25% of width
                          and height or 4x4), Medium (50% of width and height or 2x2), or Large
                          (100% of width and height or 1 tile) buttons on the Property Bar.


                        To change the size of texture tiles
                        1 Select the texture fill with the Pick tool.
                        2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Texture Fill Dialog.
                        3 Click the Tiling button.
                        4 In the Size section, type a value in the Width and Height box.

                        To change the tile size interactively
                        1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Fill tool.




236                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 6
           2 Select the pattern or texture fill.
           3 To size the pattern, drag the square handles of the tiling vector.

Setting a fill’s tile origin
           Setting the tile origin in a pattern fill or texture fill, lets you specify exactly
           where the patterns or textures begin. When you adjust the horizontal or
           vertical position of the first pattern or texture, relative to the top of the
           object, your adjustments affect the rest of the tile. The Preview window in
           the dialog boxes reflects the changes of any offset.

           To set the tile origin of a pattern
           1 Select the pattern fill with the Pick tool.
           2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Pattern Fill Dialog.
           3 In the Origin section, type a value in the X box to set the amount of
             horizontal offset.
           4 In the Origin section, type a value in the Y box to set the amount of
             vertical offset.

           To set the tile origin of a texture
           1 Select the texture fill with the Pick tool.
           2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Texture Fill Dialog.
           3 Click the Tiling button.
           4 Follow steps 3 and 4 from the previous procedure.


           Ÿ Increasing the value in the X box moves the tile to the right; decreasing
             the value moves the tile to the left. Increasing the value in the Y box
             moves the tile down; decreasing the value moves the tile up.


           To set the tile origin interactively
           1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Fill tool.
           2 Select the pattern or texture fill.
           3 Drag the center handle of the tiling vector that appears on the object to the
             location that you want to set as the origin.




                                                     Filling and outlining objects         237
Rotating a fill
                        You can rotate a pattern fill or texture fill to change the appearance of the tile.
                        You can rotate a pattern or texture fill using the Interactive Fill tool or by
                        adjusting the rotation settings in the dialog boxes.
You can change the
appearance of your
tile by adjusting the
rotation angle.




                        To rotate a pattern fill
                        1 Select the pattern fill with the Pick tool.
                        2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Pattern Fill Dialog.
                        3 In the Transform section, type an angle value in the Rotate box.

                        To rotate a texture fill
                        1 Select the texture fill with the Pick tool.
                        2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Texture Fill Dialog.
                        3 Click the Tiling button.
                        4 In the Transform section, type an angle value in the Rotate box.

                        To rotate a pattern or texture fill using the Interactive Fill tool
                        1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Fill tool.
                        2 Select the pattern or texture fill.
                        3 Drag the circular rotation handle on the tiling vector and rotate the pattern
                          in a clockwise or counterclockwise direction.

Skewing a fill
                        You can skew or slant a pattern fill or texture fill. CorelDRAW lets you skew
                        a pattern or texture fill using the Interactive Fill tool or by adjusting the
                        settings in the dialog boxes.



238                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 6
You can adjust the
appearance of your
tile by adjusting the
skew angle.




                        To skew a pattern fill
                        1 Select the pattern fill with the Pick tool.
                        2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Pattern Fill Dialog.
                        3 In the Transform section, type an angle value in the Skew box.

                        To skew a texture fill
                        1 Select the texture fill with the Pick tool.
                        2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Texture Fill Dialog.
                        3 Click the Tiling button.
                        4 In the Transform section, type an angle value in the Skew box.

                        To skew a pattern or texture fill using the Interactive Fill tool
                        1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Fill tool.
                        2 Select the pattern or texture fill.
                        3 To skew, drag one of the square skew handles on the tiling vector.

Setting the transform fill option
                        The Transform Fill With Object option lets you rotate, scale and skew a
                        pattern or texture fill while transforming an object.

                        To set the pattern Transform Fill With Object option
                        1 Select the pattern fill with the Pick tool.
                        2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Pattern Fill Dialog.
                        3 Enable the Transform Fill With Object check box.




                                                                 Filling and outlining objects     239
           To set the texture Transform Fill With Object option
           1 Select the texture fill with the Pick tool.
           2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Texture Fill Dialog.
           3 Click the Tiling button.
           4 Enable the Transform Fill With Object check box.

           To set the Transform Fill With Object option using the Property
           Bar
           1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Fill tool.
           2 Select the pattern or texture fill.
           3 On the Property Bar, click the Transform Fill With Object button.

Offsetting tiles of a fill
           Offsetting the tiles in a pattern fill or texture fill, lets you specify exactly
           where the patterns or textures begin. When you adjust the horizontal or
           vertical position of the first pattern or texture, relative to the top of the
           object, your adjustment affects the rest of the pattern or texture. The
           Preview window reflects the changes of any offset.

           To offset rows or columns of pattern tiles
           1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
           2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Pattern Fill Dialog.
           3 In the Row or column offset section, do one of the following:
              Ÿ To offset rows, enable the Row button.
              Ÿ To offset columns, enable the Column button.
           4 Type the amount of offset in the % Of Tile Size box.

           To offset rows or columns of texture tiles
           1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
           2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Texture Fill Dialog.
           3 Click the Tiling button.
           4 Follow steps 3 and 4 from the previous procedure.




240        CorelDRAW: Chapter 6
Creating Mesh Fill objects
         Using a mesh object lets you create unique effects by adjusting many of the
         fill properties. You can define the mesh object by specifying a grid and its
         intersecting points. Unique effects result from manipulating the nodes that
         comprise the grid. Using the node editing features of CorelDRAW you can
         also modify the node type, reduce the number of nodes, or add and remove
         nodes from the mesh object.

Creating a mesh object
         You can create a mesh object that meets your needs. Using the Interactive
         Mesh Fill tool you can apply a mesh object to simple objects, curves, and
         bitmaps. When you apply a mesh to an object the object is converted to a
         mesh fill object.

         To create a mesh object
         1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Mesh Fill tool.
         2 On the Property Bar, type the number of columns in the top portion of the
           Grid Size box, and press ENTER.
         3 On the Property Bar, type the number of rows in the bottom portion of the
           Grid Size box, and press ENTER.
         4 Using the shape cursor, adjust the nodes in the grid to create the desired
           mesh.


         Ÿ You can apply a mesh fill to closed objects only.
         Ÿ When an object is complex you need to PowerClip the objects into a grid
           mesh. For more information see “Working with PowerClip” on page 526.


Editing a mesh object
         Using the Interactive Mesh Fill tool you can edit the grid by adding and
         removing nodes.

         To add a node to a mesh object
         1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Mesh Fill tool.
         2 Select the mesh fill object.
         3 Click on a grid line where you want to add a node.
         4 Hold down SHIFT, and double-click using the shape cursor.


                                                 Filling and outlining objects           241
         To add an intersection point to a mesh object
         1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
         2 Click on the mesh where you want to add an intersection node.
         3 Click the Add Node(s) button on the Property Bar.


         Ÿ You can also double-click in a mesh to add intersection nodes.


         To remove nodes to a mesh object
         1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the “To add a node to a mesh object” procedure.
         2 Click on the node or intersection node that you want to delete.
         3 Click the Delete Node(s) button on the Property Bar.


         Ÿ You can also double-click a node or intersection node to delete it.


Copying a mesh
         You can copy a mesh from one object to another in the Drawing Window.

         To copy a mesh from another object
         1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Mesh Fill tool.
         2 Select the object you want to copy a mesh to.
         3 Click the Copy Mesh Fill Properties From button on the Property Bar
         4 Select the object that you want to copy the mesh from.


         Ÿ CorelDRAW copies the number of rows and columns as well as the
           intersection point colors to the new object. When you copy a mesh
           CorelDRAW tries to duplicate the mesh as closely as possible.


Adding color to a mesh object
         You can add color to individual nodes or to patch in a mesh object.




242      CorelDRAW: Chapter 6
Creating a mesh
object lets you blend
colors in a grid.




                        To add color to an intersection node in a mesh object
                        1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Mesh Fill tool.
                        2 Select an intersection node.
                        3 Click a color from the Color Palette.

                        To mix a color in a mesh object
                        1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Mesh Fill tool.
                        2 Hold down CTRL and click a color from the Color Palette.


                        Ÿ You can also drag a color from the on-screen Color Palette on to an
                          intersection node.
                        Ÿ You can also marquee select nodes to apply a color to an entire area of the
                          mesh. For more information see, “Selecting nodes and segments” on page
                          118.


                        To add color to a patch in a mesh object
                        1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Mesh Fill tool.
                        2 Drag a color from the Color Palette to a patch in the mesh object.




                                                                Filling and outlining objects           243
Shaping and adjusting a mesh object
                      You can shape a mesh object to create unique fill effect. You can modify the
                      appearance of the mesh by adjusting the position of the nodes and
                      intersection nodes. You can also transform a mesh object using the
                      transformation tools. For more information see, “Transforming objects” on
                      page 261.
You can shape a
mesh by adjusting
the intersection or
outline nodes.




                      To shape a mesh by the intersection node
                      1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Mesh Fill tool.
                      2 Using the shape cursor, select an intersection node on the outline of the
                        object.
                      3 Drag the node to a new location.

                      To adjust a node vertically
                      1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Mesh Fill tool.
                      2 Using the shape cursor, select a node on a vertical grid line.
                      3 Drag the node vertically.

                      To adjust a node horizontally
                      1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Mesh Fill tool.
                      2 Using the shape cursor, select a node on a horizontal grid line.
                      3 Drag the node horizontally.



244                   CorelDRAW: Chapter 6
         To adjust an intersection node
         1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Mesh Fill tool.
         2 Using the shape cursor, select an intersection node.
         3 Drag the node to a new position.


         Ÿ When you drag intersection points from inside the mesh towards the
           outside of the object no fill is applied.
         Ÿ If the mesh object contains color, adjusting the intersection nodes within
           the mesh blends the colors.
         Ÿ You can also set the outline properties for a mesh object. For more
           information, see “Outlining objects” on page 246.



         Ÿ You can also marquee select nodes to shape an entire area of the mesh.


Changing the node and segment type
         Using the node and segment properties you can change the type nodes or
         segments that make up the mesh grid. You can also adjust the curve
         smoothness slider to reduce the amount of nodes between the intersection
         points.

         To change the node type
         1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Mesh Fill tool.
         2 Using the shape cursor, select a node.
         3 Enable one of the following buttons on the Property Bar:
            Ÿ Cusp — makes the node a cusp node which have independent control
              points. A curve that passes through a cusp node can bend at a sharp
              angle.
            Ÿ Smooth — makes a node smooth which have control points always
              directly opposite each other. Smooth nodes produce a smooth
              transition between line segments.
            Ÿ Symmetrical — makes a symmetrical node which have control points
              always directly opposite each other. Also, the control points are always
              equal lengths. Symmetrical nodes produce the same curvature on both
              sides of the node.




                                                 Filling and outlining objects       245
        To change the segment type
        1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Mesh Fill tool.
        2 Using the shape cursor, select a node.
        3 Enable one of the following buttons on the Property Bar:
           Ÿ Convert Curve To Line — makes a segment straight
           Ÿ Convert Line To Curve — makes a segment curved

        To change the curve smoothness
        1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Mesh Fill tool.
        2 Using the shape cursor, marquee select the intersection nodes.
        3 Click the Curve Smoothing box on the Property Bar, and adjust the
          Smoothness slider.


        Ÿ Moving the slider to the right, reduces the number of nodes between
          intersection points.


Removing a mesh
        You can remove a mesh from an object. When you remove a mesh the object
        remains a curve and has all the same properties as other curve objects.

        To remove a mesh
        1 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Mesh Fill tool.
        2 Select a mesh fill object.
        3 Click the Clear Mesh button on the Property Bar.


Outlining objects
        You can change the size, shape, and color of outlines. Lines or objects with
        open paths can have ends that are rounded, square, cropped, or tipped with
        arrowheads and other line-ending shapes. Objects with closed paths (e.g.,
        squares and polygons) do not have end-points, but you can choose from
        pointed, rounded, or truncated corners.




246     CorelDRAW: Chapter 6
Working with outlines
          An outline is the area that surrounds an object. When you create an object,
          CorelDRAW gives it a default outline that is a black solid fill. You can specify
          the outline’s color as well as set its width and style.

Applying outline colors
          You can change the color of an outline to create a contrast to the object’s fill
          color. Applying an outline using the Outline Color dialog box lets you
          exercise more control over the outline color. Applying an outline using the
          Outline Pen dialog box lets you set the outline thickness, style and corner
          shape. To color an outline quickly you can use the on-screen Color Palette.
          To select a color from a specific color model, see “Working with color” on
          page 303.

          To apply an outline color using the Outline Color dialog box
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
          2 Open the Outline Tool flyout, and click Outline Color Dialog.
          3 Choose a color model from the Model list.
          4 Click a color from the Color Bar and from the visual selector.


          Ÿ You can also enter the color components of a color on the Property Bar.


          To apply an outline color using the Outline Pen dialog box
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
          2 Open the Outline Tool flyout, and click Outline Pen Dialog.
          3 Open the Color picker, and click a color in the Color Palette.


          Ÿ You can also click the Other button to create or choose a custom color.


          To apply an outline color using the Color Palette
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
          2 Right-click a color from the Color Palette.




                                                    Filling and outlining objects      247
                         Ÿ You can also drag a color from the Color Palette to the object’s edge. As
                           the mouse pointer moves over the object, it changes shape to show where
                           the color will be applied.


Converting outlines to objects
                         You can convert an outline to an object which lets you apply a fill to an
                         outline. When you use thick outlines, the fill can continue through to the
                         outer edge of the object, including the outline. When an outline is converted,
                         it acquires all the properties of any object.
Converting outline to
an object lets you
apply fill and outline
properties.




                         To convert an outline to an object
                         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                         2 Click Arrange, Convert Outline To Object.


                         Ÿ You can only convert objects that have an outline.
                         Ÿ If the Behind Fill option is enabled, the outline object appears behind the
                           original object.


Adjusting an outline’s width
                         The width of an outline determines the thickness of the line in points.
                         Changing the thickness of an object’s outline changes the appearance of the
                         object.

                         To adjust the outline width
                         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.




248                      CorelDRAW: Chapter 6
                        2 Open the Outline Tool flyout, and click Outline Pen Dialog.
                        3 Type the new line width in the Width box.

                        To adjust the outline width using the Interactive Fill tool
                        1 Click the object with the Pick tool.
                        2 Open the Interactive Fill flyout, and click the Interactive Fill tool.
                        3 On the Property Bar, type a width in the Outline Width list.


                        Ÿ A number of preset outline widths are also available from the Outline Tool
                          flyout. Options include: Hairline, 1/2 Point, 2 Point (Thin), 8 Point
                          (Medium), 16 Point (Medium-Thick), and 24 Point (Thick).


Setting the corner shape
                        Setting the corner shape changes the appearance of lines and curves,
                        especially if the object has a very thick line weight or the object is
                        particularly small.
Choose one of the
Corner Styles:
Bevelled, Rounded, or
Mitered corners.




                        To set an object’s corner shape
                        1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                        2 Open the Outline Tool flyout, and click Outline Pen Dialog.
                        3 Enable one of the following Corner Style buttons:
                           Ÿ Mitered Corners
                           Ÿ Beveled Corners
                           Ÿ Rounded Corners




                                                                  Filling and outlining objects    249
Setting the line cap style
                      The line cap style affects the appearance of the endpoints of open paths.
                      Setting the line cap shape to Rounded or Extended makes the line slightly
                      longer.
Choose one of the
Line Cap Styles:
Square, Rounded, or
Extended corners.




                      To set an object’s line cap style
                      1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                      2 Open the Outline Tool flyout, and click Outline Pen Dialog.
                      3 Enable one of the following Line Caps Style buttons:
                         Ÿ Square Line Caps
                         Ÿ Rounded Line Caps
                         Ÿ Extended Square Line Caps

Choosing and editing a line style
                      CorelDRAW comes with many different line styles. Line styles are preset
                      lines that have different attributes, such as dotted lines, or dashed lines.
                      Applying a line style does not change the shape of the line or the amount of
                      space it occupies. You can edit an existing line style to meet your needs.

                      To choose a line style
                      1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                      2 Open the Outline Tool flyout, and click Outline Pen Dialog.
                      3 Choose a line style from the Line Style selector.




250                   CorelDRAW: Chapter 6
                         Ÿ You can also choose a line style from the Outline Style Selector on the
                           Property Bar.


                         To edit a line style
                         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                         2 Open the Outline Tool flyout, and click Outline Pen Dialog.
                         3 Click the Edit Style button.
                         4 Adjust the line end by moving the bar to the right.
                         5 Click the squares to turn dots on or off.
                         6 Click the Add button to add the line style to the bottom of the list.
                         7 Click the Replace button to replace a style that was previously added to
                           the list.

Creating calligraphic outlines
                         You can give an object a hand-drawn look using Calligraphy settings. By
                         adjusting these settings, you can vary the thickness of an object’s outline.
Calligraphy settings
let you give an object
a hand-drawn
appearance by
varying the thickness
of its outline.




                         To create a calligraphic outline
                         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                         2 Open the Outline Tool flyout, and click Outline Pen Dialog.
                         3 Enable one of the Corner Style buttons. The first and third options make
                           the nib square; the second option makes it round.
                         4 Type a value in the Stretch box.
                            Reducing the value makes square nibs rectangular and round nibs oval,
                            creating more pronounced calligraphic effects.



                                                                   Filling and outlining objects     251
                        5 Type a value in the Angle box.
                           The angle controls the orientation of the pen in relation to the drawing
                           surface.


                        Ÿ You can also adjust the Stretch and Angle values by dragging in the
                          Preview box.
                        Ÿ You can also modify line widths after creating the calligraphic outline by
                          changing the value in the Width box.


Using the Behind Fill option
                        Use the Behind Fill option to apply an outline to a stylized font such as a
                        script font. Normally, outlines are applied after the fill is applied. Half of the
                        outline lies inside the object, while the other half lies outside the object.
                        When you enable the Behind Fill check box, the outline is drawn first, then
                        the fill is placed on top of the outline. Consequently, half of the outline is
                        covered by the fill.
The Behind Fill
option allows you to
apply an outline to a
stylized font.




                        To enable the Behind Fill option
                        1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                        2 Open the Outline Tool flyout, and click Outline Pen Dialog.
                        3 Enable the Behind Fill check box.

Using the Scaling With Image option
                        Scaling an image specifies whether the thickness of the object’s outline
                        remains the same or changes in proportion to the object’s size. If the Scale
                        With Image check box is enabled, the outline thickness increases when you
                        enlarge the object (by scaling or stretching) and decreases when you make
                        the object smaller.


252                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 6
Scaling an image
determines whether
the outline thickness
remains the same or
scales with the
image.




                        To enable the Scale With Image option
                        1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                        2 Open the Outline Tool flyout, and click Outline Pen Dialog.
                        3 Enable the Scale With Image check box.

Setting the miter limit
                        When two lines meet at a sharp angle and form a spike that extends beyond
                        the intersection of the lines, the miter limit controls when the application
                        switches from a mitered (pointed) join to a beveled (squared-off) joint.
Setting the miter
limit determines the
end shape of two
intersecting lines.




                        To set the miter limit
                        1 Click Tools, Options.
                        2 In the list of categories, click Workspace, Edit.
                        3 Type a value from 5 and 45 degrees in the Miter Limit box.




                                                                  Filling and outlining objects   253
                         Ÿ Any corner that is less than the Miter Limit will have a beveled
                           (squared-off) point. Corner joints above the limit will come to a mitered
                           (sharp) point. This limit prevents corners from extending far beyond the
                           actual corner at small angles, such as when a text character comes to a
                           spike, for example, in the letter “M.”


Removing outlines
                         You can remove an object’s outline quickly using the Color Palette or the
                         Outline Tool flyout.

                         To remove an object’s outline using the Color Palette
                         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                         2 Right-click No Color on the Color Palette.

                         To remove an object’s outline using the Outline Tool flyout
                         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                         2 Open the Outline Tool flyout, and click No Outline.

Applying and editing line-ending shapes
                         Line-ending shapes let you design the start or end point of a curve object.You
                         can apply, edit, or create arrowheads using the Edit Arrowhead dialog box.
                         New line-ending shapes are added to the top of the list of line styles.

Applying line-ending shapes
                         You can apply arrowheads and other line-ending shapes to the ends of an
                         open path.
Choose from a
variety of line-ending
shapes included with
CorelDRAW.




254                      CorelDRAW: Chapter 6
         To apply line-ending shapes using the Outline Pen dialog box
         1 Select a line or curve with the Pick tool.
         2 Open the Outline Tool flyout, and click Outline Pen Dialog.
         3 Click the left Arrowhead selector, and choose the shape you want for the
           start of the line.
         4 Click the right Arrowhead selector, and choose the shape you want for the
           end of the line.

         To apply line-ending shapes using the Property Bar
         1 Select a line or curve with the Pick tool.
         2 Click the Start Arrowhead selector on the Property Bar, and choose the
           shape you want for the start of the line.
         3 Click the End Arrowhead selector on the Property Bar, and choose the
           shape you want for the end of the line.
            Use the Outline Style selector to select another outline style.

Switching line-ending shapes
         If you change the direction of a line or curve, you can switch arrowheads
         from one end of the line to the other. You can also remove the arrowheads
         from the end of a line or curve.

         To switch arrowheads from one end of the line to another
         1 Select a line or curve with the Pick tool.
         2 Open the Outline Tool flyout, and click Outline Pen Dialog.
         3 Click one of the Arrowhead selectors, and choose the shape you want for
           the line.
         4 Click Options, Swap.

         To remove an arrowhead
         1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
         2 Click Options, None.

Creating line-ending shapes
         You can create your arrowhead or other line-ending shape. New arrows
         appear on the Property Bar, at the bottom of the arrowhead list in the Outline
         Pen dialog box.


                                                Filling and outlining objects     255
          The arrow you create can be any size — you can adjust the size later using
          the Edit Arrowhead dialog box. The number of arrowheads is limited to 100.
          If you already have this many and want to create new ones, you must first
          delete some of the existing ones. If the arrowhead consists of more than one
          object, you must combine all objects using the Combine or Weld command.

          To create arrowheads and other line-ending shapes using the
          Create Arrow command
          1 Draw an arrowhead.
             The arrowhead shape assumes the fill and outline attributes of the line to
             which it is applied.
          2 Click the arrowhead shape with the Pick tool.
          3 Click Tools, Create, Arrow.
             The new arrowhead appears at the bottom of the Arrowhead selector.

          To create arrowheads using the Outline Pen dialog box
          1 Open the Outline Tool flyout, and click Outline Pen Dialog.
          2 In the arrowhead section, click Options, New.
          3 Drag the side handles along the arrowhead’s box to stretch vertically or
            horizontally, or drag the corner handles to change the size of the
            arrowhead.
          4 Drag the hollow nodes along the arrowhead’s outline.


          Ÿ To get a closer view of the arrowhead, enable the 4X Zoom check box.


Editing line-ending shapes
          When you apply an arrowhead to a path, its size is determined by the
          thickness of the path’s outline. When you increase the thickness, the
          arrowhead size increases proportionately. To create a larger arrowhead
          without changing the outline of the path to stretch the arrowhead. You can
          also adjust the arrowhead’s position relative to the end of the path, center the
          arrowhead, or flip it horizontally or vertically.

          To stretch an arrowhead or line-ending shape
          1 Select a line or curve with the Pick tool.
          2 Open the Outline Tool flyout, and click Outline Pen Dialog.


256       CorelDRAW: Chapter 6
         3 Under the arrowhead you want to edit, click Options, Edit.
         4 Drag the side handles along the arrowhead’s box to stretch vertically or
           horizontally, or drag the corner handles to change the size of the
           arrowhead.

         To move an arrowhead or line-ending shape
         1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
         2 Drag the hollow nodes along the arrowhead’s outline.

         To center an arrowhead or line-ending shape
         1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the “To stretch an arrowhead or line-ending
           shape” procedure.
         2 Do one of the following:
            Ÿ Click the Center In X button to center the arrowhead vertically on the
              line. The letter “X” refers to the horizontal axis.
            Ÿ Click the Center In Y button to center the arrowhead horizontally on
              the line. The letter “Y” refers to the vertical axis.

         To flip an arrowhead
         1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the “To stretch an arrowhead or line-ending
           shape” procedure.
         2 Do one of the following:
            Ÿ Click the Reflect In X button to flip the arrowhead vertically on the
              line. The letter “X” refers to the horizontal axis.
            Ÿ Click the Reflect In Y button to flip the arrowhead horizontally on the
              line. The letter “Y” refers to the vertical axis.

Deleting line-ending shapes
         You can delete arrowheads or line-ending shapes.

         To delete arrowheads or line-ending shapes
         1 Select a line or curve with the Pick tool.
         2 Open the Outline Tool flyout, and click Outline Pen Dialog.
         3 Choose an arrowhead or line-ending shape.
         4 Under the arrowhead that you want to edit, click Options, Delete.




                                                Filling and outlining objects         257
258   CorelDRAW: Chapter 6
TRANSFORMING OBJECTS                                                    7
To transform an object in CorelDRAW, the first thing you must do is select it.
You can transform all graphic and text objects in the following ways without
altering their basic shapes:
Ÿ position — moves the object to another area of the Drawing Window
  based on coordinates you specify
Ÿ size — changes the size of an object by an amount you specify in pixels,
  millimeters, inches or other units, while maintaining its shape and relative
  proportions
Ÿ scale — changes the size of an object by a percentage value you specify,
  making it larger or smaller either proportionally or nonproportionally
Ÿ stretch — changes an object’s relative horizontal or vertical proportions,
  making one larger compared to the other
Ÿ rotate — turns an object upside down or sideways, or tilts it by any degree
  you specify
Ÿ skew — adds a slant to an object
Ÿ mirror — creates a reflection of an object horizontally, vertically, or
  diagonally
You can perform multiple transformations on single objects, on multiple
objects, and on combined or grouped objects. There are always several
different ways to make each transformation; you can choose the method that
works best for you, depending on whether you prefer to transform objects
quickly and interactively or with greater precision.
There are other transformations you can do that alter an object’s basic shape:
you can split, cut, and erase portions of objects; and you can weld, trim, and
intersect objects. These features allow you to create entirely new shapes.
Welding several objects binds them together to create one object. Trimming
removes the areas that are overlapped by other selected objects. Intersecting
objects creates a new object from the area where two or more objects
overlap.
If you perform a transformation to a single object or a group of objects and
are not happy with it, CorelDRAW lets you undo the transformation.




                                              Transforming objects          261
Finding and using the transformation tools
         In CorelDRAW there are numerous ways to transform objects, but most fall
         into one of two categories: transforming interactively, and transforming with
         precision. You can choose the method that suits you best, depending on your
         preference and your drawing. An interactive transformation is one you do
         quickly and visually on screen, often using the mouse. A more precise
         transformation involves specifying numerical coordinates and values that tell
         CorelDRAW exactly how to change the object.
         When applying transformations to objects in CorelDRAW using the mouse,
         you can usually hold down CTRL or SHIFT to constrain or transform the
         object from its center, respectively. By maintaining these CorelDRAW
         settings, you ensure that they work in the traditional CorelDRAW fashion.
         However, you can change these default settings to Windows standards if you
         prefer.

Using the transformation tools
         There are up to five different ways to transform most objects: using the
         mouse, the Free Transform tools, the Property Bar, the Transform toolbar, or
         the Transformation Docker. The mouse is usually the quickest and most
         intuitive way to transform objects, but will not necessarily work by itself for
         every transformation (for instance, to weld, trim, or intersect objects, you
         will need to use the mouse in conjunction with the Property Bar or the
         Shaping Docker). If you require greater precision or more options, you can
         choose from several other methods. Choose the method that works best for
         your drawing.

         To transform objects quickly using the Pick tool and Property Bar
         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
         2 Enter new values in the appropriate boxes on the Property Bar and press
           ENTER.

         To transform objects interactively using the Free Transform Tools
         1 Click the Shape Edit flyout in the Toolbox.
         2 Click the Free Transform tool.
         3 Click one of the following tools on the Property Bar:
            Ÿ Free Rotation tool
            Ÿ Free Angle Reflection tool
            Ÿ Free Scale tool



262      CorelDRAW: Chapter 7
   Ÿ Free Skew tool
4 Select the object to transform.
5 Follow the procedure for the transformation you are making.


Ÿ This method only works for rotating, mirroring, scaling, and skewing
  objects.


To transform objects with precision using the Transformation
Docker
1 Click Arrange, Transformation, and click one of the following buttons in
  the Transformation Docker:
   Ÿ the Position button
   Ÿ the Rotation button
   Ÿ the Scale And Mirror button
   Ÿ the Size button
   Ÿ the Skew button
2 Follow the instructions for the transformation you are applying.


Ÿ To weld, trim, or intersect objects, use the Shaping Docker instead by
  clicking Arrange, Shaping.


To transform objects with precision using the Transform toolbar
1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
2 Enter new values in the appropriate boxes on the Transform toolbar and
  press ENTER.


Ÿ You can’t use all of these methods for every transformation. For instance,
  you can’t cut, erase, weld, trim, or intersect objects using the Transform
  toolbar. Therefore, the first thing you should do is find out which methods
  are possible for the transformation you’re making — and then choose the
  best of all the possible methods, depending on your personal preferences
  and your particular drawing.




                                            Transforming objects           263
         Ÿ To open the Transform toolbar, click Window, Toolbars, and enable the
           Transform check box.
         Ÿ The Free Transform tools on the Property Bar function independently of
           the number boxes on both the Property Bar and the Transform toolbar —
           not in conjunction with them. Therefore, choose one method or the other;
           and ensure that you follow the appropriate procedures for the method you
           choose.


Using and customizing the interactive transformation options
         You will find the CTRL, SHIFT, and ALT keys useful when transforming
         objects using the mouse. These commands can constrain an object’s
         transformation by degrees, transform an object from its center, or transform
         it horizontally and vertically at the same time.
         You can also change the number of increments by which you split, rotate,
         skew, or mirror an object. The default value for splitting, rotating, skewing,
         and mirroring while holding down CTRL is 15 degrees.

         To cut, rotate, skew, or mirror an object in 15-degree increments
         Ÿ Hold down CTRL while dragging with the mouse.

         To change the number of increments by which you cut, rotate,
         skew, or mirror an object
         1 Click Tools, Options and click Workspace, Edit.
         2 Type a new value in the Constrain Angle box.

Using the CorelDRAW default settings
         CorelDRAW lets you switch to Windows standards if you prefer. When you
         work in Windows standards, pressing the SHIFT key constrains the object,
         transforming it in increments, while holding down CTRL transforms a copy
         of the object, leaving the original intact.

         To switch to Windows standards
         1 Click Tools, Options.
         2 In the list of categories, double-click Toolbox.
         3 Click Pick tool.
         4 Enable the Windows Standard button.




264      CorelDRAW: Chapter 7
Undoing transformations
         When you work on a drawing, CorelDRAW keeps track of the operations and
         commands you perform. If you make a mistake or change your mind about
         transformations you have just finished, you can clear them easily.
         You can undo transformations (i.e., rotate, size, stretch, scale, rotate, skew,
         and mirror) applied to an object or group of objects. If you select a group, only
         the transformations performed on the group as a whole are cleared;
         transformations performed on individual objects before they were grouped
         remain unchanged.
         CorelDRAW also lets you undo a transformation while you are in the midst of
         applying it. For example, if you begin rotating an object, then decide you
         don’t want to, you can use the ESC key to stop the transformation.
         CorelDRAW will revert your object to its original size, position, and shape,
         unchanged.

Clearing transformations
         You can clear all transformations to an object except for changes to its
         position. You can also redo transformations you have cleared.

         To undo all transformations applied to an object
         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
         2 Click Arrange, Clear Transformations.

         To redo all cleared transformations
         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
         2 Click Edit, Undo Clear Transformations.

         To undo a transformation in progress when using the mouse
         Ÿ Press ESC before you release the mouse.


         Ÿ Pressing ESC to undo a transformation in progress only works if you have
           not yet released the mouse button to complete the transformation. If you
           have already released the mouse button and still wish to undo a
           transformation, use the Clear Transformations or Undo commands.




                                                       Transforming objects          265
Applying transformations to duplicates
                        CorelDRAW offers you an easy way to experiment with different
                        transformations. If you want to see the effect of a transformation but keep
                        the original intact, you can transform a copy of the object.
The advantage of
transforming a
duplicate is that you
can experiment:
CorelDRAW lets you
view the
transformation on a
copy of the object
(2) without changing
the original (1).




                        CorelDRAW creates a copy of the object as it is being transformed, leaving
                        the original unaffected. If you decide that you’d rather keep the original, you
                        can simply delete the copy.

Transforming duplicates
                        You can transform a copy of the object to see how your original object would
                        look after the transformation, without actually changing it. If you don’t like
                        the effects of the transformation, simply delete the copy. CorelDRAW creates
                        the copy while you are applying the transformation. You can transform
                        duplicates using the mouse, the Transformation Docker, or the Transform
                        toolbar.

                        To transform a duplicate using the mouse
                        1 Begin a transformation using the mouse.
                        2 Click the right mouse button during the transformation, and release it
                          before you release the left mouse button.
                           CorelDRAW creates a copy of the object while you are transforming it,
                           leaving the original intact.

                        To transform a duplicate using the Transformation Docker
                        Ÿ After entering new values for the transformation you want to apply, click
                          the Apply to Duplicate button in the Transformation Docker.

                        To transform a duplicate using the Transform toolbar
                        1 Select the object with the Pick tool.


266                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 7
                        2 Click Window, Toolbars, and enable the Transform check box.
                        3 Click the Apply To Duplicate button on the Transform toolbar.
                           The button is activated when it appears pressed.
                        4 Type new values in the Transform toolbar boxes, then press ENTER.
                           As long as you keep the Apply To Duplicate button activated, CorelDRAW
                           will continue to transform duplicates.


                        Ÿ When using the Transform toolbar to transform a duplicate, ensure that
                          you are not mistakenly trying to use the Free Transform tools on the
                          Property Bar. The Free Transform tools on the Property Bar function
                          independently of the boxes on the Property Bar and Transform toolbar
                          (not in conjunction with them), and will not produce a duplicate — even if
                          you have enabled the Apply To Duplicate button.


Splitting and erasing portions of objects
                        When you split an object, CorelDRAW lets you choose between cutting the
                        object into two objects, or leaving it as one object composed of two or more
                        subpaths. You can also reshape objects by redrawing their paths. When you
                        do, CorelDRAW automatically draws a path in an object starting at the point
                        you select, and converts the object to curves.
Using the Knife tool
or the Eraser tool,
you can split objects
or erase parts of
them.




                        Separating one part of an object from another can require careful node
                        editing. CorelDRAW makes this easier by letting you erase unwanted
                        portions of objects. You can remove parts of a selected object by erasing


                                                                     Transforming objects           267
          them, automatically closing any affected paths. If you erase connecting lines,
          CorelDRAW does not create new objects; it simply creates separate
          subpaths. Whenever you erase part of an object, it automatically becomes a
          curve object.

          What is a path?
          Paths are the basic elements from which all shapes and lines are constructed.
          A path has no width or color, but you can give it width or color by adding an
          outline to it. By default, paths are drawn with a thin black outline. This
          makes paths visible when you first create them.

          What is a subpath?
          Subpaths are the basic curves and shapes from which a single curve object is
          constructed. For example, a single curve object with subpaths is often
          created when text is converted to curves. The letter “O,” for instance, is
          composed of two ellipses. The ellipses are subpaths that compose the single
          curve object, “O.” One of the simplest reasons for creating an object with
          subpaths is that you can produce objects with holes in them. In the above
          example, you can see objects underneath the center of the letter “O.”

Splitting an object with the Knife tool
          You can split an object in two and completely reshape it by redrawing its path.
          By default, the Knife tool automatically closes open paths when it cuts them.
          You can split an object along a straight line, along a freehand line, or by
          redrawing a path. You can choose to split an object into two subpaths or two
          objects, and you can specify whether you want to close paths automatically or
          keep them open.

          To split an object along a straight line
          1 Open the Shape Edit flyout, and click the Knife tool.
          2 Position the knife cursor where you want to start cutting.
             The cursor will snap upright when it’s ready to cut.
          3 Click once.
          4 Move the cursor to where you want to stop cutting.
          5 Click again.




268       CorelDRAW: Chapter 7
To split an object along a freehand line
1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
2 Drag the mouse from where you want the cut to start to where you want
  it to end.

To reshape an object by redrawing a path
1 Open the Shape Edit flyout, and click the Knife tool.
2 Position the knife cursor where you want to start cutting.
   The cursor will snap upright when it’s ready to cut.
3 Drag the mouse from where you want the cut to start to where you want
  the cut to end.
   Do not release the mouse.
4 Press TAB once or twice to choose the cut you want.
   Hold down TAB for a second or two each time to view the different cuts.
5 Release the mouse.

To specify that you want to split an object into two subpaths
Ÿ Enable the Leave As One Object button on the Property Bar.
   Disabling this button splits the object into two objects.

To specify whether you want to close paths automatically or keep
them open
Ÿ Enable the Auto-Close On Cut button on the Property Bar.
   Disabling this button leaves new pathe open after splitting an open path.


Ÿ Holding down SHIFT while splitting an object with the Knife tool puts you
  in Bezier curve mode. Holding down SHIFT + CTRL puts you in Bezier
  curve mode with the curve constrained by increments of 15 degrees.
Ÿ Holding down ESC while splitting an object with the Knife tool will undo
  the Knife operation and return the cursor to the beginning, leaving the
  object intact. This only works if you have not yet released the mouse
  button to finish the cut.




                                              Transforming objects       269
          Ÿ As soon as you use the Knife tool on an object, it becomes a curve object.


Erasing portions of an object
          The Eraser tool removes portions of selected objects that you drag it over,
          and closes any affected paths.You can change the size and shape of the eraser
          nib to suit your purposes.

          To erase portions of an object
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
          2 Open the Shape Edit flyout, and click the Eraser tool.
          3 Drag the eraser over the object.

          To create a hole in an object
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the above procedure.
          2 Double-click anywhere on the object.

          To erase portions of an object in straight lines
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the “To erase portions of an object” procedure.
          2 Click once on the object at the point where you want to begin to erase.
          3 Release the mouse, hold down TAB, and click again where you want to
            stop erasing.
             Hold down CTRL if you also want to constrain the line.

          To change the size of the Eraser nib
          Ÿ Type a value in the Eraser Thickness box on the Property Bar and press
            ENTER.


          Ÿ The Eraser tool automatically reduces the number of nodes on a curve it
            is erasing, but you can change this by disabling the Auto-Reduce On Erase
            button on the Property Bar.
          Ÿ As soon as you use the Eraser tool on an object, it becomes a curve
            object.




270       CorelDRAW: Chapter 7
          Ÿ You can click the Circle/Square button on the Property Bar to toggle
            between a circle or square nib shape.
          Ÿ Holding down ESC while erasing part of an object with the Eraser tool
            will undo the operation and return the cursor to the beginning, leaving the
            object intact. This will only work if you have not yet released the mouse
            to finish erasing.


Positioning and moving objects
          Dragging with the mouse is the quickest way to move objects in your
          drawing. You can move an object interactively by dragging it anywhere in
          your drawing and releasing the mouse button at the desired location. If you
          require more precision, you can place objects at specific ruler coordinates.
          You can also move objects by a specific distance, and move copies of objects.
          CorelDRAW also lets you nudge objects in increments using the keyboard.
          You can set the nudge distance to any value you want.
          By default, when you move or position an object, the object moves according
          to its center anchor point. Consequently, the center of the object moves to
          specific ruler coordinates. However, you can assign a new anchor point. The
          anchor points correspond to the object’s selection handles. You can also reset
          the anchor point to its original position.

Positioning objects with precision
          To position an object precisely in CorelDRAW, you must specify the
          horizontal and vertical coordinates of where to place it on the ruler. By
          default, you position an object according to its center anchor point, which is
          also the center of the object. You can reset the anchor point to position the
          object relative to a different set of coordinates. Note that this is different from
          moving an object, which involves relocating it a specified distance from its
          current position. For more information, see “Moving objects a specified
          distance” on page 272.

          To position an object
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
          2 Open the Shape Edit flyout, and click the Free Transform tool.
          3 Disable the Relative To Object button on the Property Bar.
             The button is disabled when it appears raised.




                                                         Transforming objects           271
          4 Type values in the X (horizontal) and Y (vertical) Object(s) Position boxes
            on the Property Bar.
          5 Keep the cursor in the X or Y box, and press ENTER.


          Ÿ You can also position an object by selecting it with the Pick tool and typing
            new values in the X and Y Object(s) Position boxes in the Property Bar.
            These values specify the coordinates of the new location where you want
            to place the object, relative to the origin (0,0 coordinates) of the rulers.
            Positive values move the object up and to the right; negative values move
            it down and to the left.


          To position an object using a different anchor point
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
          2 Click Arrange, Transformation, and click the Position button.
          3 Disable the Relative Position check box in the Transformation Docker.
          4 Type values in the H (horizontal) and V (vertical) Position boxes to specify
            a new location in your drawing.
          5 Enable an Anchor Point check box to assign an anchor point.
             The check boxes correspond to the eight selection handles and the
             object’s center.
          6 Click the Apply button.


          Ÿ When you disable the Relative Position check box in the Transformation
            Docker, the H and V boxes identify the ruler coordinates of the anchor
            point.



          Ÿ You can use the ruler as a guide when you’re specifying coordinates. You
            can place the ruler’s point of origin (0,0) anywhere in your Drawing
            Window to help you reposition the selected object.


Moving objects a specified distance
          When you move an object in CorelDRAW, you move it a specified distance
          from its current position. By default, you move an object according to its
          center anchor point, which is also the center of the object. You can change
          the anchor point to move the object relative to a different center location.


272       CorelDRAW: Chapter 7
Note that this is different from positioning an object, which involves
specifying horizontal and vertical coordinates on the ruler. For more
information, see “Positioning objects with precision” on page 271.

To move an object a specified distance
1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
2 Open the Shape Edit flyout, and click the Free Transform tool.
3 Enable the Relative To Object button on the Property Bar.
   The button is enabled when it appears pressed.
4 Type values in the X (horizontal) and Y (vertical) Object(s) Position boxes
  on the Property Bar.
5 Keep the cursor in the X or Y box, and press ENTER.


Ÿ You can also move an object by selecting it and typing new values in the X
  and Y Object(s) Position boxes on the Property Bar. These values specify
  the distance you want to move the object, relative to its current location.
  Positive values move the object up and to the right; negative values move
  it down and to the left.


To move an object a specified distance using a different anchor
point
1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
2 Click Arrange, Transformation, and click the Position button.
3 Enable the Relative Position check box in the Transformation Docker.
   The values in the H (horizontal) and V (vertical) boxes both change to 0.
4 Enable an Anchor Point check box to assign an anchor point.
   The check boxes correspond to the eight selection handles and the
   object’s center.
5 Type values in the H and V boxes to specify the distance you want to
  move the object.
6 Click the Apply button.




                                             Transforming objects          273
         Ÿ When you enable the Relative Position check box in the Transformation
           Docker, the H and V boxes identify the position of the center anchor point
           as 0,0. When you specify a different anchor point, the values in the H and
           V boxes represent that anchor point’s position relative to the center
           anchor point (0,0).


Resetting the position anchor
         By default, you position or move an object according to its center anchor
         point, which is also the center of the object. If you change the anchor point
         using the Transformation Docker, you can reset it later.

         To reset the anchor point to an object’s center
         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
         2 Click Arrange, Transformation, and click the Position button.
         3 Enable the Anchor Point button representing the object’s center.


Sizing and stretching objects
         CorelDRAW lets you size and stretch objects interactively or with greater
         precision, depending on your preference and your drawing. An interactive
         size or stretch is one you do quickly and visually on screen, often using the
         mouse. A more precise size or stretch involves specifying numerical
         coordinates and values that tell CorelDRAW exactly how to change the
         object.
         Sizing changes an object’s dimensions by specific values, as opposed to
         scaling, which changes the dimensions by a specified percentage. For more
         information, see “Scaling objects” on page 278.
         When you stretch an object, you change its horizontal and vertical
         dimensions to alter the object’s proportions. By dragging one of the object’s
         side selection handles, you can stretch objects in either a vertical or
         horizontal direction.
         When you size an object, you can choose to maintain its aspect ratio. When
         you maintain the aspect ratio, you preserve the relationship between the
         height and the width of the object.
         For example, if you draw a square that is five inches by five inches, and you
         double its size proportionally, the new object will be 10 inches by 10 inches.
         If you increase its size nonproportionally, you can change it to 10 inches by
         20 inches (or any other nonproportional size). However, when you size an
         object nonproportionally you create a ratio between the X and Y dimensions



274      CorelDRAW: Chapter 7
                      which will affect any further transformations. If you want to revert the object
                      to its original one-to-one proportions before transforming it again, you must
                      disable the Non-proportional check box, then re-enter the equal values.

Sizing objects using the mouse
                      The easiest way to size objects is to drag the corner handles of the selection
                      box using the mouse. CorelDRAW displays the object’s outline while you
                      drag, so that you can preview the effects of the new size.
You can use the
corner selection
handles to increase
or decrease an
object’s size
proportionally.




                      To size an object using the mouse
                      1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                      2 Drag one of the corner selection handles — inward to decrease the size of
                        the object, or outward to increase it.

                      To size an object from its center
                      1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                      2 Hold down SHIFT, and drag one of the corner selection handles.


                      Ÿ To increase the size of an object in increments of 100%, hold down CTRL
                        while dragging a handle.




                                                                    Transforming objects         275
                        Ÿ To increase the object’s size in increments of 100% from its center, hold
                          down CTRL + SHIFT while dragging a handle.
                        Ÿ To size the object horizontally and vertically at the same time, hold down
                          ALT when you drag a corner handle.


Stretching objects using the mouse
                        When you stretch an object, you resize its horizontal and vertical dimensions
                        unproportionally. You can stretch objects interactively by dragging the
                        horizontal and vertical selection handles using the mouse.
Using the mouse, you
can stretch an object
by dragging its
selection handles
horizontally or
vertically.




                        To stretch an object horizontally or vertically using the mouse
                        1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                        2 Drag one of the side selection handles — inward to decrease the size of
                          the object, or outward to increase it.

                        To stretch an object from its center
                        1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                        2 Hold down SHIFT, and drag one of the side selection handles.




276                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 7
          Ÿ To stretch an object in increments of 100%, hold down CTRL as you drag
            a side selection handle.
          Ÿ To stretch an object vertically and horizontally at the same time, hold
            down ALT as you drag one of the corner selection handles.


Sizing and stretching objects with precision
          Sizing involves changing an object’s dimensions horizontally and vertically
          while maintaining its proportions. Stretching involves increasing an object’s
          size either horizontally or vertically. You can specify precise dimensions to
          produce an object that is the size and shape you require.

          To size an object with precision using the Transformation Docker
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
          2 Click Arrange, Transformation, and click the Size button.
          3 Disable the Non-proportional check box to maintain the proportion of
            width to height.
          4 Type a value in either the H (horizontal) box or the V (vertical) box.
             The number in the other box changes to reflect the object’s new
             proportional size.
          5 Click the Apply button.

          To stretch an object with precision using the Transformation
          Docker
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
          2 Enable the Non-proportional check box to specify that the length and
            width will be sized nonproportionally.
          3 Type a value in the H (horizontal) box to specify the object’s width.
          4 Type a value in the V (vertical) box to specify the object’s height.
          5 Click the Apply button.




                                                        Transforming objects          277
       Ÿ When you stretch an object by enabling the Non-proportional check box in
         the Transformation Docker, CorelDRAW lets you enter values in the H
         (horizontal) or V (vertical) boxes that change the object’s original
         proportions, creating a new ratio between the two values. If you then
         disable the check box to resize the object, CorelDRAW will resize it based
         on the new, nonproportional values you just entered. Therefore, if you
         stretch an object, then decide you want to resize it based on its original
         proportions, you must first disable the Non-proportional check box and
         re-enter the original one-to-one proportional values.



       Ÿ You can also size and stretch an object precisely by selecting it with the
         Pick tool and entering new values in the Object(s) Size boxes on the
         Property Bar.


Scaling objects
       When you scale an object in CorelDRAW, you change its size without altering
       its basic shape. You can scale objects interactively, or with greater precision.
       An interactive scale is one you do quickly and visually on screen, often using
       the mouse. A more precise scale involves specifying percentage values that
       tell CorelDRAW exactly how to change the object.
       Scaling changes an object’s dimensions by a specified percentage. Note that
       scaling is different from sizing, which changes an object’s dimensions by a
       specified amount.
       When you scale an object, you can choose to maintain its aspect ratio. When
       you maintain an object’s aspect ratio, you preserve the relationship between
       the height and the width of the object.
       For example, if you draw a square that is five inches by five inches, and you
       scale it by 200% proportionally, the new object will be 10 inches by 10 inches.
       If you scale it nonproportionally instead, you could enter percentage values
       that change it to 10 inches by 20 inches (or any other nonproportional size).
       However, when you scale an object nonproportionally you create a ratio
       between the X and Y dimensions which will affect any further
       transformations. If you want to revert the object to its original one-to-one
       proportions before transforming it again, you must disable the
       Non-proportional check box, then re-enter the equal values.
       The Free Scale tool lets you scale an object along its horizontal and vertical
       axes simultaneously, and quickly enlarge or reduce an object relative to its
       anchor point.




278    CorelDRAW: Chapter 7
                       CorelDRAW also lets you set an anchor point anywhere in the Drawing
                       Window simply by clicking. By clicking inside an object, you can scale the
                       object from its center. By clicking outside of an object, you can scale and
                       position it according to the distance and direction in which you drag the
                       mouse. CorelDRAW displays the object’s outline as you drag, so you can
                       preview the effects of the scale.

Scaling objects interactively
                       There are two interactive ways to scale an object in CorelDRAW: using the
                       mouse and using the Free Scale tool. You can scale an object along its
                       horizontal and vertical axes simultaneously, and quickly enlarge or reduce an
                       object relative to its anchor point.
The Free Scale tool
scales an object
along the horizontal
and vertical axis
simultaneously.




                       To scale an object using the mouse
                       1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                       2 Hold down CTRL, and drag one of the corner selection handles.
                          The object scales by increments of 100% as you drag.

                       To scale an object using the Free Scale tool
                       1 Open the Shape Edit flyout, and click the Free Transform tool.
                       2 Click the Free Scale tool on the Property Bar.
                       3 Click the object you want to scale.




                                                                    Transforming objects         279
          4 Click anywhere in the Drawing Window to fix an anchor point, and do not
            release the mouse.
          5 Drag to scale the object.


          Ÿ To maintain the horizontal and vertical proportions of an object when
            scaling using the mouse, hold down CTRL while dragging, or disable the
            Non-proportional Scaling/Sizing Ratio button on the Property Bar.
          Ÿ For better control when setting an anchor point, click near the object and
            drag away from it slowly. If you find that the object is moving off the
            Drawing Window, zoom out to retrieve it.


Scaling objects with precision
          Scaling changes an object’s dimensions by a specified percentage. For
          example, a value of 100% leaves the object unchanged; 200% doubles the
          size of the object; and 50% reduces its size by half.
          You can scale by a horizontal or a vertical factor. When you use the
          Transformation Docker, you can also maintain the aspect ratio.

          To scale an object using the Transformation Docker
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
          2 Click Arrange, Transformation, and click the Scale And Mirror button.
          3 Type percentage values in the Scale H (horizontal) and V (vertical) boxes.
          4 Click the Apply button.


          Ÿ By default, CorelDRAW scales an object from its center.



          Ÿ You can also scale an object precisely by selecting it with the Pick tool and
            entering new values in the Scale Factor boxes on the Property Bar.


          To maintain the aspect ratio while scaling using the
          Transformation Docker
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
          2 Disable the Non-proportional check box.



280       CorelDRAW: Chapter 7
          3 Type a percentage value in the Scale H (horizontal) or V (vertical) box.
             As you change one value, the other value changes automatically to
             maintain the original proportions of the object. If you type different values
             in the H and V boxes, CorelDRAW uses the last number you typed as the
             scale factor.


          Ÿ When you scale an object by enabling the Non-proportional check box in
            the Transformation Docker, CorelDRAW lets you enter values in the H
            (horizontal) or V (vertical) boxes that change the object’s original
            proportions, creating a new ratio between the two values. If you then
            disable the check box to rescale the object, CorelDRAW will scale it again
            based on the new, nonproportional values you just entered. Therefore, if
            you scale an object, then decide you want to scale it again based on its
            original proportions, you must disable the Non-proportional check box and
            re-enter the original proportional values.


Setting the scale anchor point
          You can change an object’s anchor point from its center to any of its eight
          selection handles by enabling a different anchor point button at the bottom of
          the Transformation Docker. Clicking one of these buttons defines a point that
          remains fixed when you scale the object. As a result, you scale the object
          around that point.

          To set an object’s scale anchor point
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
          2 Click Arrange, Transformation, and click the Scale and Mirror button.
          3 Enable an Anchor Point check box to assign an anchor point.
             The check boxes correspond to the eight selection handles and the
             object’s center.
          4 Click the Apply button.

          To reset the scale anchor point to its center
          1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
          2 Enable the Anchor Point button representing the object’s center.
          3 Click the Apply button.




                                                        Transforming objects          281
                        Ÿ By default, an object scales around an anchor point in the middle of its
                          selection box, but you can change the anchor point to suit your needs.


Rotating objects
                        Like the other transformation tools, the rotation tools are flexible and easy to
                        use. You can rotate an object around any point in your illustration in a variety
                        of ways.
                        Dragging an object’s rotation handles with the mouse is a simple and quick
                        way to rotate it. By dragging one of the rotation handles in circular motions,
                        you can rotate an object around its current position interactively while
                        viewing the changes you make on-screen.
                        If you use the Free Rotation tool to rotate an object instead, you can set the
                        center of rotation with a click of the mouse. When you start to drag the
                        mouse, an outline of the object and a line of rotation — a dashed blue line
                        that extends beyond the Drawing Page — appear. The line of rotation
                        indicates the angle at which you are rotating the object from the center of
                        rotation. The object’s outline allows you to preview the effects of the
                        rotation.
                        There are also tools that allow you to rotate objects more precisely. You can
                        pivot an object by a precise amount around its center of rotation, or rotate it
                        around a different coordinate in your illustration.
The Free Rotation
tool lets you quickly
rotate an object
around any point in
the Drawing Window.




                        By default, an object always rotates around its center of rotation. You can
                        move the center of rotation to any location in your drawing. You can also
                        reset the center of rotation.



282                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 7
Rotating objects interactively
                    You can rotate an object interactively by dragging its rotation handles with
                    the mouse or by using the Free Rotation tool.
You can rotate an
object clockwise
using the mouse.




                    To rotate an object using the mouse
                    1 Double-click the object with the Pick tool.
                       The rotation and skewing handles appear as two-way arrows; the center of
                       rotation marker appears in the middle of the selection box.
                    2 Click a rotation handle (the corner two-way arrows) and drag in a
                      clockwise or counterclockwise direction to rotate.

                    To rotate an object around a different anchor point using the
                    mouse
                    1 Double-click the object with the Pick tool.
                    2 Drag the center of rotation marker to the desired location — anywhere
                      inside or outside the object.
                    3 Click a corner rotation handle, and drag in a clockwise or
                      counterclockwise direction to rotate.

                    To rotate a line, a curve, or a closed curve using the mouse
                    1 Double-click the object with the Pick tool.
                    2 Click a rotation handle, and drag in a clockwise or counterclockwise
                      direction to rotate.


                                                                    Transforming objects      283
          To rotate an object using the Free Rotation tool
          1 Open the Shape Edit flyout, and click the Free Transform tool.
          2 Click the Free Rotation tool.
          3 Select the object you want to rotate.
          4 Click in the Drawing Window to specify the center of rotation.
          5 Drag the line of rotation to rotate the object.


          Ÿ The closer you move the cursor to an object’s center of rotation, the more
            sensitive the rotation is to mouse movement. The further you move the
            cursor along the line of rotation, the smoother the rotation.



          Ÿ You can skew or size an object while you rotate it by holding down ALT to
            skew or SHIFT to size.
          Ÿ To have the center of rotation snap to various points of other object(s) in
            your drawing, click Layout, Snap To Objects. Then move the center of
            rotation towards the other object(s).


Rotating objects with precision
          You can rotate an object by a specific number of degrees for extra precision.
          You can also rotate an object around a point relative to its current position.

          To rotate an object with precision using the Transformation
          Docker
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
          2 Click Arrange, Transformation, and click the Rotation button.
          3 Disable the Relative Center check box in the Transformation Docker.
          4 Type values in the Rotation H (horizontal) and V (vertical) boxes to
            specify the coordinates around which you want to rotate the object.
          5 Type a value in the Rotation Angle box.
          6 Click the Apply button.




284       CorelDRAW: Chapter 7
                         Ÿ You can also rotate an object precisely by selecting it with the Pick tool
                           and typing a new value in the Angle Of Rotation box on the Property Bar.



                         Ÿ A positive value in the Rotation Angle box rotates the object
                           counterclockwise; a negative value rotates it clockwise from its current
                           position.
                         Ÿ You can also rotate the object around any of its selection handles. For
                           more information, see “Setting the center of rotation with precision” on
                           page 285.


Setting the center of rotation with precision
                         When you rotate an object, it revolves around its center by default. You can
                         move an object’s center of rotation to anywhere in the Drawing Window,
                         You can also move the center of rotation to a specific ruler coordinate or by a
                         specific distance. The object will rotate around that new point.
You can set the
center of rotation
precisely to rotate an
object around
another object.




                         To rotate an object around a specified ruler coordinate
                         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                         2 Open the Shape Edit flyout, and click the Free Transform tool.
                         3 Disable the Relative To Object button on the Property Bar.
                            The Relative To Object button is disabled when it appears raised.
                         4 Type values in the X (horizontal) and Y (vertical) Center Of Rotation
                           Position boxes on the Property Bar.
                         5 Type a value in the Angle box on the Property Bar, and press ENTER.




                                                                       Transforming objects         285
          To rotate an object around a point relative to its current position
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
          2 Enable the Relative To Object button on the Property Bar.
             The Relative To Object button is enabled when it appears pressed.
          3 Type values in the X (horizontal) and Y (vertical) Center Of Rotation
            Position boxes on the Property Bar.
          4 Type a value in the Angle box, and press ENTER.


          Ÿ Negative (-) values rotate the object clockwise; positive (+) values rotate
            it counterclockwise.
          Ÿ Moving the center of rotation to a specific coordinate is useful for rotating
            a number of objects while maintaining their alignment because you can
            specify the same coordinates for multiple objects.



          Ÿ You can also rotate an object precisely relative to its current position using
            the Transformation Docker.


Resetting the center of rotation
          By default, an object rotates around a point (called the center of rotation) in
          the middle of its selection box. If you move the center of rotation, you can
          reset it to the center again using the Property Bar or the mouse.

          To reset the center of rotation using the mouse
          1 Double-click the object with the Pick tool.
             The rotation and skewing handles appear as two-way arrows, and the
             center of rotation marker appears in the middle of the box.
          2 Hold down CTRL, and drag the center of rotation marker towards the
            middle of the object.
          3 Release the mouse button to snap the marker to the object’s center.

          To reset the center of rotation for a line, curve, or closed object
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.




286       CorelDRAW: Chapter 7
       2 Click the object to display its rotation handles.
       3 Hold down CTRL and drag the center of rotation towards the middle of
         the object.

       To reset the center of rotation precisely
       1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
       2 Open the Shape Edit flyout, and click the Free Transform tool.
       3 Enable the Relative To Object button on the Property Bar.
          The Relative To Object button is enabled when it appears pressed.
       4 Type 0,0 in the X (horizontal) and Y (vertical) Center Of Rotation Position
         boxes.
       5 Keep the cursor in the X or Y box, and press ENTER.


       Ÿ You can also use the Transform toolbar or the Transformation Docker to
         reset the center of rotation.


Skewing objects
       Like the other transformation tools, the skewing tools are flexible and easy to
       use. You can skew objects interactively, or with greater precision. An
       interactive skew is one you do quickly and visually on screen, often using the
       mouse. A more precise skew involves specifying percentage values that tell
       CorelDRAW exactly how to change the object.
       Dragging an object’s skewing handles with the mouse is the fastest way to
       add a slant to objects in your illustration. The Free Skew tool is also a quick
       way to skew the horizontal and vertical dimensions at the same time.
       When you use the Free Skew tool, it slants the horizontal and vertical lines of
       an object simultaneously around a fixed point, called an anchor point. You can
       quickly set an anchor point by clicking anywhere in the Drawing Window, and
       you can reset the anchor point if you choose.




                                                     Transforming objects          287
The Free Skew tool
lets you slant an
object around any
point in the Drawing
Window.




                       The skew is relative to the anchor point. For example, if you click inside the
                       object, you can skew from its center. If you click outside the object, you skew
                       according to the anchor point you set, to the distance between the object and
                       the anchor point, and to the direction and the distance you drag with the
                       mouse.

Skewing objects interactively
                       You can skew objects interactively with the mouse by dragging the skewing
                       handles. Skewing handles are the straight horizontal and vertical arrows
                       which appear at the mid-points of the object. The Free Skew tool changes the
                       slant and the position of the object.
Using the mouse to
skew an object
horizontally and to
the right.




                       To skew an object using the mouse
                       1 Double-click the object with the Pick tool.
                       2 Do one of the following:


288                    CorelDRAW: Chapter 7
            Ÿ Drag a horizontal skewing handle to skew the object left or right.
            Ÿ Drag a vertical skewing handle to skew the object up or down.

         To skew an object horizontally and vertically
         1 Double-click the object with the Pick tool.
         2 Hold down ALT, and drag a skewing handle.

         To skew a line, curve, or closed object
         1 Double-click the object with the Pick tool.
         2 Drag a skewing handle in any direction.

         To skew an object using the Free Skew tool
         1 Open the Shape Edit flyout, and click the Free Transform tool.
         2 Click the Free Skew tool on the Property Bar.
         3 Click the object you want to skew.
         4 Click anywhere in the Drawing Window to fix an anchor point.
         5 Drag to skew the object.


         Ÿ To maintain control when setting an anchor point, click close to the object
           and drag away from it slowly. If you find that the object is moving off the
           Drawing Window, you can zoom out to retrieve it.
         Ÿ To skew an object along its horizontal and vertical dimensions at the same
           time, hold down ALT as you drag the skewing handle. Keep the cursor
           close to the object to control it.


Skewing objects with precision
         You can skew objects by a specific amount. By default, the skew anchor point
         is at the center of the object.

         To skew an object with precision
         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
         2 Open the Shape Edit flyout, and click the Free Transform tool.




                                                     Transforming objects          289
         3 Type a horizontal value in the top portion and a vertical value in the lower
           portion of the Skew Angle boxes on the Property Bar.
         4 Keep the cursor in one of the Skew Angle boxes, and press ENTER.

         To change an object’s skew anchor point
         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
         2 Click Arrange, Transformation, and click the Skew button.
         3 Click an Anchor Point check box to assign an anchor point.
            The check boxes correspond to the eight selection handles and the
            object’s center.
         4 Click the Apply button.

Resetting the skew anchor to an object’s center
         By default, an object skews around an anchor point in the center of its
         selection box. If you move the skew anchor point, you can reset it to the
         center again.

         To reset the skew anchor point to an object’s center
         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
         2 Click Arrange, Transformation, and click the Skew button.
         3 Enable the center Anchor Point button in the Transformation Docker.


Mirroring objects
         The mirror options let you make a reflection of any object in an illustration.
         You can mirror objects horizontally, vertically, or diagonally, using the mouse,
         the Free Angle Reflection tool, the Property Bar or the Transformation
         Docker. Mirroring an object horizontally flips it from left to right or vice
         versa; similarly, mirroring an object vertically flips it from top to bottom or
         vice versa.
         The Free Angle Reflection toolmirrors an object in the Drawing Window
         according to the angle you specify. You can set the anchor point by clicking
         the mouse.




290      CorelDRAW: Chapter 7
The Free Angle
Reflection tool
mirrors objects
precisely at any
angle.




                   If you use the Free Angle Reflection tool, an outline of the object and a
                   dashed blue line that intersects the anchor point appear as you begin to drag
                   with the mouse. They extend beyond the Drawing Page. The dashed blue
                   line is called the line of reflection. Where you set the anchor point
                   determines the distance between the object and the line of reflection. The
                   line of reflection indicates the angle at which you are mirroring the object
                   from the anchor point.

Mirroring objects
                   You can mirror objects horizontally, vertically, or diagonally You might find it
                   easiest to mirror objects using the mouse. You can also use the Free Angle
                   Reflection tool to mirror objects using the Property Bar. By default, the
                   mirror anchor point is in the center of the object. When you use the Free
                   Angle Reflection Tool or the Transformation Docker, you can change the
                   anchor point to specify the direction in which you want to mirror the object.




                                                                  Transforming objects          291
Using the mouse to
mirror an object
vertically.




                     To mirror an object horizontally using the mouse
                     1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                     2 Hold down CTRL and drag the object’s left or right selection handles to
                       the opposite side of the object.
                        An outline of the object appears when you reach the opposite side of the
                        object.
                     3 Release the mouse button and then release CTRL.

                     To mirror an object vertically using the mouse
                     1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                     2 Hold down CTRL, and drag the object’s top or bottom selection handles to
                       the opposite side of the object.
                        An outline of the object appears when you reach the opposite side of the
                        object.
                     3 Release the mouse button and then release CTRL.

                     To mirror an object diagonally using the mouse
                     1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                     2 Hold down CTRL, and drag one of the corner handles of the object’s
                       selection box to the opposite side.




292                  CorelDRAW: Chapter 7
   An outline of the object appears when you reach the opposite side of the
   object.
3 Release the mouse button and then release CTRL.

To mirror an object using the Free Angle Reflection Tool
1 Open the Shape Edit flyout, and click the Free Transform tool.
2 Click the Free Angle Reflection tool on the Property Bar.
3 Click the object you want to mirror.
4 Click anywhere in the Drawing Window to fix an anchor point.
5 Drag the mouse to create the line of reflection.

To mirror an object using the Transformation Docker
1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
2 Click Arrange, Transformation, and click the Scale And Mirror button.
3 Click one of the following buttons in the Transformation Docker:
   Ÿ Horizontal Mirror — mirrors an object horizontally
   Ÿ Vertical Mirror — mirrors an object vertically
4 Enable an Anchor Point check box to assign an anchor point.
   The check boxes correspond to the eight selection handles and the
   object’s center. By clicking a button, you specify the direction in which
   you want to mirror the object.
5 Click the Apply button.


Ÿ Mirror an object diagonally using the Transformation Docker by clicking
  both the Horizontal Mirror and the Vertical Mirror buttons in the
  Transformation Docker.
Ÿ Because the mirror anchor point is in the center of the object, a
  symmetrical object may not appear to move when you mirror it.




                                              Transforming objects         293
       Ÿ The closer you move the cursor to the object along the line of reflection,
         the more sensitive the mouse is to movement. The further you move the
         mouse from the object, the smoother the movement.
       Ÿ You can also mirror an object by selecting it with the Pick tool and clicking
         either the Horizontal Mirror button or Vertical Mirror button on the
         Property Bar.


Welding, trimming and intersecting objects
       When you weld, trim, or intersect objects, you can create completely new
       shapes that are irregular and unusual. There are two ways to weld, trim, or
       intersect objects: using the Shaping Docker, and using the Pick tool with the
       Property Bar. You can weld, trim, or intersect single objects with other single
       or multiple objects, as well as multiple objects with multiple objects.
       You can apply these operations to almost any object created in CorelDRAW,
       including clones, objects on different layers, and single objects with
       intersecting lines. However, you cannot weld, trim, or intersect Paragraph
       text, dimension lines, bitmaps, or masters of clones.

       Welding objects
       Welding several objects binds them together to create one object with a
       single outline. This new object uses the welded objects’ perimeter as its
       outline, and all intersecting lines disappear.
       You can weld objects regardless of whether or not they overlap each other. If
       you weld objects that do not overlap, they form a weld group that acts as a
       single object. In both cases, the object takes on the fill and outline attributes
       of the target object — the object to which you welded the selected object(s).
       You can weld any number of objects at one time, including clones, objects on
       different layers, and single objects with intersecting lines. When you weld
       objects on different layers, the resulting welded object resides on the same
       layer as the target object. When you weld single objects with intersecting
       lines, the object breaks into several subpaths, but its appearance remains the
       same.

       Trimming objects
       When you trim an object, you remove the areas that are overlapped by other
       selected objects. These areas are cut away, creating an entirely new shape.
       Trimming is a quick way to create objects with irregular shapes.
       The object you trim, called the target object, retains its fill and outline
       attributes. For example, if you trim a rectangle that is overlapped by a circle,



294    CorelDRAW: Chapter 7
                        you remove the area of the rectangle that was covered by the circle to create
                        a new, irregular shape.

                        Intersecting objects
                        Intersecting creates a new object from the area where two or more objects
                        overlap. The shape of this new object can be simple or complex, depending
                        on the shapes you intersect.
                        The new object’s fill and outline attributes depend on the object you define as
                        the target object — the object you intersect with the first selected object(s).
                        The resulting new object uses the fill and outline attributes of this target
                        object.

Welding objects
                        You can create a single curve object out of two or more objects. If the objects
                        overlap, the result is a single object with one outline. If the objects don’t
                        overlap, they form a weld group in which the objects appear separate but are
                        actually treated as one object.
The Weld command
merges overlapping
objects (1) to create
a single object with
one outline (2).




                        To weld objects using the Shaping Docker
                        1 Select the objects with the Pick tool.
                        2 Click Arrange, Shaping.
                        3 In the Shaping Docker, click the Weld button.
                        4 Enable one of the following check boxes:
                           Ÿ Source Object(s) — keeps a copy of the selected object after welding


                                                                      Transforming objects         295
            Ÿ Target Object(s) — keeps a copy of the target object (the object to
              which you’re welding the selected object) after welding
         5 Click the Weld To button.
         6 Click the object you want to be the target object.
            The welded object takes on the fill and outline attributes of the target
            object.


         Ÿ You can select multiple objects for both the source and the target of the
           weld operation by holding down SHIFT while selecting them or by
           marquee selecting them.
         Ÿ You can remove holes created after welding single objects with
           intersecting lines by deleting the resulting interior subpaths.


         To weld objects using the Property Bar
         1 Select the objects with the Pick tool.
         2 Click the Weld button on the Property Bar.


         Ÿ If you marquee select the objects when welding using the Property Bar,
           the welded object assumes the outline and fill properties of the
           bottom-most selected object. If you use multiple selection, the welded
           object takes on the properties of the object you selected last.


Trimming objects
         Trimming creates new, irregularly shaped objects by removing the areas that
         overlap other selected objects. Before you trim objects, you must decide
         which object you want to trim (the target object) and which object(s) you
         want to use to trim it. The objects you use to trim must overlap — or be
         overlapped by — the target object. You can trim single objects with one or
         more objects, and you can trim multiple objects with multiple objects.




296      CorelDRAW: Chapter 7
You can use the Trim
command to remove
areas from an object.




                        To trim an object using the Shaping Docker
                        1 Using the Pick tool, select all the objects you want to use to trim the
                          target object.
                        2 Click Arrange, Shaping.
                        3 In the Shaping Docker, click the Trim button.
                        4 Enable one of the following check boxes:
                           Ÿ Source Object(s) — keeps a copy of the object you’re using to trim
                           Ÿ Target Object(s) — keeps a copy of the object you’re trimming
                        5 Click the Trim button.
                        6 Click the target object.

                        To trim an object using the Property Bar
                        1 Using the Pick tool, select the object you want to trim and the object(s)
                          you want to use to trim it.
                        2 Click the Trim button on the Property Bar.


                        Ÿ If you marquee select the objects, CorelDRAW trims the bottom-most
                          selected object. If you use multiple selection, CorelDRAW trims the
                          object you selected last.




                                                                     Transforming objects           297
                        To trim multiple objects with multiple objects
                        1 Marquee select two or more objects that you have chosen to trim the
                          target objects.
                        2 Click Arrange, Shaping.
                        3 In the Shaping Docker, click the Trim button.
                        4 Using the Pick tool, hold down SHIFT and select the objects you want to
                          trim.
                        5 Release SHIFT.


                        Ÿ You do not have to group multiple objects prior to trimming them.


Intersecting objects
                        Intersecting creates a new object from an area where two or more objects
                        overlap. The result is one object with the size and shape of this overlapping
                        area. In addition to this new object, you can keep all, some, or none of the
                        original objects. The new object always uses the fill and outline attributes of
                        the target object.
The Intersect
command creates a
new object out of the
area shared by
overlapping objects.




                        To intersect objects using the Shaping Docker
                        1 Select the objects with the Pick tool.
                        2 Click Arrange, Shaping.



298                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 7
3 In the Shaping Docker, click the Intersection button.
4 Enable one of the following check boxes:
   Ÿ Source Object(s) — keeps a copy of all other selected objects (except
     the target object)
   Ÿ Target Object(s) — keeps a copy of the target object
5 Click the Intersect With button.
6 Click the object that you want to be the target object.

To intersect objects using the Property Bar
1 Select the objects with the Pick tool.
2 Click the Intersect button on the Property Bar.


Ÿ If you marquee select the objects, the new intersected object takes on the
  properties of the bottom-most selected object. If you use multiple
  selection, the new intersected object takes on the properties of the object
  you selected last.


To intersect multiple objects with multiple objects
1 Marquee select two or more objects that you have chosen to intersect
  with the target objects.
2 Click Arrange, Shaping.
3 In the Shaping Docker, click the Intersect button.
4 Using the Pick tool, hold down SHIFT and select the objects you want to
  intersect.
5 Release SHIFT.


Ÿ You do not have to group multiple objects prior to intersecting them.




                                             Transforming objects         299
300   CorelDRAW: Chapter 7
WORKING WITH COLOR                                                      8
It is important to understand how color is communicated by your scanner,
monitor, and printer in order to achieve a consistent and accurate
reproduction of the colors you desire. A basic understanding of the color
spaces and color management of your equipment helps you achieve the
precise color you want for your project. Color management is the process of
ensuring that the final colors you see in your project are as close to, or as
accurate a reproduction of the ones you want no matter which devices you
use.
We all see color differently. Color is subjective to the human eye. Each device
that interacts with your project’s file: the scanner, monitor, and printer may
have a different color space. For example, a color that is visible to the human
eye may not be reproducible by your printer.
Because there are so many color variations, a precise method for defining
each color is required. For example, once you find the perfect shade of light
orange, you need to be able to reproduce that color and possibly tell others
how to do the same. A color model defines that perfect shade of light orange
by breaking it down into precise components that allow you to accurately
transmit the information to other people and to the electronic devices you
use to create projects. A color model is a system used to organize and define
colors according to a set of basic properties which are reproducible.

Color models
There are many different color models that define colors, for example, HSB,
RGB, CMYK, and CIE Lab color models. The RGB and CMYK color models
are only two of a number of models developed to suit a variety of digital
design and desktop publishing applications. It is not necessary to be familiar
with all these models, but it is helpful to be familiar with a few of the more
widely used ones.

HSB model
Without any light or a viewer, objects all around us are colorless. Color only
occurs in our minds after our visual sensory system has seen the
wavelengths that give objects their color. Based on how people perceive
color, the HSB color model defines color in three attributes:




                                               Working with color          303
The HSB color model




                         Ÿ Hue (H)
                         Ÿ Saturation (S)
                         Ÿ Brightness (B)
                      Hue (H) is the name we give a color in everyday language. Hues form the
                      Color Wheel. The hue of a lemon is yellow, that of a strawberry is red.
                      Saturation (S) refers to vividness of the color or how much color
                      concentration does the object contain. The figurine does not contain very
                      much yellow when compared to the yellow saturation of lemon. Colors can be
                      separated into bright or dark colors when their Brightness (B) is compared.
                      Brightness refers to adding or removing whiteness from a color. The mask is
                      bright and lighter then the dark yellow lemon.

                      RGB model
                      The millions of colors your monitor produces can all be described as amounts
                      of red, green, and blue. These three color components form the basis for the
                      RGB (Red, Green, and Blue) color model. Each of the three colors is
                      assigned a numeric value between 0 and 255. The RGB model is based on
                      colors of light, and higher RGB values correspond to the presence of greater
                      quantities of white light. Consequently, higher RGB values result in lighter
                      colors. When all three color components are at the maximum value, the
                      resulting color is white light. Because the RGB model creates colors by
                      adding light, it is called an additive color model. Monitors and scanners can
                      employ the additive color model because they emit light. They emit particles
                      of red, green, and blue light and create the illusion of millions of different
                      colors.




304                   CorelDRAW: Chapter 8
The RGB color model




                      One of the limitations of the RGB model is that it is device dependent. This
                      means that not only are there color variations between monitors and
                      scanners by different manufacturers but there are color variations between
                      identical devices from the same manufacturer. All monitors drift over time
                      and display colors differently making it imperative to regularly calibrate your
                      monitor and the other electronic devices you use to create your projects. The
                      RGB model cannot be a color standard because its color results are not 100
                      percent repeatable.

                      CMYK model
                      The colors you see on your monitor are reproduced on paper using pigments
                      instead of light. Printers render colors on paper and other mediums through
                      reflected light. The most common method of reproducing color images on
                      paper is by combining cyan, magenta, yellow, and black pigments. These four
                      colors are the color components of the CMYK (Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and
                      black) color model. Each color of the CMYK color model is described as a
                      percentage (from 0 to 100). Pigments produce color by reflecting certain
                      wavelengths of light while absorbing others. Darker pigments absorb more
                      light. Because the CMYK color model is based on pigment colors, higher
                      percentages of pigment result in darker colors. In theory, when 100 percent
                      cyan, 100 percent magenta, and 100 percent yellow are combined, the
                      resulting color is black. In reality, a muddy brown is produced so black
                      pigment must be added to the color model and to the printing process, to
                      compensate for the color limitations. The CMYK color model is called a
                      subtractive color model because it creates colors by absorbing light. The
                      CMYK model cannot be a color standard because its color results are not 100
                      percent repeatable as it is a device dependent color model.




                                                                     Working with color         305
The CMYK color model




                       CIE Lab model
                       A great deal of color research has been accomplished in order to acquire a
                       color model that is device independent and repeatable. In 1931 La
                       Commision Internationale de L   ’Eclairage (CIE) defined a device-independent
                       color model, based on how the human eye perceives color. The CIE Lab
                       model incorporates the theory that a color cannot be both green and red at
                       the same time nor can it be yellow and blue at the same time. As such, single
                       values are used to describe the green/red and blue/yellow components of any
                       color. Lab stands for the three values this model uses to define color — a
                       lightness value (L) which can range from 0 to 100 and two chromaticity
                       ranges: green to red (a) and blue to yellow (b). The two chromaticity values
                       can range from +120 to -120. Lab (sometimes called L*a*b*) provides a
                       system for defining color that bases color values on widely accepted
                       standards rather than on individual color-producing devices.

                       Reproducing colors accurately
                       Each piece of equipment you use, from scanners to printers, to create your
                       project, has a specific range of colors that it can reproduce. This is referred to
                       as a device gamut. If you don’t take these differences into account, the colors
                       you see on your monitor may not match the colors on the printed page. For
                       more information, see “Reproducing colors accurately” on page 325.


Choosing colors
                       You are able to display multiple on-screen Color Palettes. The quickest way
                       to choose a color is by using the on-screen Color Palettes. However, none of
                       the on-screen Color Palettes contain quite the right color, you can use one of
                       the following methods of choosing colors. Each method offers different ways
                       of finding the perfect color. The method you choose should be based on how
                       you prefer to work.




306                    CorelDRAW: Chapter 8
Choosing a color by a color model
The color models offer a visual representation of the full spectrum of colors.
You can change the color by manipulating the controls associated with the
color model. For example, when you use the default color viewer, which is
the HSB color model, you can change the hue (the color) by moving a slider.

Choosing a color by blending
The color blender allows you to combine colors. The color blender displays a
grid of colors that it creates from the four base colors you select.

Choosing a color using color harmonies
Color harmonies are most useful when you’re selecting several colors for a
project. By using color harmonies, you are guaranteed that the colors you
choose look good together. Color harmonies work by superimposing a shape,
such as a rectangle or a triangle, over a Color Wheel. You can also manipulate
the superimposed shape (the rectangle, triangle, or pentagon.) As you move
the black spot on the shape around the wheel, the other circles also move.
The colors at each corner are always complementary, contrasting, or
harmonious, depending on the shape you select. The color harmonies now
allow you to select the color model you prefer to use. You can choose from
several different color models, including the RGB or CMYK models.

Choosing a color from a color palette
You have the ability to display multiple on-screen Color Palettes, and keep
them floating, or dock them to any edge of the Application Window.
There are two types of color palettes from which you can choose colors: fixed
color palettes and custom color palettes. Don’t confuse these types of color
palettes with the ability to have multiple on-screen Color Palettes. On-screen
Color Palettes are used to display and select colors from both fixed and
custom color palettes. To open multiple on-screen Color Palettes, use the
Color Palette Browser and enable the on-screen Color Palettes name check
box. You can explore the new PANTONE metallic color palettes. We feature
the PANTONE MATCHING SYSTEM and PANTONE Pastel Colors, which
can be printed on coated or uncoated paper.
Fixed color palettes are provided by third-party manufacturers and are most
useful when accompanied by a color swatch book. A swatch book is a
collection of color samples that shows exactly what each color looks like
when printed. The best reason for using a color from a fixed color palette is
seeing exactly how that color appears when it’s printed correctly. Swatch
books are available at most art supply stores or directly from a swatch book
manufacturer.



                                               Working with color         307
An example of a
swatch book




                  Several fixed color palettes are collections of spot color inks. If you select a
                  color from one of these palettes, be aware that each color requires its own
                  color separation. Spot color palettes have a tint control slider, which allows
                  you to choose the percentage of ink density you desire for that color. For
                  more information about spot colors and color separations, see “Creating color
                  separations” on page 729.
                  Custom color palettes are collections of colors you have chosen to save as a
                  color palette file (.CPL extension).You have the ability to copy a color swatch
                  by dragging a color swatch from any palette into your custom palettes. There
                  is no limit to the number of custom palettes you can create. For more
                  information, see “Customizing Color Palettes” on page 320. Any on-screen
                  Color Palette can be selected to be the default on-screen Color Palette. The
                  default Color Palette is used in all of the color pickers.

                  Choosing a color from the Color Docker window
                  The Color Docker window can be docked to any edge of the Application
                  Window or float as a separate window. You can also change the appearance
                  and size of the Color Docker window. With the Color Docker window open,
                  you can access other tools and windows.

Choosing a color from the on-screen Color Palette
                  The quickest way to add colors to an object is by clicking on a color swatch
                  within any of the on-screen Color Palettes. One feature that is unique to all
                  on-screen Color Palettes, is that they let you augment the current color of an
                  object with a new color. For example, you can add some red to a yellow object
                  to create an orange object. Spot colors in the on-screen Color Palette are
                  marked by a dot in the bottom-left corner of the color swatch.


308               CorelDRAW: Chapter 8
         To choose the fill or outline color of an object
         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
         2 Do one of the following:
            Ÿ Click a color in the on-screen Color Palette to change the fill color.
            Ÿ Right-click a color in the on-screen Color Palette to change the outline
              color.

         To augment the current fill or outline color of an object
         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
         2 Do one of the following:
            Ÿ Hold down CTRL, and click a color in the on-screen Color Palette to
              change the fill color.
            Ÿ Hold down CTRL, and right-click a color in the on-screen Color Palette
              to change the outline color.
         3 Repeat step 2 to add more color.


         Ÿ You can also change the fill or outline color of an object by dragging the
           color swatch from the on-screen Color Palette to the outline or fill of the
           object.
         Ÿ You can also augment the current fill or outline color of an object by
           holding down CTRL and dragging the color swatch from the on-screen
           Color Palette to the outline or fill of the object.
         Ÿ Hold down the mouse on a color swatch to view a grid of neighboring
           colors.


Choosing a color from the color viewer
         The default color viewer is based on the HSB color model. You can select
         different color models, e.g., CMYK, RGB, Lab, or grayscale for the color
         you’re choosing, but the color viewer remains based on the HSB model. You
         can select other color viewers if you don’t want to use the HSB color viewer.
         You may want to add the color you chose into a custom palette. For more
         information see “Editing an existing Custom Palette” on page 322.

         To choose the fill or outline color of an object
         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
         2 Do one of the following:


                                                        Working with color             309
         Ÿ Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click the Uniform Fill button to change
           the fill color.
         Ÿ Open the Outline Tool flyout and click the Outline Color Dialog button
           to change the outline color.
      3 Click the Models Tab.
      4 Hold down the mouse button on the Models list box to display the color
        model list.
      5 Hold down the mouse button on the Options, select Color Viewers to
        display and select the color model from the color viewer list.
      6 Do one of the following:
         Ÿ Drag the small box in the color selection area to the color you want to
           use.
         Ÿ Move the color slider up or down to change the range of colors
           displayed in the color selection area on the left.
         Ÿ Use the name list box, and select a color by name.

      To use an alternate color viewer
      1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
      2 Hold down the mouse button on the Models list box to display the color
        model list.
      3 Hold down the mouse button on the Options button, and select Color
        Viewers to display the color viewer list.
      4 Click an alternate color viewer.
         Each color viewer lets you use a slider and a color selection area to
         choose a color.

      To change the model of the color being selected
      1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the “To choose the fill or outline color of an
        object” procedure.
      2 Choose another model of the color from the Model list box.


      Ÿ Sometimes when selecting a color you choose an out of gamut color and
        an in gamut button appears to the left of the new selected color. Clicking
        the in gamut button selects the closest in gamut color.




310   CorelDRAW: Chapter 8
Choosing a color by blending other colors
         You can only blend colors that are in your default on-screen Color Palette. If
         you want to blend other colors, change the default on-screen Color Palette.
         You can increase or decrease the number of blended color swatches displayed
         by changing the color grids’ cell size. You can select multiple colors from the
         Color Blend area to add to your custom palettes. For more information see
         “Customizing Color Palettes” on page 320.

         To choose the fill or outline color of an object
         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
         2 Do one of the following:
            Ÿ Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click the Uniform Fill button to change
              the fill color.
            Ÿ Open the Outline Tool flyout, and click the Outline Color Dialog button
              to change the outline color.
         3 Click the Mixers tab.
         4 Click the Options button, and select Mixers, Color Blend.
         5 Click each of the four color pickers, and choose a color from each of the
           four color pickers.
         6 In the color selection area, click the color you want to choose.

         To change the color grid cell size
         1 Follow steps 1 to 4 from the previous procedure.
         2 Slide the Size Slider to select the grid cell size you want to use.


         Ÿ When selecting a color you choose an out of gamut color. An in gamut
           button then appears to the left of the new selected color. Clicking the in
           gamut button selects the closest in gamut color.


Choosing a color using color harmonies
         Each option in the Hues list box corresponds to a shape that is superimposed
         on the Color Wheel. Each row in the color grid below begins with the color
         underneath one of the points on the shape superimposed on the Color Wheel.
         Since color harmonies are most useful when you are selecting several colors,
         try using color harmonies when working with custom palettes. For more




                                                         Working with color            311
      information see “Adding or deleting multiple colors in a Custom Palette” on
      page 324.

      To choose the uniform fill or outline color of an object
      1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
      2 Do one of the following:
         Ÿ Open the Fill tool flyout and click the Uniform Fill button to change the
           fill color.
         Ÿ Open the Outline Tool flyout, and click the Outline Color Dialog button
           to change the outline color.
      3 Click the Mixers tab.
      4 Do one of the following:
         Ÿ Drag the black circle around the Color Wheel to change the color
           swatches below the wheel.
         Ÿ Click on a spot on the Color Wheel and the black point will move there.
      5 From the color grid below the Color Wheel, click the color swatch you
        want to use.

      To change the relationship between the colors on the Color
      Wheel
      1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
      2 Choose a hue option from the Hues list box.


      Ÿ Each hue option corresponds to a different configuration of points on the
        Color Wheel. Experiment to find the configuration that provides the color
        set you prefer.


      To change the appearance of colors in the color swatches
      1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the “To choose the uniform fill or outline color of
        an object” procedure.
      2 Choose a color variation option from the Variations list box.
      3 To change the number of swatches in the color grid, do one of the
        following:
         Ÿ Type a number in the Number box.
         Ÿ Move the size Slider.


312   CorelDRAW: Chapter 8
          Ÿ Sometimes when selecting a color you choose an out of gamut color and
            an in gamut button appears to the left of the new selected color. Clicking
            the in gamut button selects the closest in gamut color.


Choosing a color from a fixed color palette
          Fixed color palettes are provided by third-party manufacturers and work best
          when accompanied by a color swatch book. It is recommended that you use
          Netscape Navigator or Microsoft Internet Explorer fixed color palettes if you
          will be creating information for these mediums. The PANTONE MATCHING
          SYSTEM, Focoltone, TOYO COLOR FINDER, and DIC fixed color palettes
          are all spot colors. If you create color separations when you print, each color
          from these palettes requires a separate printing plate. This can significantly
          increase the cost of your print job. If you want to use these colors but you
          don’t want to use spot colors, convert the spot colors to process colors when
          you print. For more information, see “Choosing General Color Settings” on
          page 332. You are able to drag colors from the fixed palettes to your custom
          palettes. The colors within a fixed palette cannot be altered.

          To choose the uniform fill or outline color of an object
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
          2 Do one of the following:
             Ÿ Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click the Uniform Fill button to change
               the fill color.
             Ÿ Open the Outline Tool flyout, and click the Outline Color Dialog button
               to change the outline color.
          3 Click the Fixed Palettes tab.
          4 Choose a palette from the Palette list box.
          5 Click the color scroll bar to change the range of colors displayed in the
            color selection area on the left.
          6 Do one of the following:
             Ÿ Scroll the color scroll bar to the color swatch you want to select.
             Ÿ Click on the name list box arrow and scroll down to the color name you
               want to select.
             Ÿ Type in the color name in the name list box.
             Ÿ Hold down the mouse button on a color swatch and select a color from
               the neighborhood color picker.



                                                          Working with color            313
         To hide or display the names of the colors
         1 Follow steps 1 to 4 from the previous procedure.
         2 Click the Options button, and enable or disable Show Color Names.


         Ÿ If the selected color is within a fixed palette that supports tints, then
           change the tint by moving the tint slider or by typing a number in the Tint
           number box.
         Ÿ The neighborhood color picker for Fixed Palettes shows the same color
           with different ink densities. The neighborhood color picker for Custom
           Palettes shows colors that is closest to the chosen color by Hue and
           Lightness.


Choosing a color from a custom color palette
         A custom color palette can include colors from any color model or fixed color
         palette. Custom color palettes should be saved as a color palette file (.CPL
         extension.) The User Defined Inks are all custom spot colors. If you create
         color separations when printing, each color from this palette will require a
         separate printing plate. If you don’t want to use spot colors, convert the spot
         colors to process colors when printing. For more information see “Creating
         color separations” on page 729.

         To choose the uniform fill or outline color of an object
         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
         2 Do one of the following:
            Ÿ Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click the Uniform Fill button to change
              the fill color, or press SHIFT + F11.
            Ÿ Open the Outline Tool flyout, and click the Outline Color Dialog button
              to change the outline color, or press SHIFT + F12.
         3 Click the Custom Palettes tab.
         4 Choose a palette from the Palette list box.
         5 Do one of the following:
            Ÿ Scroll the color scroll bar to the color swatch you want to select.
            Ÿ Click the name list box arrow and scroll down to the color name you
              want to select.
            Ÿ Type in the color name in the Name list box.



314      CorelDRAW: Chapter 8
            Ÿ Hold down the mouse button on a color swatch and select a color from
              the neighborhood color picker.
         6 Click the color swatch you want to use.

         To display or hide the names of the colors
         1 Follow steps 1 to 4 from the previous procedure.
         2 Click the Options button and enable or disable Show Color Names.


         Ÿ The Palette list box displays only the currently open custom palettes and
           palettes inside the Custom\Palettes folder. Open another palette through
           the Palette list box by choosing Open Palette and specifying the folder and
           filename.
         Ÿ The neighborhood color picker for Custom Palettes shows colors that are
           the closest to the chosen color swatch by Hue and Lightness.


Choosing a color by setting numeric values
         You can select a color by entering the values of its color components. The
         color components you can change depend on the color model being used to
         define the color. You can select a color by entering the values of its color
         components only while in the Models or Mixers areas.

         To choose the uniform fill or outline color of an object
         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
         2 Do one of the following:
            Ÿ Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click the Uniform Fill button to change
              the fill color.
            Ÿ Open the Outline Tool flyout, and click the Outline Color Dialog button
              to change the outline color.
         3 Click the Options button and select the a color model.
         4 Type values in the color value boxes.




                                                        Working with color         315
             The color model you choose will determine the color values you can
             change. For example, if you choose RGB, then the color values are Red,
             Green, and Blue. If you choose HSB, then the values are Hue, Saturation,
             and Brightness.
             You can type in numeric values only for the Models and Mixers areas. You
             can not change any of the numeric values within the Fixed or Custom
             Palette areas. The range of acceptable values varies from color model to
             color model.


          Ÿ You can also change the color model and numeric color values of an object
            by selecting it with the Interactive Fill tool, then changing the color
            component values on the Property Bar.
          Ÿ You are not able to select a color by entering the values of its color
            components for Fixed or Custom Palette. You are able to view the color
            component values in different color models.


Choosing the default fill and outline colors
          You can change the default outline and fill colors by choosing a color when no
          object is selected. A dialog box prompts you to select the type of object for
          which you want to change the default color.

          To choose the default fill or outline color
          1 Ensure that no object is selected.
          2 Do one of the following:
             Ÿ Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click the Uniform Fill button to change
               the fill color.
             Ÿ Open the Outline Tool flyout, and click the Outline Color Dialog button
               to change the outline color.
          3 Enable any or all of the following check boxes:
             Ÿ Graphic
             Ÿ Artistic Text
             Ÿ Paragraph Text


             Ÿ You can also enable the Don’t Show Me Again check box.




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Choosing a color from the Color Docker window
         The Color Docker window can be docked to any edge of the Application
         Window or float as a separate window. You can also change the appearance
         and size of the Color Docker window. The Color Docker window allows you
         access other tools and windows while the Color Docker window remains
         open. The Color Docker window displays primarily the HSB Hue based color
         space. You can view the colors expressed as numerical values in other color
         spaces.

         To choose a from the Color Docker window
         1 Click Window, Dockers, Colors.
         2 Select your object.
         3 Do one of the following:
           Ÿ Drag the small box in the color selection area to the color you want to
             use.
           Ÿ Move the color slider up or down to change the range of colors
             displayed in the color selection area.
           Ÿ Type numeric values in the color space spin boxes.
         4 Do one of the following:
           Ÿ Click the Fill button to select the color as the Fill color.
           Ÿ Click the Outline button to select the color as the Outline color.

         To view the color in another color space
         1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
         2 From the list box at the top of the Color Docker window select the color
           space you want to see the colors numerical expressed as.


         Ÿ The color selection area displays the default HSB Hue based color space.
           If you do choose Grayscale, you will see a different color space and the
           numerical value available is Lightness (L).



         Ÿ You can see the Fill and Outline colors and their numeric values on the
           bottom of the Application window.




                                                         Working with color       317
Working with Multiple On-Screen Color Palettes
         Multiple on-screen Color Palettes provide quick access to numerous palettes
         and to the colors you use most. You can display any fixed or custom color
         palette as an on-screen Color Palette. On-screen Color Palettes can be
         docked to any edge of the Application Window or float as a separate window.
         You can change the appearance and size of one or all multiple on-screen
         Color Palettes. The advantage of having access to multiple on-screen Color
         Palettes is that it gives you the ability to create a custom palette by dragging
         color swatches from any palette to your custom palette. This does not
         remove the color swatch from the source palette, but rather copies the color
         swatch onto your custom palette.

Accessing On-Screen Color Palettes
         This procedure explains how to access different on-screen Color Palettes.
         For information on changing individual colors, see “Customizing Color
         Palettes” on page 320. Spot colors in the on-screen Color Palette are marked
         by a dot in the bottom left corner of the color swatch.

         To access an On-Screen Color Palette
         Ÿ Click Window, Color Palettes, click on the on-screen Color Palette you
           want to display.

         To open an On-Screen Color Palette
         1 Click Window, Color Palettes, click Color Palette Browser.
         2 To open a palette enable the check box beside the palette(s) in the Color
           Palette Browser Docker Window.

         To open an On-Screen Color Palette that is not in the Color
         Palettes Browser Docker Window
         1 Do one of the following:
            Ÿ Click Window, Color Palette, and click Color Palette Browser Docker
              Window.
            Ÿ Click Window, Color Palette, and Open Palette.
         2 Click Open at the bottom of the Color Palettes Browser Docker Window.
         3 Select the Palette you wish to open.




318      CorelDRAW: Chapter 8
          To close an On-Screen Color Palette
          Ÿ Do one of the following:
             Ÿ Disable the check box beside the palette in the Color Palettes Browser
               Docker Window.
             Ÿ Right-click the on-screen Color Palette’s title bar to hide it.


          Ÿ Any docked on-screen Color Palette can be identified by placing the cursor
            over a color swatch and its name will appear beneath in a tip box. Floating
            on-screen Color Palettes display their name in their Title Bar.


Changing the Default On-Screen Color Palette
          The Default on-screen Color Palette is the color palette that you will see in
          any of the drop down color pickers. You can select any Color Palette to be the
          Default on-screen Color Palette.

          To choose a different default On-Screen Color Palette
          Ÿ Right-click, hold and release on a color swatch of the on-screen Color
            Palette you want as your default on-screen Color Palette, and click Set As
            Default Palette.

Changing the position and size of an On-Screen Color Palette
          You can float the on-screen Color Palette in the Application Window or dock
          the on-screen Color Palette and change its size.

          To undock the on-screen Color Palette
          Ÿ Do one of the following:
             Ÿ Hold down the mouse button on the border of the on-screen Color
               Palette and drag it away from the edge of the Application Window.
             Ÿ Double Click on the border of the on-screen Color Palette.

          To dock the On-Screen Color Palette
          Ÿ Do one of the following:
             Ÿ Drag the title bar of the on-screen Color Palette to any edge of the
               Application Window.
             Ÿ Double click on the title bar to return the Floating on-screen Palette.



                                                          Working with color          319
         To specify the number of rows in a docked On-Screen Color
         Palette
         1 Right-click the on-screen Color Palette, and click Properties.
         2 Type a value in the Maximum palette Rows When Docked box.

Customizing the On-Screen Color Palette
         You are able to customize the appearance and behavior of the on-screen
         Color Palette to match the way you work. You can choose to work with large
         color swatch boxes and display or hide the No Color color swatch. If you have
         difficulty right-clicking on the gray area of the on-screen Color Palette to
         access the pop-up menu, you can set the right mouse button to display the
         pop-up menu.

         To use large swatches
         1 Right-click the on-screen Color Palette, and click Properties.
         2 Enable the Large Swatches check box.

         To display a No Color color swatch
         1 Right-click the on-screen Color Palette, and click Properties.
         2 Enable the Show No Color well check box.

         To change the behavior of the right mouse button
         1 Right-click the on-screen Color Palette, and click Properties.
         2 Click one of the following buttons:
            Ÿ Display Pop-Up Menu
            Ÿ Set Outline Color


         Ÿ The Pop up menu can still be shown, using the right mouse key to click
           and release.


Customizing Color Palettes
         Custom Color Palettes are collections of colors that you save as a color
         palette file (.CPL file extension.) These palettes can contain both spot colors
         and colors created using any color model. Many previously created custom
         palettes are available to you in the Palette folder or you can create new
         palettes from scratch. Custom palettes are useful when you repeatedly select


320      CorelDRAW: Chapter 8
         the same colors or when you want to work with a set of colors that look good
         together. There are three ways to customize a palette: create a custom
         palette using the Palette Editor, use the “New Palette From Selection”
         command, or “New Palette From Document” command.

Creating custom palettes
         When you create a custom palette, the palette is empty and ready for you to
         choose the colors you want to include in it. You can create a custom palette
         that includes all the colors from the object that you selected or from the
         current document.

         To create a custom palette
         1 Click Window, Color Palette, Palette Editor.
         2 Click the New button.
         3 Specify a palette filename (.CPL file extension.)
         4 Include a description of the palette in the Description box.
         5 Click Save.

         To create a new palette from Selection
         1 Click Window, Color Palettes, Create Palette From Selection.
         2 Specify a palette filename (.CPL file extension.)
         3 Include a description of the palette in the Description box.
         4 Click Save.

         To create a new palette from a document
         1 Click Window, Color Palettes, Create Palette From Document.
         2 Specify a palette filename (.CPL file extension.)
         3 Include a description of the palette in the Description box.
         4 Click Save.


         Ÿ The description you write in the Description box becomes the name of the
           new custom palette. If you do not write in a description, the filename is
           displayed as the palette name.




                                                        Working with color         321
          Ÿ Select your objects before using the New Palette From Selection
            command.
          Ÿ A document must be open before using the New Palette From Document
            command.


Editing an existing Custom Palette
          There are five commands you can use to edit your custom palettes: Edit
          Color, Add Color, Delete Color, Sort Colors, and Reset Palette. Your palette
          does not need to be open in order to edit it. Palettes that are currently open
          appear in the Palette list box. Remember to save before you exit the Palette
          Editor or your changes will be lost.

          To edit an unopened custom palette
          1 Click Window, Color Palettes, Palette Editor.
          2 Do one of the following:
             Ÿ Click the Open button.
             Ÿ Choose Open Palette from the list box at the top of the Palette Editor
               dialog box.
          3 Click palette filename you want to open.
          4 Select the modifying command you wish to use.

          To edit an open palette that is currently open
          1 Click Window, Color Palettes, Palette Editor.
          2 Choose the palette from the list box at the top of the Palette Editor dialog
            box.
          3 Click Edit Color.

          To edit a color within your palette
          1 Click Window, Color Palettes, Palette Editor.
          2 Choose the palette from the list box at the top of the Palette Editor dialog
            box.
          3 Click Edit Color.
          4 Edit the color in the Select Color dialog box.
          5 Click OK to change colors.




322       CorelDRAW: Chapter 8
         To add a color within your palette
         1 Click Window, Color Palettes, Palette Editor.
         2 Choose the palette from the list box at the top of the Palette Editor dialog
           box.
         3 Click Add Color.
         4 Select a new color in the Select Color dialog box.
         5 Click Add To Palette.

         To delete a color within your palette
         1 Click Window, Color Palettes, Palette Editor.
         2 Choose the palette from the list box at the top of the Palette Editor dialog
           box.
         3 Select the color you wish to delete from your palette.
         4 Click Delete Color.

         To sort colors within your palette
         1 Click Window, Color Palettes, Palette Editor.
         2 Choose the palette from the list box at the top of the Palette Editor dialog
           box.
         3 Click sort colors and click the method you wish use to sort your colors.

         To reset the palette you are currently editing
         Ÿ Click Reset Palette if you want to cancel the changes you have made to
           your palette since the last time you saved changes.

Saving a custom palette
         Save the changes you make to a custom palette before exiting or your
         changes are lost.

         To save a palette with a new filename
         1 Click Window, Color Palettes, Palette Editor.
         2 Click the Save As button.
         3 Specify a folder and palette filename.




                                                        Working with color         323
Adding or deleting multiple colors in a Custom Palette
          The methods for choosing colors in the Palette Editor are identical to the
          methods available in the Uniform Fill dialog box. Select multiple colors from
          the Blend area, Fixed and Custom Palettes. For information about choosing a
          color, see “Choosing colors” on page 306.

          To add multiple colors to a custom palette
          1 Click Window, Color Palettes, Palette Editor.
          2 Choose the palette from the list box at the top of the Palette Editor dialog
            box.
          3 Click Add Color.
          4 In Select Color dialog box, do one of the following:
             Ÿ Position the cursor over the first color swatch you want to choose, hold
               down SHIFT, and click the color swatches you want to add to the
               palette.
             Ÿ Position the cursor over the first color swatch you want to choose, hold
               down CTRL, and click the color swatches that you want to add to the
               palette.
          5 Click Add To Palette.

          To delete multiple colors from a custom palette
          1 Click Window, Color Palettes, Palette Editor.
          2 Choose the palette from the list box at the top of the Palette Editor dialog
            box.
          3 In the color selection area, do one of the following:
             Ÿ Position the cursor over the first color swatch you want to delete, hold
               down SHIFT, and click the color swatches you want to delete from the
               palette.
             Ÿ Position the cursor over the first color swatch you want to delete, hold
               down CTRL, and click the color swatches you want to delete from the
               palette.
          4 Click the Delete Color button.




324       CorelDRAW: Chapter 8
         Ÿ Click the Reset Palette button to return the palette to the state it was in
           before you began making changes.
         Ÿ You can move individual colors by dragging them to a new position in the
           palette area.


Naming colors in a custom palette
         Naming colors helps you to keep track of, or quickly locate, colors in a
         custom palette.

         To name a color
         1 Click Window, Color Palettes, Palette Editor.
         2 Choose the palette from the list box at the top of the Palette Editor dialog
           box.
         3 Choose a color in the palette dialog.
         4 Type a name in the Name box.


Reproducing colors accurately
         Each piece of equipment you use to create a project has a specific range of
         colors it can reproduce. This is referred to as a device gamut. For example, a
         monitor displays a different range of colors, or color gamut, than the color
         gamut that reproduced on a printing press. It is important that the colors
         your customer requests are the colors you provide in your final product, be it
         in a magazine, or a newspaper, or on television or the Internet.
         This means that your document might include colors that appear properly on
         your monitor but can’t be reproduced on paper. Different monitors, scanners,
         printers, and other types of equipment all have slightly different color
         gamuts. Different color gamuts can occur even between similar models of
         equipment from the same manufacturer. For colors to be accurately
         translated from device to device, you need to account for the differences
         between the color gamuts of each device.

         Using a Color management system
         A color management system (CMS) can minimize the differences in color
         gamuts. Without a CMS, each application you use generates its own color
         profile, this means that your output colors may not be consistent. A CMS:
            Ÿ provides device profiles (scanner, monitor, printer) to map the color
              spaces between these devices



                                                        Working with color          325
         Ÿ can convert from one color model to another color model (for example,
           from RGB to CMYK)
         Ÿ provides accurate on-screen or print previews of colors when printed
           to allow color corrections
      Without color management system, it is not possible to accurately achieve
      color consistency throughout the publishing process which involves the use
      of different devices or systems. Enabling color correction causes on-screen
      colors to look duller than they did before color correction was enabled.

      Choosing Color Profiles
      Profiles, or ICC Color Profiles, are files in a format defined by the
      International Color Consortium. They describe the color characteristics of
      color devices and color spaces. Color management software, such as the
      software in CorelDRAW, uses ICC profiles to transform colors from device to
      device, and from one color space to another. Having the right profiles is
      important to getting good color.
      Corel software ships with many pre-defined profiles for scanners, monitors,
      and printers that you can choose to load into your system. Many device
      manufacturers have ICC Color Profiles available for you to download. Work
      with profiles that most closely match the devices you have on your system.
      When you first install your software, generic device profiles will be selected
      for you to use.
      There are 5 profiles you can set to manage color. Use the Monitor profile
      when displaying documents to your monitor. Use the Scanner profile when
      scanning images from a scanner device. Use the Composite Printer profile
      when printing to a local or networked color printer. Use the Separations
      Printer profile to define CMYK colors in your documents and when creating
      color separation for printing. Use the Internal RGB profile to define RGB
      colors in your documents. Changing any of these profile will influence the
      colors you see and get from the software.
      The quickest approach for setting profiles is to set the Monitor profile to the
      profile for your monitor, and the Composite Printer profile to the profile for
      your local printer. If you have a special RGB color space you need to work in,
      you can change the Internal RGB profile to that color space. If you are
      scanning and have a profile for your scanner, choose your scanner’s profile
      from the scanner list.

      Using Embedded color profiles
      Embedded color profiles take into account the different color gamuts that
      exist and provide cross-platform communication of the different color spaces.
      A color profile is a description of a device’s color handling capabilities and
      characteristics. An embedded color profile is a color profile, attached to or


326   CorelDRAW: Chapter 8
embedded into a color document. It describes the color space of the colors
contained within the document. Corel supports ICC-embedded profiles. This
allows the same color profile to be communicated across platforms, and
ensures accurate color management throughout the publishing process.
Embedded color profiles ensure accurate color reproduction between the
input (scanner) and the output (printer) device. The ability to embed ICC
profiles into many file formats, including CorelDRAW .CPT and .CDR
formats, allows for consistent color spaces between all applications that
support ICC profiles. TIFF and .EPS formats are supported by CorelDRAW.
Use Color profiles to correct on-screen colors so each color displays as
accurately as possible based on its color values. Color profiles can display
colors on screen as they will appear when they are printed. Proper color
profiles can also warn you when a selected color is outside your printer’s
color gamut. Accurate color profiles of your scanner, monitor, and printer
make it possible for colors to be corrected so the color you see on the screen
matches the color in the final output.

Setting the General color settings
The General color settings page contains several additional controls for color
behavior. The first three check boxes let you control how colors from some
special palettes are separated when printing to color separations. With the
check boxes enabled, colors from these palettes separate into their own
individual printing plates.
The next group of check boxes control several functions. Enabling “Show
CMYK in percentages” causes the screen display of CMYK values to fall into
the range of 0 to 100. Disabling this option causes CMYK values to display
within the range 0 to 255. “Map spot colors into CMYK gamut” is a useful
option which allows you to avoid making additional color separation plates for
any spot colors contained in your document. Spot colors separate into the
basic C, M, Y, and K printing plates for the printing process. “Composite
printer simulates color output of separations printer” is useful for previewing
on a local printer what the document will look like when printed on a printing
press as color separations. It does this by using the color profiles of both the
local printer and the separations printer.
The “Rendering Intent” drop down list, controls the method the color
management system uses when it converts colors between spaces that are
different sizes or different gamuts. The problem is what to do with colors in
one space that are not part of the other space? How do you pick a color in the
smaller space to represent the starting color in the larger space? There are
three ways to do this. The Rendering Intent option lets you control the
method used.
If you choose Saturation, a matching color is chosen so that the saturation
component is maximized. It emphasizes saturation in colors, and may cause


                                               Working with color          327
      noticeable shifts in out-of-gamut colors. This is the best for vector graphics
      (lines, text, and solid colored objects.)
      If you choose Perceptual, a matching color is chosen so that it and all colors
      that are like it, all have the same relationship to each other in the new color
      space. There is no abrupt changes between colors, but all colors are
      somewhat different in the new color space. It shifts all the colors in an image
      so the range of colors lies within the color gamut. This ensures that the
      relationship between colors is unchanged. This technique works extremely
      well for bitmaps and photographic-like images
      If you choose Automatic, the application chooses for you on an
      object-by-object basis: vector objects will use Saturation, and bitmap objects
      will use Perceptual. Automatic is the default mode.

      Calibrating your equipment
      It is equally important that you calibrate your devices before working on a
      project in order to achieve color consistency. Calibration refers to the process
      of building a profile for your monitor, so its particular color characteristics are
      captured for use by a color management system. After calibrating your
      monitor, you know what its color space limits are and what colors you expect
      it to produce.

      Calibrating your monitor
      All monitors respond differently to the same electronic information. Two
      identical monitors from the same manufacturer respond differently and
      display slightly different colors on screen when provided with the identical
      color file. This is due to a number of factors such as monitor age, ambient
      lighting, or monitor settings. To achieve consistent color reproduction, it is
      recommended that you calibrate your monitor and be aware of factors that
      can affect your monitor’s performance.
      The following are recommendations to aid you in achieving accurate color
      reproduction in your projects.
      Ÿ Warm up your monitor for up to one hour before beginning calibration.
      Ÿ Clean your monitor screen before beginning calibration.
      Ÿ Manually adjust your monitor controls and tape them down so they are not
        accidentally readjusted after system calibration.
      Ÿ Calibrate your monitor on a regular basis, especially if it is an older
        monitor because phosphors fade over time.
      Ÿ Have consistent lighting. Each type of lighting, fluorescent, incandescent,
        and natural, will affect the colors you see displayed on your monitor. Avoid




328   CorelDRAW: Chapter 8
   natural light as much as possible since this changes constantly throughout
   the day. Consider having grid diffusers installed over fluorescent lighting.
Ÿ Use a neutral background on your monitor and for your work area to avoid
  influencing your perception of colors.
Ÿ Take breaks. Give your eyes a rest throughout your work period. Take the
  time to look away from your monitor to avoid eye strain and fatigue.
Ÿ If you view your work on more then one monitor, make sure they are all
  set at the same white point.
Ÿ Use monitor profile building software to build a profile for your monitor.

Calibrating your scanner
Perform scanner calibration every month or so, depending on use. Scanner
bulbs change color with age, affecting the color of your scans. Keep the glass
clean to improve scanning quality.
There are several tools available for scanner calibration. All of them use the
same basic technique: place a known source image on the scanner, scan the
image, and look at the colors recorded. Knowing what the values, the colors
should be and comparing them to the colors scanned, build a profile that
corrects the scanner to produce the right colors. Refer to the accessories
that came with your software or your scanner for more information. After
you have made your profile, you set it as your Scanner profile.

Calibrating your printer
Color from printers can vary widely, from day to day, from printer to printer,
and from one set of inks or color sheets to another. Colors are influenced by
the paper used. Inkjet printers, for example, take a wide variety of papers:
plain copy paper, coated paper, glossy paper, and many other types of paper.
The interaction between the inks and the paper affects the resulting colors.
To insure accurate color, create a profile for each combination of media (inks,
paper, etc.), and update the profiles as conditions change. Printers age with
time, and this, too, can cause colors to shift. Updating profiles periodically
will ensure your printer colors are as accurate as possible.
Given all the warnings above, you can still get decent color behavior from a
stock or pre-made color profile for your printer. The general behavior of the
printer and inks will be captured in such a profile, and the differences due to
age and paper will be ignored.
To make a profile for your printer, use a third party printer or output
profile-making tools. You need a device to “read” the colors produced by your
printer. There are several profile making tools available that let you scan the
printer output on a calibrated scanner. The end result is a printer profile that
you can use as your Composite Printer profile.


                                                Working with color         329
Correcting color
          Color correction adjusts screen colors to display them as accurately as
          possible. If you only correct the display colors, then the on-screen colors are
          adjusted according to your monitor’s color profile. If you display colors as
          they will print, then the on-screen colors are adjusted according to your
          monitor and your printer’s color profiles. The color matching mode
          determines how colors are adjusted when corrections are necessary.

          To color correct display colors
          1 Click Tools, Color Management.
          2 Enable the Calibrate Colors For Display check box.


          Ÿ This check box must be enabled in order to use color management.


          To display colors as they will print
          1 Follow steps 1 to 2 from the previous procedure.
          2 Enable the Display Simulated Printer Colors check box.
          3 Do one of the following:
             Ÿ Click the Simulate Composite Printer button to display colors as they
               will print on a composite printer.
             Ÿ Click the Simulate Separations Printer button to display colors as they
               will print on a printer that uses color separations.

          To change the color matching mode
          1 Follow step 1 from the “To color correct display colors” procedure.
          2 In the list of categories, click General.
          3 Choose one of the following from the Color Matching Mode list box:
             Ÿ Saturation
             Ÿ Perceptual
             Ÿ Automatic


          Ÿ You won’t see the effects of changing the color mode on screen if color
            correction is not enabled.




330       CorelDRAW: Chapter 8
Viewing out-of-gamut colors
                        When enabled, the gamut alarm, overlays out-of-gamut colors with a warning
                        color.
The bright yellow
portions of the chair
and hat represent
out-of-gamut colors.




                        To enable the gamut alarm
                        1 Click Tools, Color Management.
                        2 Enable the Highlight Colors Out Of Printer Gamut check box.

                        To change the warning color
                        1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
                        2 Choose a color from the Warning Color picker.
                        3 Move the transparency slider to set the transparency of the warning color.

                        To view out-of-gamut colors in the Palette Editor
                        1 Click Window, Color Palettes, Palette Editor.
                        2 Click on one of the following:
                           Ÿ Edit Color
                           Ÿ Add Color
                        3 In the Select Color dialog box, click Options, Gamut Alarm.

Setting color profiles
                        Setting color profiles properly is required for accurate color reproduction.
                        When you are setting up a color profile, use the provided profile. If color
                        profiles are not available, obtain a professionally created profile from the
                        manufacturer of the device. Color profiles are often available through the
                        Internet.



                                                                        Working with color             331
         To set the appropriate color profiles
         1 Click Tools, Color Management, and click Profiles in the list of categories.
         2 Choose a profile from the Monitor, Scanner, Composite Printer,
           Separations Printer and Internal RGB list boxes.


         Ÿ Many of the supplied printer color profiles were created using ColorBlind
           color management software. For more information regarding ColorBlind
           and color profiles, contact Color Solutions, Inc. at http://www.color.com.
         Ÿ If you are sending your file off to a print shop, ask for a profile for their
           printer.


Choosing General Color Settings
         The General color settings page in the Options dialog box contains additional
         controls for color behavior. The first three check boxes let you control how
         colors from some special palettes are separated when printing to color
         separations. Map spot colors into CMYK gamut if you want to avoid
         additional color separation plates for any spot colors contained in your
         document. Spot colors require their own individual printing plates and add
         additional costs to the printing process. For more information see “Creating
         color separations” on page 729. The next set of checkboxes control the
         behavior of CMYK color space. The Rendering Intent list box controls the
         method the color management system uses when it converts colors between
         spaces that are different sizes.

         To treat FOLCOLTONE, TOYO and DIC colors as spot inks
         1 Click Tools, Color Management, and click Profiles.
         2 Enable the color palette check box you want as spot inks.

         To control the behavior of CMYK color space
         1 Click Tools, Color Management, and click Profiles.
         2 Enable the CMYK behavior check box you want to control.

         To select the method of color space conversion
         1 Click Tools, Color Management, and click Profiles.
         2 Click one of the following methods of color space conversion from the
           Rendering Intent list box:
            Ÿ Automatic


332      CorelDRAW: Chapter 8
   Ÿ Perceptual
   Ÿ Saturation


Ÿ Saturation works well for vector graphics (lines, text, and solid colored
  objects.)
Ÿ Perceptual works well for bitmaps and photographic-like images.




                                               Working with color         333
334   CorelDRAW: Chapter 8
       WORKING WITH TEXT                                                        9
       CorelDRAW lets you apply word-processing features to text. Using the Text
       tool, you can create Artistic text and Paragraph text. Artistic text is best
       when you’re working with short lines of text because you can apply a large
       range of effects. For larger bodies of text that have greater formatting
       requirements, you should create Paragraph text.
       After adding text to documents, you can change the text type (e.g., from
       Paragraph text to Artistic text) or convert Artistic text to curves. Before you
       start any task, you must select the text. You can enhance text by embedding
       graphics, and adding symbols and special characters. CorelDRAW lets you
       edit text in the Drawing Window and the Edit Text dialog box.
       Some formatting features apply to both Artistic text and Paragraph text. For
       example, spacing text and applying bold formatting. Other formatting
       features apply only to Paragraph text. For example, adding columns and drop
       caps.
       Managing Paragraph text frames can involve basic tasks, such as moving
       frames, or more involved tasks, such as linking frames to direct the flow of
       text.
       You can create effects by fitting Artistic text to a path. You can also customize
       this effect. For example, you can change the distance between the text and
       path.
       While working with text, you can use the writing tools to verify grammar and
       spelling, replace a word with a synonym, create a user word list for the
       writing tools to use, or generate a count of text elements.
       You may need to open a document containing fonts that aren’t installed on
       your system. You can substitute these missing fonts for fonts that are
       available on your system. You can accept the PANOSE suggestions or choose
       a font.
       By changing the default text preferences that control how text and text
       features are displayed, you may find working with text more efficient.


Adding, converting, and selecting text
       In CorelDRAW, you create both Paragraph text and Artistic text with the Text
       tool. Clicking in the Drawing Window and typing, creates Artistic text.
       Adding a Paragraph text frame first and typing text in the frame, creates




                                                        Working with text          337
                      Paragraph text. You can think of Paragraph text frames as containers that
                      hold text.
Adding Paragraph
text to a Paragraph
text frame.




                      There are two types of Paragraph text frames: fixed-sized and automatically
                      sized. When you add a frame of a fixed size, the size of the frame you draw
                      doesn’t change. If you type more text than the frame can hold, the frame size
                      doesn’t change, and the text is cut off. If you choose to add a frame that sizes
                      automatically, the frame size adjusts vertically according to the amount of
                      text you type.
                      After you create a text object you can convert the text type. For example,
                      you can convert Artistic text to Paragraph text and vice versa.
                      When you’re working with Artistic text, you can modify the shape of
                      characters. Before you do this, you must convert the text to curves. By
                      converting, you can transform characters to single line and curve objects.
                      Then you can use the Shape tool to add, delete, or move the nodes
                      comprising a character to alter its shape.
                      Before performing any operation to text, you need to select the text. The tool
                      you use to select a character, line, or paragraph varies with the operation.
                      When you select a text object, eight selection handles and an X appears in
                      the center of the object. By clicking the center X, you can transform, apply
                      special effects, and make global formatting changes to whole text objects. For
                      information about transforming text, see “Transforming objects” on page
                      261. For information about what special effects you can apply to text, see
                      “Creating special effects” on page 431.


                      Ÿ You can add Asian characters when you’re running one of the following
                        versions of Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows NT Workstation 4:
                        Korean, Chinese simplified, Chinese traditional, or Japanese. When you’re
                        running CorelDRAW on the Arabic, Hebrew, or English BiDi enabled
                        version of Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows NT 4, you can add




338                   CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
                         bidirectional text. For more information, see the Reference section of the
                         online Help.
                      Ÿ You can also add text using the Clipboard. When you use the Special Paste
                        command, you can insert text as Paragraph text, as Artistic text, or as an
                        OLE object, provided the originating application is OLE compliant and it is
                        open. For information about importing, see “Importing, exporting, and
                        OLE” on page 743.


Adding Paragraph text
                      You can add Paragraph text to a drawing by adding a frame. You can add a
                      Paragraph text frame that maintains its size or one that adjusts vertically as
                      you type.
Adding Paragraph
text to frames that
size automatically.




                      To add Paragraph text in fixed-sized frames
                      1 Click the Text tool.
                      2 Click anywhere in the Drawing Window and drag away (in any direction)
                        from this point to size the Paragraph text frame.
                         The frame is created when you release the mouse button. The text cursor
                         appears at the top left corner of the frame if your default alignment is set
                         to Left or None.
                      3 Type in the Paragraph text frame.




                                                                       Working with text         339
                        Ÿ You can automatically adjust the size of text to fill the frame. For more
                          information, see “Fitting text to a Paragraph text frame” on page 380.


                        To add Paragraph text in automatically-sized frames
                        1 Click Tools, Options.
                        2 In the list of categories, double-click Text, and click Paragraph.
                        3 Enable the Expand And Shrink Paragraph Text Frames To Fit Text check
                          box.
                        4 Click OK.
                        5   Follow all of the steps from the previous procedure.

Adding Artistic text
                        You can add Artistic text to a drawing to add short lines of text to a
                        document, especially if you plan to work with special effects.
Adding Artistic text.




                        To add Artistic text
                        1 Click the Text tool.
                        2 Click anywhere in the Drawing Window, and type.

Converting Artistic text to Paragraph text and vice versa
                        You can convert from one text type to another.

                        To convert Paragraph text to Artistic text
                        1 Select the Paragraph text frame with the Pick tool.
                        2 Click Text, Convert To Artistic Text.



340                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
          To convert Artistic text to Paragraph text
          1 Select the Artistic text with the Pick tool.
          2 Click Text, Convert To Paragraph Text.


          Ÿ If you convert Paragraph text to Artistic text, you lose attributes that are
            specific to Paragraph text, such as columns, tabs, and drop caps.
          Ÿ You cannot convert Paragraph text to Artistic text when: the frame
            containing the Paragraph text is linked to another frame, the Paragraph
            text has special effects applied to it, or the Paragraph text overflows the
            frame that contains it.
          Ÿ If the Paragraph text overflows the frame, you can change the font size so
            that the text fits the frame exactly. For more information, see “Fitting text
            to a Paragraph text frame” on page 380.



          Ÿ You can also convert one text type to another using the Convert Text
            button on the Property Bar.


Converting Artistic text to curves
          You can convert Artistic text to curves to manipulate individual nodes to
          change the shape of characters.

          To convert Artistic text to curves
          1 Select the Artistic text with the Pick tool.
          2 Click Arrange, Convert To Curves.
          3 Open the Shape Edit Flyout, and click the Shape tool.
          4 Shape the text.


          Ÿ Converting text to curves ensures that the appearance of the fonts used in
            your drawing are not compromised when another user views your file.




                                                           Working with text          341
                        Ÿ After you convert Artistic text to curves, text commands are no longer
                          available. The converted object will print as curves using your printer
                          fonts.
                        Ÿ For more information about using the Shape tool to shape, modify, and
                          delete nodes, see “Drawing and shaping objects” on page 85.



                        Ÿ You can also convert text to curves using the Convert To Curves button
                          on the Property Bar.


Selecting Paragraph and Artistic text
                        You can select characters or paragraphs within a line of Artistic text or a
                        Paragraph text frame. You can also select text with the Shape tool to
                        manipulate characters individually.
Selection handles and
a center X appear
when you select text.




                        To select specific characters
                        1 Click the Text tool.
                        2 Click at the beginning or end of a word or sentence in the Artistic text or
                          Paragraph text frame.
                        3   Drag the cursor across the text you want to select.

                        To select a whole text object
                        1 Click the Text tool.
                        2 Click the text object.




342                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
       Ÿ When you’re changing the font of the whole text object, you need to select
         the text with the Pick tool.



       Ÿ Select multiple text objects by holding down SHIFT as you click with the
         Text tool.
       Ÿ You can also select whole text objects using the Pick tool.


       To select single characters
       1 Open the Shape Edit flyout, and click the Shape tool.
       2 Select the text.
          Character nodes appear next to each character.
       3 Click the node to the left of a character to select it.


       Ÿ Select multiple nodes by holding down SHIFT as you click with the Shape
         tool.


Adding graphics, symbols, and special characters
       Enhance text by adding special characters and symbols, or embedding
       graphics.
       You can add special characters and symbols to text as a text object or as a
       graphic object. When you add symbols and special characters to text,
       CorelDRAW treats them as text. When you add them as graphic objects,
       CorelDRAW treats special characters and symbols as curves. Consequently,
       the symbol is a separate graphic object, that you can edit as you would other
       graphic objects or use to create background patterns for a document.
       When you tile symbols, each symbol within the pattern is a separate object to
       which you can apply effects. You can change the spacing between the rows
       and columns in which the symbols are arranged.
       Additionally, you can change objects, such as company logos or modified
       letter shapes, into symbol characters and add them to the symbol sets in the
       Symbols And Special Characters Docker window. The object you use can be
       any size. CorelDRAW resizes it to match the proportions of other symbols in
       the set. Symbols you create appear at the end of the pattern list.
       When you embed a graphic object or bitmap into Artistic text and Paragraph
       text, it’s treated as a text character. As a result, you can apply formatting


                                                         Working with text       343
                      options according to the type of text into which you embed the graphic
                      object.

Adding symbols and special characters to a document
                      You can add a symbol as a text object or as a graphic object.
You can add symbols
as text or as a
graphic object.




                      To add a symbol or a special character as a text object
                      1 Select the text (Artistic text or Paragraph text frame) with the Text tool.
                      2 Place the insertion point where you want to add the symbol.
                      3 Click Window, Dockers, Symbols And Special Characters.
                      4 Choose a symbol category from the list box.
                      5 Double-click a symbol in the Sample window.


                      Ÿ You can type a value in the Size box to change the symbol height.


                      To add a symbol and special characters as a graphic object
                      1 Follow steps 3 to 5 from the previous procedure.
                      2 Click a symbol in the Sample window, and drag it to the Drawing Page.


                      Ÿ You can make more symbol fonts available by adding them during a
                        custom installation of CorelDRAW.
                      Ÿ You can change the default outline and fill properties of symbols and
                        special characters that you add as graphic objects. For more information
                        about styles, see “Working with styles” on page 144.




344                   CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
                    Ÿ You can also choose a symbol by typing its index number in the Number
                      (#) box. The CorelDRAW Libraries Catalog list index numbers.


Embedding graphic objects in text
                    You can embed graphics into Artistic text or Paragraph text. You can also
                    remove an embedded object from text. The object returns to its original
                    state.
Embedding graphic
objects in text.




                    To embed graphic objects in text
                    1 Select the graphic object with the Pick tool.
                    2 Hold down the right mouse button, and drag the graphic object to its
                      desired location in the text.
                       The cursor changes to an insert in text cursor.
                    3 Click one of the following:
                       Ÿ Move Into Text — to move the graphic object from the Drawing
                         Window into the frame
                       Ÿ Copy Into Text — to copy the graphic object into the frame


                    Ÿ You must save the file as a version 8 or 9 file to preserve the graphic
                      object in text.
                    Ÿ You can apply special effects to the graphic object (for example, envelope,
                      blend, and distortion) before you embed it in text.




                                                                      Working with text         345
                    Ÿ You can also drag an embedded graphic from one frame to another. For
                      more information, see “Editing by dragging in the Drawing Window” on
                      page 348.


                    To remove an embedded object from the Paragraph text frame
                    1 Select the object from the text using the Text tool.
                    2 Hold down the right mouse button, and drag the graphic object to the
                      Drawing Window.
                    3 Click Move Here.


                    Ÿ You can also copy the object to the Drawing Window by clicking Copy
                      Here.


Creating a pattern using symbols
                    You can create background patterns by tiling symbols.
Tiling symbols to
create a pattern.




                    To create a pattern using symbols
                    1 Click View, Dockers, Symbols.
                    2 Choose a symbol category from the list box.



346                 CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
         3 Choose a symbol from the Sample window.
         4 Enable the Tile check box.
         5 Drag the symbol to the Drawing Page.

         To change the row and column spacing
         1 Follow steps 1 to 4 from the previous procedure.
         2 Click the Tile Options button.
         3 Do one of the following:
            Ÿ Type values in the Horizontal and Vertical boxes to specify the spacing
              between symbols.
            Ÿ Enable the Identical Values check box to maintain equal spacing around
              a symbol.
         4 Click OK.
         5 Drag the symbol to the Drawing Page.

Adding symbols and special characters to a symbol set
         You can add objects, such as company logos or modified letter shapes, to the
         symbol sets in the Symbols And Special Characters Docker window.

         To add a symbol
         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
         2 Click Tools, Create, Symbol.
         3 Type a name for a new symbol category, or choose an existing category
           from the list box.


         Ÿ To add a symbol or special character to a symbol set, the object must have
           a closed path. If the object contains multiple objects, you must combine all
           the objects. For more information, see “Combining two or more objects”
           on page 184. In addition, you must use TrueType fonts to create symbols.


Editing text
         You can edit Artistic text and Paragraph text directly in the Drawing Window
         or in the Edit Text dialog box.




                                                        Working with text         347
          When working with small bodies of text, you might find editing text directly
          in the Drawing window more convenient. You can edit Artistic and Paragraph
          text by dragging it.
          For large bodies of text, you may want to edit in the Edit Text dialog box,
          which lets you find and replace text and provides access to writing tools and
          formatting options. In cases where perspective, envelope, or extrude effects
          have been applied to Artistic text, you must use the Edit Text dialog box. For
          more information about perspective, envelope, and extrude, see “Creating
          special effects” on page 431.
          In addition, if you use the Edit Text dialog box frequently, you may want to
          change your default settings to display it automatically when you click the
          Text tool. You can also use the Microsoft Intellimouse to scroll through the
          Edit Text dialog box.

Editing by dragging in the Drawing Window
          You can change your default settings and edit a line of Artistic text or
          Paragraph text by dragging in the Drawing Window. You can drag Artistic text
          to a Paragraph text frame, and you can drag Paragraph text between frames.

          To edit text by dragging in the Drawing Window
          1 Click Tools, Options.
          2 In the list of categories, click Text.
          3 Enable the Drag And Drop Text Editing check box.
          4 Using the Text tool, select the text you want to move.
          5 Hold down the right mouse button, and drag the text to its new location.
          6 Click one of the following:
             Ÿ Move Here
             Ÿ Copy Here


          Ÿ You can drag an embedded graphic in a Paragraph text frame to another
            frame. For more information, see “Embedding graphic objects in text” on
            page 345.


Editing text in the Edit Text dialog box
          You can edit text in the Edit Text dialog box.




348       CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
          To type or edit text in the Edit Text dialog box
          1 Select the text with the Text tool.
          2 Click Text, Edit Text.
          3 Type your changes as required.


          Ÿ You can only edit Artistic text that hasn’t been converted to curves.
          Ÿ The Edit Text dialog box doesn’t display changes you make to spacing.


Finding and replacing text characters in the Edit Text dialog box
          You can search a document to find text you want to edit. You can also find and
          replace text.

          To find text characters
          1 In the Edit Text dialog box, click the Options button, and click Find Text.
          2 Type the text you want to find in the Find What box.
          3 Enable the Match Case check box to find the exact case of the text you
            specified, if required.
          4 Click the Find Next button.
             CorelDRAW finds the first text block that contains the characters you
             specified.


          Ÿ You can also find text characters in the Drawing Window by clicking Edit,
            Find And Replace, Find Text.


          To find and replace text characters
          1 In the Edit Text dialog box, click the Options button, and click Replace
            Text.
          2 Type the text you want to find in the Find What box.
          3 Type the replacement text in the Replace With box.
          4 Enable the Match Case check box to find the exact case of the text you
            specified in the Find What and Replace With boxes, if required.
          5 Click one of the following buttons:



                                                          Working with text          349
             Ÿ Replace — replaces the first occurrence of the text specified in the
               Find What box
             Ÿ Replace All — replaces all occurrences of the text specified in the Find
               What box
             Ÿ Find Next — finds the next occurrence of the text specified in the
               Find What box


          Ÿ You can also find and replace text characters in the Drawing Window by
            clicking Edit, Find And Replace, Replace Text.


Displaying the Edit Text dialog box automatically
          You can change your default settings so that the Edit Text dialog box displays
          automatically when text is selected and you click the Text tool, when you
          select text using the Text tool, or when you click a blank space in the
          Drawing Window with the Text tool.

          To display the Edit Text dialog box automatically
          1 Click Tools, Options.
          2 In the list of categories, click Text.
          3 Disable the Edit Text On Screen check box.

Scrolling in the Edit Text dialog box using Intellimouse
          You can use the Microsoft IntelliMouse to scroll through the Edit Text dialog
          box.

          To scroll in the Edit Text dialog box using Intellimouse
          1 Click the wheel button.
          2 Point the mouse in the direction you want to scroll.
             To increase the panning rate, move the cursor away from the origin mark.
          3 Click the wheel button to stop scrolling.


          Ÿ You can also scroll by turning the wheel button.




350       CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
Formatting text
                        There are formatting properties you can apply to Artistic text and Paragraph
                        text. You can adjust the spacing between characters, words, and lines, as well
                        as enhance text by shifting and rotating characters.


                        Ÿ You can customize toolbars by adding buttons for the commands and
                          options you use most frequently. For more information, see “Customizing
                          toolbars” on page 804.


Applying character properties
                        You may want to enhance Artistic text and Paragraph text by modifying its
                        character properties, applying lines to text, and changing the text case. You
                        can change the font type and size of text, and apply bold and italic formatting.
                        You can accent text by underlining and overscoring (placing a line above the
                        text) it. The strikethrough feature lets you indicate text you may want to
                        remove. By changing the line properties of underlines, overscores, and
                        strikethroughs, you can further emphasize text.
                        If your document includes scientific notation, you can make text subscript or
                        superscript. You also can change the case of text. For example, you can
                        change lowercase text to title case without deleting or replacing characters.

Changing the font type and size
                        You can change the font type for specific characters or the whole text object.
                        You can also increase or decrease the size of text.
You can change (1)
text by altering the
(2) font type and (3)
size.




                        To change the font for specific characters
                        1 Select the text with the Text tool.



                                                                         Working with text          351
          2 Click Text, Format Text.
          3 Click the Font tab.
          4 Choose a font type from the Font list box.

          To change the font for the whole text object
          1 Select the text with the Pick tool.
          2 Follow steps 2 to 4 from the previous procedure.


          Ÿ You can also type a name in the Font list box.


          To change the font size
          1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
          2 Type a value in the Size box.


          Ÿ If someone else plans to view your file, each font you use in your
            document must also be installed on their machine. Otherwise,
            CorelDRAW substitutes the font using PANOSE. (For more information
            about PANOSE, see “Substituting unavailable fonts” on page 422. To avoid
            this problem, you can save the font with the document by enabling the
            Embed Fonts Using TrueDoc in the Save Drawing dialog box. Click File,
            Save As, and enable the Embed Fonts Using TrueDoc check box.



          Ÿ You can also change the font type and size using the Property Bar.


Applying bold and italic formatting
          You can apply bold and italic formatting to text.




352       CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
You can change (1)
text by applying (2)
bold and (3) italic
formatting.




                       To apply bold formatting
                       1 Select the text.
                       2 Click Text, Format Text.
                       3 Click the Font tab.
                       4 Choose Bold from the Style list box.


                       Ÿ You can also use the Bold button on the Property Bar to apply bold
                         formatting.


                       To apply italic formatting
                       1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
                       2 Choose Italic from the Style list box.


                       Ÿ Because some fonts do not support bold and italic properties, they are not
                         always available.



                       Ÿ You can also use the Italic button on the Property Bar to apply italic
                         formatting.


Adding, modifying, and removing underline, overscore, and
strikethrough formatting
                       You can apply underlines, overscores, and strikethroughs to text.




                                                                       Working with text          353
You can apply (1)
underlines, (2)
overscores, and (3)
strikethroughs to
text.




                      To underline text
                      1 Select the text.
                      2 Click Text, Format text.
                      3 Click the Font tab.
                      4 Choose a line style from the Underline list box.


                      Ÿ You can also underline text by clicking the Underline button on the
                        Property Bar.


                      To overscore text
                      1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
                      2 Choose a line style from the Overscore list box.

                      To strikethrough text
                      1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the “To underline text” procedure.
                      2 Choose a line style from the Strikethrough list box.

                      To remove underline, overscore, or strikethrough
                      1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the “To underline text” procedure.
                      2 Choose None from the Underline, Overscore, or Strikethrough list box.

Changing underline, overscore, and strikethrough line properties
                      You can change the thickness of underlines, overscores and strikethroughs.
                      You can also change the distance between text and a line.



354                   CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
                        To change the thickness of a line
                        1 Select the text to which underline, overscore, or stikethrough formatting
                          is applied.
                        2 Click Text, Format text.
                        3 Click the Font tab.
                        4 Click the Edit button next to the line type (Underline, Overscore, or
                          Strikethrough).
                        5 Type a value in the Thickness box to specify the line width.

                        To change distance between the line and text
                        1 Follow steps 1 to 4 from the previous procedure.
                        2 Type a value in the Baseline Shift box.
                        3 Choose a unit value from the Units list box.

Making text superscript or subscript
                        You can make text appear in superscript or subscript.
You can make text
(1) subscript and (2)
superscript.




                        To make text superscript
                        1 Select the text.
                        2 Click Text, Format Text.
                        3 Click the Font tab.
                        4 Choose Superscript from the Position list box.




                                                                         Working with text        355
                       To make text subscript
                       1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
                       2 Choose Subscript from the Position list box.


                       Ÿ You can also make text superscript by using the Shape tool to click the
                         Superscript button on the Property Bar.
                       Ÿ You can also make text subscript by using the Shape tool to click the
                         Subscript button on the Property Bar.


Changing text case
                       You can change text case without retyping the text.
You can change the
text case to (1)
sentences case, (2)
lowercase, (3)
uppercase, (4) title
case, and (5) toggle
case.




                       To change text case
                       1 Select the text you want to change with the Text tool.
                       2 Click Text, Change Case.
                       3 Enable one of the following text case buttons:
                          Ÿ Sentence Case — capitalizes the initial letter of the first word in each
                            sentence
                          Ÿ Lowercase — makes all text small letters
                          Ÿ Uppercase — capitalizes all letters



356                    CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
           Ÿ Title Case — capitalizes the initial letter of each word
           Ÿ Toggle Case — reverses the case; all capital letters become lowercase
             and all lowercase letters become uppercase

        To make text small caps
        1 Select the text.
        2 Click Text, Format Text.
        3 Click the Font tab.
        4 Choose Small Caps from the Uppercase list box.

Specifying text spacing
        By changing the spacing of Artistic text and Paragraph text, you can enhance
        the text and make it more readable. You can change the spacing between
        characters, words, and lines. When you space characters manually, you can
        change default settings to display or hide character outlines. You can also
        align Artistic text horizontally.
        You can change the space between all characters, all words, or characters and
        words proportionately. You can also kern specific characters. Kerning
        balances the optical space with other letters in a word or line. Kerning differs
        from spacing in that it affects only the white space between the specified
        characters.
        Changing the line spacing for Artistic text applies the spacing to lines of text
        with a carriage return between them. For Paragraph text, the space applies to
        lines of text within the same paragraph. You can also change the spacing
        before and after paragraphs for Artistic text and Paragraph text.
        Setting a value for character outlines determines whether CorelDRAW
        shows the outlines of characters you’re spacing manually. If the number of
        characters selected is less than or equal to the value you specify,
        CorelDRAW displays their outlines as you space them.
        Aligning Artistic text is different from aligning Paragraph text. When you
        align Paragraph text, you align text with respect to the frame. For more
        information, see “Aligning Paragraph text horizontally” on page 367.
        However, when you align Artistic text, it is aligned with the point you first
        clicked when you entered the text. If characters have not been shifted
        horizontally, applying No Alignment produces the same result as applying
        Left Alignment.




                                                         Working with text         357
                       Ÿ Options available for specifying text spacing depend on the tool you use to
                         select the text. Selecting with the Text tool or the Pick tool lets you adjust
                         spacing between characters, words, lines, and paragraphs. Selecting with
                         the Text tool also lets you adjust kerning between a range of characters.
                         Selecting with the Shape tool lets you specify horizontal and vertical
                         spacing with precise values using the Property Bar.


Changing character and word spacing
                       You can change the spacing between characters, words, and paragraphs with
                       precision for both Artistic text and Paragraph text.
You can change the
(1) default spacing
between (2)
characters, (3)
words, and (4) words
and characters.




                       To change the spacing between characters
                       1 Select the text.
                       2 Click Text, Format Text.
                       3 Click the Space tab.
                       4    In the Character box, type a value for the amount of space you want to
                           insert between individual characters.
                           This value represents a percentage of the space character (the space
                           inserted when you press SPACEBAR). The maximum percentage value is
                           2000; the minimum percentage value is -100.




358                    CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
                       Ÿ You can change the spacing of all characters in a Paragraph text frame, or
                         selected paragraphs. To change spacing in the entire frame, select the
                         frame with the Pick tool. To change specific paragraphs only, select the
                         paragraphs with the Text tool.


                       To change spacing between words
                       1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
                       2 In the Word box, type a value for the amount of space you want to insert
                         between words.
                          This value represents a percentage of the space character (the space
                          inserted when you press SPACEBAR). The maximum percentage value is
                          2000; the minimum percentage value is 0.

                       To change spacing between words and characters
                       1 Open the Shape Edit flyout, and click the Shape tool.
                       2 Select the text.
                       3 Drag the Interactive Horizontal Spacing arrow right to increase, or left to
                         decrease the spacing.


                       Ÿ You can also change the spacing of selected characters by holding down
                         CTRL and dragging character nodes with the Shape tool.


Using range kerning
                       You can adjust the spacing between a selected series of letters to improve
                       their appearance on the printed page.
Kerning adjusts the
spacing between
selected characters.




                                                                      Working with text         359
                      To use range kerning
                      1 Using the Text tool, select two or more characters of Paragraph text or
                        Artistic text.
                      2 Click Text, Format Text.
                      3 Click the Font tab.
                      4 Type a value in the Range Kerning box.
                         This value represents a percentage of the space character (the space
                         inserted when you press SPACEBAR). The maximum percentage value is
                         1000; the minimum percentage value is -100.


                      Ÿ You can also use the Pick tool for Paragraph text.


Changing the spacing between lines
                      You can change the space between all lines. In Paragraph text frames, you
                      can adjust the spacing before and after paragraphs.
Changing the (1)
default spacing (2)
between lines.




                      To change spacing between lines
                      1 Select the text.
                      2 Click Text, Format Text.
                      3 Click the Space tab.
                      4 Choose a unit of measurement from the list box beside the Line box.
                         This value represents a percentage of the character height. The maximum
                         percentage value is 2000; the minimum percentage value is 0.
                      5 Type a value for the amount of space you want to add between the lines of
                        text in the Line box.


360                   CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
          To change the amount of space before a paragraph
          1 Select the Paragraph text frame or paragraph.
          2 Click Text, Format Text.
          3 Click the Space tab.
          4 Type a value in the Before Paragraph box to specify the amount of space
            you want before each paragraph.
             This value represents a percentage of character height for the chosen
             font.

          To change the amount of space after a paragraph
          1 Select the Paragraph text frame or paragraph.
          2 Click Text, Format Text.
          3 Click the Space tab.
          4 Type a value in the After Paragraph box to specify the amount of space
            you want after each paragraph.
             This value represents a percentage of character height for the chosen
             font.


          Ÿ When you change line spacing for Artistic text, the spacing applies to lines
            of text with a carriage return between them. For Paragraph text, the space
            applies to lines of text within the same paragraph.


Displaying character outlines when spacing
          You can specify a value to determine if CorelDRAW displays or hides
          character outlines when you space characters manually.

          To specify a display value for character outlines for manual
          kerning
          1 Click Tools, Options.
          2 In the list of categories, click Text.
          3 Type a value in the Display box.

Aligning Artistic text horizontally
          You can align Artistic text horizontally from the point you click when you
          enter text.


                                                          Working with text            361
          To align Artistic text horizontally
          1 Select Artistic text with the Pick tool.
          2 Click Text, Format Text.
          3 Click the Align tab.
          4 Enable one of the following buttons:
             Ÿ No Alignment — applies no justification
             Ÿ Left Alignment — aligns text along the left margin
             Ÿ Center Alignment — aligns text between the left and right margins
             Ÿ Right Alignment — aligns text along the right margin
             Ÿ Full Alignment — aligns text evenly along the left and right margins
             Ÿ Force Full Alignment — aligns text evenly along the left and right
               margins and stretches the last line to the right margin


          Ÿ You can align Artistic text horizontally only.



          Ÿ You can also align text using the alignment buttons on the Property Bar.


Shifting and rotating characters
          Shifting individual and multiple Artistic text and Paragraph text objects
          vertically and horizontally can add an interesting effect to text. You can also
          rotate characters.
          You can return characters you’ve shifted horizontally to the baseline and
          maintain a vertical shift or rotation. You can also remove vertical shifts and
          rotations.

Shifting characters horizontally and vertically
          You can shift characters horizontally and vertically. When you shift
          characters, you move them from the baseline.




362       CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
Shifting characters
horizontally and
vertically.




                        To shift a character horizontally
                        1 Select a text character.
                        2 Click Text, Format text.
                        3 Click the Align tab.
                        4 Type a value in the Horizontal box.

                        To shift a character vertically
                        1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
                        2 Type a value in the Vertical box.


                        Ÿ You can also shift characters with the Shape tool by typing values in the
                          Horizontal Shift box and Vertical Shift box on the Property Bar.


Rotating characters
                        You can rotate Artistic text and Paragraph text characters.
Rotating a character.




                                                                        Working with text        363
         To rotate a character
         1 Select a character.
         2 Click Text, Format text.
         3 Click the Align tab.
         4 Type a value in the Rotation box.


         Ÿ You can also rotate characters with the Shape tool by typing a value in the
           Angle of Rotation box on the Property Bar.


Straightening shifted and rotated characters
         You can straighten text characters that you’ve angled, shifted horizontally,
         and shifted vertically. You can remove the vertical shift only by returning
         characters to the baseline.

         To remove the rotation or shift
         1 Select the text with the Text tool.
         2 Click Text, Straighten Text.

         To return a character to the baseline
         1 Open the Shape Edit flyout, and click the Shape tool.
         2 Select the node to the left of the character.
         3 Click Text, Align To Baseline.


Formatting Paragraph text
         Formatting Paragraph text makes it more readable and effective. You can add
         columns, tabs, indents, bullets, and drop caps. You can also change the
         vertical and horizontal alignment, and automatically hyphenate text.


         Ÿ Paragraph text frames are also referred to as “frames.”


Adding columns to Paragraph text frames
         Columns are an effective way to lay out text-intensive documents, such as
         newspapers, magazines, and newsletters. You can create columns of equal or



364      CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
                    varying widths and gutters. When you add, edit, or delete columns, you can
                    maintain the width of the Paragraph text frame and resize the columns or you
                    can maintain the width of the columns and resize the frame.


                    Ÿ When you import text with column formatting, CorelDRAW maintains the
                      column formatting.
                    Ÿ You can change the vertical alignment of text in columns. For more
                      information, see “Aligning Paragraph text vertically” on page 367.


Adding and editing columns of equal widths
                    You can create columns of equal or varying widths and spacing. When you’re
                    adding and removing columns, you can fix the frame width or the column
                    width.
Adding columns of
equal widths.




                    To add columns of equal widths
                    1 Using the Pick tool, select the Paragraph text frame to which you want to
                      add columns.
                    2 Click Text, Format Text.
                    3 Click the Frames And Columns tab.
                    4 Type a value in the Number Of Columns box.
                    5 Enable the Equal Column Width button to create columns and gutters of
                      equal widths.

                    To maintain the current frame width while adding or deleting
                    columns
                    1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
                    2 Enable the Maintain Current Frame Width button.


                                                                  Working with text         365
         3 Follow steps 4 and 5 from the previous procedure.
           You can add or delete columns, and the column widths adjust to fit the
           width of the frame.

         To maintain the current column width while adding or deleting
         columns
         1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the “To add columns of equal widths” procedure.
         2 Enable the Automatically Adjust Frame Width button.
         3 Follow steps 4 and 5 from the “To add columns of equal widths”
           procedure.
           You can add or delete columns, and the current column width remains
           fixed while the width of the frame adjusts automatically.


         Ÿ Edit the frame, column, or gutter width by dragging the borders with the
           Text tool.
         Ÿ Edit the columns and gutters proportionately by dragging a side selection
           handle with the Text tool.


Adding columns of varying widths
         You can create columns of varying widths and spacing in Paragraph text
         frames.

         To add columns of varying widths
         1 Select a Paragraph text frame.
         2 Click Text, Format Text.
         3 Click the Frames And Columns tab.
         4 Type a value in the Number Of Columns check box.
         5 Disable the Equal Column Width check box.
         6 Type a value in the Width box beside each column # (number).
         7 Type a value in the Gutter box to indicate the amount of space you want
           between the columns.




366      CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
          Ÿ Edit the frame or column width by dragging the border with the Text tool.
          Ÿ Edit the gutter width by dragging the border with the Text tool, however
            you also change the width of the adjacent column.


Adjusting paragraph alignment
          Aligning Paragraph text, lines up text according to the Paragraph text frame.
          You can horizontally align all paragraphs, or a select few within a Paragraph
          text frame. Furthermore, you can vertically align all paragraphs in the
          columns of a selected Paragraph text frame.

Aligning Paragraph text horizontally
          You can horizontally align all paragraphs, or select a few within a Paragraph
          text frame.

          To align Paragraph text horizontally
          1 Select the Paragraph text or frame.
          2 Click Text, Format Text.
          3 Click the Align tab.
          4 Enable an alignment button.


          Ÿ You can also align all columns vertically within a frame.
          Ÿ You can align multiple Paragraph text frames using the Align And
            Distribute command. For more information, see “Aligning objects
            horizontally and vertically” on page 179.


Aligning Paragraph text vertically
          You can adjust the vertical alignment of Paragraph text.




                                                          Working with text         367
Adjusting the vertical
alignment of
columns.




                         To align Paragraph text vertically
                         1 Select the Paragraph text frame with the Pick tool.
                         2 Click Text, Format Text.
                         3 Click the Frames And Columns tab.
                         4 Choose an option from the Vertical Justification list box.


                         Ÿ You can also align columns vertically in a Paragraph text frame.


Applying drop caps to paragraphs
                         Drop caps are an effective way to attract a reader’s eye to the beginning of a
                         chapter or paragraph. Applying drop caps to paragraphs enlarges the initial
                         letter and insets it into the body of text.
                         You can customize a drop cap by changing its settings. For example, you can
                         change the distance between a drop cap letter and the body text.

Adding and removing drop caps
                         You can create an eye-catching chapter or paragraph by adding a drop cap.
                         You can also remove the drop cap without deleting it.




368                      CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
Adding drop caps.




                    To add a drop cap
                    1 Select the Paragraph text frame or paragraphs.
                    2 Click Text, Format Text.
                    3 Click the Effects tab.
                    4 Choose Drop Cap from the Effect Type list box.
                    5 Click one of the following:
                       Ÿ Dropped — wraps text around the dropped letter
                       Ÿ Hanging Indent — offsets the initial letter away from the body of text

                    To remove a drop cap
                    1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
                    2 Choose None from the Effect Type list box.


                    Ÿ You can draw more attention to a drop cap, change the font or color or by
                      adding a border. For more information, see “Filling and outlining objects”
                      on page 211.



                    Ÿ You can also add a drop cap by clicking the Show/Hide Drop Cap button on
                      the Property Bar.


Changing drop cap settings
                    You can specify the number of lines that appear beside a drop cap. You can
                    also specify the distance between the drop cap letter and the body of text.



                                                                    Working with text         369
         To specify the number of lines that appear beside the drop cap
         letter
         1 Select the Paragraph text frame or paragraph.
         2 Click Text, Format Text.
         3 Click the Effects tab.
         4 Choose Drop Cap from the Effect Type list box.
         5 Type a value in the Dropped Lines box.

         To specify the distance between the drop cap letter and the body
         of text
         1 Follow steps 1 to 4 from the previous procedure.
         2 Type a value in the Distance From Text box.

Applying tabs to paragraphs
         You can add tabs to indent Paragraph text. You can delete all or some of the
         default tab stops and set your own. You can also change the tab alignment.
         In addition, you can set trailing leader tabs. A leader tab automatically creates
         dots that precede the tab. Often leadered tabs are used in tables and lists,
         such as tables of contents and indexes. You can customize a trailing leader
         tab by changing the character or the space between the characters.

Adding and removing tabs
         You can add and remove tabs from Paragraph text frames.

         To add a tab
         1 Select the Paragraph text frame or paragraph.
         2 Click Text, Format Text.
         3 Click the Tabs tab.
         4 Click the Add Tab button.
            A row is added to the bottom of the list.
         5 Click the new cell in the Tabs column, and type a value.

         To remove a tab
         1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
         2 Click the cell in the Tab column you want to remove.


370      CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
          3 Click one of the following buttons:
             Ÿ Delete Tab — removes that tab
             Ÿ Delete All — removes all of the tabs


          Ÿ When you select frames with the Text tool, you can add and remove tabs
            using the Horizontal ruler.


Changing tab settings
          You can set tabs at regular intervals and change the tab alignment. For
          example, you can change the default alignment from left to right.

          To set tabs at regular intervals
          1 Select the Paragraph text frame or paragraph with the Text tool.
          2 Click Text, Format Text.
          3 Click the Tabs tab.
          4 Type a value in the box beside the Set Tabs Every button.
          5 Click the Set Tabs Every button to add the tabs.

          To change the alignment of tabs
          1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
          2 Double-click the cell in the Alignment column.
          3 Choose an alignment option from the list box.


          Ÿ When you select frames with the Text tool, you can change the alignment
            of tabs using the Horizontal ruler.


Setting trailing leader tabs
          You can add trailing leader tabs to Paragraph text. You can also change the
          character used and adjust the space between characters.




                                                          Working with text         371
Setting trailing
leader tabs.




                   To add tabs with a trailing leader character
                   1 Select the Paragraph text frame or paragraph with the Text tool.
                   2 Click Text, Format Text.
                   3 Click the Tabs tab.
                   4 Click the cell in the Leadered column to enable the check box.

                   To change the trailing leader character
                   1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
                   2 Type a character in the first Character box.

                   To decrease or increase space between trailing leader characters
                   1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the “To add tabs with a trailing leader character”
                     procedure.
                   2 Type a value from 0 to 10 in the Spacing box.
                      Lower values decrease and higher values increase the spacing between
                      leader characters.

Specifying paragraph indentation
                   You can change the space between a Paragraph text frame and its text by
                   indenting. You can indent an entire paragraph, the first line of a paragraph, all
                   but the first line of a paragraph (a hanging indent), or indent from the right
                   side of the frame.
                   You can also remove an indent without deleting or retyping.




372                CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
Adding indents
         You can indent the first line of a paragraph, all but the first line, or the entire
         paragraph. You can also right indent a paragraph.

         To indent the first line of a paragraph
         1 Select the Paragraph text frame or paragraph with the Text tool.
         2 Click Text, Format Text.
         3 Click the Align tab.
         4 Type a value in the First Line box.

         To create a hanging indent
         1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
         2 Type a value in the Left box.

         To indent an entire paragraph
         1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the “To indent the first line of a paragraph”
           procedure.
         2 Type the same value in the First Line box and the Left box.

         To right indent a paragraph
         1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the “To indent the first line of a paragraph”
           procedure.
         2 Type a value in the Right box.


         Ÿ You can also increase and decrease indents by clicking the Increase Indent
           button or Decrease Indent button on the Property Bar.


Removing indents
         You can remove indents without deleting.

         To remove indents
         1 Select the Paragraph text frame or paragraph with the Text tool.
         2 Click Text, Format Text.




                                                            Working with text           373
         3 Click the Align tab.
         4 Type 0 in the First Line, Right, and Left boxes.

Adding bullets to paragraphs
         You can use bulleted lists to present nonsequential, parallel pieces of
         information in a consistent format. To create several bulleted lists, you can
         use one of the predefined Paragraph text bullet styles to format them
         consistently. You can customize bullets by changing the size, position, and
         spacing of bullets. You can make your own bullets by adding symbols to a
         symbol set. For more information, see “Adding symbols to a symbol set” on
         page 347.

Adding and removing bullets
         You can add bullets that text wraps text around. You can also offset a bullet
         from text to create a hanging indent. You can remove a bullet without
         deleting your text.

         To add a bullet that text wraps around
         1 Select the Paragraph text frame or paragraph with the Text tool.
         2 Click Text, Format Text.
         3 Click the Effects tab.
         4 Choose Bullet from the Effect Type list box.
         5 Choose a font from the Font list box.
         6 Choose a symbol from the Sample window.
            You can also choose a bullet by entering its index number in the Symbol #
            box. Index numbers are listed in the Symbol and Clipart Libraries Catalog.
         7 Click the Bulleted button.

         To add a bullet with a hanging indent
         1 Follow steps 1 to 6 from the previous procedure.
         2 Click Hanging Indent in the Indents section.
         3 Type a value in the Position box.


         Ÿ You can also add a bullet with a hanging indent by clicking the Show/Hide
           Bullet button on the Property Bar.



374      CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
                    To remove a bullet
                    1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the “To add a bullet that text wraps around”
                      procedure.
                    2 Choose None from the Effect Type list box.

Customizing bullets
                    You can customize the appearance of a bullet by changing its size, position,
                    and spacing.
Adding customized
bullets.




                    To change the bullet size
                    1 Select the Paragraph text frame or paragraph with the Text tool.
                    2 Click Text, Format Text.
                    3 Click the Effects tab.
                    4 Choose Bullet from the Effect Type list box.
                    5 Type a value in the Size box.

                    To raise or lower the position of a bullet
                    1 Follow steps 1 to 4 from the previous procedure.
                    2 Type a value in the Baseline Shift box.
                       Negative values lower the position of the bullet; positive values raise it.

                    To change the space between the bullet and text
                    1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the “To change the bullet size” procedure.
                    2 Click the Align tab.
                    3 Type a value for the amount of space you want between the bullet and the
                      text in the First Line box.


                                                                     Working with text          375
         4 Type the same value that you specified in step 3 in the Left box.
            The space between the frame and the text changes. As a result, the
            spacing between the bullet and the text changes.

Hyphenating text
         Hyphenation can be useful when you work with columns or have limited
         space for text. By enabling hyphenation, CorelDRAW automatically divides
         words at the end of lines instead of wrapping them to the next line. You can
         apply hyphenation to a Paragraph text frame or to selected paragraphs within
         a frame.
         By customizing the hyphenation settings, you can control when hyphenation
         occurs. For example, you can specify a character requirement and whether
         hyphenation occurs in words with capital letters.

Applying hyphenation to Paragraph text
         You can apply automatic hyphenation for selected paragraphs in a Paragraph
         text frame or for all paragraphs in the document.

         To set automatic hyphenation for all paragraphs in the document
         1 Click the bottom Default Style To Edit button on the Property Bar.
            Default Paragraph Text appears in the Style list box.
         2 Click Text, Format Text.
         3 Click the Space tab.
         4 Enable the Use Automatic Hyphenation check box.
         5 Click one of the following buttons:
            Ÿ Apply — applies the formatting and keeps the Format Text dialog box
              open
            Ÿ OK — applies the formatting and closes the Format Text dialog box
         6 Enable the Paragraph text check box.
         7 Disable the Artistic text check box.
            The existing text in your document remains unaffected. Only subsequent
            frames you create will use automatic hyphenation.

         To set automatic hyphenation for selected Paragraph text
         1 Select the Paragraph text frame or paragraph with the Text tool.
         2 Click Text, Format Text.


376      CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
         3 Click the Space tab.
         4 Enable the Use Automatic Hyphenation check box.

Specifying hyphenation settings
         You can customize hyphenation settings by applying hyphenation to words
         containing capital letters and specifying the minimum number of characters
         required in a word for hyphenation to occur. You can also specify the
         minimum number of letters before and after a hyphen, as well as the distance
         from the right margin that CorelDRAW starts hyphenating words (also called
         the hot zone).

         To hyphenate words containing capital letters
         1 Select the Paragraph text frame or paragraph with the Text tool.
         2 Click Text, Format Text.
         3 Click the Space tab.
         4 Enable the Use Automatic Hyphenation check box.
         5 Click the Hyphenation Settings button.
         6 Enable the Break Capitalized check box to hyphenate words with initial or
           all capital letters.

         To specify the minimum number of characters a word requires
         for hyphenation
         1 Select the Paragraph text frame or paragraph with the Text tool.
         2 Click Text, Format Text.
         3 Click the Space tab.
         4 Enable the Use Automatic Hyphenation check box.
         5 Click the Hyphenation Settings button.
         6 Type a value in the Minimum Word Length box.

         To specify the minimum number of characters before a hyphen
         1 Follow steps 1 to 5 from the previous procedure.
         2 Type a value in the Minimum Characters Before box.




                                                        Working with text       377
       To specify the minimum number of characters after a hyphen
       1 Follow steps 1 to 5 from the “To specify the minimum number of
         characters a word requires for hyphenation” procedure.
       2 Type a value in the Minimum Characters After box.

       To specify the hot zone for hyphenation
       1 Follow steps 1 to 4 from the “To specify the minimum number of
         characters a word requires for hyphenation” procedure.
       2 Click the Hyphenation Settings button in the Hyphenation section.
       3 Type a value in the Hot Zone box to specify the distance from the right
         margin that you want CorelDRAW to start hyphenating words.


Managing Paragraph text frames
       Managing Paragraph text frames helps you use them more effectively.
       CorelDRAW treats frames similarly to other objects in a drawing, so you can
       size and move a frame like any object. Fitting text to a frame, increases or
       decreases the point size of text so that it fits the frame exactly. You can hide
       and show the frame outline, specify the minimum number of characters in a
       line, as well as hide and show spacing arrows. You can hide spacing arrows if
       you don’t plan to adjust the spacing between words, characters, and lines of
       text.
       You can break frames apart to create paragraphs in separate frames. You can
       continue to break frames apart to the character level. You can also combine
       frames. When working with Paragraph text, you can drag text out of a frame
       to create a new frame.
       By inserting Paragraph text frames inside graphic objects, you can use
       objects as containers for text and change the shape of frames. Inserting a
       frame inside an object positions the frame inside of the object’s outline. You
       can also separate a frame from an object and the frame will retain the shape
       of the object. You can also change the shape of text by wrapping frames
       around objects. Additionally, you can wrap Paragraph text around Artistic text
       and Paragraph text frames. You can wrap text using contour or square
       wrapping styles. The contour wrapping styles follow the curve of the object.
       The square wrapping styles following the bounding box of the object.
       Furthermore, you can link frames to direct the flow of text between frames.


       Ÿ Paragraph text frames are also referred to as “frames.”




378    CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
Sizing Paragraph text frames
                     You can size a Paragraph text frame independent of its text, or you can size a
                     frame and its text together.
Sizing a Paragraph
text frame.




                     To increase or decrease the frame size independent of its text
                     1 Using the Pick tool, click anywhere in or on the border of the frame.
                     2 Drag any selection handle outward to increase, or inward to decrease the
                       size of the frame.

                     To size Paragraph text and its frame
                     1 Click Tools, Options.
                     2 In the list of categories, double-click Text, and click Paragraph.
                     3 Disable the Expand And Shrink Paragraph Text Frames To Fit Text check
                       box.
                     4 Click OK.
                     5 Click anywhere in or on the border of a Paragraph text frame with the
                       Pick tool.
                     6 Hold down ALT, and drag one of the corner selection handles to resize the
                       frame and the text simultaneously.
                        The text maintains the shape of the original font, but the font size
                        changes.


                     Ÿ To size a frame with columns of varying widths, you must drag the side
                       selection handles to resize the frame. Dragging the frame border adjusts
                       the width of that column.




                                                                      Working with text        379
                       Ÿ If you’re resizing the frame with the Text tool, you can also drag the frame
                         border to resize the frame.
                       Ÿ You can also use the Pick tool to resize a frame.


Moving Paragraph text frames
                       You can move Paragraph text frames in a drawing.

                       To move a frame using the Text tool
                       1 Using the Text tool, click the X in the center of the frame.
                          The cursor changes to a four-way cursor.
                       2 Drag the Paragraph text frame outline to a new location.


                       Ÿ You can also move a frame using the Pick tool.


Fitting text to a Paragraph text frame
                       You can have CorelDRAW adjust the point size of text so that the text fits the
                       Paragraph text frame exactly.
Fitting text to a
frame so it fits the
frame exactly.




380                    CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
         To fit text to a Paragraph text frame
         1 Select the frame with the Pick tool.
         2 Click Text, Fit Text To Frame.


         Ÿ If you fit text to linked frames, CorelDRAW adjusts the size of text in all
           the linked frames. For more information about linking frames, see
           “Linking Paragraph text frames together” on page 388.


Showing and hiding Paragraph text frame outlines
         You can hide or show Paragraph text frame outlines.

         To show or hide Paragraph text frame outlines
         Ÿ Click View, Text Frames.
            If a check mark appears beside the Text Frames command name, frame
            outlines are displayed. If no check mark appears, frame outlines are
            hidden.

Specifying the minimum number of characters per line
         You can specify the minimum number of characters permitted in each line of
         a Paragraph text frame. For example, when you set the minimum width to
         five, each line must have at least five characters to appear.

         To specify the minimum number of characters per line
         1 Click Tools, Options.
         2 In the list of categories, click Text.
         3 Type a value in the Minimum Line Width box.

Showing and hiding interactive spacing arrows
         You can show or hide the Interactive Horizontal Spacing and Interactive
         Vertical Spacing arrows when you select a Paragraph text frame.

         To show the interactive spacing arrows
         1 Click Tools, Options.
         2 In the list of categories, click Text.
         3 Enable the Show Selection Handles While Editing check box.


                                                         Working with text          381
                      To hide the interactive spacing arrows
                      1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
                      2 Disable the Show Selection Handles While Editing check box.

Breaking apart Paragraph text frames
                      You can break Paragraph text into the following subcomponents: columns,
                      paragraphs, bullets, lines, words, and characters. Every time you break apart
                      a frame, the subcomponents are placed in separate frames. For example, You
                      can break apart a frame containing multiple words, with each frame
                      containing one word from that line.
Breaking apart (1)
multiple paragraphs
in a frame into (2)
single paragraphs,
(3) sentences, (4)
words, and (5)
characters.




                      To break apart a Paragraph text frame
                      1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                      2 Click Arrange, Break Apart.


                      Ÿ To break apart a frame to the next component, repeat the above
                        procedure.


Combining Paragraph text frames
                      You can combine two or more Paragraph text frames to create one frame.




382                   CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
          To combine Paragraph text frames

          1 Hold down SHIFT and select the frames with the Pick tool.
          2 Click Arrange, Combine.


          Ÿ The text in the first frame you select appears first in the combined frame.
          Ÿ You can’t combine frames with envelopes or when text is fitted to a curve.
          Ÿ If you select the frame with columns first, the combined frame will have
            columns.


Dragging text from a Paragraph text frame to create a frame
          You can drag text out of a Paragraph text frame to create a frame.

          To drag text into a new frame
          1 Using the Text tool, select the Paragraph text.
          2 Hold down the right-mouse button, and drag the text to the Drawing
            Window.
             The cursor changes to a text from frame cursor.
          3 Click one of the following:
             Ÿ Copy — copies the text to the frame
             Ÿ Move — moves the text to the frame


          Ÿ You can also drag text from a frame to another existing frame. For more
            information, see “Editing by dragging in the Drawing Window” on page
            348.


Inserting Paragraph text frames inside objects
          You can insert a Paragraph text frame inside an object.




                                                          Working with text        383
A Paragraph text
frame inside of an
object.




                     To insert text inside an object
                     1 Select the object with the Pick tool.

                     2 Click the Text tool.
                     3 Drag the cursor over the object’s outline.
                     4 Click the object when the cursor changes to an insert in object cursor.
                        A frame appears inside the object.
                     5 Type inside the frame.


                     Ÿ You can also apply an envelope to a Paragraph text frame. For more
                       information about envelopes, see “Creating envelopes” on page 457.


Separating a Paragraph text frame from an object
                     You can separate a Paragraph text frame from an object.

                     To separate a Paragraph text frame from an object
                     1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                     2 Click Arrange, Separate.
                     3 Click the outline of the frame, and drag it to a new location.

Wrapping Paragraph text around objects
                     You can wrap Paragraph text around objects so that the text follows the shape
                     of the object. You can also wrap text so that it follows the object’s bounding
                     box. You can also adjust the space between text and the object.



384                  CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
Wrapping Paragraph
text around objects.




                       To wrap Paragraph text around an object so that it follows the
                       object’s shape
                       1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                       2 On the Property Bar, click the Wrap Paragraph Text button, and click one
                         of the following Contour wrapping styles:
                          Ÿ Text Flows Left — wraps text around the left side of the object
                          Ÿ Text Flows Right — wraps text around the right side of the object
                          Ÿ Straddle Text — wraps text around all sides of the object
                       3 Click OK.
                       4 Click the Text tool, and create a Paragraph text frame on top of the object.
                       5 Type in the Paragraph text frame.
                          The text flows around the object, leaving the space occupied by the object
                          blank.

                       To wrap Paragraph text around an object so that it follows the
                       object’s bounding box
                       1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                       2 On the Property Bar, click the Wrap Paragraph Text button, and click one
                         of the following Square wrapping styles:
                          Ÿ Text Flows Left — wraps text around the left side of the object
                          Ÿ Text Flows Right — wraps text around the right side of the object
                          Ÿ Straddle Text — wraps text around all sides of the object
                          Ÿ Above/Below — wraps text above and below the object
                       3 Follow steps 3 to 5 from the previous procedure.



                                                                       Working with text          385
         Ÿ You can wrap existing Paragraph text around an object by applying the
           wrapping style to the object, and dragging the frame on the object.


         To change the amount of space between the text and an object
         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
         2 On the Property Bar, click the Wrap Paragraph Text button.
         3 Type a value in Text Wrap Offset box.

         To remove wrapping styles
         1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
         2 Click None.


         Ÿ You can also remove the text wrap by disabling the Wrap Paragraph Text
           button on the Property Bar.


Wrapping Paragraph text around text
         You can wrap Paragraph text around Artistic text or a Paragraph text frame.
         The wrapping styles let you follow text’s shape or the text’s bounding box.

         To wrap Paragraph text around text so that it follows the text’s
         shape
         1 Select the text with the Pick tool.
         2 On the Property Bar, click the Wrap Paragraph Text button, and click one
           of the following Contour wrapping styles:
            Ÿ Text Flows Left — wraps text around the left side of the frame or
              Artistic text
            Ÿ Text Flows Right — wraps text around the right side of the frame or
              Artistic text
            Ÿ Straddle Text — wraps text around all sides of the frame or Artistic
              text
         3 Click OK.
         4 Click the Text tool, and create a Paragraph text frame on top of the text.




386      CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
        5 Type in the Paragraph text frame.
           The text in the Paragraph text frame flows around the text, leaving the
           space occupied by the object blank.

        To wrap Paragraph text around text so that it follows the text’s
        bounding box
        1 Select the frame with the Pick tool.
        2 On the Property Bar, click the Wrap Paragraph Text button, and click one
          of the following Square wrapping styles:
           Ÿ Text Flows Left — wraps text around the left side of the frame or
             Artistic text
           Ÿ Text Flows Right — wraps text around the right side of the frame or
             Artistic text
           Ÿ Straddle Text — wraps text around all sides of the frame or Artistic
             text
           Ÿ Above/Below — wraps text above and below the frame or Artistic text
        3 Follow steps 3 to 5 from the previous procedure.

Linking Paragraph text frames
        Linking Paragraph text frames directs the flow of text from one frame to the
        other, if the amount of text exceeds the original frame. When you shrink or
        enlarge a linked frame, or change the size of the text, the amount of text in
        the next frame adjusts automatically. You can remove links or change the
        direction of flow.
        You can also link a frame to an open or closed path object. When you link a
        frame to an open path (i.e., a line), the text flows onto the line. When you link
        a frame to an object with a closed path (e.g., a rectangle), a Paragraph text
        frame is inserted and the text flows inside the object. You can also link to
        frames and objects across pages. When the linked frame is on a different
        page, the page number appears beside the blue arrow.
        You can change your settings so that Paragraph text formatting is applied to
        all linked frames, selected frames, or all selected and subsequently created
        frames.
        After linking frames, you can redirect the flow. By selecting the frame or
        object, a blue arrow indicates the direction of the text flow. (You can change
        your settings to hide and display direction arrows.) When you’re changing
        the flow, it’s important to remember that text flows from the bottom of the
        frame or object. Therefore, you must select the bottom text flow tab of the



                                                         Working with text          387
                         frame or object whose text flow you want to change, then select the frame or
                         object into which you want the flow to continue.
                         You can also remove the link. When you have only two linked frames and you
                         remove the link, the text flows into the remaining frame. When you remove a
                         link between frames or objects and you have a series of links, the text flows
                         into the next frame or object.

Linking Paragraph text frames together
                         You can link two or more Paragraph text frames to allow text to flow between
                         them.
Graphic 1 shows
selecting a frame to
contain overflow text.
Graphic 2 shows the
linked frames.




                         To link Paragraph text frames
                         1 Select the starting frame with the Pick tool.
                         2 Click the     text flow tab at the bottom of the frame.
                            If there is too much text in the frame, the text flow tab contains an
                            arrow. The cursor changes shape.
                         3 Click inside the frame to which you want to create a link.
                            The    text flow tab and a blue line indicate that the frame is linked.


                         Ÿ You can create and link Paragraph text frames before you type text into
                           the starting frame.




388                      CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
                    Ÿ You can also use the text flow tab at the top of a frame to link to another
                      frame.


Linking a Paragraph text frames to an object
                    You can link a Paragraph text frame to an open path or closed path object.
Linking Paragraph
text frames to
objects.




                    To link a Paragraph text frame to an object
                    1 Select the text frame with the Pick tool.
                    2 Click the     text flow tab at the bottom of the frame.
                       If there is too much text in the frame, the text flow tab contains an arrow
                           .
                       The cursor changes shape.
                    3 Click the object to which you want to link.
                       The text flow tab and a blue line indicate that the frame is linked to the
                       object.


                    Ÿ If the text exceeds the open or closed path, you can link it to another
                      frame or object.




                                                                    Working with text           389
                     Ÿ You can also insert a frame inside an object with a closed path, then link to
                       other objects and frames. For more information, see “Inserting Paragraph
                       text frames inside objects” on page 383.


Linking frames and objects on different pages
                     You can link Paragraph text frames and objects that on different pages.
Linking Paragraph
text frames across
pages.




                     To link frames on different pages
                     1 Select the starting frame with the Pick tool.
                     2 Click the     text flow tab at the bottom of the Paragraph text frame.
                        If there is too much text in the frame, the tab contains an arrow      .
                     3 Using the Navigator, click the Page tab that contains the second frame.
                     4 Select the frame into which you want to continue the text flow.
                        The text flow tab and a dashed blue line indicate that the frame is
                        linked. The page number to which the frame is linked also appears.

                     To link a frame to an object on a different page
                     1 Using the Pick tool, select the frame from which you want the text to flow.
                     2 Follow steps 2 and 3 from the previous procedure.
                     3 Select the object into which you want to continue the text flow.


390                  CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
Changing the text flow to a different Paragraph text frame or object
          You can redirect the flow of text to different Paragraph text frame or object.

          To change text flow to a different frame
          1 Using the Pick tool, click   text flow tab at the bottom of the frame whose
            link you want to change.
          2 Select the frame into which you want the text flow to continue.

          To change text flow to a different object
          1 Using the Pick tool, click the text flow tab at the bottom of the object
            whose link you want to change.
          2 Select the object into which you want the text flow to continue.

Hiding and showing link flow indicators
          You can hide or show the arrows that indicate the direction of the text flow.

          To hide the link flow indicators
          1 Click Tools, Options.
          2 In the list of categories, double-click Text, and click Paragraph.
          3 Click one of the following buttons:
             Ÿ To All Linked Frames — applies the same text formatting to all
               connected frames
             Ÿ To Selected Frames Only — applies the same text formatting only to
               selected frames
             Ÿ To Selected And Subsequent Frames — applies the same text
               formatting only to selected and succeeding linked frames
          4 Disable the Show Linking Of Text Frame check box.

          To show the link flow indicators
          1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
          2 Enable the Show Linking Of Text Frame check box.

Specifying link options for frames
          You can apply formatting to all linked Paragraph text frames, selected frames,
          or selected and subsequently created frames.



                                                           Working with text          391
         To choose Paragraph text frame formatting options
         1 Click Tools, Options.
         2 In the list of categories, double-click Text, and click Paragraph.
         3 Click one of the following buttons:
            Ÿ To All Linked Frames — applies the same text formatting to all
              connected frames
            Ÿ To Selected Frames Only — applies the same text formatting only to
              selected frames
            Ÿ To Selected And Subsequent Frames — applies the same text
              formatting only to selected and succeeding linked frames


            Ÿ The link options affect only the formatting attributes that you can
              apply to frames (e.g., columns, drop caps, indents, and tabs), as well as
              general formatting attributes (e.g., font type, size, and weight); color
              doesn’t apply. You must apply color to the text in each linked frame or
              to the text object separately.

Removing links between frames or objects
         You can remove links between Paragraph text frames and objects. You can
         also delete the frame or object.

         To remove links between frames or object
         1 Using the Pick tool, select the frames or object you want to separate.
         2 Click Arrange, Separate.

         To delete a linked Paragraph text frame or object
         1 Using the Pick tool, select the frame or object you want to delete.
         2 Click Edit, Delete.


Fitting text to a path
         You can position Artistic text along the path of an open object (e.g., a line) or
         closed object (e.g., a square). Once you’ve fit text to a path, you can
         Ÿ specify the orientation of characters relative to the path. This allows you
           to create the impression that letters are standing upright. You can also
           rotate individual characters to follow the contours of the path.
         Ÿ adjust the spacing between the text and path


392      CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
                        Ÿ specify the vertical position and vertical orientation of the text using the
                          characters’ baseline, ascender, descender, or center point
                        Ÿ specify the horizontal position of text along the path
                        Ÿ position text to the opposite side of the path


                        CorelDRAW treats text fitted to a path as one object. You can also separate
                        the text from the object. When you separate a text from a curved or closed
                        path, the text retains the shape of the object to which it was fitted.
                        Straightening reverts text to its original appearance.

Fitting text to a path
                        You can fit Artistic text to open and closed paths.
Fitting text (1)
interactively, (2) to
an open path, and
(3) to a closed path.




                        To fit text to a path using the Fit Text To Path command
                        1 Using the Pick tool, select the path.
                        2 Click Text, Fit Text To Path.
                        3 Type along the path.

                        To fit text to a path interactively
                        1 Select the path to which you want to fit the text.
                        2 Click the Text tool.
                        3 Drag the cursor over the path.



                                                                           Working with text       393
                      4 Click the path when the cursor changes to the fit to path cursor.
                      5 Type along the path.


                      Ÿ You can’t fit text to the path of another text object.



                      Ÿ To edit Artistic text on a path directly, double-click the text with the Text
                        tool.


Adjusting the orientation of text fitted to a path
                      You can create interesting effects by changing the orientation of characters
                      on the path.
Adjusting the
orientation of text
fitted to a path.




                      To adjust the orientation of text fitted to a path
                      1 Select the text fitted to a path with the Pick tool.
                      2 Choose an option from the Text Orientation list box on the Property Bar.


                      Ÿ You can also adjust the orientation by holding down CTRL and selecting
                        the text with the Pick tool. Hold down CTRL and drag the selection
                        handles to change the orientation.




394                   CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
Adjusting the distance between the text and path
                         You can adjust the distance between the text and the path to which its fit.
Changing the
distance between text
and a path.




                         To adjust the distance between the text and path
                         1 Select the text fitted to a path with the Pick tool.
                         2 Type a value in the Distance From Path box on the Property Bar.
                         3 Press ENTER.


                         Ÿ You can also adjust the horizontal spacing of text fitted to a path by
                           clicking text with the Shape tool, and dragging the Interactive Horizontal
                           Spacing arrows.


Specifying the vertical alignment of text fitted to a path
                         You can specify the vertical alignment of the text relative to the path.
Specifying the
vertical alignment of
text fitted to a path.




                                                                           Working with text        395
                         To specify the vertical alignment of text
                         1 Select the text fitted to a path with the Pick tool.
                         2 Choose one of the following from the Vertical Placement list box on the
                           Property Bar:
                            Ÿ Baseline
                            Ÿ Ascender
                            Ÿ Descender
                            Ÿ Center
                            Ÿ Variable


                         Ÿ You can also edit Artistic text or Paragraph text fitted to paths directly in
                           the Drawing Window.


Changing the horizontal position of text fitted to a path
                         You can change the horizontal position of the text relative to the path. You
                         also can change the horizontal position of text according to the start node,
                         end node, or center of the open path to which its fit. For text fit to a closed
                         path, you can change the quadrant to which the text is fit.
Changing the
horizontal position of
text fitted to a path.




                         To change the horizontal position of text fitted to a path
                         1 Select the text fitted to a path with the Pick tool.
                         2 Type a value in the Horizontal Offset box on the Property Bar.
                         3 Press ENTER.




396                      CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
                      Ÿ You can also change the horizontal position of text along a path by
                        dragging character nodes with the Shape tool.


                      To change the horizontal position of text fitted to an open path
                      1 Select the text fitted to an open path with the Pick tool.
                      2 Choose an option from the Text Placement list box on the Property Bar.

                      To change the quadrant of text fitted to a close path
                      1 Select the text fitted to a closed path with the Pick tool.
                      2 Choose an option from the Text Placement list box on the Property Bar.

Positioning text on the opposite side of the path
                      You can position text so that it appears on the opposite side of the path.
Positioning text on
the other side of a
path.




                      To position text on the opposite side of the path
                      1 Select the text fitted to a path with the Pick tool.
                      2 Click the Place On Other Side button on the Property Bar.

Removing text from a path
                      You can separate Artistic text from an open path or closed path. The text and
                      graphic object become two objects, allowing you to select and manipulate
                      each individually. You can also straighten separated text to return it to its
                      original appearance.




                                                                        Working with text          397
You can return (1)
text fitted to a path
to its original state
by (2) separating it
from the path, and
(3) straightening it.




                        To separate text from a path
                        1 Select the text fitted to a path with the Pick tool.
                        2 Click Arrange, Separate.

                        To straighten text
                        1 Select the text fitted to a path with the Pick tool.
                        2 Click Text, Straighten Text.


Using the writing tools
                        The writing tools help you correct spelling and grammatical errors in
                        documents, as well as find alternative words.
                        There are two tools you can use to verify spelling — the automatic spell
                        checker and the Spell Checker that you access through the Text menu. The
                        automatic spell check is controlled with the right-mouse button and indicates
                        errors as you type.
                        Grammatik® verifies the spelling, grammar, punctuation, and style. You can
                        change the rules and style Grammatik uses to check documents.
                        CorelDRAW sometimes indicates that a word is incorrect because the word
                        isn’t in the word lists it’s consulting. By adding these words to user word
                        lists, CorelDRAW recognizes them words the next time it checks the
                        document.
                        By adding words to Type Assist, you can replace abbreviations and words you
                        often mistype.

Using the automatic spell checker
                        You can create text in a drawing and automatically spell check the text as you
                        type. A red wavy underline identifies misspelled text. You can change the


398                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
         settings so that CorelDRAW spell checks all Paragraph text frames, or only
         selected frames. The automatic spell checker is controlled with the
         right-mouse button.
         You may decide to ignore the indicated errors. You can change the settings to
         have CorelDRAW indicate ignored errors by underlining them with a blue
         wavy line.
         By adding corrections to Type Assist, misspelled words are added to a list
         with the correct spelling beside them. The next time you type the misspelled
         word, Type Assist correct the word automatically.
         The automatic spell checker creates a suggestion list for misspelled words
         that you can use to help you correct the word. You can set the maximum
         number of spell checking suggestions CorelDRAW displays.


         Ÿ You can use the Spell Checker to check the whole document at once. For
           more information, see “Working with the Spell Checker” on page 401.


Spell checking a document automatically
         You can spell check the document as you type. You can also spell check all or
         selected Paragraph text frames.

         To enable automatic spell checking
         1 Click Tools, Options.
         2 In the list of categories, double-click Text, and click Spelling.
         3 Enable the Perform Automatic Spell Checking check box.

         To show errors in all Paragraph text frames
         1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
         2 Enable the Show Errors In All Text Frames button.

         To show errors in selected Paragraph text frames
         1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the “To enable automatic spell checking”
           procedure.
         2 Enable the Show Errors In Selected Text Frame Only button.




                                                          Working with text       399
Ignoring spelling errors
          You can ignore the spelling suggestions CorelDRAW offers. You can change
          the settings and have CorelDRAW indicate ignored errors with a blue wavy
          line. You can also remove the option that ignores spelling errors.

          To ignore an error during a spell check
          Ÿ Right-click the misspelled word, and choose Ignore All.

          To indicate errors you ignore during the spell check
          1 Click Tools, Options.
          2 In the list of categories, double-click Text, and click Spelling.
          3 Enable the Show Errors Which Have Been Ignored check box.

          To remove the ignore flag
          Ÿ Right-click the ignored error, and click Unignore All.

Adding your corrections to Type Assist automatically
          You can add misspelled words and their corrections to Type Assist
          automatically.

          To add corrections to Type Assist automatically
          1 Click Tools, Options.
          2 In the list of categories, double-click Text, and click Spelling.
          3 Enable the Add Corrections To Type Assist check box.


          Ÿ Choosing an alternate word when the Add Corrections To Type Assist
            check box is enabled adds the correction to Type Assist.


Specifying the maximum number of spell checking suggestions
          You can specify the maximum number of spelling suggestions CorelDRAW
          displays.

          To specify the maximum number of spell checking suggestions
          1 Click Tools, Options.




400       CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
         2 In the list of categories, double-click Text, and click Spelling.
         3 Type a value in the Display Spelling Suggestions box.


         Ÿ You can a maximum of 10 spelling suggestions.


Working with the Spell Checker
         The Spell Checker lets you check a whole document, a paragraph, a word, or
         specified text. You can use the Spell Checker to insert corrections, or you can
         edit text manually by interrupting the spell check and typing corrections
         directly in the Drawing Window.
         During a spell checking session, the Spell Checker may not recognize some
         words and indicate them as errors. You can add these words to user word
         lists so that they aren’t indicated in future sessions.
         By setting options, you can determine how the Spell Checker verifies the
         document. For example, you can have the Spell Checker verify only new and
         modified text after you’ve spell checked the document, or recheck the whole
         document.
         Additionally, you can change the language the Spell Checker uses to verify
         documents.

Using the Spell Checker
         You can spell check the entire document, part of the document, or selected
         text.

         To spell check the whole document
         1 Click a blank space in the Drawing Window to deselect any objects.
         2 Click Text, Writing Tools, Spell Check.
            The misspelled word appears in the Not Found box. The most likely
            correction appears in the Replace With box. A list of other possible
            replacements appear in the Replacements box.
         3 Choose the correct word from the Replacements list to display it in the
           Replace With box, if required.
            If necessary, type your own correction in the Replace With box, and press
            ENTER.
         4 Click one of the following buttons:




                                                          Working with text        401
            Ÿ Replace — replaces the highlighted word in your document with the
              word in the Replace With box
            Ÿ Auto Replace — replaces all instances of the same error in your
              document with the word in the Replace With box
            Ÿ Skip Once — overlooks this occurrence of the word, during this spell
              check, and moves to the next word
            Ÿ Skip All — overlooks all occurrences of this word during this spell
              check

         To spell check part of the document
         1 Select a text object with the Pick tool.
         2 Click Text, Writing Tools, Spell Check.
         3 Choose an option from the Check list box.
         4 Click the Start or the Resume button.

         To spell check selected text
         1 Select the specific word or words with the Text tool.
         2 Click Text, Writing Tools, Spell Check.


         Ÿ The Spell Checker can’t correct words used in the wrong context. For
           example, if you type “she had too apples” instead of “she had two apples,”
           the Spell Checker doesn’t indicate that the word “too” is an error.



         Ÿ You can spell check the whole document after it has already been verified
           by choosing Document from the Check list box.


Correcting misspelled words manually
         You can correct misspelled words by typing in the Drawing Window.

         To correct text manually in the Drawing Window during a spell
         check
         1 Click the Text tool.
         2 Click a blank space in the Drawing Window to deselect any objects.
         3 Click Text, Writing Tools, Spell Check.


402      CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
             Any misspelled words are highlighted in the document.
          4 Select the highlighted text, and type the correction in the Drawing
            Window.
          5 Click the Resume button to continue with the spell check.

Adding words to a word list during a spell check
          You can add words that the Spell Checker doesn’t recognize to a user word
          list, so that they will be recognized in future spell checks. For more
          information about user word lists, see “Working with user word lists” on
          page 415.

          To add a word to a user word list during a spell check
          1 Click the Text tool.
          2 Click a blank space in the Drawing Window to deselect any objects.
          3 Click Text, Writing Tools, Spell Check.
          4 Click the Add button when the Spell Checker stops on a word it doesn’t
            recognize.

Specifying options for the Spell Checker
          You can specify options in the Spell Checker to determine how it verifies the
          document.

          To specify spell check options
          1 Click Text, Writing Tools, Spell Checker.
          2 Click the Options button, and click any of the following:
             Ÿ Auto Start — starts the Spell Checker as soon as you open it
             Ÿ Beep on Misspelled — makes CorelDRAW beep when the Spell
               Checker finds misspelled words
             Ÿ Recheck All Text — rechecks the entire text, not just new or modified
               text, after you have spell checked the document
             Ÿ Check Words With Numbers — checks any text containing numbers
             Ÿ Check Duplicate Words — checks for duplicate words positioned
               side-by-side
             Ÿ Check Irregular Capitalization — checks any irregular capitalization
             Ÿ Prompt Before Auto Replacement — asks you before the Spell
               Checker automatically replaces text


                                                         Working with text         403
            Ÿ Show Phonetic Suggestions — displays a list of words that sound like
              the word in the Replace With (or Insert Word) box
            A check mark appears beside enabled options.

Changing the spell check language
         You can change the default spell checking language the Spell Checker uses.

         To change the spell check language
         1 Click Text, Writing Tools, Spell Check.
         2 Click the Options button, and click Language.
         3 Choose a language from the Current Language list.


         Ÿ You can change only to a language that is installed on the computer.



         Ÿ You can also type the abbreviated language name in the Language box.


         To save a language as the default spell check language
         1 Follow all the steps from the previous procedure.
         2 Enable the Save As Default Writing Tool Language check box.

Working with Grammatik
         Grammatik checks documents for spelling, grammar, and punctuation errors.
         By typing in the Drawing Window, you can edit documents manually. By
         setting options, you can control how Grammatik functions. For example, you
         can have Grammatik start proofreading as soon as you open the dialog box.
         You can use Grammatik to replace passive sentences with active sentences
         or add words it doesn’t recognize to a user word list. When a passive
         sentence doesn’t have a subject, you can specify the subject for Grammatik
         to use. You can also change the default language Grammatik uses to check
         documents.
         Grammatik bases its checks on a style. Styles are comprised of grammar
         rules, writing styles, and levels of formality. You can change the grammar
         checking style, and as a result, change the interpretation of these elements.
         You can also edit grammar checking styles by removing or adding grammar
         rules which those styles contain. You can also create, edit, and restore
         grammar checking styles.


404      CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
        You can have Grammatik analyze the grammatical structure of your writing
        and your writing style to determine its level of readability. You can use this
        information to decide how to correct possible errors and refine your writing
        style.
        Grammatik can assign a part of speech to each word or group of words in a
        sentence (e.g., subject, verb, or subordinate clause) and display it in a parse
        tree. You can also analyze the parts of speech (e.g., conjunction, abbreviation,
        or preposition) of a selected sentence.
        In addition, you can generate and view three statistical summaries: Basic
        Counts, Flagged List, and Readability Report. For Basic Counts, Grammatik
        provides a count of paragraphs, sentences, words (as well as their levels of
        complexity), and syllables. It also provides counts for the average number of
        syllables per word, words per sentence, and sentences per paragraph. You
        can use the Basic Counts report to determine if you use many long words in
        your writing.
        The Flagged summary provides a list of the types of errors flagged in the
        document. It also lists the number of times each error was flagged. Flagged
        summaries can be useful for identifying the types of grammar problems that
        appear frequently in your writing.
        The Readability summary estimates the skill level required for a reader to
        understand your document. Grammatik analyzes readability by comparing
        your document with a comparison document, then generates a Readability
        report. You can choose a Grammatik comparison document or add a
        comparison document. Grammatik evaluates a document according to a
        readability formula, which is dependent on the language you select, the level
        of difficulty required to read the document, how often you use the passive
        voice, the length and complexity of sentence structure, and the complexity of
        words.

Using Grammatik
        You can use Grammatik to check your whole document, part of a document,
        or specific text.

        To use Grammatik to check the whole document
        1 Select the text with the Pick tool.
        2 Click Text, Writing Tools, Grammatik.
        3 Choose Document from the Check list box.
           Suggestions for corrections appear in the Replacements box. The
           sentence with the suggested correction appears in the New Sentence box.
        4 Click one of the following buttons:


                                                         Working with text         405
            Ÿ Replace — replaces the highlighted text in your document with the
              highlighted correction in the Replacements box
            Ÿ Skip Once — overlooks the highlighted text during this grammar
              check and moves to the next error
            Ÿ Skip All — overlooks all occurrences of the highlighted text during this
              grammar check
            Ÿ Auto Replace — replaces all instances of the same error in your
              document with the word in the Replacements box

         To use Grammatik to check part of a document
         1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
         2 Choose an option from the Check list box.
         3 Click the Start or the Resume button.

         To use Grammatik to check specific text
         1 Select the specific word or words with the Text tool.
         2 Click Text, Writing Tools, Grammatik.

Editing grammar errors manually
         You can edit errors by typing in the Drawing Window.

         To edit grammar errors manually
         1 Click the Text tool.
         2 Select the text with the Pick tool.
         3 Click Text, Writing Tools, Grammatik.
         4 Select the highlighted text, and type the correction in the Drawing
           Window.
         5 Click the Resume button to continue with the grammar check.

Specifying options for Grammatik
         You can determine the way in which Grammatik works by specifying options.

         To specify options for Grammatik
         1 Click Text, Writing Tools, Grammatik.
         2 Click the Options button.



406      CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
         3 Click one of the following options:
            Ÿ Auto Start — begins proofreading as soon as you open Grammatik
            Ÿ Prompt Before Auto Replacement — displays a prompt before
              Grammatik inserts an automatic replacement
            Ÿ Suggest Spelling Replacements — displays suggestions for
              replacements automatically
            A check mark appears beside the enabled options.

Replacing passive sentences with active sentences
         You can enable the passive voice grammar rule and replace passive sentences
         with active sentences. When a passive sentence doesn’t contain a subject,
         you can add the subject for Grammatik to use in the replacement sentence.

         To enable the passive voice rule
         1 Click Text, Writing Tools, Grammatik.
         2 Click the Options button, and click Checking Styles.
         3 Click the Edit button.
         4 Enable the Passive Voice check box in the Rule classes list.
         5 Click one of the following:
            Ÿ Save — edits the grammar checking style
            Ÿ Save As — creates a grammar checking style

         To replace a passive sentence with an active sentence
         1 Select the text with the Pick tool.
         2 Click Text, Writing Tools, Grammatik.
         3 Choose Document from the Check list box.
         4 Choose the replacement text from the Replacement box.
         5 Click the Replace button.

         To specify a subject
         1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
         2 Double-click <Subject> in the Replacements box.
         3 Type a subject in the New Subject box.




                                                        Working with text      407
         4 Click OK.
         5 Click the Replace button.


         Ÿ Grammatik flags passive sentences when the Passive Voice rule is
           enabled. For more information about rules, see “Creating and editing
           grammar checking styles” on page 410.


Adding words to a word list during a grammar check
         You can add words Grammatik doesn’t recognize to a user word list.

         To add a word to a user word list during a grammar check
         1 Select the text with the Pick tool.
         2 Click Text, Writing Tools, Grammatik.
         3 Click the Add button when Grammatik stops on a word it doesn’t
           recognize.

Changing the grammar checking language
         You can change the language Grammatik uses to check a document and save
         it as the default language.

         To change the grammar checking language
         1 Click Text, Writing Tools, Grammatik.
         2 Click the Options button, and click Language.
         3 Choose a language from the Language list.

         To save a language as the default grammar check language
         1 Follow all the steps from the previous procedure.
         2 Enable the Save As Default Writing Tool Language check box.

Changing the grammar checking style
         You can change the grammar checking style Grammatik uses to check a
         document. By disabling and enabling rules, you can remove the rule options
         the style uses or add a rule you want the style to use.




408      CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
To change the grammar checking style
1 Click Text, Writing Tools, Grammatik.
2 Click the Options button, and click Checking Styles.
3 Choose one of the following options from the Checking Style list box.
  Ÿ Fiction — allows for artistic writing. The level of formality is Informal
  Ÿ Advertising — emphasizes mechanics and grammatical accuracy rather
    than style. The level of formality is Informal
  Ÿ Documentation Or Speech — targets a general, non-scientific audience
    and challenges jargon and special terminology. The level of formality is
    Standard
  Ÿ Technical Or Scientific — targets scientific publications containing
    long, complex noun phrases and a technical vocabulary. The level of
    formality is Formal
  Ÿ Informal Memo Or Letter — allows industry-specific jargon and is
    designed for less formal memos and letters. The level of formality is
    Informal
  Ÿ Formal Memo Or Letter — targets correspondence, meeting minutes,
    and legal documents which require a formal tone and a strict
    interpretation of grammar and style rules. The level of formality is
    Formal
  Ÿ Student Composition — targets longer documents. The level of
    formality is Formal
  Ÿ Spelling Plus — verifies spelling and simple rules such as punctuation
    and capitalization. The level of formality is Standard
  Ÿ Quick Check — targets most types of documents written for a general
    audience, such as general correspondence, informal reports, essays,
    and speeches. The level of formality is Standard
  Ÿ Very Strict — targets correspondence, meeting minutes, and legal
    documents which require a formal tone and a strict interpretation of
    grammar and style rules. The level of formality is Formal
4 Click the Resume button.

To disable a rule during a proofreading session
1 Click Text, Writing Tools, Grammatik.
2 Click the Turn Off button when Grammatik displays an error you don’t
  want it to indicate.




                                               Working with text          409
         To enable a rule class during a proofreading session
         1 Click Text, Writing Tools, Grammatik.
         2 Click the Options button, and enable the Turn On Rules check box.
         3 Enable the check boxes beside the rules you want in the Rules list.


         Ÿ The Turn On Rules option is available only when you disable a rule during
           a proofreading session.


Creating and editing grammar checking styles
         You can create and edit grammar checking styles by adding and removing
         rules, changing the consecutive elements settings, and changing the level of
         formality.

         To customize the rules of a grammar checking style
         1 Click Text, Writing Tools, Grammatik.
         2 Click the Options button, and click Checking Styles.
         3 Choose a checking style from the list box.
         4 Click the Edit button.
         5 Do one of the following:
            Ÿ Enable the check boxes beside the rules in the Rule Classes list you
              want to apply .
            Ÿ Disable the check boxes beside the rules in the Rule Classes list you
              don’t want to apply.
         6 Do one of the following:
            Ÿ Click Save to save the changes to the checking style.
            Ÿ Click Save As to save create a new checking style. Type the name of
              the new style in the Custom Style Name box.

         To change the maximum allowed settings
         1 Follow steps 1 to 4 from the previous procedure.
         2 In the Rule Classes list, enable the Consecutive Elements check box.
         3 Type a value in any of the following boxes:




410      CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
            Ÿ Consecutive Nouns — specifies the number of consecutive nouns
              allowed
            Ÿ Consecutive Prepositional Phrases — specifies the number of
              consecutive prepositional phrases allowed
            Ÿ Long Sentence Length — specifies the maximum number of words
              allowed in a sentence
            Ÿ Spell Numbers Below Or Equal To — specifies the range of numbers to
              be spelled out. Set this value to zero if you don’t want figures to be
              flagged as errors
            Ÿ Words Allowed In Split Infinitive — specifies the number of words
              allowed in a split infinitive
         4 Follow step 6 from the previous procedure.

         To set the formality level
         1 Follow steps 1 to 4 from the “To customize the rules of a grammar
           checking style” procedure.
         2 Click one of the following buttons:
            Ÿ Informal — allows relaxed usage of the language and colloquial
              expressions
            Ÿ Standard — allows moderate, everyday language
            Ÿ Formal — uses strict rules of diction and language usage
         3 Follow step 6 from the “To customize the rules of a grammar checking
           style” procedure.


         Ÿ When you save an edited default checking style, an asterisk (*) appears
           beside the style name.


Restoring an edited grammar checking style
         You can restore an edited predefined grammar checking style to its original
         settings.

         To restore an edited checking style
         1 Click Text, Writing Tools, Grammatik.
         2 Click the Options button, and click Checking Styles.
         3 Choose the checking style you want to restore from the list.


                                                        Working with text          411
         4 Click the Edit button.
         5 Click the Restore button.
         6 Click the Save button.


         Ÿ You can identify an edited checking style by the asterisk (*) that appears
           beside its name.


Deleting a grammar checking style
         You may want to remove a grammar checking style that you no longer
         require.

         To delete a checking style
         1 Click Text, Writing Tools, Grammatik.
         2 Click the Options button, and click Checking Styles.
         3 Choose the checking style you want to delete from the list.


         Ÿ You can delete only grammar checking styles that you create.


Using Grammatik to analyze writing style
         You can have Grammatik analyze the grammatical structure of your writing
         and your writing style to determine the level of readability.

         To analyze text
         1 Using the Text tool, place the cursor in the sentence you want to analyze.
         2 Click Text, Writing Tools, Grammatik.
         3 Click the Options button.
         4 Click Analysis.
         5   Click one of the following:
             Ÿ Parse Tree — analyzes the parts of sentence you selected
             Ÿ Parts Of Speech — identifies the parts of speech in the sentence you
               selected
             Ÿ Basic Counts — counts the text elements



412      CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
             Ÿ Flagged — displays the number and types of flagged grammar issues
             Ÿ Readability — analyzes the readability of the text

Analyzing parts of speech
          You can have Grammatik analyze the parts of speech of a sentence and view
          the report.

          To analyze parts of speech
          1 Using the Text tool, place the cursor in the sentence you want to analyze.
          2 Click Text, Writing Tools, Grammatik.
          3 Click the Options button.
          4 Click Analysis.
          5 Click Parts Of Speech.


          Ÿ The Parts Of Speech dialog box automatically updates as new errors are
            found.


Analyzing parts of a sentence
          You can analyze a sentence by having Grammatik assign a sentence part to
          each word or group of words. View the assignments by using a parse tree.

          To view a parse tree
          1 Place the Insertion point in the sentence you want to analyze with the
            Text tool.
          2 Click Text, Writing Tools, Grammatik.
          3 Click the Options button.
          4 Click Analysis.
          5 Click Parse Tree.

Displaying basic text elements and flagged counts
          You can generate a count of the basic text elements used. You can also
          generate a count of the types of errors flagged.




                                                         Working with text           413
          To view a basic word count
          1 Place the Insertion point in the sentence you want to analyze with the
            Text tool.
          2 Click Text, Writing Tools, Grammatik.
          3 Click the Options button.
          4 Click Analysis.
          5 Click Basic Counts.

          To view a list of the types of errors flagged
          1 Follow steps 1 to 4 from the previous procedure.
          2 Click the Flagged option.

Testing the readability of a document
          You can have Grammatik estimate the amount of skill required for a reader to
          understand a document. Grammatik does this by comparing your document
          with a comparison document. You can change the comparison document
          Grammatik uses, or add a new comparison document.

          To test the readability of a document
          1 Using the Text tool, place the Insertion point in the sentence you want to
            analyze.
          2 Click Text, Writing Tools, Grammatik.
          3 Click the Options button.
          4 Click Analysis.
          5 Click Readability.

          To change the comparison document
          1 Follow all the steps from the previous procedure.
          2 Choose a comparison document from the Comparison Document list box.

          To add a comparison document
          1 Open the document you want to use as a comparison document.
          2 Follow the steps from the “To test the readability of a document”
            procedure.
          3 Click the Add Document button.


414       CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
          Ÿ You can add custom comparison documents to the list of comparison
            documents only one at a time.



          Ÿ Use the Compare Documents feature to track your writing progress by
            comparing one version of the document to the next revision.


Working with user word lists
          User word lists are personal vocabulary lists which you create by adding
          words or phrases that you commonly misspell, or words which the Spell
          Checker and Grammatik don’t recognize. When the Spell Checker and
          Grammatik detect an unknown word or phrase, they treat the word or phrase
          like an error. By adding such words and phrases to user word lists, the
          writing tools will recognize them as being correct.
          The Spell Checker and Grammatik scan two types of word lists — user word
          lists and main word lists. You can have up to ten lists of each type active
          when you use the writing tools. CorelDRAW first scans the document user
          word lists. If the word or phrase is not found there, CorelDRAW scans the
          active word lists in the order in which they are displayed. If you write a
          document in another language, you can create and use a word list for that
          language and enable it. Alternative words appear in the Replacements or
          Suggestions list box in the Spell Checker and Grammatik.
          In addition, you can customize user words lists. For example, you can add a
          word you want the Spell Checker and Grammatik to skip.
          You can also disable or remove a user word list from the Spell Checker and
          Grammatik.


          Ÿ Each document has its own user word list to which you can add words and
            phrases that pertain to that document. You can create and use multiple
            user word lists when you spell check or grammar check a document. If
            more than one word list is activated, the document user word list is the
            first list the program scans.


Creating and activating user word lists
          You can create a user word list and add words to it or add words to an existing
          list. You can enable a user word list so the writing tools use it to verify
          documents. You can also select a user word list for another language.




                                                          Working with text         415
         To create a user word list
         1 Click Text, Writing Tools, Grammatik or Spell Check.
         2 Click the Options button, and click User Word Lists.
         3 Click the Add List button.
         4 Choose the drive and folder where you want to store the file, and type a
           name in the File Name box.
         5 Click the Open button.

         To add a word to a user word list
         1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
         2 In the Word Lists list, enable the check box next to the user word list to
           which you want to add a word.
         3 Click the Add Entry button when Grammatik stops on a word you want to
           add.

         To enable a user word list
         1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the “To create a user word list” procedure.
         2 In the Word Lists list box, enable the check box next to the word list.

         To select a user word list for another language
         1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the “To create a user word list” procedure.
         2 Choose a language from the Language list box.

Customizing user word lists
         You can also add a list of alternative words or phrases for the Spell Checker
         and Grammatik to display. You can add words and phrases you want the
         writing tools to replace or skip. If a user word list contains an error, you can
         edit the list or delete the entry.

         To add a list of alternative words to a user word list
         1 Click Text, Writing Tools, Grammatik or Spell Check.
         2 Click the Options button, and click User Word Lists.
         3 In the Word Lists list, enable the check box next to the word list you want
           to edit, if there are multiple word lists.
         4 Type the word or phrase you want to replace in the Word/Phrase box, and
           type its replacement in the Replace With box.


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         5 Click the Add Entry button.
         6 Repeat steps 3 and 4 for each alternative word.

         To add a replacement word to a user word list
         1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
         2 Type the word or phrase you want to replace in the Word/Phrase box, and
           type its replacement in the Replace With box.
         3 Click the Add Entry button.

         To add a word you want to skip to a user word list
         1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the “To add a list of alternative words to a user
           word list” procedure.
         2 Type the word or phrase you want to skip in the Word/Phrase box.
         3 Click the Add Entry button.

         To edit a word or phrase in a user word list
         1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the “To add a list of alternative words to a user
           word list” procedure.
         2 Select the word or phrase you want to edit in the box located at the
           bottom of the User Word Lists dialog box.
         3 Edit the word or phrase in the Replace With box.
         4 Click the Replace Entry button.

         To delete a word from a user word list
         1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the “To add a list of alternative words to a user
           word list” procedure.
         2 Choose the word or phrase you want to delete in the box located at the
           bottom of the User Word Lists dialog box.
         3 Click the Delete Entry button.

Disabling and removing user word lists
         You can disable or remove a user word list from the Grammatik or Spell
         Checker dialog box.

         To disable a user word list
         1 Click Text, Writing Tools, Grammatik or Spell Check.


                                                         Working with text          417
         2 Click the Options button, and click User Word Lists.
         3 In the Word Lists list, disable the check box next to the word list you want
           to disable.

         To remove a user word list
         1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
         2 Choose the user word list from the Word Lists list box.
         3 Click the Remove List button.


         Ÿ Removing a user word list does not delete it.


Using Type Assist
         Using Type Assist, you can correct capitalization errors automatically and
         create shortcuts to frequently used words and phrases. For example, you can
         store the phrase “for your information” under the abbreviation “FYI” so that
         each time you type “FYI” followed by a space, it is replaced with the phrase.

Customizing Type Assist
         You can use Type Assist to replace text and punctuation marks and change
         letter case automatically. You can also undo a Type Assist correction.

         To customize Type Assist
         1 Click Text, Writing Tools, Type Assist.
         2 Enable any of the following check boxes:
            Ÿ Capitalize First Letter Of Sentences
            Ÿ Change Straight Quotes To Typographic Quotes
            Ÿ Correct Two Initial, Consecutive Capitals
            Ÿ Capitalize Names of Days
            Ÿ Replace Text While Typing, and type the text in the Replace box. Type
              the replacement text in the With box, and click the Add button




418      CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
          Ÿ The Correct Two Initial, Consecutive Capitals option doesn’t make a
            change when a capital letter is followed by a space or period, or if a word
            contains other capital letters.
          Ÿ You can change the text case instead of enabling the Capitalize First
            Letter Of Sentences check box to change selected text to sentence case.
            For more information, see “Changing text case” on page 356.


          To undo a Type Assist correction
          Ÿ Click Edit, Undo Typing.

Using the Thesaurus
          The Thesaurus displays a list of synonyms, antonyms, definitions, and
          examples of usage of words for which you request alternatives. Alternatives
          for a selected word are displayed in the Replacements list and definitions and
          examples of selected words are displayed in the Definitions list.
          You can change the settings of the Thesaurus to control how it operates. For
          example, you can display a list of definitions for word. You can also specify
          the language the Thesaurus uses.
          You can customize the Thesaurus look-up options to specify what types of
          alternative words appear when you look up a word.

Looking for alternative phrasing
          You can use the Thesaurus to find alternative words or phrases. You can also
          use the Thesaurus to replace a word with a synonym.

          To use the Thesaurus
          1 Select the text with the Text tool.
          2 Click Text, Writing Tools, Thesaurus.
             The selected word and its part of speech appears in the Replacements
             box. The definitions appear in the Definitions list.
          3 Double-click a word in the Replacements box to display the list of its
            definitions in the Definitions For list.
          4 Click the word you want to use as the replacement text.
          5 Click the Replace button.




                                                          Working with text          419
         Ÿ You can display a list of synonyms for a word by double-clicking it.


Customizing Thesaurus settings
         You can customize Thesaurus settings.

         To customize Thesaurus settings
         1 Click Text, Writing Tools, Thesaurus.
         2 Click the Options button.
         3 Enable any of the following options:
            Ÿ Auto Look Up — enables the Thesaurus as soon as you open the dialog
              box
            Ÿ Auto Close — closes the Thesaurus when you click the Replace button
            Ÿ Show Definitions — displays definitions for words
            Ÿ Spelling Assist — displays spelling suggestions when you type a word
              the Thesaurus doesn’t recognize
            A check mark appears beside the enabled options.

Changing the Thesaurus language
         You can change the default language the Thesaurus uses.

         To change the Thesaurus language
         1 Click Text, Writing Tools, Thesaurus.
         2 Click the Options button.
         3 Enable Language, and choose the language you want to use from the
           Current Language list box.
            A check mark appears beside the enabled options.

Customizing Thesaurus look-up options
         You can customize the Thesaurus look-up options to specify what types of
         alternative words appear when you look up a word.

         To customize Thesaurus look-up options
         1 Click Text, Writing Tools, Thesaurus.
         2 Click the Options button.


420      CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
         3 Enable any of the following options:
            Ÿ Synonyms — looks up words with the same meaning
            Ÿ Related Words — looks up words with a similar meaning
            Ÿ Antonyms — looks up words with opposite meanings
            Ÿ Words For One Definition — displays words for one definition of a word
              at a time
            A check mark appears beside enabled options.
         4 Select a word or type a word in the Replace With box.
         5 Click the Look Up button.


         Ÿ You can also look up a word by double-clicking it in the Thesaurus dialog
           box.


Checking statistics
         You can check text statistics to count text elements, including the number of
         lines, words, characters, and the names of the fonts and styles used. You can
         either display statistics for selected text objects or for the entire document. If
         no text objects are selected, all text elements in the document, including tab
         and space characters, are counted.

Checking statistics in a document
         You can count text for an entire document or selected text.

         To count text elements for an entire document
         1 Click a blank space in the Drawing Window to deselect any objects.
         2 Click Text, Text Statistics.

         To count text elements for selected text
         1 Using the Pick tool, select a text object — either a line of Artistic text or a
           Paragraph text frame.
         2 Click Text, Text Statistics.
         3 Enable the Show Style Statistics check box to display information about
           the styles used.




                                                           Working with text          421
Substituting unavailable fonts
         When you open a file that contains a font that is not installed on your
         computer, PANOSE provides you with a list of fonts you can use to substitute
         the font. You can accept the suggestion, or choose another font. You can make
         the substitution for the current document only, or make it permanent.
         Rather than substituting missing fonts each time you open a document
         containing missing fonts, you can set up a list of matches for uninstalled
         fonts. This list is saved for all subsequent documents when you exit
         CorelDRAW.
         Additionally, if you use CorelDRAW to import documents from Macintosh
         programs, you can add to or change the table to match Windows font names
         to Macintosh font names.

Changing font substitutions
         You can change the font substitution by replacing the substitute font. You can
         make this font substitution temporary or permanent for that document.

         To change a font substitution
         1 Open the file.
            If the document contains fonts that are not installed on your computer, the
            PANOSE Font Matching Results dialog box appears.
         2 Choose the Missing Font and Substituted Font match you want to change.
         3 Choose a new font from the Substituted Font list box.
         4 Click OK.
         5 PANOSE Font Matching asks you if you want to save the changes to the
           Font Matches Exceptions file; choose the option that best suits your
           needs.

         To change a font substitution for a document temporarily
         Ÿ In the PANOSE Font Matching Results dialog box, click the Temporary
           option.

         To change a font substitution for a document permanently
         Ÿ In the PANOSE Font Matching Results dialog box, click the Permanent
           option.




422      CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
          Ÿ When you choose the Permanent option, you are given the choice to make
            the change in the Exceptions file. Making this change means the font
            substitution will be permanent for all documents.


Building a list of matches for missing fonts
          You can build a list of matches for uninstalled fonts.

          To build a list of matches for missing fonts
          1 Click Tools, Options.
          2 In the list of categories, double-click Text, and click Fonts.
          3 Click the PANOSE Font Matching button.
          4 Click Exceptions in the PANOSE Font Matching Preferences dialog box to
            change the default substitution font.
          5 Click the Add button.
          6 Type the name of the font to replace in the Missing Font box.
          7 Choose a font that is installed on your computer from the Substituted Font
            list.


          Ÿ Accurately map fonts that have a different font family but look similar by
            editing the Alternate Spellings list.


Matching a Windows font to a Macintosh font
          You can specify the Windows equivalents for Macintosh fonts contained in a
          document.

          To match a Windows font to a Macintosh font
          1 Click Tools, Options.
          2 In the list of categories double-click Text, and click Fonts.
          3 Click the PANOSE Font Matching button.
          4 Click the Spelling button.
          5 Click the Add button.
          6 Choose a Windows font name from the Windows Name box.
          7 Type the Macintosh spelling for the font in the Macintosh Name box.


                                                            Working with text      423
         Ÿ The PANOSE Font Matching feature works only with .CDR and .CDT
           files. It will not work with text that you copy from the Clipboard.


Setting preferences
         When you’re creating text, you can change the settings. You can change the
         appearance of text on-screen and adjust the increment used to change the
         font size through the keypad. You can also specify a text unit of
         measurement, change how CorelDRAW displays fonts and symbols, and
         change the Clipboard settings.
         Greeking text increases the redraw speed by representing text with lines.
         You specify the maximum text size, and text below that value is greeked.
         Make text readable again by reducing the greeking value or by using Zoom.
         Greeking does not affect the printed text.
         You can also change the on-screen appearance of text by smoothing
         characters. Anti-aliasing fills jagged pixels with intermediate color or shades
         of gray to increase clarity.
         You can can increase or decrease the text point size using the keypad. By
         default, the size changes by increments of one point. You can change the
         default point size setting.
         By default, the setting for text units of measurement is points. You can
         change this setting for the current and all subsequent documents you create.
         When you’re creating text, you can change how CorelDRAW displays fonts
         and symbols. For example, you can display only fonts used in the active
         document or display only TrueType symbols. You can also determine what
         nonprinting characters CorelDRAW displays in the Drawing Window and the
         Edit Text dialog box.
         Changing the Clipboard settings affects how CorelDRAW transfers text to
         the Clipboard. You can specify whether text is copied or cut to the Clipboard
         as text or as curves. You can also specify whether calligraphic pen outlines
         transfer to the Clipboard or export using any of the vector graphics export
         filters. However, some export filters retain calligraphic outlines regardless of
         the setting selected.

Changing the appearance of text on-screen
         You can greek text to make text below a specified font size appear as lines.
         You can also smooth text by filling in jagged pixels.

         To specify the size of text to greek
         1 Click Tools, Options.


424      CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
          2 In the list of categories, click Text.
          3 Type a value in the in the Greek Text Below box.
             This specifies the number of pixels at which you want to start greeking
             text.

          To smooth edges of screen fonts
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
          2 Enable the Smooth Edges Of Screen Fonts check box.

Specifying the increment used to size text
          You can specify the increment CorelDRAW uses to size text the keypad.

          To specify the increment used to size text
          1 Click Tools, Options.
          2 In the list of categories, click Text.
          3 Type a value in the Keyboard Text Increment box.


          Ÿ By holding down CTRL and pressing 8 and 2 on the keypad, you can
            increase and decrease the font size.


Changing the default text unit of measurement
          You can change the unit of measurement used for text, which affects the
          current and all subsequent documents you create in CorelDRAW.

          To specify default text units
          1 Click Tools, Options.
          2 In the list of categories, click Text.
          3 From the Default Text Units list box, choose the units of measurement
            you want to work with when formatting text.

Choosing font and symbol display options
          You can specify the symbol and font types displayed in the font lists on the
          Text toolbar and Property Bar. You can also show samples in the font lists,
          show only the fonts used in the active document, and specify a value to
          determine the number of most recently used fonts displayed in the font lists.


                                                         Working with text          425
      You can also specify the symbol and font groupings for the Symbols And
      Special Characters Docker window.

      To customize the contents of the font lists
      1 Click Tools, Options.
      2 In the list of categories, double-click Text, and click Fonts.
      3 In the Font List Contents section, enable any of the following check boxes
        for the font and symbol groupings you want to display in the font list in the
        Text toolbar and Property Bar:
         Ÿ Show TrueType Fonts
         Ÿ Show Type 1 Fonts
         Ÿ Show TrueType Symbols
         Ÿ Show Type 1 Symbols

      To show font samples in the font lists
      1 Follow all of the steps from the previous procedure.
      2 Enable the Show Font Sample In Drop Down Fonts Lists check box.

      To show only the fonts used in the active document
      1 Follow all of the steps from the “To customize the contents of the font
        lists” procedure.
      2 Enable the Show Document Fonts Only check box.

      To specify a value for the number of most recently used fonts
      displayed in the font lists
      1 Follow all of the steps from the “To customize the contents of the font
        lists” procedure.
      2 Type a value in the Display The Most Recently Used Fonts box.

      To specify the contents of the symbols and special characters list
      1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
      2 In the Symbol List Contents section, enable any of the following check
        boxes for the symbol and font groupings you want to display in the
        Symbols And Special Characters Docker window:
         Ÿ Show TrueType Fonts
         Ÿ Show Type 1 Fonts


426   CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
             Ÿ Show TrueType Symbols
             Ÿ Show Type 1 Symbols

Displaying and specifying options for nonprinting characters
          You can specify which nonprinting characters are displayed in the Drawing
          Window and the Edit Text dialog box.

          To display nonprinting characters while editing in the Edit Text
          dialog box
          1 Using the Pick tool, select a text object — a line of Artistic text or a
            Paragraph text frame.
          2 Click Text, Edit Text.
          3 Click the Non-printing Characters button to display soft returns, hard
            returns, tabs, and spaces in the Edit Text dialog box.

          To display or hide the nonprinting characters in the Drawing
          Window
          1 Select the text with the Text tool.
          2 Do one of the following:
             Ÿ Enable the Non-printing Characters button on the Property Bar to
               display nonprinting characters.
             Ÿ Disable the Non-printing Characters button on the Property Bar to
               hide nonprinting characters.

          To specify which nonprinting characters are displayed
          1 Click Tools, Options.
          2 In the list of categories, click Text.
          3 Enable or disable the following check boxes in the Non-printing Character
            box:
             Ÿ Soft Returns
             Ÿ Hard Returns
             Ÿ Tabs
             Ÿ Spaces




                                                           Working with text           427
Setting Clipboard options
         You can specify whether to copy or cut text to the Clipboard as text or as
         curves. You can also specify whether to transfer calligraphic pen outlines to
         the Clipboard or to export them using any of the vector graphics export
         filters.

         To paste text to the Clipboard as text
         1 Click Tools, Options.
         2 In the list of categories, click Text.
         3 Enable the Text In Metafile check box.

         To paste text to the Clipboard as curve objects
         1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
         2 Disable the Text In Metafile check box.

         To paste text from the Clipboard as calligraphic text
         1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the “To paste text to the Clipboard as text”
           procedure.
         2 Enable the Calligraphic Text check box.




428      CorelDRAW: Chapter 9
       CREATING SPECIAL EFFECTS                                         10
       The special effects in CorelDRAW let you alter the appearance of objects.
       You can distort objects, add new elements to objects, and change the
       relationship between objects.
       By blending two objects, you create a series of intermediate objects that
       show a transition in color, shape, and size. Three distortion effects let you
       change the shape of objects: Push and Pull, Zipper, and Twister. You can also
       change the shape of an object by applying an envelope to it then shaping the
       envelope. The object conforms to the shape of the envelope. By extruding an
       object, CorelDRAW adds surfaces to make it appear three-dimensional.
       Adding one and two-point perspective lets you create the illusion of depth
       and distance. You can create the illusion of depth between objects by adding
       drop shadows. You can apply transparencies, which are grayscale masks, to
       objects. Transparencies are applied on top of the object’s current fill,
       therefore the object’s color show through the transparency. The lenses in
       CorelDRAW let you change the appearance of objects you view through
       them. You can contour an object, creating the effect created by contour lines
       on a topographical map. When you create PowerClip objects, you place an
       object inside another object. One object becomes the contents; the other
       object becomes the container.
       You can apply effects to both Paragraph text and Artistic text. However, some
       effects are exclusive to Artistic text and others to Paragraph text because
       CorelDRAW treats the two text types differently.
       Effects you can apply to Paragraph text frames include applying envelopes,
       drop shadows, and PowerClip objects.
       Effects you can apply to Artistic text include extrusions, blends, contours,
       distortions, envelopes, lenses, PowerClip objects, perspectives, and drop
       shadows.


Blending Objects
       You can create a number of different blends, including straight-line blends
       and compound blends, among others. When you’ve created a blend, you
       change its intermediate objects. For example, you can set the number of
       steps and distance between intermediate objects. You can also change the
       entire blend. For example, you can change the start or end object, split the
       blend, or change the blend path.




                                                   Creating special effects        431
Creating blends
          CorelDRAW offers a variety of features for creating interesting blend effects,
          such as straight-line blends, blending along a path, compound blends, and
          copying and cloning blends.

          Straight-line blends
          The intermediate objects, in a straight-line blend, show a progression in
          shape and size between the original objects. The outline and fill colors of the
          intermediate objects progress on a straight-line path across the color
          spectrum. Special fills (i.e., fountain, pattern, and texture fills) show a
          progression between the objects’ fills. The intermediate objects’ outlines
          show a gradual progressions between different thickness and formats.

          Blending along a path
          By fitting a blend to a path or drawing a path freehand while you’re blending
          objects, the objects follow the shape of the path. By default, the intermediate
          objects take on the original objects’ horizontal and vertical orientation and
          are attached to the path at their respective centers of rotation.

          Compound blends
          Adding one or more objects to a blend creates a compound blend. To create a
          compound blend, you need two components: an existing blend and an object.
          You can connect the object at the blend’s start or end object, but not at one of
          its intermediate objects. The object where you connect is shared between
          the two branches of the compound blend but maintains its relationship (that
          is, start or end object) with both.

          Copying and cloning blends
          You can also create new blends by copying or cloning a blend’s settings to
          two selected objects. The objects take on all of the blend-related settings,
          except for their outline and fill attributes. With cloned blends, changes made
          to the original blend (also called the master) are also applied to the clone.

Creating a straight-line blend
          You can create a blend in which the intermediate objects progress in size,
          shape, and color from the start object to the end object along a straight line.




432       CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
Straight-line blends
let you create a
variety of effects.




                       To create a straight-line blend
                       1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Blend tool.
                       2 Drag the end handle of one of the objects you want to blend over the other
                         object you want to blend.
                          The end handle appears after you start dragging the object.


                       Ÿ By pressing ESC when you’re dragging the Interactive Blend tool, you
                         return the object to its state prior to dragging.


Blending objects along a path
                       You can create a blend in which the intermediate objects progress along an
                       existing path and stretch the objects along the full length of the path. You can
                       also blend along a path you draw freehand.
If you have two
objects and a path,
you can create a
blend along a path.




                       To blend objects along a path
                       1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Blend tool.



                                                                   Creating special effects         433
                        2 Drag the end handle of one of the objects you want to blend over the other
                          object you want to blend.
                           The end handle appears after you start dragging the object. This creates a
                           straight-line blend between the two objects.
                        3 Right-click the blend with the Pick tool.
                        4 Drag the blend over the path.
                        5 Click Fit Blend To Path.

                        To stretch the blend along the entire path
                        1 Follow all of the steps from the previous procedure.
                        2 Click the Miscellaneous Blend Options button on the Property Bar.
                        3 Enable the Blend Along Full Path check box.

                        To blend objects along a freehand path
                        1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Blend tool.
                        2 Hold down ALT, and draw a freehand path from one of the objects you
                          want to blend to the other object you want to blend.


                        Ÿ By pressing ESC when you’re dragging the Interactive Blend tool, you
                          return the object to its state prior to dragging.


Creating compound blends
                        You can create a compound blend by adding one or more objects to a blend’s
                        start or end object. The object you add becomes the end object of that
                        component of the compound blend.
In this compound
blend, the palette is
the end object for
the three component
blends.




434                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
         To create a compound blend
         1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Blend tool.
         2 Drag the end handle of the object you want to add over the blend’s start or
           end object.
            The end handle appears after you start dragging the object.


         Ÿ You can also create a compound blend by splitting a blend. For more
           information, see “Splitting a blend” on page 442.



         Ÿ By pressing ESC when you’re dragging the Interactive Blend tool, you
           return the object to its state prior to dragging.


Copying and cloning blends
         You can copy and clone blend settings and apply them to two selected objects
         to create a blend.

         To copy a blend
         1 Hold down SHIFT, and using the Pick tool, select the two objects to which
           you want to copy a blend.
         2 Click Effects, Copy, Blend From.
         3 Using the horizontal pointer that appears, select the blend you want to
           copy.


         Ÿ You can use the Copy Blend Properties button on the Property Bar when
           you want to copy the blend properties from one blend to another.


         To clone a blend
         1 Hold down SHIFT and using the Pick tool, select the two objects to which
           you want to clone a blend.
         2 Click Effects, Clone, Blend From.
         3 Using the horizontal pointer that appears, select the blend you want to
           clone.




                                                     Creating special effects         435
Modifying the intermediate objects of a blend
         You can alter the appearance of a blend by adjusting the space between
         intermediate objects, rotating them, setting their color progression, or
         accelerate their fills and outlines, you alter the appearance.
         You can control the spacing between intermediate objects by setting the
         distance between objects, or by specifying the number of intermediate
         objects in the blend. When you’re working with a blend that’s fit to a path,
         you can specify the exact distance between the intermediate objects.
         When you rotate a blend’s intermediate objects, the rotation progresses
         counterclockwise around the centers of rotation of the intermediate objects.
         Looping, rotates the intermediate objects around a point halfway between the
         objects’ centers of rotation.
         By setting the color progression of intermediate objects, you determine the
         way outline and fill colors progress between the start and end objects of a
         blend. CorelDRAW provides a straight, clockwise, or counterclockwise path
         through the color spectrum.
         In a basic blend, the intermediate objects are spaced evenly as they progress
         between the start and end objects. Similarly, the intermediate colors progress
         evenly between these objects. You can change object and color progressions
         so that they appear to accelerate toward the start or end object. For example
         when you accelerate objects in one direction, they get closer together as they
         progress in that direction.
         By mapping nodes, you control the way the start object is transformed into
         the end object. As a result, you have greater control over the appearance of
         the intermediate blend objects.

Setting the number of intermediate objects in a blend
         You can specify the number of intermediate objects (steps) in a blend. The
         number of intermediate objects you specify determines the amount of space
         between the objects.

         To set the number of steps in a blend
         1 Select the blend with the Pick tool.
         2 Enable the top portion of the Use Steps Or Fixed Spacing For Blend button
           on the Property Bar.
            The button is enabled when it appears pressed.
         3 Type a value in the top portion of the Number Of Steps Or Offset Between
           Blend Shapes box on the Property Bar.
         4 Press ENTER.


436      CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
                       Ÿ Higher numbers create less space.


Setting the distance between the intermediate objects blended along a
path
                       You can specify the distance between the intermediate objects that are
                       blended along a path.

                       To set the distance between intermediate objects blended along a
                       path
                       1 Select the blend along a path with the Pick tool.
                       2 Enable the bottom portion of the Use Steps Or Fixed Spacing For Blend
                         button on the Property Bar.
                          The button is enabled when it appears pressed.
                       3 Type a value in the bottom portion of the Number Of Steps Or Offset
                         Between Shapes box on the Property Bar.
                       4 Press ENTER.

Rotating the intermediate objects in a blend
                       You can rotate the intermediate objects in a blend as they progress between
                       the start and end objects. By default, objects are attached to the path by their
                       centers of rotation. You can change the default by looping the intermediate
                       objects to rotate them halfway between the start and end objects’ centers of
                       rotation.
From top to bottom:
a direct blend with
no rotation, with a
180-degree rotation,
and with a
180-degree rotation
and the Loop button
enabled.




                                                                   Creating special effects       437
          You can also rotate intermediate objects that are blended along a path.

          To rotate the intermediate objects of a straight-line blend
          1 Select the blend with the Pick tool.
          2 Type the degree to which you want to rotate the intermediate objects in
            the Blend Direction box on the Property Bar.
          3 Press ENTER.


          Ÿ Negative numbers rotate the objects clockwise.


          To loop the intermediate object of a straight-line blend
          1 Follow all of the steps from the previous procedure.
          2 Enable the Loop button on the Property Bar.
             The button is enabled when it appears pressed.


          Ÿ You can enter degree values between -360 and 360. Negative numbers
            rotate the objects clockwise.


          To rotate intermediate objects that are blended along a path
          1 Select the blend along a path with the Pick tool.
          2 Click the Miscellaneous Blend Options button on the Property Bar.
          3 Enable the Rotate All Objects check box.

Setting the color progression for the intermediate objects in a blend
          You can determine how the outline and fill colors of the intermediate objects
          in a blend progress through the color spectrum from the start object to the
          end object. You can choose from a straight, clockwise, or counterclockwise
          path through the color spectrum.

          To set the color progression for intermediate objects
          1 Select the blend with the Pick tool.
          2 Enable one of the following buttons on the Property Bar to indicate the
            type of color progression you want:
             Ÿ Direct Blend


438       CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
                         Ÿ Clockwise Blend
                         Ÿ Counterclockwise Blend
                         The button is enabled when it appears pressed.


                      Ÿ You can set the color progression for any blend that uses uniform or
                        fountain fills. You can’t create color progressions using bitmap, texture,
                        vector pattern, PostScript, or transparent fills.


Accelerating the intermediate objects’ distance, fills and outlines, and
size
                      You can change the distance between intermediate objects as they progress
                      between the start and end objects. You can also change the progression of the
                      outline and fill colors, as well as the progression of the size of intermediate
                      objects. You can link the rates of color and object acceleration so that they
                      accelerate at the same rate.
Accelerating the
objects in a blend.




                      To accelerate the distance between intermediate objects
                      1 Select the blend with the Pick tool.
                      2 Click the Object And Color Acceleration button on the Property Bar.
                      3 Move the Object Acceleration slider to set the direction and rate of object
                        acceleration.

                      To accelerate the colors of intermediate objects
                      1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
                      2 Move the Color Acceleration slider to set the direction and rate of color
                        acceleration.



                                                                  Creating special effects      439
                      To accelerate the size of intermediate objects
                      1 Select the blend with the Pick tool.
                      2 Enable the Accelerate Sizing For Blend button on the Property Bar.
                         The button is enabled when it appears pressed.

                      To link the rates of color and object acceleration
                      1 Select the blend with the Pick tool.
                      2 Enable the Link Blend Accelerations button on the Property Bar.
                         The button is enabled when it appears pressed.

Mapping nodes to set the progression of objects in a blend
                      You can specify which nodes CorelDRAW treats as the first node on start and
                      end object’s first nodes. These nodes determines how the intermediate
                      objects are transformed from the start object to become the end object.
Map the nodes shown
in the first two
examples to produce
the rotation in the
third example.




                      To change a blend’s appearance by mapping nodes
                      1 Select the blend with the Pick tool.
                      2 Click the Miscellaneous Blend Options button on the Property Bar.
                      3 Click the Map Nodes button.
                      4 Using the curved pointer that appears, select a node (hollow black square)
                        on the end object and select a node on the start object.

Editing blends
                       Editing blends lets you customize their appearance. You can manipulate a
                      blend’s intermediate objects and change its path. You can also work with the
                      individual components of a blend by separating it.



440                   CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
          You can edit blends by selecting changing the start and end objects of a blend.
          By reversing a blend’s direction, the blend progresses from the end object to
          the start object. You can also split blends to create a compound blend or fuse
          the components of a compound blend to create a single blend. When you split
          a blend, the object you choose to split the blend becomes the end object for
          one component in the blend and the start object for the other.
          When you blend an object along a path, you can select the path and apply the
          blend to new path. You can also remove a blend from its path. When you
          remove a blend from its path, the start and end objects remain stationary and
          the intermediate objects revert to their original, straight-line path.
          You can separate a blend into four possible components: the start object, the
          end object, the intermediate objects, and the path (if the objects were
          blended along a path). You can also clear a blend by removing the
          intermediate objects and leaving the start and end objects.

Selecting the start and end objects of a blend
          You can identify and select a blend’s start and end objects.

          To select the start object in a blend
          1 Select the blend with the Pick tool.
          2 On the Property Bar, click the Start And End Object Properties button, and
            click Show Start.

          To select the end object in a blend
          1 Select the blend with the Pick tool.
          2 On the Property Bar, click the Start And End Object Properties button,
            and click Show End.

Changing the blend direction and start and end objects
          You can change a blend’s start and end object without having to reblend.
          CorelDRAW automatically redirects the blend, using the same settings as the
          original blend. By changing the direction of a blend, the blend progresses
          from the end object to the start object.

          To change a blend’s start object
          1 Select the blend with the Pick tool.
          2 On the Property Bar, click the Start And End Object Properties button, and
            click New Start.
          3 Using the horizontal pointer that appears, click the new start object.


                                                      Creating special effects       441
                         Ÿ The new start object must be layered behind the selected blend’s end
                           object. For information about the stacking order of objects, see “Changing
                           the order of objects” on page 176.


                         To change a blend’s end object
                         1 Select the blend with the Pick tool.
                         2 On the Property Bar, click the Start And End Object Properties button,
                           and click New End.
                         3 Using the horizontal pointer that appears, click the new end object.


                         Ÿ The new end object must be layered in front of the selected blend’s start
                           object. For information about the stacking order of objects, see “Changing
                           the order of objects” on page 176.


                         To reverse the direction of a blend
                         1 Select the blend with the Pick tool.
                         2 Click Arrange, Order, Reverse Order.

Splitting a blend
                         You can split a blend to create a compound blend. The object you choose to
                         split the blend becomes the end object for one component in the blend and
                         the start object for the other. Thus, the original blend is split into two
                         components. For more information about compound blends, see “Creating
                         compound blends” on page 434.
Splitting a
straight-line blend to
create a compound
blend.




442                      CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
         To split a blend
         1 Select the blend with the Pick tool.
         2 Click the Miscellaneous Options button, on the Property Bar.
         3 Click the Split button.
         4 Using the curved pointer that appears, click the intermediate object at
           which you want to split the blend.


         Ÿ You can’t split a blend using the intermediate object that is immediately
           adjacent to the start or end object.
         Ÿ You can change the appearance of one component of a compound blend
           without affecting the other component.



         Ÿ You can also select a component of a compound blend by a holding down
           CTRL and clicking any of its intermediate objects.


Fusing a blend
         You can fuse the components of a split or a compound blend to create a single
         blend.

         To fuse the start object in a split or compound blend
         1 Hold down CTRL, and select the end component of the blend with the
           Pick tool.
         2 Click the Miscellaneous Options button, on the Property Bar.
         3 Click the Fuse Start button.

         To fuse the end object in a split or compound blend
         1 Hold down CTRL, and select the start component of the blend with the
           Pick tool.
         2 Click the Miscellaneous Options button, on the Property Bar.
         3 Click the Fuse End button.




                                                    Creating special effects      443
          Ÿ If the selected blend and at least two of the compound blend’s components
            share the same start or end object, a curved pointer appears. Use this
            pointer to click the intermediate object in the component blend that you
            want to fuse.


Selecting the blend path
          You can identify and select the path along which objects are blended.

          To select the blend path
          1 Select the blend with the Pick tool.
          2 Click the Path Properties button on the Property Bar, and click Show Path.

Changing the blend path
          You can apply a blend to a different path. The blend retains all of its settings
          as it follows the shape of the new path.

          To change the blend path
          1 Select the blend with the Pick tool.
          2 Click the Path Properties button on the Property Bar, and click New Path.
          3 Using the curved pointer that appears, select the path to which you want
            to apply the blend.


          Ÿ The new path to which you want to apply the selected blend must already
            be drawn.


Removing a blend from a path
          You can detach a blend from its path.

          To remove a blend from a path
          1 Select the blend with the Pick tool.
          2 Click the Path Properties button on the Property Bar, and click Detach
            From Path.




444       CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
         Ÿ You can select and detach a component of a compound blend by holding
           down CTRL while you select the component. For more information about
           compound blends, see “Creating compound blends” on page 434.


Separating and removing a blend
         You can break a blend into four possible components: the start object, the end
         object, the intermediate objects, and the path (if the objects were blended
         along a path). You can also remove the intermediate objects from a blend,
         leaving its start and end objects.

         To separate blended objects
         1 Select the blend with the Pick tool.
         2 Click Arrange, Separate.


         Ÿ You can ungroup the intermediate objects by selecting the group with the
           Pick tool and clicking Arrange, Ungroup.


         To remove a blend
         1 Select the blend with the Pick tool.
         2 Click Effects, Clear Blend.


         Ÿ You can also click the Clear Blend button on the Property Bar.


Distorting Objects
         The interactive distortion tools let you apply interesting effects to objects.
         You can push or pull the nodes of objects you’re distorting away from or
         towards their centers. By applying a zipper, you can create a jagged, pointy
         outlines. You can also edit the effects of the Zipper distortion. You can also
         twist objects. By twisting an object, you wind the object around itself into a
         shape that resembles a coil.
         Additionally, there are modifications which you can apply to all of the
         distortions which let you distort and customized them further. For example,
         you can change the center of a distortion.




                                                     Creating special effects       445
                  Ÿ You can apply each type of distortion effect to any object you create using
                    CorelDRAW, including shapes, lines, curves, and Artistic text.


Creating Push and Pull distortions
                  When you apply a Push distortion to an object, the object’s nodes are forced
                  towards its center thereby rounding the object. The Pull distortion draws an
                  object’s nodes away from its center, making the object pointy.
                  When you create a Push or Pull distortion you like, you can copy it and apply
                  it to other selected objects. If you don’t like the distortion, you can remove it
                  without deleting the object.

Applying and removing a Push distortion
                  You can apply a Push distortion to any object you create. If you don’t like the
                  distorted object, you can remove the Push distortion.
Applying a Push
distortion.




                  To apply a Push distortion
                  1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Distortion tool.
                  2 Enable the Push And Pull Distortion button on the Property Bar.
                     The button is enabled when it appears pressed.
                  3 Select the object to which you want to apply the distortion, and drag the
                    mouse to the right.


                  Ÿ The point at which you click the object determines the center of the
                    distortion.
                  Ÿ By pressing ESC when you’re dragging the Interactive Distortion tool,
                    you return the object to its state prior to dragging.



446               CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
                  Ÿ You can also create a Push distortion by typing a value (from -200 to -1) in
                    the Push And Pull Distortion Amplitude box on the Property Bar.


                  To remove a Push distortion
                  1 Select the distorted object with the Pick tool.
                  2 Click Effects, Clear Distortion.


                  Ÿ You can also remove a distortion by clicking the Clear Distortion button
                    on the Property Bar.


Applying and removing a Pull distortion
                  You can apply a Pull distortion to any object you create. If you don’t like the
                  distorted object, you can remove the Pull distortion.
Applying a Pull
distortion.




                  To apply a Pull distortion
                  1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Distortion tool.
                  2 Enable the Push And Pull Distortion button on the Property Bar.
                     The button is enabled when it appears pressed.
                  3 Select the object to which you want to apply the distortion, and drag the
                    mouse to the left.




                                                               Creating special effects       447
         Ÿ The point at which you click the object determines the center of the
           distortion.
         Ÿ By pressing ESC when you’re dragging the Interactive Distortion tool,
           you return the object to its state prior to dragging.



         Ÿ You can also create a Pull distortion by typing a value (from 1 to 200) in
           the Push And Pull Distortion Amplitude box on the Property Bar.


         To remove a Pull distortion
         1 Select the distorted object with the Pick tool.
         2 Click Effects, Clear Distortion.


         Ÿ You can also remove a distortion by clicking the Clear Distortion button
           on the Property Bar.


Copying Push and Pull distortions
         You can copy Push and Pull distortions and apply them to selected objects.

         To copy a Push or Pull distortion
         1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Distortion tool.
         2 Select the object to which you want to copy the distortion.
         3 Click Effects, Copy Effect, Distortion From.
         4 Using the horizontal pointer that appears, select the distortion you want
           to copy.


         Ÿ You can also use the Copy Distortion Properties button on the Property
           Bar.


Creating Zipper distortions
         When you apply a Zipper distortion to an object, you create a series of points
         above and below the object’s original outline. The outline follows these
         points to create a zipper effect. You can also create a random Zipper



448      CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
                    distortion, where the horizontal and vertical points follow a haphazard
                    course.
                    When you create a Zipper distortion you like, you can copy it and apply it to
                    selected objects. If you don’t like the distortion, you can remove it without
                    deleting the object.

Applying and removing a Zipper distortion
                    You can apply a Zipper distortion to an object. If you don’t like the distorted
                    object, you can remove the Zipper distortion.
Applying a Zipper
distortion.




                    To apply a Zipper distortion
                    1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Distortion tool.
                    2 Enable the Zipper Distortion button on the Property Bar.
                       The button is enabled when it appears pressed.
                    3 Select the object to which you want to apply the distortion.
                    4 Drag the end handle to determine the amplitude of the zipper effect.
                       The point at which you click the object determines the center of the
                       distortion.
                    5 In the Drawing Window, move the slider to determine the zipper
                      frequency.


                    Ÿ By pressing ESC when you’re dragging the Interactive Distortion tool,
                      you return the object to its state prior to dragging.




                                                                 Creating special effects       449
                     Ÿ You can also adjust the amplitude of the zipper effect by typing a value in
                       the Zipper Distortion Amplitude box on the Property Bar. You can type
                       values from 0 to 100. Higher values produce a more pronounced zipper
                       distortion.


                     To remove a Zipper distortion
                     1 Select the distorted object with the Pick tool.
                     2 Click Effects, Clear Distortion.


                     Ÿ You can remove a distortion by clicking the Clear Distortion button on the
                       Property Bar.


Applying a random Zipper distortion
                     You can apply the Zipper distortion to an object randomly. You can also return
                     the random Zipper distortion to a uniform pattern.
Applying a random
Zipper distortion.




                     To apply a random Zipper distortion
                     1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Distortion tool.
                     2 Enable the Zipper Distortion button on the Property Bar.
                        The button is enabled when it appears pressed.
                     3 Select the object to which you want to apply the distortion.
                     4 Drag the end handle to determine the amplitude of the zipper effect.
                     5 Enable the Random Distortion button on the Property Bar.




450                  CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
                      To return the Zipper distortion to a uniform pattern
                      Ÿ Disable the Random Distortion button on the Property Bar.

Copying Zipper distortions
                      You can copy a Zipper distortion and apply it to a selected object.

                      To copy a Zipper distortion
                      1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Distortion tool.
                      2 Select the object to which you want to copy the distortion.
                      3 Click Effects, Copy Effect, Distortion From.
                      4 Using the horizontal pointer that appears, select the distortion you want
                        to copy.


                      Ÿ You can also use the Copy Distortion Properties button on the Property
                        Bar.


Editing Zipper distortions
                      When you’re working with Zipper distortions, you can customize the effect
                      by rounding the zipper’s points, adjusting the number of points per line
                      segment, and emphasizing the distortion in a given area of the object.

Rounding the points of a Zipper distortion
                      You can round the points of a Zipper distortion.
Rounding the points
of a Zipper
distortion.




                      To round the points of a Zipper distortion
                      1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Distortion tool.


                                                                  Creating special effects        451
                     2 Select the object whose zipper points you want to round.
                     3 Enable the Zipper Distortion button on the Property Bar.
                        The button is enabled when it appears pressed.
                     4 Enable the Smooth Distortion button on the Property Bar.


                     Ÿ To return to a pointed Zipper distortion, disable the Smooth Distortion
                       button.


Changing the number of zipper points
                     You can change the number of zipper points per line segment.

                     To change the number of zipper points
                     1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Distortion tool.
                     2 Select the object to which a Zipper distortion is applied.
                     3 Enable the Zipper Distortion button on the Property Bar.
                     4 Type a value in the Zipper Distortion Frequency box on the Property Bar.


                     Ÿ Higher values produce a greater zipper frequency.


Emphasizing a Zipper distortion in a specific area
                     You can emphasize a Zipper distortion in a specific area of an object.
Emphasizing the
points of a Zipper
distortion.




                     To emphasize a Zipper distortion in a specific area of an object
                     1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Distortion tool.


452                  CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
                     2 Select the object whose zipper distortion you want to localize.
                     3 Ensure that the Zipper Distortion button is enabled on the Property Bar.
                        The button is enabled when it appears pressed.
                     4 Enable the Local Distortion button on the Property Bar.
                     5 Drag the reposition handle to the area of the object where you want the
                       zipper distortion to be more pronounced.

Creating Twister Distortions
                     The Twister distortion turns an object around itself. When you apply a
                     Twister distortion to an object, the point at which you click becomes the
                     center of the distortion, which can be also identified by a diamond-shaped
                     handle. The center is fixed while one end of the object is wound around this
                     fixed point. A dashed line, the Horizontal Line Of Origin, extends from the
                     center of the object. This line measures the amount of Twister distortion in
                     degrees you apply as you drag the rotation handle in either a clockwise or
                     counterclockwise direction. One full rotation is 359 degrees.
                     CorelDRAW also lets you adjust the rotation of Twister distortions. For
                     example, you can change the number of degrees you’ve rotated an object, as
                     well as the direction of the rotation.
                     When you create a Twister distortion you like, you can copy it and apply it to
                     other selected objects. If you don’t like the distortion, you can remove it
                     without deleting the object.

Applying and removing a Twister Distortion
                     You can apply a Twister distortion to an object. If you don’t like the effect,
                     you can remove the Twister distortion.
Applying a Twister
distortion.




                     To apply a Twister distortion
                     1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Distortion tool.


                                                                  Creating special effects        453
                       2 Enable the Twister Distortion button on the Property Bar.
                          The button is enabled when it appears pressed.
                       3 Select the object to which you want to apply the distortion, and drag the
                         mouse to the right along the x-axis, and up slightly along the y-axis to
                         apply a small amount of distortion.


                       Ÿ After you complete one full rotation (359 degrees), the Number Of
                         Rotations box counts one and the Degrees box resumes counting from
                         zero.


                       To remove a Twister distortion
                       1 Select the distorted object with the Pick tool.
                       2 Click Effects, Clear Distortion.


                       Ÿ You can remove a distortion by clicking the Clear Distortion button on the
                         Property Bar.


Adjusting the rotation of a Twister distortion
                       You can adjust the number of degrees, as well as the number of complete
                       rotations you’ve applied to an object. You can also rotate the object clockwise
                       or counterclockwise.
A Twister distortion
with multiple
rotations.




                       To change the number of degrees the object is rotated
                       1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Distortion tool.




454                    CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
          2 Select the object with the Twister distortion.
          3 Type a value in the Additional Degrees box on the Property Bar.

          To change the number of complete rotations
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
          2 Type a value in the Complete Rotations box on the Property Bar.

          To rotate the Twister distortion clockwise
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the “To change the number of degrees the
            object is rotated” procedure.
          2 Click the Clockwise button on the Property Bar.

          To rotate the Twister distortion counterclockwise
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the “To change the number of degrees the
            object is rotated” procedure.
          2 Click the Counterclockwise button on the Property Bar.

Copying Twister distortions
          You can copy a Twister distortion and apply it to a selected object.

          To copy a Twister distortion
          1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Distortion tool.
          2 Select the object to which you want to copy the distortion.
          3 Click Effects, Copy Effect, Distortion From.
          4 Using the horizontal pointer that appears, select the distortion you want
            to copy.


          Ÿ You can also use the Copy Distortion Properties button on the Property
            Bar.


Modifying distortions
          When you’re working with Push and Pull, Zipper, and Twister distortions,
          you can change the effect by moving the center of the distortion. You can also
          apply a different distortion to a distorted object. For example, you can apply a
          Twister distortion to an object to which you’ve applied a Zipper distortion.


                                                      Creating special effects       455
Changing the center of a distortion
                       You can change the center of a distortion. You can also return the reposition
                       handle to center of the distortion.

                       To change the center of a distortion
                       1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Distortion tool.
                       2 Select the distorted object.
                       3 Ensure that the appropriate distortion button is enabled on the Property
                         Bar.
                          The button is enabled when it appears pressed.
                       4 Drag the diamond-shaped position handle to a new location.
                          The distortion effect updates as you drag the reposition handle.

                       To center the reposition handle of a distortion
                       1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Distortion tool.
                       2 Select the distorted object.
                       3 Ensure that the appropriate distortion button is enabled on the Property
                         Bar.
                          The button is enabled when it appears pressed.
                       4 Click the Center Distortion button on the Property Bar.

Applying a new distortion
                       You can apply a new distortion to a distorted object.
Applying Zipper and
Twister distortions.




                       To apply a new distortion to a distorted object
                       1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Distortion tool.


456                    CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
                        2 Select the distorted object.
                        3 Click the Add New button on the Property Bar.
                        4 Enable the distortion button you want to apply on the Property Bar.
                           The button is enabled when it appears pressed.
                        5 Apply the distortion effect to the object.


Working with envelopes
                        Envelopes provide a powerful and simple way to shape objects. When you
                        apply an envelope to an object, the envelope surrounds the object and
                        appears as a dotted red line with a series of squares at points along its path.
                        By dragging the nodes in any direction, you shape the envelope. In turn, as
                        the envelope changes shape, the associated object automatically reshapes to
                        conform to the envelope.
                        Additionally, you can continue to shape an envelope and the object it
                        surrounds by editing the envelope. For example, you can change an
                        envelope’s line segments from lines to curves.

Creating envelopes
                        You can distort the shape of an object by applying an envelope to it and
                        shaping the envelope. You can apply a basic or a preset envelope. You can
                        also copy an envelope from an object in your drawing and apply it to another
                        object.
Applying envelopes
distorts the shape of
the objects.




                        By removing an envelope from an object, you return the object to its shape
                        prior to applying the envelope.




                                                                    Creating special effects       457
Applying and removing envelopes
                        You can apply an envelope to an object to shape the object. You can also apply
                        an envelope to an object with an envelope. Remove envelopes one at a time,
                        starting with the one you applied most recently.
Clockwise from the
top-left, the four
envelope editing
modes: Straight Line,
Single Arc, Double
Arc, Unconstrained.




                        To apply an envelope
                        1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Envelope tool.
                        2 Select the object to which you want to apply an envelope.
                        3 Click one of the following buttons on the Property Bar to indicate the
                          editing mode you want:
                           Ÿ Straight Line
                           Ÿ Single Arc
                           Ÿ Double Arc
                           Ÿ Unconstrained
                        4 Drag a node to change the shape of the envelope.
                        5 Repeat steps 3 and 4 until the envelope is the shape you want.


                        Ÿ You can apply envelopes to Paragraph text frames and Artistic text.
                        Ÿ By pressing ESC when you’re dragging the Interactive Envelope tool, you
                          return the object to its state prior to dragging.


                        To apply an envelope with an envelope
                        1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Envelope tool.
                        2 Select the object to which you want to apply another envelope.



458                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
         3 Click the Add New Envelope button on the Property Bar.
         4 Follow steps 3 to 5 from the previous procedure.

         To remove an envelope
         1 Using the Pick tool, select the object that has the envelope you want to
           remove.
         2 Click Effects, Clear Envelope.


         Ÿ Before clearing an envelope, you have to remove any effects that were
           applied to the object after you applied the envelope.



         Ÿ You can also remove an envelope with the Interactive Envelope tool by
           clicking the Clear Envelope button on the Property Bar.


Applying preset envelopes
         You can apply preset envelopes of various shapes.

         To apply a preset envelope
         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
         2 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Envelope tool.
         3 Enable the Keep Lines button on the Property Bar to prevent CorelDRAW
           from changing the object’s straight lines to curves when you apply the
           envelope.
         4 Click the Add Preset button on the Property Bar, and choose the envelope
           shape you want to apply.


         Ÿ By pressing ESC when you’re dragging the Interactive Envelope tool, you
           return the object to its state prior to dragging.
         Ÿ You can adjust the shape of a preset envelope after you apply it to an
           object.


Copying an envelope
         You can copy an envelope from one object and apply it to another object.



                                                     Creating special effects       459
        To copy an envelope
        1 Using the Pick tool, select the object to which you want to copy the
          envelope.
        2 Click Effects, Copy, Envelope From.
        3 Using the horizontal pointer that appears, select the object that has the
          envelope you want to copy.


        Ÿ If you’ve applied an effect to the object since you applied the envelope,
          you won’t be able to copy the envelope.
        Ÿ You can apply the same envelope effect to several different objects.



        Ÿ You can also copy an envelope using the Copy Envelope Properties button
          on the Property Bar.


Editing envelopes
        After you’ve applied an envelope to an object, you can edit the envelope in a
        variety of ways — you can change its editing mode, apply a new mapping
        mode, convert envelope segments from lines to curves and vice versa, and
        edit an envelope’s node. You can add, remove, move, or change the shape of
        envelope nodes.
        The editing modes control the shape of the envelope itself. Three of these
        modes — Straight Line, Single Arc, and Double Arc — let you drag a node or
        control point horizontally or vertically to change the shape of one side of the
        envelope. The fourth mode, Unconstrained, lets you drag a node in any
        direction to make more dramatic changes. In addition, the Unconstrained
        mode has control points for each node, which let you make precise
        adjustments to get the exact envelope shape you want.
        By applying a new mapping mode, you change how CorelDRAW fits the
        object to the envelope, not the shape of the envelope itself. There are four
        mapping modes: Horizontal, Original, Putty, and Vertical. A fifth mode, Text,
        appears if you’re using the envelope to reshape Paragraph text.
        As with object segments, envelope segments can be converted from curves
        to straight lines or from straight lines to curves. By changing the segment’s
        type, you change the way the envelope reacts when it’s edited.
        When you add nodes to an envelope, you can make minute adjustments to
        give the envelope a more complex shape. You can simplify the envelope’s
        shape by removing nodes.


460     CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
                         The most basic method of editing an envelope is to move its nodes. For
                         example, you can move adjacent nodes an equal distance in the same
                         direction.
                         You can change a node’s type, which changes the way the envelope segments
                         on either side pass through the node. Changing the node type changes the
                         shape of the envelope, which in turn changes the effect the envelope has on
                         the object.

Changing the editing mode of an envelope
                         You can continue to shape an envelope by changing its editing mode.

                         To shape an envelope
                         1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Envelope tool.
                         2 Select the object that has the envelope you want to edit.
                         3 On the Property Bar, click one of the following buttons to choose an
                           editing mode:
                            Ÿ Envelope Straight Line Mode
                            Ÿ Envelope Single Arc Mode
                            Ÿ Envelope Double Arc Mode
                            Ÿ Envelope Unconstrained Mode
                         4 Drag the nodes (or the nodes’ control points) to attain the desired
                           envelope shape.

Changing the mapping mode of an envelope
                         You can change the mapping mode of an envelope to adjust the way the object
                         fits to the envelope.
Envelope mapping
modes: (1) Original,
(2) Vertical, (3)
Putty, (4) Horizontal.




                                                                     Creating special effects       461
         To change the mapping mode
         1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Envelope tool.
         2 Select the object that has the envelope you want to edit.
         3 Choose one of the following mapping options from the Mapping Mode list
           box on the Property Bar:
            Ÿ Horizontal Mode — stretches the object to fit the basic dimensions of
              the envelope, then compresses it horizontally to fit the shape of the
              envelope
            Ÿ Original Mode — maps the corner handles on the object’s selection
              box to the envelope’s corner nodes. The other nodes are mapped
              linearly along the edge of the object’s selection box. The nodes’ control
              points are taken into consideration during mapping
            Ÿ Putty Mode — maps the corner handles on the object’s selection box
              to the envelope’s corner nodes only. The other nodes are ignored
            Ÿ Vertical Mode — stretches the object to fit the basic dimensions of the
              envelope, then compresses it vertically to fit the shape of the envelope
         4 Select the object you selected in step 1.
         5 Edit the envelope until it is the shape you want.


         Ÿ You can’t change the mapping mode for Paragraph text.


Changing a segment of an envelope
         You can change a segment of an envelope from a straight line to a curve or
         vice versa.

         To change an envelope segment to a straight line or curve
         1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Envelope tool.
         2 Select the segment you want to change.
         3 Click one of the following buttons on the Property Bar:
            Ÿ Convert Curve To Line
            Ÿ Convert Line To Curve




462      CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
         Ÿ You must use the Unconstrained envelope editing mode to change the
           envelope segment type.


Adding and removing envelope nodes
         You can add nodes to and remove nodes from envelopes to help shape the
         envelope.

         To add a node to an envelope
         1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Envelope tool.
         2 Select the object that has the envelope you want to edit.
         3 Click the Unconstrained button on the Property Bar.
         4 Double-click the envelope at the point where you want to add a node.


         Ÿ You can also click the envelope where you want to add a node and click
           the Plus button on the Property Bar.


         To remove a node from an envelope
         1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
         2 Double-click a node to remove it from the envelope.


         Ÿ You can also select the node and click the Minus button on the Property
           Bar.


Moving envelope nodes
         You can move several envelope nodes at the same time provided you’re using
         the Unconstrained editing mode. You can also move opposite nodes an equal
         distance in the same direction when you’re using an editing mode other than
         Unconstrained.

         To move several envelope nodes at once
         1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Envelope tool.
         2 Select the object that has the envelope you want to edit.
         3 Click the Unconstrained button on the Property Bar.


                                                     Creating special effects       463
         4 Marquee select the nodes you want to move.
         5 Drag any of the selected nodes.
            Each of the selected nodes move the same distance and direction as the
            node you drag.


         Ÿ CorelDRAW reshapes the selected object after you reshape its envelope.



         Ÿ You can limit node movement horizontally or vertically in the
           Unconstrained editing mode by holding down CTRL as you drag.


         To move nodes on opposite sides of the object an equal distance
         in the same direction
         1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
         2 Click one of the following buttons on the Property Bar:
            Ÿ Envelope Straight Line Mode
            Ÿ Envelope Single Arc Mode
            Ÿ Envelope Double Arc Mode
         3 Hold down CTRL as you drag a node.


         Ÿ You can move nodes on opposite sides an equal distance in the opposite
           direction by holding down SHIFT as you drag.


Changing the envelope node type
         You can change the envelope node type.

         To change an envelope node type
         1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Envelope tool.
         2 Select the object that has the envelope you want to edit.
         3 Click the Unconstrained button on the Property Bar.
         4 Click the node you want to change.
         5 Click one of the following buttons on the Property Bar:



464      CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
           Ÿ Make Node A Cusp
           Ÿ Make Node Smooth
           Ÿ Make Node Symmetrical


        Ÿ For more information about cusp, smooth, and symmetrical nodes, see
          “Drawing and shaping objects” on page 85.


Extruding objects
        Applying extrusions gives a two-dimensional object the illusion of depth.
        There are two types of extrusions — vector and bitmap.
        For vector extrusions, CorelDRAW projects points from the object and joins
        them to create extruded surfaces. These surfaces are projected toward a
        vanishing point, adding depth to the original object so that it appears
        three-dimensional. However, the vanishing points for Back Parallel and Front
        Parallel extrusions are infinite, therefore the extruded surfaces can never
        converge.
        After you’ve created a vector extrusion, you can edit it, apply fills to all or
        various extruded surfaces, and add light sources to enhance the effect of the
        extrusion.
        You can also apply bitmap extrusions to objects you create in CorelDRAW.
        Applying bitmap extrusions lets you work with objects in three dimensions.
        Once you’ve created a bitmap extrusion, you can apply bevels, Ambient and
        Point lights, and texture fills. By rendering bitmap extrusions, CorelDRAW
        creates a two-dimensional bitmap.

Creating vector extrusions
        You can apply a basic vector extrusion to objects to make them appear
        three-dimensional. You can also apply a bevel to an object and to an vector
        extrusion, as well as copy and clone an object’s extrusion attributes to
        another object.
        Beveling creates the illusion that an object’s edges are cut at an angle other
        than 90 degrees. You specify the appropriate angle and depth values for the
        size of the object being cut. The illusion itself is created through the addition
        of objects on top of the control object (the object you extruded). These
        objects work together to give the object a three-dimensional look.
        You can create vector extrusions by copying and cloning. Copying transfers
        an object’s extrusion attributes to a selected object. The selected object
        takes on all vector extrusion-related settings, while its fill and outline


                                                     Creating special effects       465
                        attributes remain unaffected. The two extruded objects have no connection
                        and can be edited independently.
                        Cloning also transfers an object’s vector extrusion attributes to a selected
                        object. The selected object takes on all vector extrusion-related settings,
                        while its fill and outline settings remain unaffected. With clones, however,
                        changes made to the original extruded object (also called the master)
                        afterward are also applied to the clone. Additionally, you can’t edit the cloned
                        object’s extrusion settings; any changes must be made to the master object.

Applying basic vector extrusions
                        You can apply a vector extrusion to an object to give it the illusion of depth.
Creating basic vector
extrusions.




                        To apply a basic vector extrusion
                        1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Extrude tool.
                        2 Select the object you want to extrude.
                           A small arrow appears below the cursor to indicate that you can extrude
                           the object.
                        3 Click the Vector Extrusion Mode button on the Property Bar.
                        4 Drag the vanishing point marker (represented by “X”) to set the depth
                          and direction of the extrusion.
                           The vanishing point marker appears after you begin to drag.
                        5 Choose an extrusion type from the Extrusion Type list box on the
                          Property Bar.
                        6 Choose a vanishing point option from the Depth box on the Property Bar.




466                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
                     Ÿ By pressing ESC when you’re dragging the Interactive Extrude tool, you
                       return the object to its state prior to dragging.



                     Ÿ You can place the vanishing point at a precise coordinate by typing values
                       in the X and Y boxes on the Property Bar.
                     Ÿ If you’re creating a perspective extrusion, you can also set the depth by
                       typing a value in the Depth box on the Property Bar or by dragging the
                       slider in the Drawing Window.


Applying beveled vector extrusions
                     You can apply beveled edges to an object or a vector extrusion.
Creating beveled
vector extrusions.




                     To apply a bevel to a vector extrusion
                     1 Using the Pick tool, select the extrusion.
                     2 Click the Bevels button on the Property Bar.
                     3 Enable the Use Bevel check box.
                     4 Type a value in the Bevel Depth box to specify how deep you want the
                       bevel.
                        You can specify values from 0.001 to 1980 inches (or the equivalent in
                        other units of measurement).
                     5 Type a value in the Bevel Angle box to specify the angle at which you
                       want to cut the bevel edge.
                        You can specify values from 1.0 (a nearly straight bevel) to 89.0 degrees (a
                        high-angle bevel).




                                                                Creating special effects       467
         Ÿ You can also set the bevel depth and angle using the Interactive Display
           box.


         To apply a bevel to an object
         1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Extrude tool.
         2 Select the object to which you want to apply a bevel.
         3 Click the Bevels button on the Property Bar.
         4 Enable the Use Bevel check box.
         5 Enable the Show Bevel Only check box.


         Ÿ By pressing ESC when you’re dragging the Interactive Extrude tool, you
           return the object to its state prior to dragging.


Copying and cloning a vector extrusions
         You can copy and clone an object’s extrusion attributes and transfer them to
         another object.

         To copy a vector extrusion
         1 Using the Pick tool, select the object to which you want to copy an
           extrusion.
         2 Click Effects, Copy Effect, Extrude From.
         3 Using the horizontal pointer that appears, select the extrusion you want to
           copy.


         Ÿ You can also use the Copy Extrude Properties button on the Property Bar.


         To clone a vector extrusion
         1 Using the Pick tool, select the object to which you want to clone an
           extrusion.
         2 Click Effects, Clone Effect, Extrude From.
         3 Using the horizontal pointer that appears, select the extrusion you want to
           clone.



468      CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
        Ÿ The selected object’s fill and outline settings remain unaffected.


Editing vector extrusions
        After you’ve applied a vector extrusion to an object, you can select the
        various components and edit them. You can also edit a vector extrusion by
        shaping the control object, changing the depth of the extruded surfaces, and
        by the rotating the vector extrusion. You can also change the vector
        extrusion type, as well as move, lock, copy, and share an extrusion’s
        vanishing point. You may also want to control the facet size used when
        CorelDRAW renders and prints illustrations containing extrusions.
        Extruded surfaces form a dynamically linked group with the original object
        (also called the control object). When you change the shape of the control
        object, the extruded surfaces automatically reflect these changes. For
        example, if you extrude a polygon, and use the Shape tool to make the
        polygon a star, the extruded surfaces change to reflect the control object’s
        new shape.
        By changing the vector extrusion type, you determine the position of the
        extruded surfaces relative to the control object, as well as the position of the
        vanishing point.
        You can move a vector extrusion’s vanishing point without changing the
        extrusion type. You can also lock a vanishing point to the page or to the
        control object. When you lock the vanishing point to the page, it remains
        fixed in its position relative to the page. When you move the control object,
        the vanishing point maintains its position. The vector extrusion is redrawn
        based on the control object’s new position.
        Further, you can copy and share vanishing points. When you copy a vector
        extrusion’s vanishing point to another object, a new vanishing point is
        created on top of the existing vanishing point. As a result, both objects
        appear to recede toward the same point. The two vanishing points can be
        edited independently. When you share a vanishing point, the vector
        extrusions all use one vanishing point. Changes to the vanishing point’s
        position affect all the extrusions that share that point.
        Facet size represents the minimum size of the polygonal surfaces used to
        create the extrusions. Each facet consists of a unique color, therefore,
        smaller facets create smoother color transitions and larger facets create
        blockier color transitions on lighted extrusions.
        When you’re editing your drawing, you may want to separate the various
        extruded surfaces or decide to clear them completely.




                                                    Creating special effects       469
Selecting vector extrusions
                     You can select the entire vector extrusion, the control object (the original
                     object), the extruded surfaces, and the beveled surfaces.
You can select the
entire extrusion,
control object
(yellow), extruded
surfaces (red), or
beveled surfaces
(lavender).




                     To select an entire vector extrusion
                     1 Click the Pick tool.
                     2 Click any of the extrusion’s extruded surfaces.

                     To select a vector extrusion’s control object
                     1 Click the Pick tool.
                     2 Click the control object.

                     To select an extruded surface
                     1 Click the Pick tool.
                     2 Hold down CTRL, and click an extruded surface.

                     To select a beveled surface
                     1 Click the Pick tool.
                     2 Hold down CTRL, and click a beveled surface.


                     Ÿ You must separate the extrusion before you can select the components.
                       For more information see, “Separating vector extrusions” on page 475.


Changing the shape of an extrusion’s control object
                     You can change the shape of a vector extrusion’s control object.


470                  CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
                         To change the shape of the control object of an extrusion
                         1 Open the Shape Edit Flyout, and click the Shape tool.
                         2 Select the control object.
                         3 Click and drag the object’s nodes one at a time to change its shape.
                            When you release the mouse button, the extruded surfaces reshape to
                            reflect your changes.


                         Ÿ You can’t use the Shape tool to edit a control object in all cases.
                           Perspective extrusions that have been rotated using the rotation tools on
                           the Property Bar and extrusions that have been altered using the Add
                           Perspective or Envelope effects can’t be edited. You need to clear the
                           effect before you shape the control object for these extrusions. For more
                           information about shaping objects, see “Drawing and shaping objects” on
                           page 85.
                         Ÿ You can use the controls in the Format Text dialog box to format the
                           extruded text. Double-click the text nodes on the object using the Shape
                           tool to access the dialog box.


Setting the depth of a vector extrusion
                         You can adjust the depth of an vector extrusion.
Changing the depth
of a vector extrusion.




                         To set the depth of a vector extrusion
                         1 Select the extrusion with the Pick tool.
                         2 Type a value in the Depth box on the Property Bar.
                         3 Press ENTER.




                                                                      Creating special effects    471
Rotating vector extrusions
                    You can rotate a vector extrusion using precise values.
Rotating a vector
extrusion.




                    To rotate a vector extrusion
                    1 Select the extrusion with the Pick tool.
                    2 Click the Extrude Rotation button on the Property Bar.
                    3 Type a value in the X-Axis Percentage box to rotate the extrusion along
                      the x-axis.
                    4 Type a value in the Y-Axis Percentage box to rotate the extrusion along
                      the y-axis.
                    5 Type a value in the Z-Axis Percentage box to rotate the extrusion along
                      the z-axis.


                    Ÿ The Rotation feature does not apply to Front Parallel and Back Parallel
                      extrusions types.


Changing the extrusion type
                    You can specify the vector extrusion type to change the vanishing point to
                    which the extruded surfaces project.

                    To change an extrusion type
                    1 Select the extrusion with the Pick tool.
                    2 Choose an extrusion type from the Extrusion Type list box on the
                      Property Bar.




472                 CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
          Ÿ The vanishing points for Back Parallel and Front Parallel extrusions are
            infinite, therefore the extruded surfaces can never converge.


Moving an extrusion’s vanishing point
          You can change the depth of a parallel extrusion and you can control the
          perspective of a perspective extrusion by moving the vanishing point.

          To move an extrusion’s vanishing point
          1 Select the extrusion with the Pick tool.
          2 Type horizontal and vertical coordinates (relative to the 0,0 point on the
            rulers) in the Vanishing Point Coordinate boxes on the Property Bar.

Locking an extrusion’s vanishing point
          You can lock a vector extrusion’s vanishing point to the page or to the control
          object.

          To lock an extrusion’s vanishing point
          1 Using the Pick tool, select an extrusion by clicking an extruded surface.
          2 Choose one of the following from the Vanishing Point Properties list box
            on the Property Bar:
             Ÿ VP Locked To Object
             Ÿ VP Locked To Page


          Ÿ By default, all new extrusions use the VP Locked To Object setting.


Copying and sharing vanishing points
          You can copy a vanishing point to another object or have multiple vector
          extrusions share the same vanishing point.




                                                       Creating special effects      473
Sharing the vanishing
point of a vector
extrusion.




                        To copy the vanishing point from one extrusion to another
                        1 Using the Pick tool, select the extrusion to which you want to copy a
                          vanishing point.
                        2 Choose Copy VP From from the Vanishing Point Properties list box on the
                          Property Bar.
                        3 Select the extruded object from which you want to copy the vanishing
                          point.


                        Ÿ You can edit the two vanishing points independently.


                        To have extrusions share one vanishing point
                        1 Using the Pick tool, select the extrusion with the vanishing point you
                          want to change.
                        2 Choose Shared Vanishing Point from the Vanishing Point Properties list
                          box on the Property Bar.
                        3 Select the extrusion that has the vanishing point you want shared.

Increasing the printing speed of vector extrusions
                        You can control the facet size used when CorelDRAW renders and prints
                        illustrations containing extrusions. You can also save the facet size with your
                        document.

                        To increase the printing speed of vector extrusions
                        1 Click Tools, Options.




474                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
          2 In the list of categories, click Workspace, Edit.
          3 In the Minimum Extrude Facet Size box, type a value between 0.001
            inches and 36 inches (or equivalent) to set the facet size used when
            CorelDRAW renders and prints extrusions.


          Ÿ For best results, set the minimum extrude facet size to a value from 0.001
            and 0.5 inches. A higher value (0.5 inches) will reduce screen refresh
            time. For high-quality output, decrease the facet size when you are ready
            to print your illustration.


          To save the facet size with your document
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
          2 Enable the Save Facet Size With Document check box.

Separating vector extrusions
          You can separate the components of a vector extrusion. By separating the
          components you can select and edit them. For more information, see
          “Selecting vector extrusions” on page 470.

          To separate a vector extrusion

          1 Select the extrusion with the Pick tool.
          2 Click Arrange, Separate.

Clearing vector extrusions
          You can remove the extruded surfaces from the control object.

          To clear a vector extrusion
          1 Select the extrusion with the Pick tool.
          2 Click Effects, Clear Extrude.


          Ÿ You can also click the Clear Extrude button on the Property Bar.




                                                       Creating special effects    475
Filling vector extrusions
                         You can apply fills to an entire vector extrusion, the extruded surfaces, or to
                         the beveled surfaces of a vector extrusion. You can apply uniform fills,
                         fountain fills, two-color and full-color patterns, texture fills, and bitmap
                         pattern fills to extrusions.
                         Additionally, you can apply the control object’s fill to the extruded surfaces.
                         You can cover each surface individually with the fill or drape the fill so it
                         covers the object like a blanket and doesn’t break the fill’s pattern or texture.

Applying fills to extruded and beveled surfaces
                         You can apply the control object’s fill to the extruded surfaces. You can drape
                         the control object’s fill so that it covers the entire extrusion seamlessly. You
                         can also apply the extrusion’s fill or a different fill to beveled surfaces.
Clockwise from
top-left: using the
object’s fill, draping
the fill, applying a
different fill or the
extrusion’s fill to a
bevel.




                         To apply a control object’s fill to extruded surfaces
                         1 Select the extrusion with the Pick tool.
                         2 Click the Color button on the Property Bar.
                         3 Enable the Use Object Fill button.
                            The button is enabled when it appears pressed.

                         To drape the fill
                         1 Follow all of the steps from the previous procedure.
                         2 Enable the Draped Fills check box.

                         To apply an extrusion’s fill to beveled surfaces
                         1 Follow all of the steps from the “To apply a control object’s fill to extruded
                           surfaces” procedure.



476                      CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
                          2 Enable the Use Extrude Fill For Bevel button.
                              The button is enabled when it appears pressed.

                          To apply a different fill to beveled surfaces
                          1 Follow all of the steps from the “To apply a control object’s fill to extruded
                            surfaces” procedure.
                          2 Disable the Use Extrude Fill For Bevel button.
                              The button is disabled when it appears raised.
                          3 Open the Bevel Color picker, and click a color.

Applying solid fills to extruded and beveled surfaces
                          You can apply any solid color to an object’s extruded or beveled surfaces
                          without affecting the color of the control object. You can also use the
                          extruded surfaces’ fill for beveled objects.
From top-left:            e
extrusion with a solid
fill, bevel with the
extrusion’s fill, bevel
with a different solid
fill.




                          To apply a solid fill color to extruded surfaces
                          1 Select the extrusion with the Pick tool.
                          2 Click the Color button on the Property Bar.
                          3 Click the Use Solid Color button.
                          4 Open the color picker, and click a color.

                          To apply the extrude fill to beveled surfaces
                          1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
                          2 Enable the Use Extrude Fill For Bevel button.
                              The button is enabled when it appears pressed.




                                                                        Creating special effects      477
                         To apply a different solid fill to beveled surfaces
                         1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the “To apply a solid fill color to extruded
                           surfaces” procedure.
                         2 Disable the Use Extrude Fill For Bevel button.
                            The button is disabled when it appears raised.
                         3 Open the Bevel Color picker, and click a color.

Applying gradient fills to extruded and beveled surfaces
                         You can apply a gradient fill — a fill that shows a progression between two
                         colors — to an object’s extruded or beveled surfaces without affecting the
                         control object. You can also apply a solid fill to an object’s beveled surfaces.
From top-left:
beveled object with a
gradient fill, beveled
surfaces with a
gradient fill and
extruded surfaces
with a solid fill,
beveled and extruded
surfaces with a
gradient fill.




                         To apply a gradient fill to extruded and beveled surfaces
                         1 Select the extrusion with the Pick tool.
                         2 Click the Color button on the Property Bar.
                         3 Enable the Use Color Shading button.
                            The button is enabled when it appears pressed.
                         4 Open the Solid/Shade From Extrude Color picker, and click the color you
                           want at the start of the gradient fill’s color progression.
                         5 Enable the Use Extrude Fill For Bevel button on the Property Bar.
                            The button is enabled when it appears pressed.
                         6 Click the Shade To Extrude Color picker, and click the color you want at
                           the end of the gradient fill’s color progression.

                         To apply a gradient fill to an object’s beveled surfaces
                         1 Follow all of the steps from the previous procedure.


478                      CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
                      2 Disable the Use Extrude Fill For Bevel button.
                         The button is disabled when it appears raised.

                      To apply a solid fill to an object’s bevel surfaces.
                      1 Follow all of the steps from the “To apply a gradient fill to extruded and
                        beveled surfaces” procedure.
                      2 Open the Bevel Color picker, and click a color.

Lighting vector extrusions
                      Light sources enhance the three-dimensional effect created with vector
                      extrusions as well as the effect of the fill you apply. CorelDRAW produces the
                      lighting effect by creating and applying simulated white light sources. You can
                      add up to three light sources that you can project toward the extruded object
                      from different with varying intensity.
                      You can control the amount of light (also called intensity) originating from the
                      selected light source. Creating multiple light sources with high intensity
                      settings, for example, causes extruded surfaces to appear very light in color.
                      Light sources always strike the control object directly and affect extruded
                      surfaces to a lesser degree. Therefore, if the control object is partially hidden
                      from view because it has been rotated, the change in light source direction or
                      intensity may not be readily apparent.

Applying light sources to and removing them from vector extrusions
                      You can enhance an extrusion’s effect and fill attributes by applying as many
                      as three light sources. You can also remove applied light sources.
Applying light to a
vector extrusion.




                      To apply light sources to a vector extrusion
                      1 Select the extrusion with the Pick tool.



                                                                   Creating special effects       479
          2 Click the Lighting button on the Property Bar.
          3 Enable up to three of the Light buttons.
             The lights appear as numbered circles in the Preview window. A Light
             button is enabled when the button appears pressed.
          4 Drag the numbered circles in the Preview box to position the lights.

          To remove a light source from a vector extrusion
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
          2 Disable the Light button (#1, #2, or #3) that corresponds to the light you
            want to remove.
             A Light button is disabled when the button appears raised.

Adjusting the intensity of a light source
          You can darken and brighten the fill colors in a vector extrusion by adjusting
          the intensity of the light sources. You can have CorelDRAW combine the
          light and dark shades (brightness and saturation) precisely to create a more
          realistic extrusion or use a more basic shading process.

          To adjust the intensity level of a light source
          1 Select the extrusion with the Pick tool.
          2 Click the Lighting button on the Property Bar.
          3 In the Preview box, click the light (represented by a numbered circle) you
            want to adjust.
          4 Move the Intensity slider to set the desired level of light intensity.

          To make shading appear more realistic
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
          2 Enable the Use Full Color Range check box.

          To use a basic shading process
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the “To adjust the intensity level of a light
            source” procedure.
          2 Disable the Use Full Color Range check box.




480       CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
Creating bitmap extrusions
                     Applying a bitmap extrusion to an object lets you work with the object in
                     three dimensions. You can simulate the effect of beveling tools by applying
                     bevels edges — beveled edges changes the corner shape of the object. You
                     can specify the angle and the depth of the bevel for the front face of the
                     object, the back face, or both.
                     Rendering captures a view of your three-dimensional object and saves it as a
                     two-dimensional bitmap. If you don’t like the effect, you can remove the
                     bitmap extrusion.

Applying, rendering, and removing bitmap extrusions
                     You can apply a bitmap extrusion to an object and render it. If you don’t like
                     the effect you created, you can remove the bitmap extrusion.
Applying a bitmap
extrusion to text.




                     To apply a bitmap extrusion
                     1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Extrude tool.
                     2 Select the object.
                     3 Click the Bitmap Extrusion Mode button on the Property Bar.

                     To render a bitmap extrusion
                     Ÿ Click outside the bounding box of the bitmap extrusion.


                     Ÿ You can change the resolution of a bitmap extrusion. For more
                       information, see “Changing the rendering resolution of drop shadows” on
                       page 495.




                                                                 Creating special effects        481
                      To remove a bitmap extrusion
                      1 Select the rendered bitmap extrusion with the Pick tool.
                      2 Click Edit, Undo Bitmap Extrude Command.

Applying beveled bitmap extrusions
                      You can apply preset beveled edges to the front face of object, the back face,
                      or both. You can also specify the height and width of a bevel.
Applying a beveled
bitmap extrusion to
text.




                      To apply a beveled edge
                      1 Select the bitmap extrusion with the Pick tool.
                      2 Click the Front Bevel list box on the Property Bar, and choose a bevel for
                        the front of the extrusion.
                      3 Click Back Bevel list box on the Property Bar, and choose a bevel for the
                        back of the extrusion.

                      To change the bevel width
                      1 Select the bitmap extrusion with the Pick tool.
                      2 Click the Bevels button on the Property Bar.
                      3 Type a value in the Bevel Width box.
                      4 Press ENTER.

                      To change the bevel height
                      1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
                      2 Type a value in the Bevel Height box.
                      3 Press ENTER.




482                   CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
Editing bitmap extrusions
         After you’ve applied a bitmap extrusion to an object, you can select the
         rendered object to edit it. You can also change the position of bitmap
         extrusions with or without rendering them.
         When you apply a bitmap extrusion, a bounding box surrounds the object.
         You can use the bounding box to size and stretch the bitmap. Furthermore,
         you can rotate and change the depth of bitmap extrusions.

Editing rendered bitmap extrusions
         You can make changes to a rendered bitmap extrusion any time.

         To select a rendered a bitmap extrusion
         Ÿ Double-click the bitmap extrusion with the Pick tool.

Positioning bitmap extrusions
         You can position a bitmap extrusion without rendering it. You can also move a
         rendered bitmap extrusion.

         To position a bitmap extrusion without rendering it
         1 Select the bitmap extrusion with the Pick tool.
         2 Type a value in the X Object(s) Position box on the Property Bar.
         3 Type a value in the Y Object(s) Position box on the Property Bar.
         4 Press ENTER.

         To position a rendered bitmap extrusion
         1 Select the bitmap extrusion with the Pick tool.
         2 Drag the bitmap extrusion to a new location.

Sizing and stretching bitmap extrusions
         You can size bitmap extrusions proportionately or you can stretch bitmap
         extrusions. You can also fit the bitmap to the bounding box, if the bounding
         box is too large for the extrusion or if the bounding box is limiting the view of
         the extrusion.




                                                     Creating special effects        483
                     To size a bitmap extrusion proportionately
                     1 Select the bitmap extrusion with the Pick tool.
                     2 Drag one of the corner selection handles on the bounding box.

                     To stretch a bitmap extrusion
                     1 Select the bitmap extrusion with the Pick tool.
                     2 Drag one of the middle selection handles on the bounding box.


                     Ÿ You can also type values in the Object(s) Size boxes on the Property Bar.


                     To fit a bitmap extrusion to its bounding box
                     1 Double-click the bitmap extrusion with the Pick tool.
                     2 Click the Fit To View button on the Property Bar.

Setting the depth of a bitmap extrusion
                     You can set the depth of a bitmap extrusion.
Changing the depth
of a bitmap
extrusion.




                     To change the depth of a bitmap extrusion
                     1 Click the bitmap extrusion with the Pick tool.
                     2 Type a value in the Extrude Depth box on the Property Bar.
                     3 Press ENTER.

Rotating bitmap extrusions
                     You can rotate bitmap extrusions by specifying values or by using rotation
                     handles.


484                  CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
          To rotate a bitmap extrusion using the Property Bar
          1 Select the bitmap extrusion with the Pick tool.
          2 Click the Extrude Rotation button on the Property Bar.
          3 Type a value in the X-Axis Percentage box to rotate the extrusion along
            the x-axis.
          4 Type a value in the Y-Axis Percentage box to rotate the extrusion along
            the y-axis.
          5 Type a value in the Z-Axis Percentage box to rotate the extrusion along
            the z-axis.
          6 Press ENTER.

          To rotate a bitmap extrusion interactively
          1 Double-click the bitmap extrusion with the Pick tool.
          2 Double-click the bitmap extrusion to make the rotation handles appear.
          3 Drag the rotation handles to rotate the object.

Filling bitmap extrusions
          You can change the fill of bitmap extrusions by applying texture fills. Texture
          fills are random, fractally generated fills that you can use to give your objects
          a natural appearance. Texture fills significantly increase the size of your file
          and the time it takes to print. Therefore, you may want to use these fills
          sparingly, especially with larger objects.

Adding texture fills to bitmap extrusions
          You can apply a texture fill to a bitmap extrusion.

          To add a texture fill to a bitmap extrusion
          1 Select the bitmap extrusion with the Pick tool.
          2 Choose a pattern from the Texture list box on the Property Bar.

Lighting bitmap extrusions
          You can use lighting to enhance the realism and effects of bitmap extrusions.
          The same object rendered using different light can provide strikingly
          different results. For example, rendering without light is like taking a
          photograph without a flash. Conversely, too much lighting washes out subtle
          effects.



                                                       Creating special effects       485
From top to bottom:
a bitmap extrusion
with no light, with
Abmbient light, with
Point light.




                       When you first create a bitmap extrusion, there is no lighting. You can add as
                       many lights as you want, but as the number of lights increases, so does the
                       time it takes to render your final illustration. You can choose from several
                       different types of lights to create the effect you want.

                       Ambient
                       Ambient light is uniform. It has no specific origin and casts no shadows. It is
                       the equivalent of daylight in a real-world scene. Ambient light radiates in
                       every direction, has no position, and no source of origin.

                       Point
                       A Point light is a special object that casts light in all directions.

Applying Ambient light to bitmap extrusions
                       You can apply Ambient light to a bitmap extrusion. Ambient light is the
                       equivalent of environmental light.

                       To apply Ambient light to a bitmap extrusion
                       1 Select the bitmap extrusion with the Pick tool.
                       2 Click the Ambient button on the Property Bar.
                       3 Enable the On check box.
                       4 Click a color, and click OK.
                       5 Move the Brightness slider left or right to decrease or increase the
                         intensity of the light.




486                    CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
          Ÿ For deeper shadows and high contrast with lit areas, use a lower Ambient
            light value. As you increase the brightness of Ambient light, the intensity
            of shadows and other effects generated by other light setting decreases.
            This flattens the image. To rely exclusively on the other light setting, set
            Ambient light to zero. For example, to create the dramatic effect of a spot
            light on a theater stage, you would use no Ambient light.



          Ÿ You can also type a value in the Brightness box.


Applying Point light to a bitmap extrusion
          You can apply a Point light to a bitmap extrusion. You can position the light to
          project it toward the object from any direction. You can also change the
          intensity and color of a Point light. If you don’t like the lighting effect, you
          can remove it.

          To apply Point light to a bitmap extrusion
          1 Select the bitmap extrusion with the Pick tool.
          2 Click the Point Light button on the Property Bar.
          3 Click the Add Light button.
             The light source appears in the center of the black-filled circle in the
             Preview window.
          4 Click the Apply button.

          To position a Point light
          1 Follow sets 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
          2 Drag the light source from the center of the black circle to another area of
            the Preview window.
          3 Click the Apply button.

          To change the intensity of the light source
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the “To apply Point light to a bitmap extrusion”
            procedure.
          2 Click the Point light in the Preview window.
          3 Move the Brightness slider to the left or right to decrease or increase the
            intensity.



                                                      Creating special effects          487
        Ÿ You can also type a value in the Brightness box.


        To change the color of a Point light
        1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the “To apply Point light to a bitmap extrusion”
          procedure.
        2 Click the Point light in the Preview window.
        3 Click the Color button.
        4 Click a color, and click OK.
        5 Click the Apply button.

        To remove a Point light
        1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the “To apply Point light to a bitmap extrusion”
          procedure.
        2 Click the Point light in the in the Preview window.
        3 Click the Remove Light button.


Working with drop shadows
        By adding drop shadows, you create the illusion of depth between objects.
        You can add drop shadows to most objects (or groups of objects) you create
        using CorelDRAW, including Artistic text, Paragraph text, and bitmap images.
        However, you cannot add drop shadows to link groups such as blended
        objects, contoured objects, beveled objects, extruded objects, or other drop
        shadows.
        Additionally, you can edit drop shadows to customize their effects. For
        example, you can change the color of a drop shadow.

Creating drop shadows
        When you apply a drop shadow to an object, you create a linked group. The
        object to which you applied the drop shadow is the control object. Changes
        you make to the control object are reflected in the drop shadow. For example,
        if you change the size of the of the control object, the size drop shadow
        changes to reflect the control object’s size. However, you can separate the
        drop shadow, which is a bitmap, and the control object to make them separate
        objects.
        By copying or cloning, you can apply drop shadows to other objects. Copying
        a drop shadow transfers the drop shadow’s attributes to another selected
        object. Cloning also transfers a drop shadow’s attributes to a selected object;


488     CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
                       however, changes made to the original drop shadow (also called the master)
                       are applied to the clone. Additionally, you can’t edit the cloned drop shadow’s
                       settings; any changes must be made to the master drop shadow.
                       If you don’t like a drop shadow effect that you’ve added, you can remove it
                       from the object. You can also remove the object and keep the drop shadow.

Adding and removing a drop shadow
                       You can add a drop shadow to most objects you create in CorelDRAW. You can
                       also remove a drop shadow from an object or remove the object and keep the
                       drop shadow.
Adding a drop
shadow to an object.




                       To add a drop shadow to an object
                       1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Drop Shadow
                         tool.
                       2 Select the object to which you want to apply a drop shadow, and do one of
                         the following:
                          Ÿ Position the cursor over the center of the object to create a Flat
                            perspective
                          Ÿ Position the cursor over the right side of the object to create a Right
                            perspective
                          Ÿ Position the cursor over the left side of the object to create a Left
                            perspective
                          Ÿ Position the cursor over the bottom of the object to create a Bottom
                            perspective
                       3 Drag the end fill handle to position the drop shadow.




                                                                   Creating special effects         489
         Ÿ For a list of objects to which you can’t apply a drop shadow, see “Working
           with drop shadows” on page 488.
         Ÿ An object must have a fill before you apply the drop shadow for the drop
           shadow to be visible.



         Ÿ By pressing ESC when you’re dragging the Interactive Drop Shadow tool,
           you return the object to its state prior to dragging.


         To remove a drop shadow from an object
         1 Click the drop shadow with the Pick tool.
            Clicking the drop shadow selects both the drop shadow and its parent
            object. If you click the object, the drop shadow won’t be included in your
            selection.
         2 Click Effects, Clear Drop Shadow.


         Ÿ You can also remove a drop shadow from an object using the Clear Drop
           Shadow button on the Property Bar.


         To remove an object but not its drop shadow
         1 Select an object’s drop shadow with the Pick tool.
         2 Click Arrange, Separate.
         3 Select the object.
         4 Click Edit, Delete.

Copying and cloning a drop shadow
         You can transfer a drop shadow’s attributes to other objects by copying and
         cloning.

         To copy a drop shadow from one object to another
         1 Using the Pick tool, select the object to which you want to copy a drop
           shadow.




490      CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
         2 Click Effects, Copy Effect, Drop Shadow From.
         3 Using the horizontal pointer that appears, select the drop shadow that you
           want to copy.


         Ÿ You can also use the Copy Drop Shadow Properties button on the
           Property Bar.


         To clone a drop shadow from one object to another
         1 Using the Pick tool, select the object to which you want to clone a drop
           shadow.
         2 Click Effects, Clone Effect, Drop Shadow From.
         3 Using the horizontal pointer that appears, select the drop shadow that you
           want to clone.


         Ÿ If you modify the original drop shadow, the clone drop shadow will also
           change. You can’t edit the cloned drop shadow’s settings; you must change
           the master drop shadow.


Editing drop shadows
         By editing a drop shadow, you can customize the effect. You can adjust the
         horizontal and vertical distance between control objects and drop shadows.
         You can change the color of drop shadows, make them fade, and change the
         level of opacity. You can also change the feathering properties and the
         perspective of drop shadows. Furthermore, drop shadows are bitmaps that
         are rendered. You can change the rendering resolution.

Changing the offset of drop shadows
         You can change the distance between a drop shadow and its control object.

         To change the amount a drop shadow is offset from a control
         object
         1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Drop Shadow
           tool.
         2 Select the drop shadow.




                                                   Creating special effects       491
                        3 On the Property Bar, type a value in the X box to change the horizontal
                          offset.
                        4 On the Property Bar, type a value in the Y box to change the vertical
                          offset.


                        Ÿ You can only change the offset for drop shadows if the perspective type is
                          Flat. For information about changing the perspective type, see “Changing
                          the perspective of drop shadows” on page 494.


Changing the color of a drop shadow
                        You can change the color of a drop shadow.
Changing the color of
the drop shadow.




                        To change the color of a drop shadow
                        1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Drop Shadow
                          tool.
                        2 Select the drop shadow.
                        3 Click the Drop Shadow Color picker on the Property Bar, and click a color.


                        Ÿ You can also change the drop shadow’s color using the Interactive Drop
                          Shadow tool by dragging a color from the Color Palette to the end fill
                          handle.


Adjusting the opacity of a drop shadow
                        You can adjust the opacity of a drop shadow.




492                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
         To adjust the opacity of a drop shadow interactively
         1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Drop Shadow
           tool.
         2 Select the object whose drop shadow opacity you want to adjust.
         3 Move the slider to adjust the opacity of the drop shadow.
            Moving the slider towards the drop shadow’s anchor decreases the drop
            shadow’s intensity. Moving the slider towards the end fill handle increases
            the drop shadow’s intensity.

         To adjust the opacity of a drop shadow using the Property Bar
         1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Drop Shadow
           tool.
         2 Select the object whose drop shadow opacity you want to adjust.
         3 Type a value in the Drop Shadow Opacity box on the Property Bar.
            You can type values between 0 and 100. Low values create a less opaque
            drop shadow, while high values create a more opaque drop shadow.

Modifying the feathering properties of a drop shadow
         You can change a drop shadow’s feathering edge style, the feathering
         direction, as well as the level of feathering.

         To change the feathering edge style of a drop shadow
         1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Drop Shadow
           tool.
         2 Select the drop shadow.
         3 Choose an edge style from the Drop Shadow Feathering Edges list box on
           the Property Bar.


         Ÿ You must choose a feathering direction other than Average to change the
           edge style type.


         To change the feathering direction
         1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
         2 Choose a feathering direction from the Drop Shadow Direction list box on
           the Property Bar.


                                                    Creating special effects      493
                     To change the feathering intensity
                     1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the “To change the feathering edge style of a
                       drop shadow” procedure.
                     2 Type the value you want in the Drop Shadow Feathering box on the
                       Property Bar.
                       You can type values between 0 and 100. Low values create a more subtle
                       feathering effect, while high values create a more pronounced effect.

Changing the perspective of drop shadows
                     You can change the perspective of a drop shadow. The perspective type and
                     drop shadow angle work in tandem.
Changing the
perspective of the
drop shadow.




                     To change the perspective type of a drop shadow
                     1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Drop Shadow
                       tool.
                     2 Select the drop shadow.
                     3 On the Property Bar, choose a perspective type from the Drop Shadow
                       Perspective Type list box.


                     Ÿ You can also change the perspective of a drop shadow by dragging the
                       start handle using the Interactive Drop Shadow tool.


                     To change the angle of a drop shadow
                     1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
                     2 Type a value in the Drop Shadow Angle box on the Property Bar.




494                  CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
         Ÿ You can also change the angle of the drop shadow by dragging the end
           handle with the Interactive Drop Shadow tool.


Fading the drop shadow
         You can change the fade level of a drop shadow.

         To fade a drop shadow
         1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Drop Shadow
           tool.
         2 Select the drop shadow.
         3 Move the Drop Shadow Fade slider on the Property Bar.


         Ÿ You can’t change the fade level of a drop shadow which has a Flat
           perspective.



         Ÿ Moving the slider to the left makes the drop shadow more faint. Moving
           the slider to the right makes the drop shadow’s color more solid.


Changing the rendering resolution of drop shadows
         You can change the resolution by which bitmaps are rendered.

         To change the rendering resolution of a drop shadow
         1 Click Tool, Options.
         2 In the list of categories, click Document, General.
         3 Type a value in the Resolution box.


Working with transparencies
         When you apply a transparency to an object, it appears as though you’re
         applying a fill. However, a transparency is a grayscale bitmap, which acts as a
         grayscale mask, that you apply on top of the object’s current fill. Since a
         transparency is applied on top of an object, the object’s color shows through
         the transparency. You can use fountain, uniform, texture, and pattern fill
         types to create your transparency.



                                                     Creating special effects      495
                       Additionally, you can edit transparencies. For example, you can change the fill
                       type or change the level of opacity which is determined by the grayscale
                       level you specify.

Creating transparencies
                       When you apply a transparency to an object, you’re creating a grayscale mask
                       using the uniform, fountain, texture, or pattern fill type, which is applied on
                       top of the object. By positioning a transparent object on top of another object,
                       you simulate a lens.
                       A Uniform transparency is filled with a solid color. The color is consistent
                       throughout the object to which it’s applied.
                       A Fountain transparency flows smoothly from one color to another. The
                       transparency can flow in a straight line across the object (linear), in
                       concentric circles from the center of the object out (radial), in rays from the
                       center of the object out (conical), or in concentric squares from the center of
                       the object out (square).
                       A Texture transparency is a random, fractally generated transparency that
                       you can use to give your objects a natural appearance. Transparency handles
                       let you control the block of fractal texture that controls the transparency of
                       the object.
                       A Pattern transparency is a pregenerated, symmetrical image that is repeated
                       over and over, making it extremely useful for creating tiles. You can fill an
                       object completely with one image, but you would more often use a series of
                       repeated images to form a tiled fill. The effect is similar to applying wallpaper
                       to a wall.

Applying uniform transparencies
                       You can apply a solid color transparency to an object.
An object with a
uniform transparency
overlaps another
object.




496                    CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
                   To apply a uniform transparency
                   1 Select the object with the Interactive Transparency tool.
                   2 Choose Uniform from the Transparency Type list box on the Property Bar.
                   3 Click a color from the Color Palette.


                   Ÿ You can edit the transparency by clicking the Edit Transparency button on
                     the Property Bar. This opens the Uniform Transparency dialog box which
                     is similar to the Uniform Fill dialog box. For more information, see
                     “Applying a uniform fill” on page 212.
                   Ÿ By pressing ESC when you’re dragging the Interactive Transparency tool,
                     you return the object to its state prior to dragging.
                   Ÿ You can remove the transparency by clicking the Clear Transparency
                     button on the Property Bar.


Applying fountain transparencies
                   You can apply a fountain transparency to an object.
An object with a
fountain
transparency
overlaps another
object.




                   To apply a fountain transparency
                   1 Select the object with the Interactive Transparency tool.
                   2 Choose Fountain from the Transparency Type list box on the Property Bar.
                   3 Enable one of the following buttons that represents the type of fountain
                     transparency you want to apply:
                      Ÿ linear
                      Ÿ radial
                      Ÿ conical


                                                              Creating special effects     497
                      Ÿ square
                   4 Click the object where you want the transparency to start, and drag to
                     where you want the transparency to end.


                   Ÿ You can edit the transparency by clicking the Edit Transparency button on
                     the Property Bar. This opens the Fountain Transparency dialog box which
                     is similar to the Fountain Fill dialog box. For more information, see
                     “Customizing fountain fills” on page 219.
                   Ÿ By pressing ESC when you’re dragging the Interactive Transparency tool,
                     you return the object to its state prior to dragging.
                   Ÿ You can remove the transparency by clicking the Clear Transparency
                     button on the Property Bar.


Applying textured transparencies
                   You can apply a textured transparency to an object.
An object with a
textured
transparency
overlaps another
object.




                   To apply a textured transparency
                   1 Select the object with the Interactive Transparency tool.
                   2 Choose Texture from the Transparency Type list box on the Property Bar.
                   3 Choose a sample containing textures from the Texture Library list box on
                     the Property Bar.
                   4 Click the First Transparency Picker on the Property Bar and click a
                     texture.


                   Ÿ By pressing ESC when you’re dragging the Interactive Transparency tool,
                     you return the object to its state prior to dragging.


498                CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
                       Ÿ Texture transparencies add significantly to the size of your file and the
                         time it takes to print. You may want to use these transparencies sparingly,
                         especially with large objects with texture transparencies.
                       Ÿ Three transparency handles let you control the block of fractal texture
                         that controls the transparency of the object. One handle moves the entire
                         fractal and the other two scale, skew and rotate it. For more information
                         see, “Customizing pattern and texture fills” on page 235.
                       Ÿ You can edit the transparency by clicking the Edit Transparency button on
                         the Property Bar. This opens the Texture Transparency dialog box which
                         is similar to the Texture Fill dialog box. For more information, see
                         “Customizing pattern and texture fills” on page 235.
                       Ÿ You can remove the transparency by clicking the Clear Transparency
                         button on the Property Bar.


Applying pattern transparencies
                       You can apply a pattern transparency to an object.
An object with a
pattern transparency
overlaps another
object.




                       To apply a pattern transparency
                       1 Select the object with the Interactive Transparency tool.
                       2 Choose Pattern from the Transparency Type list box on the Property Bar.
                       3 Click one of the following buttons on the Property Bar:
                          Ÿ Two-color Bitmap Pattern Tranparency
                          Ÿ Full-color Pattern Transparency
                          Ÿ Bitmap Pattern Transparency
                       4 Click the First Transparency Picker on the Property Bar and click a
                         pattern.




                                                                  Creating special effects     499
         Ÿ By pressing ESC when you’re dragging the Interactive Transparency tool,
           you return the object to its state prior to dragging.
         Ÿ You can remove the transparency by clicking the Clear Transparency
           button on the Property Bar.
         Ÿ You can import bitmaps or vector graphics to use as pattern
           transparencies, and you can create simple two-color bitmap pattern
           transparencies.
         Ÿ You can edit the transparency by clicking the Edit Transparency button on
           the Property Bar. This opens the Pattern Transparency dialog box which is
           similar to the Pattern Fill dialog box. For more information, see
           “Customizing pattern and texture fills” on page 235.


Copying transparencies
         You can copy a transparency to another object.

         To copy a transparency
         1 Using the Pick tool, select the object to which you want to copy the
           transparency.
         2 Click Effects, Copy, Lens From.
         3 Using the horizontal pointer that appears, select the object from which
           you want to copy the transparency.


         Ÿ The object’s color attributes are not copied.



         Ÿ You can also use the Copy Transparency Properties button on the
           Property Bar.


Editing transparencies
         After you’ve created a transparent object, you may want to edit its attributes.
         By adjusting the grayscale level of the transparency, you can change its
         opacity. You can freeze the contents of a transparency to create a bitmap.
         Once frozen, the contents of the object no longer interact with other objects
         on the screen. For example, when you move the frozen transparency, its
         contents doesn’t change.




500      CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
          By applying merge modes, you can determine how the color of a
          transparency is combined with the color of objects that appear behind the
          transparency. Merge modes are available for fountain, pattern, and texture
          transparencies.


          Ÿ You can change the resolution by which transparencies are rendered. For
            more information, see “Changing the rendering resolution of drop
            shadows” on page 495.


Adjusting the opacity of a transparency
          You can adjust the opacity of a transparency.

          To adjust the opacity of a uniform transparency
          1 Select the uniform transparency with Interactive Transparency tool.
          2 Move the Starting Transparency slider on the Property Bar.

          To adjust the opacity of a fountain transparency
          1 Select the fountain transparency with Interactive Transparency tool.
          2 Move the Transparency Midpoint slider on the Property Bar.

          To adjust the opacity of a textured or pattern transparency
          1 Select the textured or pattern transparency with Interactive Transparency
            tool.
          2 Move the Starting Transparency slider on the Property Bar to change the
            opacity of the starting color.
          3 Move the Ending Transparency slider on the Property Bar to change the
            opacity of the ending color.


          Ÿ Lower values (less than 20) produce a more opaque effect. Higher values
            (over 80) produce a more transparent effect.
          Ÿ You can also type values in the Starting Transparency and Ending
            Transparency boxes on the Property Bar.


Freezing a transparency
          You can fix the contents of a transparency by freezing it.


                                                      Creating special effects     501
Freezing a
transparency lets you
move an object
without changing its
contents.




                        To freeze a transparency
                        1 Select the object with the Interactive Transparency tool.
                        2 Click the Freeze button on the Property Bar.

Applying merge modes to transparencies
                        You can apply a merge mode to a transparency to determine how the color of
                        a transparency is combined with the color of objects that appear behind the
                        transparency.

                        To apply merge modes
                        1 Using the Interactive Transparency tool, click the fountain, textured, or
                          pattern transparency.
                        2 Choose one of the following merge modes from the Transparency
                          Operation list box on the Property Bar.
                           Ÿ Normal — applies the transparency color on top of the base color
                           Ÿ Add — adds the values of the transparency color and the base color
                           Ÿ Subtract — adds the values of the transparency color and the base
                             color together, then subtracts 255
                           Ÿ Difference — subtracts the transparency color from the base color and
                             multiplies by 255. If the transparency color value is 0, the result will
                             always be 255
                           Ÿ Multiply — multiplies the base color by the transparency color, then
                             divides by 255. This has a darkening effect unless you are applying
                             color to white. Multiplying black with any color results in black.
                             Multiplying white with any color leaves the color unchanged
                           Ÿ Divide — divides the base color by the transparency color, or vice
                             versa, depending on which color has the higher value


502                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
          Ÿ If Lighter — replaces any base pixels that are a darker color with the
            transparency color. Base pixels that are lighter than the transparency
            color are not affected
          Ÿ If Darker — replaces any base pixels that are a lighter color with the
            transparency color. Base pixels that are darker than the transparency
            color are not affected
          Ÿ Texturize — converts the transparency color to grayscale, then
            multiplies the grayscale value by the base color
          Ÿ Hue — uses the hue of the transparency color as well as the saturation
            and lightness of the base color. If you are adding color to a grayscale
            image, there will be no change because the colors are desaturated
          Ÿ Saturation — uses the lightness and hue of the base color and the
            saturation of the transparency color
          Ÿ Lightness — uses the hue and saturation of the base color and the
            lightness of the transparency color
          Ÿ Invert — uses the transparency color’s complementary color. If a
            transparency color value is 127, there will be no change because the
            color value falls in the center of the Color Wheel
          Ÿ Logical AND — converts the transparency and base colors to binary
            values, then applies the Boolean algebraic formula AND to these
            values
          Ÿ Logical OR — converts the transparency and base colors to binary
            values, then applies the Boolean algebraic formula OR to these values
          Ÿ Logical XOR — converts the transparency and base colors to binary
            values, then applies the Boolean algebraic formula XOR to these values
          Ÿ Red — applies the transparency color to the red channel of RGB
            images
          Ÿ Green — applies the transparency color to the green channel of RGB
            images
          Ÿ Blue — applies the transparency color to the blue channel of RGB
            images


Contouring Objects
       When you apply contour lines to an object, you add a series of concentric
       lines or “steps” that radiate inside or outside of the object’s borders. You
       create an effect like that created by contour lines on a topographical map. You
       can apply contours to any object you create using CorelDRAW, including
       shapes, lines, and curves. In addition, you’ll find that you can create an array
       of interesting effects by applying contours to Artistic text.


                                                   Creating special effects       503
                      Once you’ve created a contoured object you like, you can copy or clone its
                      attributes to another object. When you copy a contour, the object to which
                      you copied the contour takes on all contour-related settings of the original
                      object, however the outline and fill attributes remain unaffected. The two
                      objects have no connection and can be edited independently.

Creating contoured objects
                      When you add contour lines to an object, you create lines that progress to the
                      center, to the inside, or to the outside of an object. You can specify the
                      number of evenly spaced lines contour lines that are added to the object, as
                      well as the distance between these lines. However, when you’re working
                      with contours that progress to the center or to the inside of an object, the
                      number of steps you set is limited by the offset and the size of the object. For
                      example, if you set an offset value of 0.1 and a steps value of 3, CorelDRAW
                      will add three contour lines spaced 0.1 inches apart inside the original object.
                      If the object is too small to accommodate your settings, CorelDRAW inserts
                      the maximum number of steps that fit between the object’s outline and
                      center.
                      You can also create a contour by copying or cloning a contoured object’s
                      settings to another object. By copying a contour, you transfer all
                      contour-related settings to the other object; its outline and fill attributes
                      remain unaffected. The two objects have no connection and can be edited
                      independently.
                      When you clone a contour, you transfer all contour-related settings; its
                      outline and fill attributes remain unaffected. However, changes made to the
                      original contour (also called the master) are applied to the clone. In addition,
                      you can’t edit the clone’s contour settings; any changes must be made to the
                      master object.

Contouring to the center of an object
                      You can add contour lines that progress to the center of the selected object.
Applying a contour
to the center of an
object.




504                   CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
                      To contour to the center of an object
                      1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                      2 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Contour tool.
                      3 Drag the start handle to the center of the object.
                         When you can’t drag the handle any further, you’ve reached the center of
                         the object.
                      4 Move the slider to change the number of contour steps.


                      Ÿ Use the Contour Offset box on the Property Bar to specify the distance
                        between contour lines. This automatically adjusts the number of contour
                        steps.
                      Ÿ You can change a contour to a center contour by selecting the contour and
                        clicking the To Center button on the Property Bar.


Contouring to the inside of an object
                      You can add evenly spaced contour lines inside the selected object.
Applying a contour
to the inside of an
object.




                      To contour inside an object
                      1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                      2 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Contour tool.
                      3 Drag the start handle towards the center of the object.
                         The distance you drag the start handle determines the contour’s final
                         step.
                      4 Move the slider to change the number of contour steps.




                                                                  Creating special effects       505
                       Ÿ The slider may disappear if there isn’t much distance between the
                         concentric shapes. You can use the Zoom tool to magnify the contoured
                         object and make adjustments.
                       Ÿ By pressing ESC when you’re dragging the Interactive Contour tool, you
                         return the object to its state prior to dragging.
                       Ÿ You can type a value in the Contour Steps box on the Property Bar to
                         change the number of concentric lines in a contour.
                       Ÿ You can type in the Contour Offset box on the Property Bar to change the
                         distance between concentric lines.
                       Ÿ You can change a contour to an inside contour by selecting the contour
                         and clicking the Inside button on the Property Bar.


Contouring to the outside of an object
                       You can add contour lines outside the selected object.
Applying a contour
to the outside of an
object.




                       To contour outside of an object
                       1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                       2 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Contour tool.
                       3 Drag the start handle away from the object.
                          The distance you drag the start handle determines the contour’s final
                          step.
                       4 Move the slider to change the number of contour steps.


                       Ÿ By pressing ESC when you’re dragging the Interactive Contour tool, you
                         return the object to its state prior to dragging.



506                    CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
         Ÿ You can type a value in the Contour Steps box on the Property Bar to
           change the number of concentric lines in a contour.
         Ÿ You can type in the Contour Offset box on the Property Bar to change the
           distance between concentric lines.
         Ÿ You can change a contour to an outside contour by selecting the contour
           and clicking the Outside button on the Property Bar.


Copying and cloning contours
         You can transfer an object’s contour attributes by copying or cloning it.

         To copy a contour
         1 Using the Pick tool, select the object to which you want to copy the
           contour.
         2 Click Effects, Copy Effect, Contour From.
         3 Using the horizontal pointer that appears, select the contour you want to
           copy.


         Ÿ You can also use the Copy Contour Properties button on the Property Bar.


         To clone a contour
         1 Using the Pick tool, select the object to which you want to clone the
           contour.
         2 Click Effects, Clone Effect, Contour From.
         3 Using the horizontal pointer that appears, select the contour you want to
           clone.

Editing contoured objects
         When you’re working with a contoured object, you can change the fill and
         outline colors assigned to the concentric objects. You can also change the
         progression of colors between the original object’s fill and outline colors and
         the final contour line’s fill and outline colors. The color progression can
         follow a straight, clockwise, or counterclockwise path through the color
         spectrum.
         When you apply contour lines to an object, the object becomes attached to
         these lines. In this state, all changes you make to the original object (e.g.,
         shaping it) also affect the contour lines. By separating the original object


                                                      Creating special effects       507
          from its contour lines, you can then make changes to the original object
          without altering the contour lines.
          After you separate a contoured object, you are left with two units: the
          original object and its contour lines group. You can further separate the
          contour lines into a series of objects and edit them individually.

Setting color progressions in a contoured object
          You can change both the outline and fill colors of a contoured object. You can
          also set the color progression of the outline and fill colors of a contoured
          object. When you apply a contour to an object with a fountain fill, you can
          change the end fountain fill color, which is applied to the last concentric
          shape.

          To set the outline color in a contoured object
          1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Contour tool.
          2 Select the contoured object.
          3 Click the Outline Color picker on the Property Bar, and click the color you
            want at the end of the outline progression.

          To set the fill color in a contoured object
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
          2 Click the Fill Color picker on the Property Bar, and click the color you
            want at the end of the fill progression.
             If the original object has a fountain fill, a second color picker appears. Use
             this control to have a fountain fill at the end of the fill progression.


          Ÿ You can change the outline and fill colors of the original object just as you
            would with any other object you create using CorelDRAW. See “Filling
            Objects” on page 211 or “Outlining objects” on page 246.
          Ÿ You can change the color of the last concentric shape using the Interactive
            Contour tool by dragging a color from the Color Palette to the end fill
            handle.


          To specify how the outline and fill colors progress through the
          color spectrum
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the “To set the outline color in a contoured
            object” procedure.


508       CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
         2 Click one of the following buttons on the Property Bar:
            Ÿ Linear Contour Colors
            Ÿ Clockwise Contour Colors
            Ÿ Counterclockwise Contour Colors

         To change the end fountain fill color applied to the last
         concentric shape
         1 Open the Interactive Tools flyout, and click the Interactive Contour tool.
         2 Select the contoured object with a fountain fill.
         3 Click the End Fountain Fill Color picker on the Property Bar, and click a
           color.

Separating an object from its contour
         You can separate an object from its contour lines. You can also ungroup the
         contour lines to make a series of objects.

         To separate an object from its contour lines
         1 Select a contoured object with the Pick tool.
         2 Click Arrange, Separate.
            The contoured object is now two units: the original object and the group of
            contour lines.

         To ungroup the contour lines
         1 Follow steps 1 to 2 from the previous procedure.
         2 Select the contour lines with the Pick tool.
         3 Click Arrange, Ungroup.


         Ÿ You can also ungroup contour lines by clicking the Ungroup button on the
           Property Bar.


Using lenses
         When you apply a lens to an object, you change the way you perceive the
         objects behind it. You can choose amongst several types of lenses, each
         producing distinctive results. These results range from color alteration (as
         produced by heat map, inverting, and brightening lenses, for example) to


                                                     Creating special effects      509
        distortion (as produced by magnifying and fish eye lenses). In each case, the
        lens changes the way you perceive the objects behind it, not the actual
        properties and attributes of those objects.
        After you create a lens object, you can edit it to modify how you perceive the
        objects behind it.

Creating lenses
        You can apply lenses to any closed-path object you create using CorelDRAW.
        For example, you can apply lenses to rectangles or objects you draw with the
        Freehand tool and Natural Media tools. You can also apply lenses to
        open-ended lines and curves, such as Paragraph text and Artistic text.
        Additionally, you can create lenses using objects imported from other
        applications, such as bitmaps. Once you create a lens you like, you can copy it
        to other objects in your drawing.
        You can choose from the following lens types: Transparency, Magnify,
        Brighten, Invert, Color Limit, Color Add, Tinted Grayscale, Heat Map,
        Custom Color Map, Wireframe, and Fish Eye.

        Transparency lens
        When you apply a Transparency lens to an object, the object takes on the
        appearance of a piece of tinted film or glass. A Transparency lens can be any
        color. When you place the lens over other objects, these objects take on the
        lens tint. You can set the lens’ level of transparency.

        Magnify lens
        A Magnify lens creates an effect similar to that produced by a magnifying
        glass. The Magnify lens overrides the original object’s fill (if any), so that the
        object appears transparent. Objects beneath the lens appear magnified by the
        amount you specify.

        Brighten lens
        A Brighten lens adds brightness or darkness to the objects underneath the
        lens. You can set the rate of brightness or darkness created by the lens.

        Invert lens
        An Invert lens causes all colors underneath it to appear as their
        complementary CMYK colors. Complementary colors are colors that appear
        opposite one another on the Color Wheel. For example, when an Invert lens
        is applied to a photo bitmap, the result simulates a photographic negative.




510     CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
Color Limit lens
A Color Limit lens works much like a color filter lens on a camera, allowing
only black and the lens color itself to show through. White and light colors in
objects beneath the lens are converted to the lens color. For example, if you
place a green Color Limit lens over a bitmap, all colors except green and
black are filtered out within the lens area.

Color Add lens
The Color Add lens simulates an additive light model. Imagine shining three
spotlights — one red, one blue, and one green — on a black background.
Where the three spotlights combine, the result is white light. The
intermediate colors are magenta, cyan, and yellow. When you create a Color
Add lens, the colors of the objects beneath the lens are added to the color of
the lens as if you were mixing colors of light.
You can specify a rate to control the extent of color addition. You can also
choose the color you want to add to the lens.

Tinted Grayscale lens
The Tinted Grayscale lens changes the colors of objects underneath it to
their grayscale equivalents. The lens color becomes the darkest color in any
object under the lens. All other colors in the object become lighter shades of
the lens’ color. You’ll find Tinted Grayscale lenses particularly effective for
creating sepia-tone effects. For example, if you place a brown grayscale lens
over a color photograph, the photograph takes on a sepia-tone look. You can
also turn a color photograph into a black-and-white photograph by placing a
black grayscale lens over the photograph.

Heat Map lens
The Heat Map lens creates the effect of an infrared image. This lens uses a
limited Color Palette of white, yellow, orange, red, blue, violet, and cyan to
illustrate the “heat” levels of colors in objects underneath the lens. By
adjusting the palette, you control which colors are “hot” and which colors are
“cool”. Hot colors beneath the lens appear as red or orange, while cool colors
appear as violet or cyan.

Custom Color Map lens
The Custom Color Map lens changes all the colors of objects behind it to a
color range between any two colors you select. In addition to defining the
range’s start and end colors, you choose the progression between the two
colors. The progression can follow a direct, forward, or reverse route through




                                            Creating special effects           511
                        the color spectrum. Areas of the lens that do not cover other objects are
                        filled with the color at the end of the color map.

                        Wireframe lens
                        Objects behind the Wireframe lens display with the outline or fill color you
                        choose. For example, if you set red for the outline and blue for the fill, all
                        objects (or parts of objects) behind the lens appear to have red outlines and
                        blue fills. Objects with no fill remain unchanged when viewed through the
                        lens.

                        Fish Eye lens
                        The Fish Eye lens distorts and either magnifies or shrinks the objects behind
                        it, depending on the percentage value you specify.


                        Ÿ When you apply a lens fill to an object, the object’s fill properties are lost.
                        Ÿ You cannot apply lenses to objects that already have extrude, contour, or
                          blend effects applied to them. If you apply a lens to a group, the lens
                          applies separately to each of the group’s component objects (as long as
                          they fit the requirements above).


Creating a Transparency lens
                        You can apply a Transparency lens to an object. The lens object takes on the
                        appearance of a piece of tinted film or glass.
Transparency lenses
apply a color tint to
objects behind them.




                        To create a Transparency lens
                        1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                        2 Click Effects, Lens.



512                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
                       3 Choose Transparency from the list box in the Lens Docker window.
                       4 Type a percentage value from 0 to 100 in the Rate box to specify the rate
                         of transparency.
                          As you increase the value, the object becomes more transparent. At
                          100%, the lens fill disappears.
                       5 Open the color picker, and click a color.
                       6 Click the Apply button.

Creating a Magnify lens
                       You can apply a Magnification lens to an object. The lens object magnifies
                       objects underneath it.
Magnify lenses
enlarge areas of
objects behind them.




                       To create a Magnify lens
                       1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                       2 Click Effects, Lens.
                       3 Choose Magnify from the list box in the Lens Docker window.
                       4 Type a value from 0.1 to 100.0 in the Amount box to indicate the amount
                         of magnification you want.
                       5 Click the Apply button.

Creating a Brighten lens
                       You can apply a Brighten lens to an object. The lens object brightens or
                       darkens objects underneath it.




                                                                     Creating special effects       513
Brighten lenses add
brightness or
darkness to any
object or image
behind them.




                        To create a Brighten lens
                        1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                        2 Click Effects, Lens.
                        3 Choose Brighten from the list box in the Lens Docker window.
                        4 Type a percentage value from -100 to 100 in the Rate box.
                           Values between 0 and 100% increase the level of brightness. Values
                           between 0 and -100% increase the level of darkness.
                        5 Click the Apply button.


                        Ÿ You’ll find the Brighten lens particularly effective for applying brightness
                          or darkness to a bitmap image.


Creating an Invert lens
                        You can apply an Invert lens to an object. The lens object makes all color
                        behind it appear as their complementary CMYK colors.
Invert lenses display
colors as their
complementary CMYK
colors.




514                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
                        To create an Invert lens
                        1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                        2 Click Effects, Lens.
                        3 Choose Invert from the list box in the Lens Docker window.
                        4 Click the Apply button.

Creating a Color Limit lens
                        You can apply a Color Limit lens to an object. The lens object filters out all
                        colors except black and the lens color you specify.
Color Limit lenses
filter out all colors
except the lens color
and black.




                        To create a Color Limit lens
                        1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                        2 Click Effects, Lens.
                        3 Choose Color Limit from the list box in the Lens Docker window.
                        4 Type a percentage value from 0 to 100 in the Rate box to indicate the filter
                          strength you want.
                        5 Open the color picker, and click a color.
                        6 Click the Apply button.

Creating a Color Add lens
                        You can apply a Color Add lens to an object. The color of the object behind
                        the lens object is added to the lens color.




                                                                      Creating special effects       515
Color Add lenses add
the lens color to the
colors of objects
behind them.




                        To create a Color Add lens
                        1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                        2 Click Effects, Lens.
                        3 Choose Color Add from the list box in the Lens Docker window.
                        4 Type a percentage value from 0 to 100 in the Rate box to indicate the rate
                          of color addition.
                           A rate of 0% results in no color addition and the lens appears to have no
                           fill. A rate of 100% represents maximum color addition.
                        5 Open the color picker, and click a color.
                        6 Click the Apply button.


                        Ÿ Since white light contains all colors of the spectrum, creating a colored
                          lens and placing it over a white object or a white page turns the lens
                          white. Adding a color to white light produces white light. To see the
                          effects, the background or object beneath the lens cannot be white.


Creating a Tinted Grayscale lens
                        You can apply a Tinted Grayscale lens to an object. The lens object changes
                        the colors of objects behind it to their grayscale equivalents.




516                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
Tinted Grayscale
lenses convert colors
behind them to their
grayscale equivalents.




                         To create a Tinted Grayscale lens
                         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                         2 Click Effects, Lens.
                         3 Choose Tinted Grayscale from the list box in the Lens Docker window.
                         4 Open the color picker, and click a color.
                         5 Click the Apply button.


                         Ÿ Colors under the lens are mapped from the lens color to an equivalent
                           tonal color of the lens. For example, a blue lens over a light-colored object
                           creates light blue. Accordingly, the same lens over a dark colored object
                           creates dark blue.


Creating a Heat Map lens
                         You can apply a Heat Map lens to an object. The lens object uses a specified
                         color palette to illustrate the “heat” levels of objects’ colors behind it.
Heat Map lenses let
you map hot and
cool colors to
simulate the
appearance of an
infrared image.




                                                                       Creating special effects     517
                         To create a Heat Map lens
                         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                         2 Click Effects, Lens.
                         3 Choose Heat Map from the list box in the Lens Docker.
                         4 Type a percentage value from 0 to 100 in the Palette Rotation box to
                           indicate the amount you want to rotate the Heat Map palette.
                            A value of 0 or 100 causes cool colors under the lens to change to white
                            and cyan. A value of 50 causes cool colors to appear as red tones.
                         5 Click the Apply button.

Creating a Custom Color Map lens
                         You can apply a Custom Color Map lens to an object. The lens objects applies
                         a specified color range to the objects behind it.
From top-left
clockwise: Use the
Direct Palette,
Forward Rainbow,
and Reverse Rainbow
settings to create
different effects with
a Custom Color Map
lens.




                         To create a Custom Color Map lens
                         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                         2 Click Effects, Lens.
                         3 Choose Custom Color Map from the list box in the Lens Docker window.
                         4 From the second list box, choose the type of Custom Color Map lens you
                           want.
                            You can choose a Direct Palette, Reverse Rainbow, or Forward Rainbow
                            lens.


518                      CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
                    5 Open the From color picker, and click the color you want at the start of the
                      color map.
                    6 Open the To color picker, and click the color you want at the end of the
                      color map.
                    7 Click the Apply button.


                    Ÿ You can switch the From and To colors by clicking the Switch button.


Creating a Wireframe lens
                    You can apply a Wireframe lens to an object. The lens object displays the
                    objects underneath it with the fill and outline you specify.
Wireframe lenses
display objects
behind them using
specific fill and
outline colors.




                    To create a Wireframe lens
                    1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                    2 Click Effects, Lens.
                    3 Choose Wireframe from the list box in the Lens Docker window.
                    4   Enable the Outline check box.
                    5 Click the Outline color picker, and click the outline color you want.
                    6 Enable the Fill check box.
                    7 Click the Fill color picker, and click the fill color you want.
                    8 Click the Apply button.

                    To maintain the outline or fill of the object
                    1 Follow steps 1 to 3 from the previous procedure.
                    2 Disable one of the following check boxes:


                                                                 Creating special effects       519
                          Ÿ Outline — maintains the object’s outline
                          Ÿ Fill — maintains the object’s fill
                       3 Enable the Remove Face check box.

Creating a Fish Eye lens
                       You can apply a Fish Eye lens to an object. The lens object distorts and either
                       magnifies or shrinks objects underneath it.
Fish Eye lenses
distort the size and
shape of objects
behind them.




                       To create a Fish Eye lens
                       1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                       2 Click Effects, Lens.
                       3 Choose Fish Eye from the list box in the Lens Docker window.
                       4 Type a value from -1000 to 1000 in the Rate box to indicate the percentage
                         by which you want the lens to distort the underlying objects.
                          Positive values distort and magnify objects by increasing amounts as their
                          rate settings progress from 1 to 1000. Negative values shrink and distort
                          objects by increasing amounts as their rate settings progress from -1 to
                          -1000. A rate of 0 results in no change to the appearance of objects behind
                          the lens.
                       5 Click the Apply button.

Copying lenses
                       You can copy lens attributes to another object. The lens type and any
                       rotation, rate, or magnification settings are copied to the selected object.

                       To copy a lens from one object to another
                       1 Using the Pick tool, select the object to which you want to copy the lens.



520                    CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
                        2 Click Effects, Copy Effect, Lens From.
                        3 Using the horizontal pointer that appears, select the object from which
                          you want to copy the lens.

Editing lenses
                        When you’re working with a lens, you may want to change how it perceives
                        objects beneath it. You can change the viewpoint of a lens, determine if it
                        displays white space, and freeze its contents.
                        By changing the viewpoint of a lens, you can display any portion of a drawing
                        through the lens without moving it. The viewpoint represents the center
                        point of what is being viewed through the lens. This point is indicated by an
                        “X” in the Drawing Window. You can position the lens anywhere in the
                        drawing, but it always shows the area around its viewpoint marker. For
                        example, you can use the viewpoint marker on a Magnify lens to enlarge part
                        of a map without obscuring any part of the map.
                        You can have CorelDRAW display a lens only where it overlaps other objects.
                        As a result, the lens effect is not seen where the lens object covers blank
                        space in the Drawing Window.
                        You can fix the contents of a lens by freezing it. You can then move the lens
                        without changing what’s displayed through the lens. Changes you make to
                        the objects seen through the lens have no effect on the lens contents.

Moving a lens’ viewpoint
                        You can display any portion of a drawing through a lens without having to
                        move the lens itself.
Move the viewpoint
(X) to show a
different part of the
drawing without
moving the lens.




                        To move a lens’ viewpoint
                        1 Select the lens with the Pick tool.
                        2 Click Effects, Lens.


                                                                   Creating special effects         521
          3 Enable the Viewpoint check box in the Lens Docker window.
             At this point, the Edit button appears to the right of the check box.
          4 Click the Edit button to display the viewpoint marker (represented by an
           “X”) in the Drawing Window.
          5 Drag the viewpoint marker to the desired position.
          6 Click the End button.
          7 Click the Apply button.

Displaying a lens only where it covers other objects
          You can show a lens only where it covers other objects.

          To display a lens only where it covers other objects
          1 Select the lens with the Pick tool.
          2 Click Effects, Lens.
          3 Enable the Remove Face check box.
          4 Click the Apply button.


          Ÿ The Remove Face option is available for color-altering lenses only and
            isn’t available for Fish Eye and Magnify lenses.
          Ÿ You can make a lens invisible by removing the outline from the lens
            object. For more information, see “Outlining objects” on page 246.


Freezing a lens’ current view
          You can fix the contents of a lens by freezing it. You can remove the freeze
          from a lens.

          To freeze a lens’s current view
          1 Select the lens with the Pick tool.
          2 Click Effects, Lens.
          3 Enable the Frozen check box.
          4 Click the Apply button.




522       CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
        To undo the Frozen effect
        1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
        2 Disable the Frozen check box.
        3 Click the Apply button.


        Ÿ Frozen lenses redraw more quickly than non-frozen lenses.


Adding perspective to objects
        Adding perspective to objects creates the illusion of distance and depth.
        Although objects are two-dimensional, applying one and two-point
        perspective adds another dimension to your drawing. By creating one-point
        perspective, you can make an object look like it’s receding from view in one
        direction. By creating two-point perspective, on the other hand, you can
        make the object look like it’s receding from view in two directions.
        After you add perspective to an object, you can further edit it to create the
        illusion you want.

Creating perspective
        Perspective is created by shortening one or two sides of an object. For
        one-point perspective, you shorten one side of an object so that it appears to
        recede in one direction. By shortening two sides, you get two-point
        perspective in which the object appears to recede in two directions.
        Once you add perspective to an object, you drag the nodes at the corners of
        the object’s grid box to simulate the effect of one-point or two-point
        perspective.
        As you drag a node, you’ll notice an “X” (or two, if you’re working with
        two-point perspective) that moves as the node moves. This symbol indicates
        the vanishing point. If you drag the node so that it meets another node or the
        vanishing point marker, the grid box reverts back to its original shape. You
        can also make adjustments to the perspective by dragging the vanishing point
        marker.
        When you’ve created a perspective you like, you can copy and apply it to one
        or more objects in your drawing. You can copy perspective to any object
        you’ve created using CorelDRAW, except Paragraph text.
        Removing the perspective effect from objects restores the object to its
        original state.




                                                    Creating special effects       523
                        Ÿ You can add perspective to any object (or group of objects) you create
                          using CorelDRAW, including Artistic text. However, you can’t apply
                          perspective to Paragraph text or bitmap images.


Applying one-point and two-point perspective to objects
                        You can create a three-dimensional effect on a two-dimensional page by
                        applying perspective to objects.
Graphics 2 and 3
show one-point and
two-point perspective
applied to the object
in graphic 1.




                        To add a one-point perspective effect to an object
                        1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                        2 Click Effects, Add Perspective.
                           A grid box with four nodes (at the corners) appears around the object. The
                           Shape tool is now selected.
                        3 Hold down CTRL, and drag one of the nodes horizontally or vertically.
                           By holding down CTRL, you constrain the node’s motion to its horizontal
                           or vertical axes to create a one-point perspective.


                        Ÿ Hold down CTRL + SHIFT as you drag to move opposing nodes the same
                          distance in opposite directions.




524                     CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
         To add a two-point perspective effect to an object
         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
         2 Click Effects, Add Perspective.
         3 Drag one of the grid box nodes diagonally toward or away from the
           object’s center.
         4 Repeat step 3 using the other nodes until you create the perspective
           effect you want.

Copying an object’s perspective
         You can copy the perspective effect from one object to another.

         To copy an object’s perspective effect
         1 Using the Pick tool, select the object to which you want to copy the
           perspective effect.
         2 Click Effects, Copy Effect, Perspective From.
         3 Using the horizontal pointer that appears, select the object with the
           perspective you want to copy.


         Ÿ You can only copy an object’s perspective if perspective is the most recent
           effect applied.


Removing an object’s perspective
         You can remove the perspective effect applied to an object.

         To remove an object’s perspective effect
         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
         2 Click Effects, Clear Perspective.


         Ÿ If you’ve applied an effect to the object since you applied perspective, you
           need to clear that effect before clearing perspective.


Editing an object’s perspective
         When you’re working with an object’s perspective, you may want to edit it by
         moving nodes or changing the vanishing point.


                                                    Creating special effects       525
Moving nodes to adjust an object’s perspective
          You can adjust an object’s one-point or two-point perspective by moving its
          nodes.

          To edit a one-point perspective effect by moving nodes
          1 Open the Shape Edit Flyout, and click the Shape tool.
          2 Select the object.
          3 Drag the appropriate nodes to adjust the perspective.


          Ÿ Hold down CTRL + SHIFT to move opposing nodes the same distance in
            opposite directions.


          To edit a two-point perspective effect by moving nodes
          1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
          2 Drag the nodes horizontally toward or away from the center point.

Moving an object’s vanishing point to change its perspective
          You can move an object’s vanishing point to change its perspective.

          To edit an object’s perspective effect by moving a vanishing point
          1 Open the Shape Edit Flyout, and click the Shape tool.
          2 Select the object.
          3 Drag the vanishing point marker or markers (represented by “X”) to
            create the desired perspective effect.


Working with PowerClip
          When you PowerClip objects, you put one object inside another object or
          group of objects. One object becomes the contents, while the other becomes
          the container. You can create a container from any object you create using
          CorelDRAW, including shapes, lines, curves, Artistic text, and groups. A
          contents object can be any object you create using CorelDRAW or import
          from another program.
          After you create a PowerClip object, you can edit it to change the way the
          contents and container objects interact.




526       CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
Creating a PowerClip object
                       When you’re creating PowerClip object, you may want to compare the
                       container object to a window. Just as a window’s frame represents the limits
                       of what you can see, a container object lets you see only the portion of a
                       contents object (or group of objects) that fits inside the container’s
                       boundaries. If the size of the contents object exceeds that of its container,
                       CorelDRAW automatically crops the contents object. You see only the
                       portion of the contents object that fits inside the container.
                       You’ll find the PowerClip feature particularly useful for placing photo files
                       (like bitmaps) inside containers of different shapes. You can create more
                       complex PowerClip effects by placing a container object into another
                       container object to produce a nested PowerClip object. Nested PowerClip
                       objects can have up to five editable levels.
                       Additionally, you can copy the contents of a PowerClip object to another
                       PowerClip object.

Applying a PowerClip
                       You can create a PowerClip object by placing an object inside another object.
                       You can create a nested PowerClip object by adding the PowerClip object to
                       another object in the Drawing Window. This object becomes the container
                       object.
Create PowerClip
objects by placing
one object inside of
another.




                       To create a PowerClip object
                       1 Using the Pick tool, select the object you want to use as the contents.
                       2 Click Effects, PowerClip, Place Inside Container.
                       3 Using the horizontal pointer that appears, select the object you want to
                         use as the container.
                          The contents object is placed inside the container object. The contents
                          and container now become a single unit.



                                                                    Creating special effects       527
         Ÿ You can also create a PowerClip object using the Object Manger. For more
           information, see “Creating PowerClip objects using the Object Manager”
           on page 191.


         To create nested PowerClip objects
         1 Follow all of the steps in the previous procedure.
         2 Select the PowerClip object.
         3 Click Effects, PowerClip, Place Inside Container.
         4 Using the horizontal pointer that appears, select the object you want to
           use as the container.


         Ÿ A nested PowerClip object can have up to five nested levels.


Copying the contents of a PowerClip object
         You can copy the contents of a PowerClip object to another PowerClip object.

         To copy the contents of a PowerClip
         1 Using the Pick tool, select the object to which you want to copy the
           contents of a PowerClip object.
         2 Click Effects, Copy Effect, PowerClip From.
         3 Using the horizontal pointer that appears, select the PowerClip object that
           contains the contents you want to copy.

Editing a PowerClip object
         When you’re working with PowerClip objects, you may want to offset the
         contents object from the center of the container, edit the contents object,
         lock or unlock the contents, or extract the contents of a PowerClip object.
         By default, CorelDRAW automatically centers PowerClip contents objects
         inside their containers. However, you can change the default so that contents
         objects are offset from the center of the container.
         When you edit the contents object, CorelDRAW temporarily separates the
         contents and container objects. You can then edit the contents of the
         PowerClip object, for example, by changing its fill and outline properties,
         without altering the container object.




528      CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
          When you lock or unlock the contents of a PowerClip object, you control the
          interaction between the contents and container objects. When a contents
          object is locked to its container object, both objects undergo the same
          changes. For example, when a PowerClip object is moved, rotated, or resized,
          both the contents and container objects are affected in the same way. When
          the contents object is unlocked, it’s locked to the page and remains stationary
          even if you move or rotate its container.
          By extracting the contents from a PowerClip object, the container and
          contents objects return to being separate objects.

Changing the default placement of a PowerClip object
          You can change the default placement of a contents object.

          To change the default placement of a contents object
          1 Click Tools, Options.
          2 In the list of categories, click Workspace, Edit.
          3 Disable the Auto-center New PowerClip Contents check box.
          4 Position the object you want to become the contents over the container.
          5 Click Effects, PowerClip, Place Inside Container.
          6 Using the horizontal pointer that appears, select the object you want to
            use as the container.


          Ÿ If the contents and container objects do not overlap, the contents won’t
            appear in the PowerClip object.
          Ÿ This setting applies to all documents, not just the active document.


Editing the contents of a PowerClip object
          You can edit the contents of a PowerClip object without affecting its
          container.

          To edit the contents of a PowerClip object
          1 Select the PowerClip object with the Pick tool.
          2 Click Effects, PowerClip, Edit Contents.




                                                      Creating special effects      529
          3 Make the desired changes to the contents object or add new objects as
            needed.
          4 Click Effects, PowerClip, Finish Editing This Level.


          Ÿ During editing, the container object appears in Wireframe mode and can’t
            be selected.



          Ÿ You can also edit the contents of a PowerClip object using the Object
            Manager. For more information, see “Creating PowerClip objects using
            the Object Manager” on page 191.


Locking and unlocking a PowerClip object
          You can lock or unlock the contents of a PowerClip object.

          To lock the contents and container objects
          Ÿ Right-click the PowerClip object, and click Lock Contents To PowerClip.
             When enabled, a check mark appears beside the command name.


          Ÿ You can also lock the PowerClip’s contents and edit it’s container using
            the Object Manager. For more information, see “Creating PowerClip
            objects using the Object Manager” on page 191.


          To unlock the contents from the container object
          Ÿ Right-click the PowerClip object, and click Lock Contents To PowerClip.
             When disabled, no check mark appears beside the command name.


          Ÿ When you unlock the contents object, it’s locked to the page.
          Ÿ Disabling the Lock Contents To PowerClip command is useful for
            repositioning the container over its contents.


Extracting the contents of a PowerClip object
          You can remove the contents from a PowerClip object.



530       CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
To extract the contents of a PowerClip object
1 Select the PowerClip object with the Pick tool.
2 Click Effects, PowerClip, Extract Contents.


Ÿ If you created nested PowerClip objects and want to extract all contents
  objects in succession, you’ll need to use perform this task for each nested
  level.



Ÿ You can also extract the contents of a PowerClip using the Object
  Manager. For more information, see “Creating PowerClip objects using
  the Object Manager” on page 191.




                                           Creating special effects      531
532   CorelDRAW: Chapter 10
         WORKING WITH BITMAPS                                             11
         Bitmaps are graphics composed of dots called pixels. Bitmaps have a fixed
         resolution and look best when you display or print them at their original size.
         Enlarging the bitmap appears to enlarge each pixel because extra pixels are
         added, making the graphic look jagged and distorted. Reducing the size of the
         bitmap eliminates pixels and shrinks the bitmap.
         Vectors are defined mathematically as a series of points joined by lines.
         Unlike bitmaps, vectors represent shapes as a series of lines and curves that
         you can resize without loss of quality. Graphical elements in a vector file are
         called objects. Each object is a self-contained entity with properties such as
         color, shape, outline, and size included in its definition. For more information
         about vectors, see “CorelDRAW Concepts” on page 6.
         Because a bitmap is a collection of arranged pixels, you cannot manipulate its
         parts individually. The color and shape appear continuous when viewed from
         a distance. However, CorelDRAW lets you manipulate bitmaps in different
         ways. You can crop bitmaps to decrease the visible area and reduce the size
         of files by linking bitmaps to your drawings. You can also trace bitmap
         images, which converts them to vector images that are easier to manipulate.
         CorelDRAW also lets you change an image by manipulating colors and tones,
         and by resampling. For example, you can hide or show bitmap colors, adjust
         image tone, or resample to change image size or resolution. You can inflate a
         bitmap to make an effect cover the entire image. You can convert an image
         from vectors to bitmaps, or from one color mode to another.
         CorelDRAW provides special effects that you can apply to images. For
         example, you can create three-dimensional images, mimic artistic styles, blur
         or clear your images, and manipulate image colors, contours, noise,
         distortions, and sharpness. For more information on applying special effects
         to bitmaps, see “Applying special effects to bitmaps” on page 584.


Cropping bitmaps
         Cropping a bitmap reduces the visible area of the bitmap. You can crop a
         bitmap before you import it or after you import it. You can also revert a
         cropped bitmap to its original form.

Cropping a bitmap before importing
         You can crop a bitmap before you import it. This lets you import only the area
         of a bitmap that you want to use, which decreases file size.


                                                      Working with bitmaps           535
         To crop a bitmap before you import it
         1 Click File, Import.
         2 Choose Crop from the list box to the left of the Options button.
         3 From the Look In list box, choose the drive and folder where the file is
           stored. Double-click on the folder to open it.
         4 In the Crop Image dialog box, do one of the following:
            Ÿ Drag a corner handle on the cropping frame — crops in two directions,
              horizontally and vertically.
            Ÿ Drag a side handle — crops in one direction, horizontally or vertically.
         5 Choose a unit type from the Units list.
         6 Click OK.
         7 Position the import placement start cursor where you choose and do one of
           the following:
            Ÿ Click — places the bitmap at its original size
            Ÿ Drag — places the bitmap proportionally at the size you choose
            Ÿ Hold down ALT, and drag — creates a non-proportional bitmap at the
              size you choose. Release the mouse button before you release ALT.

         To recrop the bitmap
         Ÿ Click the Select All button in the Crop Image dialog box.


         Ÿ Type values in the Top and Left or Width and Height boxes to make your
           cropping more precise.


Cropping a bitmap after importing
         After you import a bitmap, you can crop it using the Shape tool and node
         editing. Node editing is very powerful, allowing you to add nodes, remove
         nodes, and convert lines to curves to create effects. Then you can crop the
         image, literally removing the parts of the bitmap you have edited out. For
         more information on node editing, see “Drawing and shaping objects” on
         page 85.




536      CorelDRAW: Chapter 11
You can crop bitmaps
using the Shape tool
by adding nodes,
removing nodes, and
converting lines to
curves.




                       To crop a bitmap after you import it
                       1 Open the Shape Edit flyout and click the Shape tool.
                       2 Select the bitmap with the Shape tool.
                       3 Drag the bitmaps’ nodes to change the shape of the bitmap outline.
                       4 Click on the Pick tool.
                       5 Click Bitmaps, Crop Bitmap.

                       To allow only vertical or horizontal movement
                       Ÿ Hold CTRL while dragging the node from its original location.


                       Ÿ After you crop a bitmap using the Crop Bitmap command, the bitmap
                         cannot be returned to its original state.
                       Ÿ You cannot crop externally linked bitmaps.



                       Ÿ You can also access the Crop Bitmap command by right-clicking the
                         bitmap or choosing the Crop Bitmap button from the Property Bar.
                       Ÿ You can multi-select nodes to drag by holding the SHIFT key while
                         clicking on the nodes you want.




                                                                  Working with bitmaps        537
Working with linked bitmaps
         Instead of importing and embedding bitmaps in a drawing, you can link
         bitmaps to the drawing. When you link a bitmap, the document references
         the bitmap instead of actually attaching it. Changes you make to the original
         bitmap are applied to the bitmap in your drawing. Linking bitmaps is an
         advantage because it decreases file size.
         If you later want to embed the bitmap in a drawing — for example, you want
         to send the file to someone who doesn’t have access to the original bitmap
         files — you can resolve the links, which embeds the bitmaps in your drawing.
         The Link Manager Docker acts as the repository for all the links in a
         CorelDRAW document, including all externally linked bitmaps, bookmarks,
         and hyperlinks. Using the Link Manager, you can check the status of links,
         update linked bitmaps from their original source file, and resolve links to
         permanently embed bitmaps into your drawing.

Linking bitmaps
         You can link bitmaps when you import them into CorelDRAW. When you link
         a bitmap, a thumbnail appears in the document. The thumbnail is a
         representation of the original image which resides in another location.

         To link a bitmap to your drawing
         1 Click File, Import.
         2 Choose a file format from the Files of Type box.
         3 From the Look In list box, choose the drive and folder where the file is
           stored.
         4 Double-click to open the folder.
         5 Select the file name.
         6 Enable the Link Bitmap Externally checkbox.
         7 Click the Import button.
         8 Position the import placement start cursor where you choose and do one of
           the following:
            Ÿ Click — places the bitmap at its original size
            Ÿ Drag — places the bitmap proportionally at the size you choose
            Ÿ Hold down ALT, and drag — creates a non-proportional bitmap at the
              size you choose. Release the mouse button before you release ALT.




538      CorelDRAW: Chapter 11
Understanding the Link Manager Docker
         The Link Manager Docker helps you visualize links. It displays all the links
         within a CorelDRAW document and gives you information about each link in
         the Index control. The Index control is a columnar list with various,
         categorical headers. You can find the following headers in the Link Manager
         Docker:
            Ÿ Name — displays the name of the linked bitmap, bookmark, or
              hyperlink
            Ÿ Page — displays the location of the link in the document
            Ÿ Status — displays the progress of link validation
            Ÿ Type Icon — displays the file type of the link
         By default, the Link Manager primarily sorts links according to page number.
         The secondary sort is alphabetical.
         The Link Manager Docker displays the status of each link using four
         different icon images.
         Icon                       Status

                                    Indicates a valid link

                                    Indicates a broken link

                                    Indicates a link that needs to be updated

                                    Indicates a link that needs to be checked


         You can perform a number of tasks using the Link Manager. For more
         information, see “Using the Link Manager” on page 539.

Using the Link Manager
         The Link Manager lets you monitor and control externally linked bitmaps,
         bookmarks, and Internet hyperlinks. It tells you which links are broken,
         provides a small thumbnail of each linked bitmap, shows where each bitmap
         is linked from, and which page in a document each bitmap is linked to.
         The Link Manager lets you complete a variety of tasks:
            Ÿ Resolve — embeds the selected bitmap into the CorelDRAW document
            Ÿ Update — updates the status of all Out of Date bitmaps



                                                              Working with bitmaps   539
        Ÿ Open — launches the system default browser of the selected hyperlink
          or launches the associated bitmap editor of the selected bitmap
        Ÿ Refresh — reruns the Docker’s starter thread to check the validity of
          all links

      To resolve a linked bitmap
      1 Click Tools, Link Manager.
      2 Select the bitmap in the Link Manager Docker.
      3 Click the Resolve button.

      To edit a bitmap in its native application
      1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the previous procedure.
      2 Click the Open button.

      To update a linked bitmap
      1 Follow steps 1 and 2 from the “To resolve a linked bitmap” procedure.
      2 Click the Update button.

      To refresh the list of links
      1 Click Tools, Link Manager.
      2 Click the Refresh button.

      To select multiple links
      Ÿ Do one of the following:
        Ÿ Multiple sequential links — press SHIFT and click on the links
        Ÿ Multiple, non-sequential links — press CTRL and click on the links
          you want to select


      Ÿ You can only update an out of date bitmap, a bitmap where the file has
        changed more recently than the link was made.
      Ÿ You can only resolve or refresh more than one link item at a time.




540   CorelDRAW: Chapter 11
         Ÿ You can also access the Link Manager by clicking Window, Dockers, Link
           Manager.
         Ÿ You can also update and resolve linked bitmaps from the Bitmaps menu.


Setting the Link Manager Docker options
         The Link Manager Docker automatically provides you with information about
         links in a document using the Index Control. You can control the information
         that the Link Manager Docker displays for you by customizing its format. For
         example, you can specify whether to have URL checking, and at what
         intervals, or whether to display large bitmaps.

         To set the Link Manager Docker options
         1 Click Tools, Options.
         2 In the Workspace tree, double-click Customize, and click Link Manager.
         3 Enable one or both of the following check boxes:
            Ÿ URL checking — checks URLs at intervals you specify. Specify how
              often to check URLs by typing a minute value in the box.
            Ÿ Display large bitmaps — displays large bitmaps


Tracing bitmaps
         Bitmaps are images composed of individual dots called pixels. The
         disadvantage of bitmaps is that their resolution is fixed. This means that
         image quality can deteriorate when you scale bitmaps to different sizes. You
         can, however, modify vector graphics without a loss of quality. You can create
         vector copies of bitmap images by tracing the bitmaps.
         You can trace imported bitmaps in three ways: using CorelTRACE™, using
         the Autotrace feature to trace automatically, or by using the Freehand or
         Bezier tools to trace manually.
         CorelTRACE lets you automatically trace bitmaps and save them in a vector
         format suitable for CorelDRAW. You can launch CorelTRACE from
         CorelDRAW, trace a bitmap, and then return to CorelDRAW.
         The Autotrace feature creates vector shapes from areas of a bitmap. You can
         trace an imported bitmap by clicking an area of high contrast in the bitmap
         using the Freehand tool. You can create an outline that matches the edge of
         contrasting colors in a bitmap tightly (producing many nodes along the path)
         or loosely (producing a less accurate path with fewer nodes).




                                                     Working with bitmaps          541
Tracing bitmaps lets
you turn bitmaps
into vectors.




                       The Freehand or Bezier tools let you trace images manually. You don’t have
                       to be an experienced draftsperson to trace a bitmap precisely. With
                       CorelDRAW, you trace bitmaps in the same way you trace objects using
                       tracing paper. By magnifying the areas you trace and adjusting the settings,
                       you can trace quickly and still achieve accurate results.

Tracing bitmaps using CorelTRACE
                       You can access CorelTRACE from CorelDRAW. Use CorelTRACE to trace
                       complex bitmaps with precision.
                       You have the ability to save the CorelTRACE file to a separate file. Once you
                       complete your tracing task, you can return the results to CorelDRAW.

                       To trace a bitmap using CorelTRACE
                       1 Click Bitmaps, Trace Image.
                       2 Trace your image using CorelTRACE functionality.
                       3 Click File, Exit and Return to CorelDRAW.


                       Ÿ If you modify an image in both CorelDRAW and CorelTRACE, closing
                         CorelTRACE causes your changes in CorelDRAW to be overwritten by
                         CorelTRACE.



                       Ÿ You can also access CorelTRACE by right-clicking on the bitmap, or
                         selecting the bitmap and clicking the Trace Bitmap button on the Property
                         Bar.




542                    CorelDRAW: Chapter 11
Tracing bitmaps automatically
         The Autotrace feature lets you turn bitmaps into vector graphics that you can
         edit, scale, and print without distortion. Autotrace produces an approximation
         of a bitmap; traced bitmaps do not look the same as the original bitmap. You
         can lose many subtle details of bitmaps when you convert them to vector
         objects. For more complex bitmap tracing, see “Tracing bitmaps using
         CorelTRACE” on page 542.
         Many bitmaps cannot be autotraced. If the cursor changes to cross hairs with
         a thin straight line on the right side of the horizontal cross hair, you can use
         the Autotrace feature. If a wavy line accompanies the cross hairs, you cannot
         use the Autotrace feature. However, you can still trace all or part of the
         image manually.
         You can change the way the tracing tools respond by changing their
         properties. For more information about changing the properties of tracing
         tools, see “Controlling the behavior of the Freehand and Bezier tools” on
         page 137.

         To trace a bitmap automatically
         1 Select the bitmap with the Pick tool.
         2 Open the Curve flyout, and click the Freehand tool or Bezier tool.
            The pointer changes to the Autotrace pointer.
         3 Position the Autotrace pointer on the bitmap and click.
            A closed curve object encloses the contours of the bitmap.
         4 Repeat step 3 until you have finished selecting areas of the bitmap.
         5 With the Pick tool, click outside one of the closed curves of the bitmap.
         6 Press DELETE to delete the bitmap and view your work.

Tracing bitmaps manually
         You can trace bitmaps manually using the Freehand or Bezier tool. Manual
         tracing is faster and easier than autotracing if the imported bitmap contains
         multiple subjects with no abrupt changes in brightness levels or colors from
         one pixel to the next.

         To trace a bitmap manually
         1 Click a blank spot in the Drawing Window to ensure that the bitmap is not
           selected.
         2 Open the Curve flyout, and click the Freehand tool or the Bezier tool.



                                                      Working with bitmaps           543
       3 Do one of the following:
          Ÿ With the Bezier tool, position the cursor anywhere along the outline of a
            closed area, then trace in a series of small joined segments. Place a
            node every time the angle of the curve changes to avoid the jaggedness
            that can occur when you trace large areas with a single sweep of the
            mouse.
          Ÿ With the Freehand tool, position the cursor anywhere along the outline
            of a closed area, then trace using a smooth motion the way you move a
            pencil on paper.
       4 Do one of the following:
          Ÿ Click each spot where the object curves or changes direction.
          Ÿ Use the Shape tool to manipulate the nodes and line segments to
            customize the trace.


       Ÿ If you make a mistake while tracing, you can erase portions of the curve
         before you release the mouse button by pressing SHIFT as you drag the
         mouse backward over the line you’ve just drawn. Once you release the
         mouse button, however, this erase method will not work.



       Ÿ Switch to Wireframe view or Simple Wireframe view to see the paths
         more clearly.


Coloring bitmaps
       Some bitmaps are imported in CorelDRAW as monochrome bitmaps.
       Monochrome means that the pixels have only two colors: black and white.
       You can change the appearance of bitmaps by changing the colors of pixels or
       by applying halftone screens to them.
       You can hide or show colors in a bitmap. Hiding colors lets objects or
       backgrounds show through a bitmap. Hiding a color can also alter the
       bitmaps’ shape. For example, if you have a bitmap with the image of a person
       on a black background, you can hide the background. As a result, the bitmap
       appears to take on just the shape of the person.
       You can select colors and change the tolerance of the colors you select. If you
       increase the tolerance, CorelDRAW shows or hides a broader range of colors.
       For example, if you hide baby blue and increase the tolerance, CorelDRAW
       may also hide powder blue and navy blue.




544    CorelDRAW: Chapter 11
Coloring monochrome bitmaps
          You can change the color of pixels in a monochrome bitmap.

          To color a monochrome bitmap
          1 Select the bitmap with the Pick tool.
          2 Click a color on the Color Palette with the right mouse button to change
            the color of the foreground (black) pixels.
          3 Click a color on the Color Palette with the left mouse button to change the
            color of the background (white) pixels.

Applying a PostScript halftone screen to a bitmap
          You can apply screens to bitmaps in a drawing if you plan to print to a
          PostScript printer. The screens create special effects or ensure clearer
          printing. The screen’s effect on the bitmap is only apparent when you print
          the bitmap.
          For information about setting your screen and screen angles, see “Setting
          the halftone screen frequency” on page 727.

          To apply a screen to a bitmap
          1 Select the bitmap with the Pick tool.
          2 Open the Fill Tool flyout, and click Fill Color Dialog.
          3 Click the Fixed Palettes tab.
          4 Choose PANTONE MATCHING SYSTEM from the Type list box.
          5 Click the Options button and choose PostScript Options.
          6 Choose an option from the Type list box to set the shape of the screen.
          7 Type a value in the Frequency box to set the number of lines (or other
            shape selected above) that appear in every inch of the screen.
          8 Type a value in the Angle box to set the angle of the lines (or other
            shapes) that appear on the screen.

Hiding bitmap colors
          Color bitmaps can slow the speed at which objects are rendered on the
          screen. Hiding some colors in a bitmap increases the redraw speed.




                                                       Working with bitmaps         545
Use Hide Colors to
remove specific
colors from your
image.




                     To hide a color in a bitmap
                     1 Select the bitmap with the Pick tool.
                     2 Click Bitmaps, Bitmap Color Mask.
                     3 Enable the Hide Colors button.
                     4 Enable the check box next to the color that you want to hide.
                     5 Move the Tolerance slider to set the color tolerance for the color.
                        Higher levels remove a broader range of colors around the color you
                        select. For example, if you select baby blue and increase the tolerance,
                        CorelDRAW removes pastel blue, electric blue, and so on.
                     6 Click the Color Selector.
                     7 Point to the bitmap and click the color that you want to hide.
                        The color appears in the Bitmap Color Mask Docker.
                     8 Click the Apply button.

Displaying bitmap colors
                     You can display certain colors in a bitmap to change the bitmap’s appearance
                     or to see where a particular color has been applied.




546                  CorelDRAW: Chapter 11
Use Show Colors to
display a specific
color in your image.




                       To display a color in a bitmap
                       1 Select the bitmap with the Pick tool.
                       2 Click Bitmaps, Bitmap Color Mask.
                       3 Enable the Show Colors button.
                       4 Enable the check box next to the color you want to display.
                       5 Move the Tolerance slider to set the color tolerance for the color.
                          Higher levels show a broader range of colors around the color you select.
                          For example, if you select baby blue and increase the tolerance,
                          CorelDRAW shows pastel blue, electric blue, and so on.
                       6 Click the Color Selector.
                       7 Point to the bitmap and click the color you want to display.
                          The color appears in the Bitmap Color Mask Docker.
                       8 Click the Apply button.

Opening, saving, and editing bitmap color masks
                       The Bitmap Color Mask Docker lets you mask as many as 10 colors in a
                       bitmap. When you mask colors, you can edit them without altering the other
                       colors in an image. You can also save bitmap color masks for future use.

                       To open a bitmap color mask
                       1 Click Bitmaps, Bitmap Color Mask.
                       2 Click the Open Mask button.
                       3 In the Files of Type box, choose the file you want to open.
                          Bitmap color mask files have the extension .INI.




                                                                   Working with bitmaps        547
       4 From the Look In list box, choose the drive and folder where the file is
         stored. Double-click on the folder to open it.
       5 Double-click the file to open the bitmap color mask.

       To change the color of the bitmap color mask
       1 Click Bitmaps, Bitmap Color Mask.
       2 Choose a color from the list of colors.
       3 Click Edit Color.
       4 Use the controls in the Select Color dialog box to edit the color.
       5 Click OK.
       6 Click the Apply button.

       To save a bitmap color mask
       1 Click Bitmaps, Bitmap Color Mask.
       2 Click the Save Mask button.
       3 From the Look In list box, choose the drive and folder where you want to
         save the current color mask.
       4 Type a name for the file in the File Name box.
       5 Click Save.


       Ÿ You can also access the Bitmap Color Mask Docker by clicking the Bitmap
         Color Mask Docker button on the Property Bar.


Adjusting the tones in images
       The Color Adjustment effects control the relationship between the shadows,
       midtones, and highlights in objects in a drawing. You can also use these
       effects to adjust the brightness, intensity, lightness, and darkness of colors.
       The Color Adjustment effects let you restore the detail lost in shadows or
       highlights, correct underexposure or overexposure, and improve the quality
       of images.
       Color adjustment effects use filters to change image colors. Filters are
       applications that perform conversion tasks. These filters do not work with
       objects that contain colors from the PANTONE Matching System.




548    CorelDRAW: Chapter 11
Brightness-Contrast-Intensity
The Brightness-Contrast-Intensity effect lets you adjust the brightness,
contrast, and intensity of the tones in a drawing using HSB values.

Color Balance
The Color Balance effect shifts drawing values between primary (RGB) and
secondary (CMY) colors.

Deinterlace
The Deinterlace effect removes horizontal lines from scanned images to
produce clearer results.

Desaturate
The Desaturate effect automatically reduces the saturation of each color to
zero. It removes the hue component and converts each color to grayscale.

Gamma
The Gamma effect picks up details in low contrast drawings without
significantly affecting the shadows or highlights.

Hue-Saturation-Lightness
The Hue-Saturation-Lightness effect adjusts the hue, saturation and
lightness in images by using HLS values. This effect is useful for adjusting
the intensity of hue, saturation, and lightness in colors.

Invert
The Invert effect makes a negative of an image by converting all color values
to their opposites: black becomes white, blue becomes yellow, etc.

Level Equalization
The Level Equalization effect adjusts shadow, midtone, and highlighted areas
by redistributing shades from darkest to lightest.

Local Equalization
The Local Equalization effect enhances the contrast near edges and reveals
the details of light and dark areas of a bitmap.




                                            Working with bitmaps           549
                         Posterize
                         The Posterize effect converts color ranges in an image to solid blocks of
                         color.

                         Replace Colors
                         The Replace Colors effect replaces one image color with another color.

                         Sample/Target Balance
                         The Sample/Target Balance effect adjusts color values in an image with
                         sample colors taken directly from the image itself.

                         Selective Color
                         The Selective Color effect modifies colors by adjusting the percentage of the
                         component process colors (CMYK values) in a color spectrum option (reds,
                         yellows, greens, cyans, blues, magentas). It can also add process color to the
                         grayscale tonal component of an image.

                         Tone Curve
                         The Tone Curve effect lets you correct colors precisely, by changing
                         individual pixel values.


                         Ÿ For information about common controls used in the Color Adjustment
                           effects, see “Using bitmap effects” on page 584.


Applying the Brightness-Contrast-Intensity effect
                         The Brightness-Contrast-Intensity effect uses HSB values to adjust the
                         brightness, contrast, and intensity of the tones in a drawing.
Adjusting the
brightness, contrast,
and intensity lets you
improve the clarity
and quality of the
image.




550                      CorelDRAW: Chapter 11
                         To apply the Brightness-Contrast-Intensity effect
                         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
                         2 Click Effects, Color Adjustment, Brightness-Contrast-Intensity.
                         3 Move the following sliders:
                            Ÿ Brightness — shifts all pixel values up or down the tonal range,
                              lightening or darkening all colors equally
                            Ÿ Contrast — adjusts the difference between light and dark colors
                            Ÿ Intensity — brightens the light areas of the drawing or darkens the
                              dark areas


                         Ÿ Contrast and intensity usually go hand-in-hand because an increase in
                           contrast sometimes washes out detail in shadows and highlights, and an
                           increase in intensity can bring it back.



                         Ÿ You can also apply the Brightness-Contrast-Intensity effect by clicking the
                           Adjusts Brightness, Contrast, and Intensity button on the Property Bar.


Applying the Color Balance effect
                         The Color Balance effect shifts the colors in a drawing between RGB and
                         CMY color values. For example, if you want to tone down the blue color in a
                         photo, you can select the area you want to adjust and shift the color values
                         from blue to yellow.
The Color Balance
effect has been used
to shift the colors in
the image.




                         To apply the Color Balance effect
                         1 Select the object with the Pick tool.



                                                                    Working with bitmaps            551
          2 Click Effects, Color Adjustment, Color Balance.
          3 In the Range section, enable any of the following check boxes:
             Ÿ Shadows — color corrects the shadow areas of the drawing
             Ÿ Midtones — color corrects the midtone areas of the drawing
             Ÿ Highlights — color corrects the highlight areas of the drawing
             Ÿ Preserve luminance — maintains the luminance level of the drawing
               under the effects of color correction, ensuring the drawing retains its
               original brightness level.
          4 Move the following Color Channel sliders to set color levels:
             Ÿ Cyan-Red — adds cyan or red to the drawing to correct color
               imbalance. Move the slider to the left to add cyan and to the right to
               add red.
             Ÿ Magenta-Green — adds magenta or green to the drawing to correct
               color imbalance. Move the slider to the left to add magenta and to the
               right to add green.
             Ÿ Yellow-Blue — adds yellow or blue to the drawing to correct color
               imbalance. Move the slider to the left to add yellow and to the right to
               add blue.


          Ÿ Disabling any of the first three options in the Range section means the
            color correction does not effect the specified area. Disabling the Preserve
            luminance check box means the color correction does affect the luminance
            level, i.e., the drawing is darkened.



          Ÿ You can also apply the Color Balance effect by clicking the Balances
            Bitmap Colors button on the Property Bar.


Applying the Deinterlace effect
          The Deinterlace effect removes horizontal lines from scanned images. You
          can also use this effect to remove interlaced lines from video captures.

          To apply the Deinterlace effect
          1 Select the object with the Pick tool.
          2 Click