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					                                                     Barbara Jones, Ph.D., Academic Senate                Michael M. Fogler, Ph.D.


l  Physics

OFFICES:
                                                        Distinguished Teaching Award
                                                     David Kleinfeld, Ph.D.
                                                     Julius G. Kuti, Ph.D.
                                                     Herbert Levine, Ph.D.
                                                     Leonard N. Liebermann, Ph.D., Emeritus
                                                                                                          Alexander Groisman, Ph.D.
                                                                                                          Brian G. Keating, Ph.D.
                                                                                                          Thomas W. Murphy, Jr., Ph.D.
                                                                                                          Paolo Padoan, Ph.D.
                                                                                                          Douglas E. Smith, Ph.D.
General Administration:                              Ralph H. Lovberg, Ph.D., Emeritus
                                                                                                          Adjunct Professors
1110-113 Urey Hall Addition, Revelle College         Aneesh V. Manohar, Ph.D.
                                                     M. Brian Maple, Ph.D., Chair, Bernd T. Matthias      Hans Kobrak, Ph.D., Emeritus
Graduate Student Affairs:
                                                        Endowed Chair, Director, Institute for Pure and   Ferenc Mezei, Ph.D.
1110-121 Urey Hall Addition
                                                        Applied Physical Sciences; Director, Center for   Tihiro Ohkawa, Ph.D.
Undergraduate Student Affairs:                          Interface and Materials Science                   Raj K. Pathria, Ph.D.
1110-115 Urey Hall Addition                          George E. Masek, Ph.D., Emeritus                     Ronald E. Waltz, Ph.D.
Chair’s Office: 1110-113 Urey Hall Addition          Carl E. Mcllwain, Ph.D., Research Professor
                                                                                                          Senior Lecturers
Web site: http://physics.ucsd.edu                    Xuong Nguyen-Huu, Ph.D., Emeritus
                                                     Michael L. Norman, Ph.D.                             Richard E. Rothschild, Ph.D., Research Scientist,
Professors                                                                                                   Center for Astrophysics and Space Science
                                                     Melvin Y. Okamura, Ph.D.
Henry D. I. Abarbanel, Ph.D., Director, Institute    Thomas M. O’Neil, Ph.D.                                 The Department of Physics was established
    for Nonlinear Science                            José N. Onuchic, Ph.D., Academic Senate              in 1960 as the first new department of the UCSD
Daniel P. Arovas, Ph.D., Vice Chair, Graduate           Distinguished Teaching Award                      campus. Since then it has developed a strong
    Education                                        Hans P. Paar, Ph.D.                                  faculty and student body with unusually diversi-
Dmitri N. Bassov, Ph.D.                              Laurence E. Peterson, Ph.D., Emeritus and Research   fied interests which lie primarily in the follow-
Ami E. Berkowitz, Ph.D., Emeritus                       Professor                                         ing areas:
James G. Branson, Ph.D.                              Sally K. Ride, Ph.D., Ingrid and Joseph W. Hibben     1. Physics of elementary particles
Keith A. Brueckner, Ph.D., Emeritus                     Endowed Chair
E. Margaret Burbidge, Ph.D., Emeritus and            Ivan K. Schuller, Ph.D.                               2. Quantum liquids and superconductivity
    Research Professor                               Sheldon Schultz, Ph.D., Emeritus and Research         3. Solid state and statistical physics
Geoffrey R. Burbidge, Ph.D., Emeritus and               Professor                                          4. Plasma physics
    Research Professor                               Lu J. Sham, Ph.D.
Leonid V. Butov, Ph.D.                                                                                     5. Astrophysics and space physics
                                                     Vitali D. Shapiro, Ph.D.
Joseph C. Y. Chen, Ph.D., Emeritus                   Vivek A. Sharma, Ph.D., Academic Senate               6. Atomic and molecular collision and structure
Patrick H. Diamond, Ph.D.                               Distinguished Teaching Award, 2004                 7. Biophysics
C. Fred Driscoll, Ph.D.                              Frank Shu, Ph.D.                                      8. Geophysics
Daniel H. E. Dubin, Ph.D., Vice Chair,               Sunil K. Sinha, Ph.D.
    Undergraduate Education                                                                                9. Nonlinear dynamics
                                                     Harding E. Smith, Ph.D.
Robert C. Dynes, Ph.D., UC President                 Harry Suhl, Ph.D., Research Professor                10. Computational physics
George Feher, Ph.D., Emeritus and Research           Clifford M. Surko, Ph.D.                                In addition to on-campus research facilities,
    Professor                                        Robert A. Swanson, Ph.D., Emeritus                   the high energy program uses accelerators at
Zachary Fisk, Ph.D., Emeritus                        Harold Ticho, Ph.D., Emeritus                        SLAC, CERN, and Fermi Laboratory.The astrophysics
Donald R. Fredkin, Ph.D., Emeritus                   David R. Tytler, Ph.D.                               program uses facilities at Keck, Lick, and Kitt Peak
George M. Fuller, Ph.D.                              Wayne Vernon, Ph.D., Emeritus and Research           Observatories.
Marvin L. Goldberger, Ph.D., Emeritus                   Professor
John M. Goodkind, Ph.D.                              Arthur M. Wolfe, Ph.D., Director, Center for         The Undergraduate Program
Robert J. Gould, Ph.D., Emeritus and Research           Astrophysics and Space Sciences,
    Professor                                           Chancellor’s Associates Chair                        The Department of Physics offers undergradu-
Kim Griest, Ph.D., Chancellor’s Associates Faculty   Peter S. Wolynes, Ph.D.                              ate programs leading to the following degrees:
    Award for Excellence in Undergraduate            David Y. Wong, Ph.D., Emeritus
                                                                                                             B.S., Physics
    Teaching, 2002                                   Herbert F. York, Ph.D., Emeritus
Benjamin Grinstein, Ph.D.                                                                                    B.S., Physics with Specialization in
Jorge E. Hirsch, Ph.D.                               Associate Professors                                          Astrophysics
Terence T-L. Hwa, Ph.D.                              Massimiliano Di Ventra, Ph.D.                           B.S., Physics with Specialization in Biophysics
Kenneth A. Intriligator, Ph.D.                       Frank Wuerthwein, Ph.D.                                 B.S., Physics with Specialization in
Elizabeth Jenkins, Ph.D.
                                                     Assistant Professors                                          Computational Physics
   B.S., Physics with Specialization in Earth               In the junior year, the emphasis is on macro-          Suggested Schedule (pre-graduate-school)
         Sciences                                       scopic physics; the two principal physics subjects         FALL                    WINTER                   SPRING
   B.S., Physics with Specialization in Materials       are electromagnetism and mechanics. The math-              JUNIOR YEAR
         Physics                                        ematics and computer background required for               Phys. 100A              Phys. 100B               Phys. 120A
                                                        the physics program is completed in this year.             Phys. 105A              Phys. elective3          Phys. 130A
   B.A., General Physics                                                                                           Phys. 110A              Phys. 105B2
                                                            In the senior year, a sequence of courses in
   B.A., General Physics/Secondary Education            quantum physics provides the student the mod-              SENIOR YEAR
                                                                                                                   Phys. 140A              Phys. 140B2              Phys. lab1
    A grade-point average of 2.0 or higher in the       ern view of atomic and some aspects of sub-
                                                                                                                   Phys. 130B              Phys. elective3          Phys. elective3
upper-division major program is required for            atomic physics and the principal analytical
                                                                                                                   1   Any course from lab group listed above
graduation. Students must receive a grade of C–         methods appropriate in this domain. The relation
                                                                                                                   2   Any two courses from theoretical or experimental pre-
or better in any course to be counted toward ful-       of the microscopic to the macroscopic world is
                                                                                                                       grad-school sequence listed above
fillment of the major requirements. In exceptional      the subject of courses in thermodynamics and
                                                                                                                   3   Any restricted elective as described above
cases, students with a grade-point average in the       statistical physics, with illustrations drawn from
major of 2.5 or greater may petition to have one        gas dynamics and solid-state physics. Upper-               Suggested Schedule (career in industry)
grade of D accepted. All courses (lower- and            division laboratories teach students the essen-
                                                        tials of physical measurement and building                 FALL                    WINTER                   SPRING
upper-division) required for the major must be
                                                        advanced equipment, as well as other aspects               JUNIOR YEAR
taken for a letter grade.
                                                                                                                   Phys. 100A              Phys. 100B               [pre-grad]4
                                                        of experimental science.                                   Phys. 105A              Phys. elective3          Phys. 120A
Shang-keng Ma Award                                         The following courses are required for the             Phys. 110A              [other]5                 Phys. 130A
                                                        physics major:                                             SENIOR YEAR
  The Department of Physics presents the
                                                                                                                   Phys. 140A              [pre-grad]4              Phys. elective3
Shang-keng Ma Memorial Award at commence-               Lower-Division                                             Phys. lab2              Phys. elective3          [other]5
ment each year to a graduating physics student                                                                     Phys. 130B              [other]5
                                                        1. Physics 4A-B-C-D-E or Physics 2A-B-C-D1
who has shown exceptional ability and promise                                                                      2
                                                        2. Physics 2CL and 2DL                                         Any course from lab group listed above
during the UCSD undergraduate years.The award                                                                      3   Any restricted elective as described above
was established in 1984 to commemorate the              3. Chemistry 6A or2 a programming course                   4   any course from either pre-grad-school sequence
contributions of Professor Ma to the UCSD Depart-          such as MAE 9 or MAE 10                                     listed above
ment of Physics and to the field of theoretical con-    4. Mathematics 20C-D-E-F                                   5   any other course as approved by adviser (optional)
densed matter physics.
                                                        1 The Physics 4 series is recommended, but the Physics 2

John Holmes Malmberg Prize
                                                         sequence is acceptable by petition, in which case both    Physics Major with Specialization
                                                        2 Chemistry 6A and a programming course are required
                                                                                                                   in Astrophysics (B.S. Degree)
   The John Holmes Malmberg Prize is presented
annually at commencement to a graduating                Upper-Division                                                The astrophysics specialization is appropriate
physics student who is recognized for potential                                                                    for students who would like to gain an in-depth
                                                        1. Physics 100A-B, 105A, 110A, 120A, 130A-B,               understanding of modern astronomy and astro-
for a career in physics and a measure of experi-           140A, and an additional laboratory course
mental inquisitiveness.This prize was established                                                                  physics, and/or who wish to prepare for gradu-
                                                           from the lab group: 120B, 121, 133, 173                 ate school in astronomy or astrophysics. It is
in 1993 in memory of Professor Malmberg who
pioneered the use of non-neutral plasmas for            2. Two courses from either the theoretical or              similar to the standard physics major with elec-
sophisticated tests of plasma                              experimental pre-grad-school sequence                   tives being chosen from astronomically oriented
equilibrium, wave, and transport effects. He was           Theoretical pre-grad-school sequence:                   courses. A wide variety of technical, academic,
an involved teacher of undergraduate and gradu-            Phys. 100C, 105B, 110B, 130C, 140B                      and professional careers are possible for stu-
ate students and was active in departmental and                                                                    dents who choose this specialization.
                                                           Experimental pre-grad-school sequence:
campus affairs.                                                                                                       The following courses are required for the
                                                           Phys. 100C, 110B, 120B, 130C, 140B
                                                                                                                   physics major with specialization in astrophysics:
                                                        3. Restricted electives: Three upper-division (four-
Physics Major (B.S. Degree)                                                                                        Lower-Division
                                                           unit) or graduate courses in physics or mathe-
    The physics major provides a core of basic             matics (only one). Courses in other science
education in several principle areas of physics,                                                                   1. Physics 4A-B-C-D-E or Physics 2A-B-C-D1
                                                           disciplines may be substituted by petition.
with sufficient flexibility to allow students to pre-                                                              2. Physics 2CL and 2DL
                                                           For students wishing to prepare for graduate
pare either for graduate school or a career in                                                                     3. Chemistry 6A or2 a programming course such
                                                        school it is important that all courses in either
industry. Since in preparing for either goal, more                                                                    as MAE 9 or MAE 10
                                                        the theorist or experimentalist pre-grad-school
than the required core courses are necessary, it
                                                        sequence be taken. Mathematics 120A is also                4. Mathematics 20C-D-E-F
is important for students to meet with a physics
                                                        recommended.                                               1 The Physics 4 series is recommended, but the Physics 2
department adviser in deciding a schedule.
                                                                                                                       sequence is acceptable, in which case both
2 Chemistry 6A and a programming course are required.
                                                                Physics Major with Specialization                    1. Physics 100A, 105A, 110A, 120A, 130A, 140A,
                                                                in Biophysics (B.S. Degree)                             171, 172, 173
Upper-Division
                                                                    The Department of Physics offers an under-       2. Chemistry 140A
1. Physics 100A-B, 105A, 110A, 120A, 130A-B,                    graduate program that prepares students for              Additional electives, to achieve a count of
   140A and an additional laboratory course                     careers in biophysics. This program leads to a       twelve upper-division courses in the major, may
   from the lab group: 120B, 121, 133.                          degree in “B.S., Physics with Specialization in      be selected from biology, chemistry and physics.
2. Two courses from either the theoretical or                   Biophysics.” As a terminal degree, it is an excel-   Three additional upper-division courses, in any
   experimental pre-grad-school sequence.                       lent education for students who wish to work         subject, are required in order to satisfy UCSD
                                                                in the biotechnology industry, and provides an       requirements.
3. It is recommended that students take the
                                                                ideal background for students who plan to attend         Premedical students will need to take two
   three quarter astrophysics sequence—Physics
                                                                graduate or professional school in biological or     additional quarters of organic chemistry (Chem-
   160, 161, 162—but any three courses selected
                                                                biomedical fields.                                   istry 140B and 140C), one quarter of organic
   from the following list are acceptable:
                                                                    This program is intended for students with       chemistry laboratory (Chemistry 143A), and one
     Physics 160. Stellar Astrophysics                          a strong interest in bringing the concepts and       quarter of an upper level biology course. In addi-
     Physics 161. Compact Objects and the                       technical advances from the physical sciences        tion, some medical schools also require a quar-
     Milky Way                                                  to bear on issues in biology. The curriculum is      ter of biochemistry (Biology BIBC 100 or
     Physics 162, Galaxies and Cosmology                        chosen to prepare students as rigorously trained     Chemistry 114A). The premedical requirements
                                                                but broad-minded generalists, so that they may       may be used to satisfy elective requirements for
     Physics 163, Solar System
                                                                attack problems in the biological, biochemical,      upper-division courses.
     ECE 120, Solar System Physics                              and biomedical sciences with the tools and con-          As a guide to prospective students, we con-
     Chem. 170, Cosmochemistry                                  fidence that come from rigorous training in the      sider a schedule of required classes for a Muir
     Erth. 130, Geodynamics of Terr. Planets                    physical sciences.                                   College student.
                                                                    The curriculum for Physics Major with Specia-
     MAE 180A, Space Science and Engineering                                                                         Suggested Schedule
                                                                lization in Biophysics is designed to allow pre-
     180 A/B                                                                                                         FALL                WINTER            SPRING
                                                                medical students to complete all necessary
     Physics 223, Stellar Structure and Evolution;              courses for admission to medical schools.            FRESHMAN YEAR
     with consent of Instructor                                     The lower-division program for physics majors    Math. 20A           Chem. 6A          Chem. 6B
                                                                                                                                         Math. 20B         Chem. 6BL
     Physics 224, Interstellar Medium; with consent             with specialization in biophysics includes basic                         Phys. 4A          Math. 20C
     of Instructor                                              courses in biology and chemistry as well as                                                Phys. 4B
                                                                physics. Although the sequence Physics 4A            SOPHOMORE YEAR
     Physics 226, Galaxies & Galactic Dynamics;
                                                                through 4E is strongly recommended, students         Chem. 6C       Math. 20E              Math. 20F
     with consent of Instructor
                                                                have the choice of petitioning the department to     Math. 20D      Phys. 4D               Phys. 4E
     Physics 227, Cosmology; with consent of                    substitute the sequence Physics 2A through 2D.
                                                                                                                     Phys. 4C       Phys. 2CL              Phys. 2DL
     Instructor                                                     The following courses are required for the
                                                                                                                     JUNIOR YEAR
                                                                                                                     Phys. 100A          BILD 1            BILD 2
     Physics 228, High Energy and Compact                       physics major with specialization in biophysics:     Phys. 105A          Chem. 140A        Phys. 120A
     Objects; with consent of Instructor                                                                             Phys. 110A                            Phys. 130A
                                                                Lower-Division
     Theoretical pre-grad-school sequence:                                                                           SENIOR YEAR
                                                                1. Physics 4A-B-C-D-E and 2CL-DL; or Physics                             Phys. 172
     Phys. 100C, 105B, 110B, 130C, 140B
                                                                   2A-B-C-D and 2CL-DL (Physics 4 sequence is        Phys. 140A          Elec.             Phys. 173
     Experimental pre-grad-school sequence:                        strongly recommended)                             Phys. 171           Elec.
     Phys. 100C, 110B, 120B, 130C, 140B
                                                                2. Chemistry 6A-B-C and 6BL
Example Schedule                                                3. Biology, BILD 1 and BILD 2
                                                                                                                     B.S. in Physics with Specialization
FALL                    WINTER               SPRING                                                                  in Computational Physics
                                                                4. Mathematics 20A-B-C-D-E-F
JUNIOR YEAR                                                                                                              The computational physics specialization is
Phys 100A               Phys 100B            Phys 120A             The upper-division program includes
                                                                                                                     designed to support a broad range of career
Phys 105A               Phys 105B1           Phys 130A          advanced courses in physics, including two core
                                                                                                                     development tracks, so students may pursue
Phys 110A                                                       lecture courses and one core laboratory course
                                                                                                                     (1) a terminal B.S. degree for gainful employment
SENIOR YEAR                                                     in biophysics, as well as organic chemistry.
Phys 140A               Phys 140B            Physics Lab2                                                            in information technology and high-tech industry,
Phys 160                Phys 161             Phys 162           Upper-Division                                       (2) preparation for graduate studies in computa-
Phys 130B                                                                                                            tional science with an M.S. degree, and (3) gradu-
1   Experimentalists may replace 105B with an additional lab.                                                        ate work in physics with strong interest in
2   Any course from lab group listed above                                                                           computational physics.This flexibility is afforded
                                                                                                                     by a wide array of restricted electives which allows
students to design much of their own program                       needs and interests in consultation with the aca-    3. Mathematics 20C-F
(subject to adviser’s approval) while simultane-                   demic adviser.
ously maintaining the essential physics-based                         Grad. School Theorist with Computational          Upper-Division
curriculum. Academic advising will be provided                     Interest Track for student with interest in theo-    1. Physics 100A-B, 105A, 110A-B, 120A, 130A,
by physics faculty in the Computational Physics                    retical physics based computational science:            140A, plus one upper-division lab*
Specialization Program to assist students in                         Physics 100C, 110B, 130C, 140B                     2. Earth Sciences 50, 102, 103, 120
designing their optimal career development track                     Mathematics 132A-B
in the flexible curriculum.                                                                                             3. Restricted Electives: three upper-division
                                                                      Grad. School Experimentalist with                    earth science (four-unit) or graduate courses
    The following courses are required for Physics
                                                                   Computational Interest Track for students with          to be chosen with the approval of the SIO
Major with Specialization in Computational
                                                                   interest in experimental physics based computa-         earth sciences adviser
Physics:
                                                                   tional science:                                      4. Two courses from either the theoretical or
Lower-Division
                                                                     Physics 100C, 120B, 142                               experimental pre-grad school sequence.
1. Physics 4A-B-C-D-E or Physics 2A-B-C-D1,                          Mathematics 183                                    * Another lab course chosen from Physics 120B,
   Physics 2CL-DL                                                    CSE 80                                               121, 133, or 173.
2. Mathematics 20C-F                                                  Information Technology Track for student
                                                                   with interest in physics based software oriented     Suggested Schedule
3. Chemistry 6A
                                                                   applications:                                        FALL               WINTER             SPRING
4. MAE 9, or MAE 10, or CSE 112
                                                                     Physics 100C, 140B                                 JUNIOR YEAR
1   The 2A-B-C-D sequence is an allowed substitute by                                                                   Phys. 100A         Phys. 100B         Phys. 120A
    petition.
                                                                     CSE 12, 30, 80                                     Phys. 105A         Phys. 110B         Phys. 130A
2   Electing CSE 11, student is still required to have C or
                                                                     Mathematics 173                                    Phys. 110A         Earth Sci. 102
    Fortran based programming skills equivalent to MAE 9,             Numerical Science/Engineering Application         Earth Sci. 50
    or MAE 10.                                                     Developer Track for students with interest in        SENIOR YEAR
                                                                                                                        Phys. 140A         Earth Sci. 120     U.D. Lab
Upper-Division                                                     physics and engineering applications of numeri-      Earth Sci. 103     Restr. Elec.       Restr. Elec
                                                                   cal algorithms:                                                                            Restr. Elec.
1. Physics 100A-B, 105A-B, 110A, 120A, 121,
   130A-B, 140A, 141, 142                                            Physics 100C, 140B
                                                                     Mathematics 170A-C, 172                            Physics Major with Specialization
2. Six restricted electives from following groups:
                                                                      High Tech Instrumentation Track for students      in Materials Physics (B.S. Degree)
     Physics 100C, 110B, 120B, 130C, 140B, 173,                    with interest in physics based instrumentation:         The materials physics specialization is
     other upper-division Physics courses,
                                                                     Physics 100C, 120B, 140B                           designed to support a broad range of options,
     Mathematics 132A-B, 170A-C, 172, 173, 183
                                                                     Mathematics 183                                    so students may pursue (1) a terminal B.S.
     CSE 12, 30, 80
                                                                     CSE 12, 80                                         degree, or preparation for (2) graduate work
     Substitute Upper-Division courses3                                                                                 in materials science, or (3) graduate work in
Suggested Schedule (restricted electives                           Physics Major with Specialization                    physics. This flexibility is afforded by a wide
not shown)                                                         in Earth Sciences (B.S. Degree)                      range of restricted electives which allows stu-
                                                                                                                        dents to design much of their own program
FALL                      WINTER                SPRING                 The upper-division program for physics           while simultaneously maintaining the essential
JUNIOR YEAR                                                        majors with specialization in earth sciences         physics-based curriculum. Academic advising
Phys. 100A                Phys. 100B            Phys. 120A         is essentially the same as the standard physics
Phys. 105A                Phys. 105B            Phys. 130A                                                              will be provided by the department to assist the
                                                                   major augmented by courses in earth sciences.        student in navigating through the many options.
Phys. 110A
                                                                       Students may wish to incorporate a small         The B.S. program also serves as the entry to the
SENIOR YEAR
Phys. 140A                Phys. 141             Phys. 142          portion of the major program into their lower-       integrated five-year B.S./M.S. program.
Phys. 130B                Phys. 121                                division studies, for example, Earth Sciences 101.
2
                                                                       The following courses are required for the       Lower-Division
    Students will choose two required courses from the
    group Phys. 121, Phys. 141, Phys. 142, and either will drop    physics major with specialization in earth           1. Physics 4A-B-C-D-E or Physics 2A-B-C-D,
    the third, or take it as one of the six restricted electives   sciences:                                               Physics 2CL-DL
3   Substitute elective courses (upper-division science, math-
    ematics, engineering, or other) require adviser’s approval
                                                                   Lower-Division                                       2. Chemistry 6A-B*
                                                                   1. Physics 4A-B-C-D-E and 2CL-DL; or                 3. Mathematics 20C-F
Career Track Examples                                                 Physics 2A-B-C-D and 2CL-DL (Physics 4            4. MAE 9 or MAE 10 (or equivalent programming
with Restricted Electives                                             sequence is strongly recommended)                    experience)
   The program of electives is intended to be                      2. Chemistry 6A-B and 6BL
flexible, and can be tailored to the student’s                                                                          Upper-Division
                                                                                                                                                          Physics
                                                                                                                                                           ___
                                                                                                                                                              •
1. Physics 100A-B, 105A-B, 110A, 120A-B,                  is not intended for those who wish to proceed to    General Physics/Secondary
   130A-B, 140A, 133, 152A-B                              the Ph.D. in physics. The latter should enroll in   Education Major (B.A. Degree)
2. Four restricted electives, to be chosen from           the B.S. program.
                                                              The following courses are required for the          This program is intended for students prepar-
   Chemistry 120A-B*; Mathematics 120A;                                                                       ing for a career as a physics teacher in secondary
   ECE 103, 134, 135A-B, 136, 136L; MAE 160,              general physics major:
                                                                                                              schools. It covers the essential topics in physics
   110A; or any upper division physics course             Lower-Division                                      and provides a broadly based education in the
* Students who anticipate taking Chemistry 120A-B as an                                                       natural sciences.The program includes three
  upper-division elective are strongly advised to take
                                                          1. Physics 2A-B-C-D and 2CL-DL
                                                                                                              courses in general chemistry plus a lab, one
  Chemistry 6C.                                           2. Mathematics 20C-F                                course in organic chemistry plus a lab, and a
                                                          3. Three restrictive elective courses in science    course in earth science as required by the Single
Suggested Schedule
                                                             and engineering (a list of acceptable courses    Subject Credential Program of the state of
(restricted electives not shown)
                                                             is given below)                                  California. It also includes three courses in
FALL                 WINTER               SPRING                                                              Practicum in Learning offered by the Teacher
JUNIOR YEAR                                               Upper-Division                                      Education Program.This degree is particularly
Phys. 100A           Phys. 100B           Phys. 120A
                                                          1. Physics 100A-B, 105A, 110A-B, 120A, 130A,        suitable for students pursuing a Single Subject
Phys. 105A           Phys. 105B           Phys. 130A
Phys. 110A                                                   140A or Chemistry 127 or 131                     (Physics) credential for high schools. If you are
SENIOR YEAR                                                                                                   interested in earning a California teaching creden-
                                                          2. Restricted Electives: Sixteen units of upper-
Phys. 140A           Phys. 152A           Phys. 152B                                                          tial from UCSD, contact the Teacher Education
Phys. 120B                                Phys. 133
                                                             division courses in science and engineering
                                                                                                              Program (TEP) for information about the prerequi-
Phys. 130B                                                   (excluding mathematics)
                                                                                                              site and professional preparation requirements. It
                                                          Suggested Schedule                                  is recommended that you contact TEP as early as
Restricted Electives: Example
                                                          FALL                  WINTER         SPRING         possible in your academic career.
   As examples of restricted electives, a student         JUNIOR YEAR                                             The following courses are required for the
opting for a terminal B.S. degree (Option 1)              Phys. 100A            Phys. 100B     Phys. 120A     general physics/secondary education major:
might choose to take MAE 160, ECE 103, 136,               Phys. 105A            Phys. 110B     Phys. 130A
and Physics 121. Students preparing for graduate          Phys. 110A                                          Lower-Division
work in materials science (Option 2) might con-           SENIOR YEAR
                                                          Phys. 140A or         Restr. Elec    Restr. Elec.   1. Physics 2A-B-C-D and 2CL-DL
sider MAE 160, ECE 103, 134, and a fourth elec-
                                                          Chem. 127 or 131      Restr. Elec.                  2. Chemistry 6A-B-C and 6BL
tive. Students preparing for graduate work                Restr. Elec.
in physics (Option 3) might consider Physics                                                                  3. Earth Sciences 10, 12, or 30
100C, 110B, 140B, and a fourth elective. The pro-         Approved Lower-Division Elective Courses            4. Mathematics 20C-F
gram of electives is intended to be flexible, and
                                                             One course in computing chosen from the          Upper-Division
can be tailored to the student’s needs and inter-
                                                          following list:
ests in consultation with the academic adviser.                                                               1. Physics 100A-B, 105A, 110A-B, 120A, 130A
   See entry for Integrated Bachelor’s/Master’s              MAE 10, FORTRAN for Engineers
                                                             MAE 03, Introduction to Engineering              2. Chemistry 140A and 143A
Degree Program in Materials Physics.
                                                             Graphics and Design                              3. Earth Sciences 50
General Physics Major (B.A. Degree)                          CSE 10, Introduction to Programming              4. TEP 129A-B-C
                                                             Techniques
   This program covers the essential topics in                                                                Suggested Schedule
physics and provides a broadly based education               CSE 30, Introduction to Systems Programming
                                                                                                              FALL               WINTER            SPRING
in the natural sciences. Starting with lower-divi-           Physics 105B, Mathematical and                   JUNIOR YEAR
sion courses in mathematics, physics, computing,             Computational Physics                            Phys. 100A         Phys. 100B        Phys. 130A
biology and/or chemistry, students proceed to                                                                 Phys. 105A         Phys. 110B        Phys. 120A
upper-division mechanics, electricity and mag-               Plus two of the following courses:               Phys. 110A         Chem. 140A        Chem. 143A
netism, thermal physics, quantum physics, and                BILD 1, The Cell                                 SENIOR YEAR
                                                                                                              Earth Sci. 50      TEP 129B          TEP 129C
a physical measurements laboratory course. In                BILD 2, Multicellular Life                       TEP 129A
addition, students take sixteen units of upper-
                                                             BILD 3, Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
division elective courses in the natural sciences
or mathematics.                                              Chem. 6A, General Chemistry                      Engineering Physics Program
   While the B.A. program is suitable for students           Chem. 6B, General Chemistry                         The engineering physics program is offered
who pursue a terminal degree in physics or use it            Chem. 6C, General Chemistry                      jointly by the Departments of Physics, MAE, and
as a preparation for other professional careers, it                                                           ECE, and is administered by the Department of
                                                                                                              ECE. (See “ECE, Engineering Physics Program.”)
Transfer students who have had prior course            only (thesis). During the fourth quarter prior to          5. Completion of a thesis, with an oral presenta-
work in the major at other institutions must con-      receipt of the B.S. degree, students enrolled in the          tion to, and approval of, a three-member
sult with the Department of Physics, Student           B.S. degree program with specialization in materi-            committee from the Department of Physics
Affairs Office, 1110-115 Urey Hall Addition to         als physics (see above) may apply for admission               including the faculty adviser. If the faculty
make an appointment to see a faculty adviser.          to the M.S. program.To be eligible, students must             adviser is from outside the physics depart-
                                                       have completed the first two quarters of their                ment, the committee shall consist of the
Minor in Physics                                       junior year in residence at UCSD and have a GPA               adviser and two members from the physics
   Students may arrange minor programs or              of at least 3.0 in both their major and overall               department faculty.
programs of concentration in physics by consult-       undergraduate curriculum. It is strongly recom-            6. Three complete, separate, and consecutive
ing with the Department of Physics Student             mended that B.S. students who intend to apply to              quarters of full-time residency as a graduate
Affairs Office, 1110-115 Urey Hall Addition, and       the M.S. program take MAE 160, ECE 103, and ECE               student which will commence the quarter
their college for specific requirements. The           134 as restricted B.S. electives. It is the responsibil-      immediately following the quarter in which
Department of Physics requires at least twenty-        ity of the prospective B.S./M.S. student to select a          the B.S. degree is awarded (not counting sum-
eight units, of which at least twenty units must       faculty member (from the Department of Physics                mer session).
be upper-division. All courses must be taken for       or, with physics department approval, from the
                                                                                                                  7. Although students may receive research or
a letter grade. Lower-division transfer courses        MAE, ECE, or chemistry departments) who would
                                                                                                                     teaching assistantships if available from their
are permitted.                                         be willing to serve as the student’s adviser and
                                                                                                                     adviser or through the Department of Physics,
                                                       with whom the student would complete at least
                                                                                                                     there is no guarantee of financial support
                                                       twelve units of S/U graded research, which could
Advising Office                                                                                                      associated with the M.S. program.
                                                       commence as early as the undergraduate senior
    All students are assigned an academic adviser.     year. (Taken during the senior year, the units             8. M.S. candidates will be permitted to serve as
It is strongly recommended students see their          would count only toward the M.S. degree and not               teaching assistants, although teaching will
adviser at least once a quarter.                       toward the B.S.) The student must confirm that                not be a requirement for the degree. Students
    Additional advising information may be             the selected faculty adviser will not be on off-              who obtain a teaching assistantship should
obtained from the Department of Physics                campus sabbatical leave during any quarter of                 make sure that it does not interfere with
Student Affairs Office, 1110-115 Urey Hall             the scheduled B.S./M.S. project. Students are                 completion of the M.S. degree requirements
Addition (858) 534-3290.                               expected to meet the requirements for the M.S.                within the one year time frame allotted.
                                                       degree in one year (three consecutive, contigu-            M.S. Program: Fifth Year Curriculum
Honors Program                                         ous academic quarters) from the date of receipt
    The Department of Physics offers an Honors         of the B.S. degree. Any deviation from this plan,          1. MAT SCI 201A-B-C
Program for students who demonstrate excellence        such as a break in enrollment for one or more              2. Physics 295 (M.S. Thesis Research)
in the major. Students interested in the Honors        quarters, may result in the student being
                                                                                                                  3. Two restricted electives, to be chosen from
Program should consult the Student Affairs Office.     dropped from the program.
                                                                                                                     Physics 201, 211A-B; MAT SCI 227, 240A-B-C;
Eligibility for the Honors Program includes com-           The requirements for the M.S. degree are
                                                                                                                     ECE 231, 233: other courses allowed by petition
pletion of all required lower-division physics         as follows:
courses, ten upper-division physics courses, and a     1. Completion of at least twelve and no more
GPA of a least 3.50 in the physics major.                 than twenty-four units of research, which may           The Graduate Program
    The Honors Program consists of a minimum              begin as early as the first quarter of the senior
of eight units of Honors Thesis Research (Physics                                                                    The Department of Physics offers curricula
                                                          undergraduate year.
199H), an Honors Thesis, and the presentation                                                                     leading to the following degrees:
                                                       2. Completion of three required courses during
of the research to faculty and peers at UCSD’s                                                                       M.S., Physics
                                                          the fifth (graduate) year (MAT SCI 201A-B-C),
Undergraduate Research Conference or an                                                                              C.Phil., Physics
Undergraduate Seminar. Admission to the                   and two restricted electives (see below).
                                                                                                                     Ph.D., Physics
Honors Program is contingent upon the prior            3. Completion of restricted elective courses so               Ph.D., Physics (Biophysics)
approval of the Honors Thesis “research topic”            that the total number of units (research plus
                                                                                                                     Biophysics students will receive their M.S. and
by the Vice Chair for Education.                          required courses plus elective courses) totals
                                                                                                                  C.Phil. degrees in physics. Only their Ph.D. will be
                                                          no less than 36 units taken as a graduate stu-
                                                                                                                  in physics (biophysics).
Integrated Bachelor’s/Master’s                            dent. Students accumulate units for their
                                                          research by enrolling in Physics 295 (M.S.Thesis          Entering graduate students are required to
Degree Program in                                                                                                 have a sound knowledge of undergraduate
                                                          Research), which may be taken repeatedly.
Materials Physics                                                                                                 mechanics, electricity and magnetism; to have
                                                       4. Maintenance of a grade-point average of at              had senior courses or their equivalent in atomic
   The program offers a M.S. in physics with spe-
                                                          least 3.0 for all course work, both cumulatively        and quantum physics, nuclear physics, and ther-
cialization in materials physics. It is open only to
                                                          and for each quarter of enrollment in the               modynamics; and to have taken upper-division
UCSD undergraduates, and is a Plan I program
                                                          B.S./M.S. program.
laboratory work. An introductory course in solid-    Requirements for the Ph.D.                             Group 3: Physics 214 (Elem. Part.); 215A-B-C
state physics is desirable.                                                                                 (Part. & Fields); 217 (Renorm. Field Th.); 229
                                                         Students are required to pass a departmental
    Requirements for the master of science                                                                  (App. Quant. Mech.)
                                                     examination, advanced graduate courses, a qual-
degree can be met according to Plan II (compre-                                                             Group 4: Physics 220 (Group Th.); 221A, 221B
                                                     ifying examination, teaching requirement and a
hensive examination). (See “Graduate Studies:                                                               (Nonlinear Dyn.); Physics 241 and 242 (Comp.
                                                     final defense of the thesis as described below.
The Master’s Degree.”) The comprehensive                                                                    Phys); Mathematics 210A-B, 210C (Mathematics
examination is identical to the first-year depart-   1. DEPARTMENTAL EXAMINATION                            Physics); Mathematics 259A-B-C (Geom. Physics)
mental examination for Ph.D. students. A list of         Physics students are required to take the          Group 5: Physics 225A-B (Relativ.); 271
acceptable courses is available in the Department    departmental examination after completing one          (Bio. Neurons/Net); 272 (Bio. Molecules)
of Physics Graduate Student Affairs office. There    year of graduate work at UCSD. The examination         Group 6: Physics 223 (Stel. Str.); 224 (Intrstel.
is no foreign language requirement.                  is on the level of material usually covered in         Med.); 226 (Gal. & Gal. Dyn.); 227 (Cosmology),
                                                     upper-division courses and the graduate courses        228 (HE Astro. & Comp. Obj.)
Doctoral Degree Program                              listed below:
                                                                                                               Biophysics students select five courses from
                                                     Fall                                                   biology, biochemistry, chemistry, or physics in
    The department has developed a flexible
                                                                                                            consultation with their adviser. At least three
Ph.D. program which provides a broad, advanced       Physics 200A (Theoretical Mechanics)
                                                                                                            courses must be graduate courses.
education in physics while at the same time giv-     Physics 201 (Mathematical Physics)
ing students opportunity for emphasizing their       Physics 212A (Quantum Mechanics)                       3. QUALIFYING EXAMINATION AND
special interests. This program consists of gradu-                                                          ADVANCEMENT TO CANDIDACY
                                                     Winter
ate courses, apprenticeship in research, teaching                                                               In order to be advanced to candidacy,
experience, and thesis research.                     Physics 200B (Theoretical Mechanics)
                                                                                                            students must have met the departmental
    Entering students are assigned a faculty         Physics 203A (Adv. Classical Electrodynamics)
                                                                                                            requirements and obtained a faculty research
adviser to guide them in their program. Many         Physics 212B (Quantum Mechanics)
                                                                                                            supervisor. At the time of application for
students spend their first year as teaching assis-   Spring                                                 advancement to candidacy, a doctoral committee
tants or fellows and begin apprentice research                                                              responsible for the remainder of the student’s
in their second year. When a student’s association   Physics 203B (Adv. Classical Electrodynamics)
                                                     Physics 210A (Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics)       graduate program is appointed by the Graduate
with a research area and research supervisor is                                                             Council. The committee conducts the Ph.D.
well established, a faculty research progress com-   Physics 212C (Quantum Mechanics)
                                                                                                            qualifying examination during which students
mittee is formed with the responsibility of con-        The examination is offered twice a year, at         must demonstrate the ability to engage in thesis
ducting an annual review of progress and, at the     the beginning of the fall and spring quarters,         research. Usually this involves the presentation of
appropriate time, initiating the formation of a      and lasts two days, four hours per day. The exam-      a plan for the thesis research project.The commit-
doctoral committee. After three years of graduate    ination may be repeated once, the next time it is      tee may ask questions directly or indirectly related
study, or earlier, students complete the depart-     offered.                                               to the project and questions on general physics
mental examinations and begin thesis research.          Biophysics students take the departmental           which it determines to be relevant. Upon success-
Students specializing in biophysics make up defi-    examination after completing two years of              ful completion of this examination, students are
ciencies in biology and chemistry during the first   graduate work.                                         advanced to candidacy and are awarded the
two years and complete the departmental exami-                                                              Candidate of Philosophy degree.
                                                     2. ADVANCED GRADUATE COURSES
nations by the end of their third year of graduate
study.There is no foreign language requirement.         Physics students are required to take five          4. INSTRUCTION IN PHYSICS TEACHING
                                                     advanced graduate courses (with a grade of C              All graduate students are required to partici-
Entrance Testing                                     or better) from at least three of the groups listed    pate in the physics undergraduate teaching pro-
                                                     below no later than the end of the third year of       gram as part of their career training. The main
    An entrance test covering undergraduate
                                                     graduate work. A 3.0 average in four of the five       component of this requirement is an evaluated
physics is given to entering students during the
                                                     courses is required. (In lieu of the course require-   classroom-based teaching activity. All graduate
first week of orientation to give better guidance
                                                     ment, students may petition to take an oral            student teaching accomplishments are subject
to students in their graduate program. The
                                                     examination covering three areas of physics.)          to the approval of the vice chair for education.
results are not entered in the student’s file.
Entering students are encouraged, but not            Group 1: Physics 218A-B-C (Plasma); 234                There are several ways to satisfying the teaching
obliged, to bring the results to the first meeting   (Nonneutral Plas.); 235 (Nonlin. Plas. Th.)            requirement, including: (1) leading discussions
with their academic adviser. Entering students       Group 2: Physics 210B (Nonequil. Stat. Mech.);         as a teaching assistant, (2) practical classroom
may elect to take the departmental examination       210C, 211A, 211B (Solid State); 219 (C.M./Matl.        teaching, under faculty supervision, (3) participa-
instead of taking the entrance test.                 Sci. Lab), 230 (Adv. Solid State); 232 (Electronic     tion in an approved teaching development pro-
                                                     Materials); 236 (Many-body Th.)                        gram offered by the Department of Physics or
                                                                                                            the campus Center for Teaching Development, or
                                                                                                            (4) transferred teaching credit from another insti-
tution or department. Students who satisfy the           For course descriptions not found in the                      through optics and quantum mechanics. Examples
                                                                                                                       from biology and instrumentation. (First offered winter
requirement by teaching at UCSD should enroll            2006–2007 General Catalog, please con-                        2005) Prerequisites: Physics 1B, 1BL, Mathemat-ics 10C or
in Physics 500 during the quarter in which they          tact the department for more information.                     10D or 20C. Concurrent enrollment in Physics 1CL. (F, W, S)
complete it.
                                                                           LOWER-DIVISION                              1CL. Waves, Optics, and Modern Physics Laboratory (2)
                                                                                                                       Physics laboratory course to accompany Physics 1C.
5. THESIS DEFENSE                                           The Physics 1 sequence is primarily intended               Experiments in waves, optics, and modern physics.
   When students have completed their theses,            for biology.                                                  Course materials fee is required. First offered in winter
                                                                                                                       2005. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in Physics 1C.
they are asked to present and defend them                   The Physics 2 sequence is intended for physi-              (F, W, S)
before their doctoral committees.                        cal science and engineering majors and those
                                                                                                                       2A. Physics–Mechanics (4)
                                                         biological science majors with strong mathemat-               A calculus-based science-engineering general physics
TIME LIMITS FOR PROGRESS TO THE PH.D.
                                                         ical aptitude.                                                course covering vectors, motion in one and two
   In accordance with university policy, the                The Physics 4 sequence is intended for all                 dimensions, Newton’s first and second laws, work and
                                                                                                                       energy, conservation of energy, linear momentum, col-
Department of Physics has established the fol-           physics majors and for students with an interest              lisions, rotational kinematics, rotational dynamics,
lowing time limits for progress to the Ph.D. A stu-      in physics. This five-quarter sequence covers the             equilibrium of rigid bodies, oscillations, gravitation.
dent’s research progress committee helps ensure          same topics as the Physics 2 sequence, but it                 Prerequisites: Mathematics 20A, and concurrent enroll-
                                                                                                                       ment in Mathematics 20B. (F,W,S)
that these time limits are met.                          covers these topics more slowly and in more
                          Theorists   Experimentalists   depth. The Physics 4 sequence provides a solid                2B. Physics–Electricity and Magnetism (4)
Advancement to Candidacy 4 years          5 years                                                                      Continuation of Physics 2A covering charge and mat-
                                                         foundation for the upper-division courses                     ter, the electric field, Gauss’s law, electric potential,
Total Registered Time and 7 years         8 years
                                                         required for the physics major.                               capacitors and dielectrics, current and resistance, elec-
  Support                                                                                                              tromotive force and circuits, the magnetic field,
                                                            Note: Since some of the material is dupli-
                                                                                                                       Ampere’s law, Faraday’s law, inductance, electromag-
Departmental Colloquium                                  cated in the Physics 1, 2 and 4 sequences, credit             netic oscillations, alternating currents and Maxwell’s
                                                         cannot be obtained for both. Please check with                equations. Prerequisites: Physics 2A, Mathematics 20B,
  The department offers a weekly colloquium                                                                            and concurrent enrollment in Mathematics 20C. (F,W,S)
                                                         the Physics Student Affairs Office when switch-
on topics of current interest in physics and on
                                                         ing sequences. (Example: Physics 1A followed by               2BL. Physics Laboratory–Mechanics and
departmental research programs. Students are                                                                           Electrostatics (2)
                                                         Physics 2A, no credit for Physics 2A.)
expected to register and attend the colloquium.                                                                        One hour lecture and three hours’ laboratory.
                                                            Physics 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 are intended         Experiments include gravitational force, linear and rota-
                                                         for non-science majors. Physics 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10,            tional motion, conservation of energy and momentum,
Supplementary Course Work                                                                                              collisions, oscillations and springs, gyroscopes. Expe-
                                                         and 12 do not use calculus while Physics 11 uses              riments on electrostatics involve charge, electric field,
and Seminars                                             some calculus.                                                potential, and capacitance. Data reduction and error
   The department offers regular seminars in             1A. Mechanics (3)                                             analysis are required for written laboratory reports.
                                                         First quarter of a three-quarter introductory physics         Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in Physics 2B or 4C.
several areas of current interest. Students are                                                                        (F,W,S) Course materials fee is required.
                                                         course, geared towards life-science majors. Equilib-
strongly urged to enroll for credit in seminars          rium and motion of particles in Newtonian mechanics,
                                                                                                                       2C. Physics–Fluids, Waves, Thermodynamics, and
related to their research interests and, when            examples from astronomy, biology and sports, oscilla-
                                                                                                                       Optics (4)
appropriate, to enroll in advanced graduate              tions and waves, vibrating strings and sound.
                                                                                                                       Continuation of Physics 2B covering fluid mechanics,
                                                         Prerequisites: Mathematics 10A or 20A, prior or concur-
courses beyond the departmental requirement.                                                                           waves in elastic media, sound waves, temperature,
                                                         rent enrollment in Mathematics 10B or 20B, concurrent
                                                                                                                       heat and the first law of thermodynamics, kinetic the-
To help beginning students choose a research             enrollment in Physics 1AL laboratory. (F,W,S)
                                                                                                                       ory of gases, entropy and the second law of thermo-
area and a research supervisor, the department           1AL. Mechanics Laboratory (2)                                 dynamics, Maxwell’s equations, electromagnetic
offers a special seminar (Physics 261) that sur-         Physics laboratory course to accompany Physics 1A.            waves, geometric optics, interference and diffraction.
                                                         Experiments in mechanics. Prerequisite: concurrent            Prerequisites: Physics 2B, Mathematics 20C, and concur-
veys physics research at UCSD.                                                                                         rent enrollment in Mathematics 20D. (F,W,S)
                                                         enrollment in Physics 1A. (F,W,S)
                                                                                                                       2CL. Physics Laboratory–Electricity and Magnetism,
Course Credit by Examination                             1B. Electricity and Magnetism (3)
                                                                                                                       Waves, and Optics (2)
                                                         Second quarter of a three-quarter introductory
   Students have an option of obtaining credit           physics course geared toward life-science majors.             One hour lecture and three hours’ laboratory.
                                                         Electric fields, magnetic fields, DC and AC circuitry.        Experiments on refraction, interference/diffraction
for a physics graduate course by taking the final                                                                      using lasers and microwaves; lenses and the eye;
                                                         Prerequisites: Physics 1A, 1AL and prior or concurrent
examination without participating in any class           enrollment in Mathematics 10C-D or 20C. Concurrent            acoustics; oscilloscope and L-R-C circuits; oscillations,
exercises. They must, however, officially register       enrollment in Physics 1BL. (F,W,S)                            resonance and damping, measurement of magnetic
                                                                                                                       fields; and the mechanical equivalence of heat.
for the course and notify the instructor and the                                                                       Prerequisites: prior or concurrent enrollment in Physics
                                                         1BL. Electricity and Magnetism Laboratory (2)
Department of Physics graduate student affairs           Physics laboratory course to accompany Physics 1B.            1C, 2C, or 4D. (F,W,S) Course materials fee is required.
office of their intention no later than the first        Experiments in electricity and magnetism. Course
                                                         materials fee is required. Prerequisite: concurrent enroll-   2D. Physics–Relativity and Quantum Physics (4)
week of the course.                                      ment in Physics 1B. (F, W, S)                                 A modern physics course covering atomic view of
                                                                                                                       matter, electricity and radiation, atomic models of
                                                         1C. Waves, Optics, and Modern Physics (3)                     Rutherford and Bohr, relativity, X-rays, wave and parti-
                 COURSES                                 Third quarter of a three-quarter introductory physics         cle duality, matter waves, Schrπdinger’s equation,
                                                         course geared toward life-science majors. Behavior of         atomic view of solids, natural radioactivity. Prere-
                                                         systems under combined thermal and electric forces,           quisites: Physics 2B and Mathematics 20D. (F,W,S)
                                                         the interaction of light with matter as illustrated
2DL. Physics Laboratory–Modern Physics (2)                    gravity; orbits, weightlessness, and Kepler’s laws; the      90. Undergraduate Seminar–Physics Today (1)
One hour of lecture and three hours of laboratory.            Earth’s physical environment (including its atmos-           Undergraduate seminars organized around the
Experiments to be chosen from refraction, diffraction         phere, its magnetic field, and radiation from the sun);      research interests of various faculty members. Prere-
and interference of microwaves, Hall effect, thermal          and light as an electromagnetic wave. These topics           quisite: none. (F,W,S)
band gap, optical spectra, coherence of light, photo-         form the basis for an introduction to the space pro-
electric effect, e/m ratio of particles, radioactive          gram and discussion of the scientific reasons for per-       91. Undergraduate Seminar on Physics (1)
decays, and plasma physics. Prerequisites: 2BL or 2CL,        forming experiments or observations in space.                Undergraduate seminars organized around the
prior or concurrent enrollment in Physics 2D or 4E. (S)       Restricted to P/NP grading option if taken after             research interests of various faculty members. (F,W,S)
Course materials fee is required.                             Physics 1A, 2A, or 4A. (W)
                                                                                                                           99. Independent Study (2)
4A. Physics for Physics Majors–Mechanics (4)                  7. Introductory Astronomy (4)                                Independent reading or research on a topic by special
The first quarter of a five-quarter calculus-based            Introduction to astronomy and astrophysics. Topics           arrangement with a faculty member. (P/NP grading
physics sequence for physics majors and students              same as Physics 5. This course uses basic pre-calculus       only.) Prerequisites: lower-division standing. Completion
with a serious interest in physics. The topics covered        level mathematics (algebra, proportions, logs, similar       of thirty units at UCSD undergraduate study, a minimum
are vectors, particle kinematics and dynamics, work           triangles). Physics 5 or 7 and Earth Sciences 10 and 30      UCSD GPA of 3.0, and a completed and approved
and energy, conservation of energy, conservation of           form a three-quarter sequence. Students may not              “Special Studies” form. Department stamp required.
momentum, collisions, rotational kinematics and               receive credit for both Physics 5 and Physics 7.
dynamics, equilibrium of rigid bodies. Prerequisites:         Restricted to P/NP grading option if taken after                               UPPER-DIVISION
Mathematics 20A and concurrent enrollment in                  Physics 1A, 2A, or 4A. (W)
Mathematics 20B. (W)
                                                              8. Physics of Everyday Life (4)                              100A. Electromagnetism (4)
4B. Physics for Physics Majors–Mechanics, Fluids, Waves,      Examines phenomena and technology encountered                Coulomb’s law, electric fields, electrostatics; conduc-
and Heat (4)                                                  in daily life from a physics perspective. Topics include     tors and dielectrics; steady currents, elements of cir-
Continuation of Physics 4A covering oscillations, grav-       waves, musical instruments, telecommunication,               cuit theory. Four hours lecture. Prerequisites: Physics 2C
ity, fluid statics and dynamics, waves in elastic media,      sports, appliances, transportation, computers, and           or 4D, Mathematics 20D; 20E, 20F. (Concurrent enroll-
sound waves, heat and the first law of thermodynam-           energy sources. Physics concepts will be introduced          ment in Math. 20F permitted.) (F)
ics, kinetic theory of gases, second law of thermody-         and discussed as needed employing some algebra. No
namics, gaseous mixtures and chemical reactions.              prior physics knowledge is required. Restricted to           100B. Electromagnetism (4)
Prerequisites: Physics 4A, Mathematics 20B and concur-        P/NP grading option if taken after Physics 1A, 2A, or        Magnetic fields and magnetostatics, magnetic materi-
rent enrollment in Mathematics 20C. (S)                       4A. (S)                                                      als, induction, AC circuits, displacement currents;
                                                                                                                           development of Maxwell’s equations. Four hours lec-
4C. Physics for Physics Majors–Electricity and                9. The Solar System (4)                                      ture. Prerequisite: Physics 100A. (W)
Magnetism (4)                                                 A non-mathematical exploration of our Solar System
Continuation of Physics 4B covering charge and                and other planetary systems for non-science majors.          100C. Electromagnetism (4)
Coulomb’s law, electric field, Gauss’s law, electric          The sun, terrestrial and giant planets, satellites, aster-   Electromagnetic waves, radiation theory; application
potential, capacitors and dielectrics, current and            oids, comets and meteors. The formation of planetary         to optics; motion of charged particles in electromag-
resistance, magnetic field, Ampere’s law, Faraday’s law,      systems, space exploration, the development and              netic fields; relation of electromagnetism to relativistic
inductance, magnetic properties of matter, LRC cir-           search for life. (F)                                         concepts. Four hours lecture. Prerequisite: Physics 100B.
cuits, Maxwell’s equations. Prerequisites: Physics 4B,                                                                     (S)
Mathematics 20C and concurrent enrollment in                  10. Concepts in Physics (4)
Mathematics 20E. (F)                                          This is a one-quarter general physics course for non-        105A. Mathematical and Computational Physics (4)
                                                              science majors. Topics covered are motion, energy,           A combined analytic and mathematica-based numer-
4D. Physics for Physics Majors–Electromagnetic Waves,         heat, waves, electric current, radiation, light, atoms and   ical approach to the solution of common applied
Optics, and Special Relativity (4)                            molecules, nuclear fission and fusion. This course           mathematics problems in physics and engineering.
Continuation of Physics 4C covering electromagnetic           emphasizes concepts with minimal mathematical for-           Topics: Fourier series and integrals, special functions,
waves and the nature of light, cavities and wave              mulation. Prerequisite: college algebra or equivalent.       initial and boundary value problems, Green’s func-
guides, electromagnetic radiation, reflection and             Restricted to P/NP grading option if taken after             tions; heat, Laplace and wave equations. Prerequisites:
refraction with applications to geometrical optics,           Physics 1A, 2A, or 4A. (W)                                   Mathematics 20E and 20F and Physics 4E or 2D. (F)
interference, diffraction, holography, special relativity.
Prerequisites: Physics 4C, Mathematics 20D and concur-        11. Survey of Physics (4)                                    105B. Mathematical and Computational Physics (4)
rent enrollment in Mathematics 20F. (W)                       Survey of physics for non-science majors with strong         A continuation of Physics 105A covering selected
                                                              mathematical background, including calculus. Physics         advanced topics in applied mathematical and numer-
4E. Physics for Physics Majors–Quantum Physics (4)            11 describes the laws of motion, gravity, energy,            ical methods. Topics include statistics, diffusion and
Continuation of Physics 4D covering experimental              momentum, and relativity. A laboratory component             Monte-Carlo simulations; Laplace equation and
basis of quantum mechanics: Schrödinger equation              consists of two experiments with gravity and conser-         numerical methods for nonseparable geometries;
and simple applications; spin; structure of atoms and         vation principles. Prerequisites: Mathematics 10A or 20A     waves in inhomogeneous media,WKB analysis; nonlin-
molecules; selected topics from solid state, nuclear,         and concurrent enrollment in Math 10B or 20B. (F)            ear systems and chaos. Prerequisite: Physics 105A. (W)
and elementary particle physics. Prerequisites: Physics
4D, Mathematics 20E, and concurrent enrollment in             12. Energy and the Environment (4)                           107/207. Macromolecule Structure Determination by
Mathematics 20D. (S)                                          A course covering energy fundamentals, energy use in         X-ray Crystallography (4)
                                                              an industrial society and the impact of large-scale          This course will describe the different steps used in
5. The Universe (4)                                           energy consumption. It addresses topics on fossil fuel,      solving for a three-dimensional structure of a macro-
Introduction to astronomy. Topics include the earth’s         heat engines, solar energy, nuclear energy, energy           molecule using X-ray crystallography. Topics covered:
place in the universe; the atom and light; the birth, life,   conservation, transportation, air pollution and global       theory of X-ray diffraction by a crystal; X-ray sources &
and death of stars; the Milky Way galaxy; normal and          effects. Concepts and quantitative analysis. (S)             detectors; crystallization of a protein; crystal symme-
active galaxies; and cosmology. Physics 5 or 7, and                                                                        try; solution of phase problem by the isomorphous
Earth Sciences 10 and 30 form a three-quarter                 87. Freshman Seminar in Physics and Astrophysics (1)         replacement method; anomalous scattering; molecu-
sequence. Students may not receive credit for both            The Freshman Seminar Program is designed to pro-             lar replacement method; model building and phase
Physics 5 and Physics 7. Restricted to P/NP grading           vide new students with the opportunity to explore an         improvement; structure refinement. Prerequisites:
option if taken after Physics 1A, 2A, or 4A. (F,S)            intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small          Mathematics 20D and Physics 100A, or BIBC 100 or
                                                              seminar setting. Freshman seminars are offered in all        Chemistry 114A or consent of instructor. (F) (Not offered
6. Physics of Space Science and Exploration (4)               campus departments and undergraduate colleges,               in 2006-07.)
Descriptive introduction to basic physics concepts rel-       and topics vary from quarter to quarter. Enrollment is
evant to space science and exploration.Topics include         limited to fifteen to twenty students, with preference       110A. Mechanics (4)
                                                              given to entering freshmen.                                  Phase flows, bifurcations, linear oscillations, calculus
                                                                                                                           of variations, Lagrangian dynamics, conservation
laws, central forces, systems of particles, collisions, cou-   gen spectrum, identical particles. Four hours lecture.         trolled fusion.Three hours lecture. Prerequisites: Math.
pled oscillations. Four-hour lecture. Prerequisites:           Prerequisite: Physics 130A. (F)                                20D or consent of instructor. Physics 100 (B,C) or ECE
Physics 2C or 4D, Mathematics 20D, 20E, 20F (concurrent                                                                       107 and Physics 110A are suggested. Cross listed with
enrollment in Mathematics 20F permitted). (F)                  130C. Quantum Physics (4)                                      MAE 117A. (S)
                                                               Scattering theory, symmetry and conservation laws,
110B. Mechanics (4)                                            systems of interacting particles, interaction of electro-      152A. Condensed Matter Physics (4)
Noninertial reference systems, dynamics of rigid bod-          magnetic radiation with matter, Fermi golden rule, the         Physics of the solid state. Binding mechanisms, crystal
ies, Hamilton's equations, Liouville's theorem, chaos,         relativistic electron. Prerequisites: Physics 100C or equiv-   structures and symmetries, diffraction, reciprocal
continuum mechanics, special relativity. Prerequisites:        alent, 130B. (W)                                               space, phonons, free and nearly free electron models,
Physics 110A and Mathematics 20E. (W)                                                                                         energy bands, solid state thermodynamics, kinetic the-
                                                               133/219. Condensed Matter/Materials Science                    ory and transport, semiconductors. Prerequisites:
SIO 111/Phys. 111 Introduction to Ocean Waves and              Laboratory (4)                                                 Physics 130A or Chemistry 133, and Physics 140A. (W)
Tides (4)                                                      A project-oriented laboratory course utilizing state-of-
This course will cover a broad range of physical               the-art experimental techniques in materials science.          152B. Electronic Materials (4)
oceanography topics, including linear dynamics of              The course prepares students for research in a modern          Physics of electronic materials. Semiconductors:
surface gravity waves, dispersion relations, spectral          condensed matter-materials science laboratory.                 bands, donors and acceptors, devices. Metals: Fermi
descriptions, group velocity, shoaling waves, ray the-         Under supervision, the students develop their own              surface, screening, optical properties. Insulators: dia-
ory, edge waves, Coriolis force, the tide-generating           experimental ideas after investigating current                 /ferro-electrics, displacive transitions. Magnets: dia-
force, LaPlace's tide equations, Kelvin waves.                 research literature.With the use of sophisticated state-       /para-/ferro-/antiferro-magnetism, phase transitions,
Prerequisites: Math. 20A-E and Physics 2A-C or equiva-         of- the-art instrumentation students conduct                   low temperature properties. Superconductors: pairing,
lent. (W)                                                      research, write a research paper, and make verbal pre-         Meissner effect, flux quantization, BCS theory.
                                                               sentations. Prerequisites: Physics 2CL and 2DL for under-      Prerequisite: Physics 152A or consent of instructor. (S)
120A-B. Physical Measurements (4-4)
                                                               graduates; Physics 152A or Physics 211A for graduate
A laboratory-lecture course in physical measurements           students. (S) Course materials fee is required.                154. Nuclear and Particle Physics (4)
with an emphasis on electronic methods. Topics                                                                                The strong, electromagnetic and weak interactions of
include circuit theory, special circuits. Fourier analysis,    137. String Theory (4)                                         elementary particles at high energies. Symmetries and
noise, transmission lines, transistor theory, amplifiers,      Quantum mechanics and gravity. Electromagnetism                conservation laws. Introduction to the calculation of
feedback, operational amplifiers, oscillators, pulse cir-      from gravity and extra dimensions. Unification of              particle decay widths and scattering cross-sections
cuits, digital electronics. Three hours lecture, four          forces. Quantum black holes. Properties of strings and         using Feynman diagrams. Relativistic equations of
hours laboratory. Prerequisites: Physics 2CL and 2DL,          branes. Prerequisites: Physics 100A and 110A or consent        motion, including the Dirac equation. Prerequisites:
Physics 100A. (S,F) Course materials fee is required.          of instructor, Physics 130A may be taken concurrently. (S)     Physics 130B.
121. Experimental Techniques (4)                               140A. Statistical and Thermal Physics (4)
                                                                                                                              155. Nonlinear Dynamics (4)
A laboratory-lecture course on the performance of sci-         Integrated treatment of thermodynamics and statisti-
                                                                                                                              Qualitative aspects of Hamiltonian and dissipative
entific experiments with an emphasis on the use of             cal mechanics; statistical treatment of entropy, review
                                                                                                                              dynamical systems: stability of orbits, integrability of
microcomputers for control and data handling. Topics           of elementary probability theory, canonical distribu-
                                                               tion, partition function, free energy, phase equilibrium,      Hamiltonian systems, chaos and nonperiodic motion,
include microcomputer-architecture, interfacing, and                                                                          transition to chaos. Examples to be drawn from
programming, digital to analog and analog to digital           introduction to ideal quantum gases. Prerequisites:
                                                               Physics 130A, or consent of instructor. (F)                    mechanics, fluid mechanics, and related physical sys-
conversion, asynchronous buses, interrupt and control                                                                         tems. Numerical work and graphical display and inter-
techniques, transducers, actuators, digital signal pro-        140B. Statistical and Thermal Physics (4)                      pretation will be emphasized. Three hours lecture.
cessing–signal filtering, deconvolution, averaging and         Applications of the theory of ideal quantum gases              Prerequisites: Physics 100B and 110B. (S)
detection, construction techniques–soldering, parts            in condensed matter physics, nuclear physics and
selection, assembly methods, project management–               astrophysics; advanced thermodynamics, the third               160. Stellar Astrophysics (4)
planning, funding, scheduling, and utilization of per-         law, chemical equilibrium, low temperature physics;            Introduction to stellar astrophysics: observational
sonnel. Three hours lecture, four hours laboratory.            kinetic theory and transport in non-equilibrium sys-           properties of stars, solar physics, radiation and energy
Prerequisite: Physics 120A or equivalent. (W) Course           tems; introduction to critical phenomena including             transport in stars, stellar spectroscopy, nuclear
materials fee is required.                                     mean field theory. Prerequisites: Physics 140A, or con-        processes in stars, stellar structure and evolution,
                                                               sent of instructor. (W)                                        degenerate matter and compact stellar objects, super-
129/229. Applied Quantum Mechanics (4)                                                                                        novae and nucleosynthesis. Physics 160, 161, and 162
Fundamental Quantum Theory: Schrödinger equation               141.Computational Physics I: Probabilistic Models and          may be taken as a three-quarter sequence for students
and probabilistic interpretation, illustrated by electron      Simulations (4)                                                interested in pursuing graduate study in astrophysics
in quantum box. Rectilinear particle motion: bound             Project-based computational physics laboratory                 or individually as topics of interest. Prerequisite: Physics
states, bonding, scattering and tunneling, device              course with student’s choice of Fortran90/95, or               2 or 4 sequence or equivalent. (F)
dynamics. Harmonic oscillators: phonons and photons            C/C++. Applications from materials science to the
                                                               structure of the early universe are chosen from molec-         161. Black Holes and The Milky Way Galaxy (4)
in cavity. Perturbation theory. Angular momentum and
                                                               ular dynamics, classical and quantum Monte Carlo               The structure and content of the Milky Way galaxy and
spin: particle statistics. Graduate students will have                                                                        the physics of black holes.Topics will be selected from:
longer homework assignments and an additional take-            methods, physical Langevin/Fokker-Planck processes,
                                                               and other modern topics. Prerequisite: upper-division          general relativity, theory and observation of black
home exam. Prerequisites: (Math. 20D and 20F) or (Math.                                                                       holes, galactic x-ray sources, galactic structure, physi-
102 and 110) or MAE 105 or Phys. 105A. (W)                     standing or consent of instructor. (W)
                                                                                                                              cal processes in the interstellar medium, star forma-
                                                               142. Computational Physics II: PDE and Matrix                  tion. Physics 160, 161, and 162 may be taken as a
130A. Quantum Physics (4)                                                                                                     three-quarter sequence for students interested in pur-
                                                               Models (4)
Phenomena which led to the development of quantum              Project-based computational physics laboratory                 suing graduate study in astrophysics or individually as
mechanics.Wave mechanics; the Schrödinger equation,            course for modern physics and engineering problems             topics of interest. Prerequisites: Physics 2 or 4 sequence
interpretation of the wave function, the uncertainty           with student’s choice of Fortran90/95, or C/C++.               or equivalent. (W)
principle, piece-wise constant potentials, simple har-         Applications of finite element PDE models are chosen
monic oscillator, central field and the hydrogen atom.         from quantum mechanics and nanodevices, fluid                  162. Galaxies and Cosmology (4)
Observables and measurements. Four hours lecture.              dynamics, electromagnetism, materials physics, and             The structure and properties of galaxies, galaxy
Prerequisites: Physics 2C or 2D, 4E, or equivalent. (S)        other modern topics. Prerequisite: upper-division stand-       dynamics and dark matter, the expanding universe,
                                                               ing or consent of instructor. (S)                              plus some of the following topics: the big bang, early
130B. Quantum Physics (4)                                                                                                     universe, galaxy formation and evolution, large scale
Matrix mechanics, angular momentum and spin,                   151. Elementary Plasma Physics (4)                             structure, active galaxies and quasars. Physics 160, 161,
Stern-Gerlach experiments, dynamics of two-state sys-          Particle motions, plasmas as fluids, waves, diffusion,         and 162 may be taken as a three-quarter sequence for
tems, approximation methods, the complete hydro-               equilibrium and stability, nonlinear effects, con-             students interested in pursuing graduate study in
astrophysics or individually as topics of interest.               visor. Prerequisite: Completion of 90 units with 2.5 GPA    Mathematics 20D, Physics 100A, or BIBC 100 or Chemistry
Prerequisites: Physics 2 or 4 sequence or equivalent. (S)         and consent of faculty adviser.                             114A or consent of instructor. (F) (Not offered in 2006-
                                                                                                                              07.)
163. Exploring the Solar System (4)                               198. Directed Group Study (2 or 4)
Topics will include: the early solar system, and plane-           Directed group study on a topic or in a field not           210A. Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics (4)
tary formation; an introduction to the Sun and planets;           included in the regular departmental curriculum.            Approach to equilibrium: BBGKY hierarchy; Boltzmann
the solar wind and its interaction with planets; space-           (P/NP grades only.) Prerequisites: consent of instructor    equation; H-theorem. Ensemble theory; thermody-
craft instruments and observations; the search for life           and departmental chair. (F,W,S)                             namic potentials. Quantum statistics; Bose condensa-
in the solar system; and the search for planets outside                                                                       tion. Interacting systems: Cluster expansion; phase
our solar system. Prerequisites: Physics 2A-B or Physics          199. Research for Undergraduates (2 or 4)                   transition via mean-field theory; the Ginzburg crite-
4A-4C. (F)                                                        Independent reading or research on a problem by             rion. Prerequisites: Physics 140A-B, 152A, 200A-B, or
                                                                  special arrangement with a faculty member. (P/NP            equivalent; concurrent enrollment in Physics 212C. (S)
171/271. Biophysics of Neurons and Networks (4-4)                 grades only.) Prerequisites: consent of instructor and
Fundamental limits to measurements on nervous sys-                departmental chair. (F,W,S)                                 210B. Nonequilibrium Statistical Mechanics (4)
tems, the biophysics of excitable membranes and neu-                                                                          Transport phenomena; kinetic theory and the
rons, and the fundamentals of recurrent neuronal                  199H. Honors Thesis Research for Undergraduates (2-4)       Chapman-Enskog method; hydrodynamic theory;
networks. The emphasis is on information processing               Honors thesis research for seniors participating in the     nonlinear effects and the mode coupling method.
by the nervous system through physical reasoning                  Honors Program. Research is conducted under the             Stochastic processes; Langevin and Focker-Planck
and mathematical anaylsis. Three hours lecture. The               supervision of a physics faculty member. Prerequisite:      equation; fluctuation-dissipation relation; multiplica-
graduate version, Physics 271, will include a report at           admission to the Honors Program in physics. (F,W,S)         tive processes; dynamic field theory; Martin-Siggia-
the level of a research proposal. Prerequisites: Physics                                                                      Rose formalism; dynamical scaling theory. Prerequisite:
100A and 110A, BILD 1, Chemistry 6C and Physics 140A,                                                                         Physics 210A. (F)
for graduate students, consent of instructor. The gradu-                               GRADUATE
ate version, Physics 271, will include a report at the                                                                        210C. Statistical Field Theory (4)
level of a research proposal. (F)                                 200A. Theoretical Mechanics (4)                             Phase transition and critical phenomena: Landau-
                                                                  Lagrange’s equations and Hamilton’s principle; sym-         Ginzburg model and statistical field theory; Goldstone
172/272. Biophysics of Molecules (4-4)                            metry and constants of the motion. Applications to:         modes; breakdown of mean-field theory. Universality;
Physical concepts and techniques used to study the                charged particle motion; central forces and scattering      scaling theory; the renormalization group. Epsilon
structure and function of biological molecules, the               theory; small oscillations; anharmonic oscillations;        expansion; large-N expansion; the nonlinear-sigma
thermodynamics and kinetics of biological activity, and           rigid body motion; continuum mechanics. Prerequisite:       model. Topological defects; duality; the Kosterlitz-
physical descriptions of biological processes. Examples           Physics 110B or equivalent. (F)                             Thouless transition. Prerequisite: Physics 210A or con-
from enzyme action, protein folding, photobiology, and                                                                        sent of instructor. (W)
molecular motors. Three hours lecture. Prerequisites:             200B. Theoretical Mechanics (4)
                                                                  Hamilton’s equations, canonical transformations;            211A. Solid-State Physics (5)
Physics 100A and 110A, BILD 1, Chemistry 6C and Physics
                                                                  Hamilton-Jacobi theory; action-angle variables and          The first of a two-quarter course in solid-state physics.
130A; and graduate students, consent of instructor. The
                                                                  adiabatic invariants; introduction to canonical pertur-     Covers a range of solid-state phenomena that can
graduate version, Physics 272, will include a report at
                                                                  bation theory, nonintegrable systems and chaos;
the level of a research proposal. (W)                                                                                         be understood within an independent particle
                                                                  Liouville equation; ergodicity and mixing; entropy; sta-
                                                                                                                              description. Topics include: chemical versus band-the-
                                                                  tistical ensembles. Prerequisite: Physics 200A. (W)
173. Modern Physics Laboratory: Biological and                                                                                oretical description of solids, electronic band structure
Quantum Physics (4)                                               201. Mathematical Physics (5)                               calculation, lattice dynamics, transport phenomena
A selection of experiments in contemporary physics                An introduction to mathematical methods used in             and electrodynamics in metals, optical properties,
and biophysics. Students select among pulsed NMR,                 theoretical physics.Topics include: a review of complex     semiconductor physics. Prerequisite: Physics 152A or
Mossbauer, Zeeman effect, light scattering, hologra-              variable theory, applications of the Cauchy residue         equivalent. (F)
phy, optical trapping, voltage clamp and genetic tran-            theorem, asymptotic series, method of steepest
scription of ion channels in oocytes, flourescent                 descent, Fourier and Laplace transforms, series solu-       211B. Solid-State Physics (4)
imaging, and flight control in flies. Prerequisites: Physics      tions for ODE’s and related special functions, Sturm        Continuation of 211A. Deals with collective effects in
120A, BILD 1 and Chemistry 6BL. (S)                               Liouville theory, variational principles, boundary value    solids arising from interactions between constituents.
                                                                  problems, and Green’s function techniques. (F)              Topics include electron-electron and electron-phonon
180/280. Teaching and Learning Physics (4)                                                                                    interactions, screening, band structure effects, Landau
How people learn and understand key concepts in                   203A. Advanced Classical Electrodynamics (5)                Fermi liquid theory. Magnetism in metals and insula-
physics. Readings in physics, physics education                   Electrostatics, symmetries of Laplace’s equation and        tors, superconductivity; occurrence, phenomenology,
research, and cognitive science. Field work teaching              methods for solution, boundary value problems, elec-        and microscopic theory. Prerequisites: Physics 210A,
and evaluating pre-college and college students.                  trostatics in macroscopic media, magnetostatics,            211A. (offered in alternate years) (W)
Useful for students interested in teaching and learning           Maxwell’s equations, Green functions for Maxwell’s
physical sciences. Prerequisites: Physics 1, 2, or 4 series, or   equations, plane wave solutions, plane waves in             212A. Quantum Mechanics (4)
consent of instructor.                                            macroscopic media. Prerequisite: Physics 100C or equiv-     Hilbert space formulation of quantum mechanics and
                                                                  alent. (W)                                                  application to simple systems: states and observables,
191. Undergraduate Seminar on Physics (1)                                                                                     uncertainty relations and measurements, time evolu-
Undergraduate seminars organized around the                       203B. Advanced Classical Electrodynamics (4)                tion, and mixed states and density matrix. Symmetries:
research interests of various faculty members. Prere-             Special theory of relativity, covariant formulation of      commuting observables and symmetries, rotation
quisite: Physics 2A or 4A series.                                 electrodynamics, radiation from current distributions       group representations, Clebsh-Gordon coefficients,
                                                                  and accelerated charges, multipole radiation fields,        Wigner-Eckhardt theorem, and discrete symmetries
195. Physics Instruction (2-4)                                    waveguides and resonant cavities. Prerequisite: Physics     (parity, time reversal, etc.). Prerequisite: Physics 130B or
Students will be responsible for and teach a class sec-           203A. (S)                                                   equivalent. (F)
tion of a lower-division physics course. They will also
attend a weekly meeting on teaching methods and                   107/207. Macromolecule Structure Determination by           212B. Quantum Mechanics (4)
materials conducted by the professor who supervises               X-ray Crystallography (4)                                   Time independent perturbation theory: non-degener-
their teaching. (P/NP grades only.) Prerequisite: consent         This course will describe the different steps used in       ate and degenerate cases, Zeeman effect, fine struc-
of instructor. (F,W,S)                                            solving for a three-dimensional structure of a macro-       ture, exclusion principle, and many-electron atoms.
                                                                  molecule using X-ray crystallography. Topics covered:       Time dependent perturbation theory: interaction pic-
197. Physics Internship (4)                                       theory of X-ray diffraction by a crystal; X-ray sources &   ture and Dyson series, transition rates. Radiation the-
An enrichment program which provides work experi-                 detectors; crystallization of a protein; crystal symn-      ory: quantization of EM field, calculation of atomic
ence with industry, government offices, etc., under the           metry; solution of phase problem by the isomorphous         level transition rates, line width, and spontaneous
supervision of a faculty member and industrial super-             replacement method; anomalous scattering; molecu-           decay. Prerequisite: Physics 212A. (W)
                                                                  lar replacement method; model building and phase
                                                                  improvement; structure refinement. Prerequisites:
212C. Quantum Mechanics (4)                                    interactions relevant to inertial fusion. Prerequisite:      225A-B. General Relativity (4-4)
Scattering theory: Lippman-Schwinger formalism,                Physics 218B. (S)                                            This is a two-quarter course on gravitation and the
Born approximation, partial waves, inelastic processes,                                                                     general theory of relativity. The first quarter is
and spin dependence. Path integrals: introductions             133/219. Condensed Matter/Materials Science                  intended to be offered every year and may be taken
and simple examples, rigid rotator, and Bohm-                  Laboratory (4)                                               independently of the second quarter. The second
Aharonov effect. Dirac equation: single particle equa-         A project-oriented laboratory course utilizing state-of-     quarter will be offered in alternate years. Topics cov-
tion, hydrogen atom, and holes. Prerequisites: Physics         the-art experimental techniques in materials science.        ered in the first quarter include special relativity, dif-
212A-B. (S)                                                    The course prepares students for research in a modern        ferential geometry, the equivalence principle, the
                                                               condensed matter-materials science laboratory.               Einstein field equations, and experimental and obser-
214. Physics of Elementary Particles (4)                       Under supervision, the students develop their own            vational tests of gravitation theories.The second quar-
Classification of particles using symmetries and invari-       experimental ideas after investigating current               ter will focus on more advanced topics, including
ance principles, quarks and leptons, quantum electro-          research literature.With the use of sophisticated state-     gravitational collapse, Schwarzschild and Kerr geome-
dynamics, weak interactions, e p interactions, deep-
                                   +   -
                                                               of-the-art instrumentation students conduct research,        tries, black holes, gravitational radiation, cosmology,
inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, pp collisions, intro-     write a research paper, and make verbal presentations.       and quantum gravitation. (225B offered in alternate
duction to QCD. Prerequisite: Physics 215A. (W)                Prerequisites: Physics 2CL and 2DL for undergraduates;       years) (F,W)
                                                               Physics 152A or Physics 211A for graduate students. (S)
215A. Particles and Fields (4)                                                                                              226. Galaxies and Galactic Dynamics (4)
The first quarter of a three-quarter course on field the-      220. Group Theoretical Methods in Physics (4)                The structure and dynamics of galaxies. Topics include
ory and elementary particle physics. Topics covered            Study of group theoretical methods with applications         potential theory, the theory of stellar orbits, self-con-
include the relation between symmetries and conser-            to problems in high energy, atomic, and condensed            sistent equilibria of stellar systems, stability and
vation laws, the calculation of cross sections and reac-       matter physics. Representation theory, tensor meth-          dynamics of stellar systems including relaxation and
tion rates, covariant perturbation theory, and quantum         ods, Clebsh-Gordan series.Young tableaux. The course         approach to equilibrium. Collisions between galaxies,
electrodynamics. (F)                                           will cover discrete groups, Lie groups and Lie algebras,     galactic evolution, dark matter, and galaxy formation.
                                                               with emphasis on permutation, orthogonal, and uni-           Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (offered in alternate
215B. Particles and Fields (4)                                 tary groups. Prerequisite: Physics 212C. (S)                 years)
Continuation of 215A. Gauge theory quantization by
means of path integrals, SU(3) symmetry and the                221A. Nonlinear and Nonequilibrium Dynamics of               227. Cosmology (4)
quark model, spontaneous symmetry breakdown,                   Physical Systems (4)                                         An advanced survey of topics in physical cosmology.
introduction to QCD and the Glashow-Weinberg-                  An introduction to the modern theory of dynamical            The Friedmann models and the large-scale structure
Salam model of weak interactions, basic issues of              systems and applications thereof.Topics include maps         of the universe, including the observational determi-
renormalization. Prerequisite: Physics 215A. (W)               and flows, bifurcation theory and normal form analy-         nation of Ho (the Hubble constant) and qo (the decel-
                                                               sis, chaotic attractors in dissipative systems,              eration parameter). Galaxy number counts. A
215C. Particles and Fields (4)                                 Hamiltonian dynamics and the KAM theorem, and                systematic exposition of the physics of the early uni-
Modern applications of the renormalization group in            time series analysis. Examples from real physical sys-       verse, including vacuum phase transitions; inflation;
quantum chromodynamics and the weak interactions.              tems will be stressed throughout. Prerequisite: Physics      the generation of net baryon number, fluctuations,
Unified gauge theories, particle cosmology, and spe-           200B. (offered in alternate years) (W)                       topological defects and textures. Primordial nucle-
cial topics in particle theory. Prerequisites: Physics 215A-                                                                osynthesis, both standard and nonstandard models.
B. (offered in alternate years) (S)                            221B. Nonlinear and Nonequilibrium Dynamics of               Growth and decay of adiabatic and isocurvature den-
                                                               Physical Systems (4)                                         sity fluctuations. Discussion of dark matter candidates
217. Field Theory and the Renormalization Group (4)            Nonlinear dynamics in spatially extended systems.            and constraints from observation and experiment.
Application of field theory techniques and the renor-          Material to be covered includes fluid mechanical             Nucleocosmo-chronology and the determination of
malization group method to problems in condensed               instabilities, the amplitude equation approach to pat-       the age of the universe. Prerequisite: consent of instruc-
matter or particle physics. Topics will vary and may           tern formation, reaction-diffusion dynamics, inte-           tor. (offered in alternate years)
include: spin-glass and other systems dominated by             grable systems and solitons, and an introduction to
quenched disorders; polymer statistics and liquid crys-        coherent structures and spatio-temporal chaos.               228. High-Energy Astrophysics and Compact Objects (4)
tals; bosonization and many-body quantum systems in            Prerequisites: Physics 210B and 221A. (offered in alter-     The physics of compact objects, including the equa-
1+1 dimensions; quantum chromodynamics and the                 nate years) (S)                                              tion of state of dense matter and stellar stability the-
electroweak model. Prerequisites: Physics 210C, 212C, or                                                                    ory. Maximum mass of neutron stars, white dwarfs, and
                                                               223. Stellar Structure and Evolution (4)                     super-massive objects. Black holes and accretion disks.
consent of instructor. (offered in alternate years) (S)
                                                               Energy generation, flow, hydrostatic equilibrium,            Compact x-ray sources and transient phenomena,
218A. Plasma Physics (4)                                       equation of state. Dependence of stellar parameters          including x-ray and γ-ray bursts. The fundamental
The basic physics of plasmas is discussed for the simple       (central surface temperature, radius, luminosity, etc.)      physics of electromagnetic radiation mechanisms:
case of an unmagnetized plasma. Topics include: ther-          on stellar mass and relation to physical constants.          synchrotron radiation, Compton scattering, thermal
mal equilibrium statistical properties, fluid and Landau       Relationship of these parameters to the H-R diagram          and nonthermal bremsstrahlung, pair production, pul-
theory of electron and ion plasma waves, velocity              and stellar evolution. Stellar interiors, opacity sources,   sars. particle acceleration models, neutrino production
space instabilities, quasi-linear theory, fluctuations,        radiative and convective energy flow. Nuclear reac-          and energy loss mechanisms, supernovae, and neu-
scattering or radiation, Fokker-Planck equation. (F)           tions, neutrino processes. Polytropic models. White          tron star production. Prerequisites: Physics 130A-B-C or
                                                               dwarfs and neutron stars. Prerequisites: Physics 130C or     equivalent. (offered in alternate years)
218B. Plasma Physics (4)                                       equivalent, Physics 140A-B or equivalent. (S/U grades
This course deals with magnetized plasma. Topics               permitted.) (offered in alternate years) (F)                 129/229. Applied Quantum Mechanics (4)
include: Appleton-Hartree theory of waves in cold                                                                           Fundamental Quantum Theory: Schrödinger equation
plasma, waves in warm plasma (Bernstein waves,                 224. Physics of the Interstellar Medium (4)                  and probabilistic interpretation, illustrated by electron
cyclotron damping). MHD equations, MHD waves, low              Gaseous nebulae, molecular clouds, ionized regions,          in quantum box. Rectilinear particle motion: bound
frequency modes, and the adiabatic theory of particle          and dust. Low energy processes in neutral and ionized        states, bonding, scattering and tunneling, device
orbits. Prerequisite: Physics 218A. (W)                        gases. Interaction of matter with radiation, emission        dynamics. Harmonic oscillators: phonons and photons
                                                               and absorption processes, formation of atomic lines.         in cavity. Perturbation theory. Angular momentum and
218C. Plasma Physics (4)                                       Energy balance, steady state temperatures, and the           spin: particle statistics. Graduate students will have
This course deals with the physics of confined plasmas         physics and properties of dust. Masers and molecular         longer homework assignments and an additional take-
with particular relevance to controlled fusion. Topics         line emission. Dynamics and shocks in the interstellar       home final. Prerequisites: (Math. 20D and 20F) or (Math.
include: topology of magnetic fields, confined plasma          medium. Prerequisites: Physics 130A-B or equivalent,
                                                                                                                            102 and 110) or MAE 105 or Phys. 105A. (W)
equilibria, energy principles, ballooning and kink             Physics 140A-B or equivalent. (S/U grades permitted.)
instabilities, resistive MHD modes (tearing, rippling          (offered in alternate years)                                 230. Advanced Solid-State Physics (1-4)
and pressure-driven), gyrokinetic theory, microinsta-                                                                       Selection of advanced topics in solid-state physics;
bilities and anomalous transport, and laser-plasma                                                                          material covered may vary from year to year. Examples
of topics covered: disordered systems, surface physics,      252. Plasma Physics Seminar (0–1)                           Useful for students interested in teaching and learning
strong-coupling superconductivity, quantum Hall              Discussions of recent research in plasma physics. (S/U      physical sciences. Undergraduate students are
effect, low-dimensional solids, heavy fermion systems,       grades only.) (F,W,S)                                       required to read and discuss papers in class. Graduate
high-temperature superconductivity, solid and liquid                                                                     students are expected to read the papers and prepare
helium. (Offered in alternate years.) Prerequisite:          253. Astrophysics and Space Physics Seminar (0–1)           an annotated bibliography on the background litera-
Physics 211B.                                                Discussions of recent research in astrophysics and          ture, then lead the in-class discussion on the topics
                                                             space physics. (S/U grades only.) (F,W,S)                   covered in the papers. Prerequisites: Physics 1, 2, or 4
152B/232. Electronic Materials (4)                                                                                       series, or consent of instructor.
Physics of electronic materials. Semiconductors:             257. High-Energy Physics Special Topics Seminar (0–1)
bands, donors and acceptors, devices. Metals: Fermi          Discussions of current research in high-energy              295. M.S. Thesis Research in Materials Physics (1–12)
surface, screening, optical properties. Insulators: dia-     physics. (S/U grades only.) (F,W,S)                         Directed research on M.S. dissertation topic. (F,W,S)
/ferro-electrics, displacive transitions. Magnets: dia-
/para-/ferro-/antiferro-magnetism, phase transitions,        258. Astrophysics and Space Physics Special Topics          297. Special Studies in Physics (1–4)
low temperature properties. Superconductors: pairing,        Seminar (0–1)                                               Studies of special topics in physics under the direction
Meissner effect, flux quantization, BCS theory.              Discussions of current research in astrophysics and         of a faculty member. Prerequisites: consent of instructor
Prerequisites: Physics 152A, Phys 211 or consent of          space physics. (S/U grades only.) (F,W,S)                   and departmental vice chair, education.(S/U grades per-
instructor. Graduate students in Phys 232 will com-                                                                      mitted.) (F,W,S)
plete a special topics paper. (S)                            260. Physics Colloquium (0–1)
                                                             Discussions of recent research in physics directed to       298. Directed Study in Physics (1-12)
235. Nonlinear Plasma Theory (4)                             the entire physics community. (S/U grades only.)            Research studies under the direction of a faculty mem-
This course deals with nonlinear phenomena in plas-          (F,W,S)                                                     ber. (S/U grades permitted.) (F,W,S)
mas. Topics include: orbit perturbation theory, sto-
chasticity, Arnold diffusion, nonlinear wave-particle        261. Seminar on Physics Research at UCSD (0–1)              299. Thesis Research in Physics (1-12)
and wave-wave interaction, resonance broadening,             Discussions of current research conducted by faculty        Directed research on dissertation topic. (F,W,S)
basics of fluid and plasma turbulence, closure meth-         members in the Department of Physics. (S/U grades
                                                             only.) (W,S)                                                500. Instruction in Physics Teaching (1-4)
ods, models of coherent structures. Prerequisite: Physics                                                                This course, designed for graduate students, includes
218C or consent of instructor.(offered in alternate years)                                                               discussion of teaching, techniques and materials nec-
                                                             262. Complex Dynamical Systems Seminar (0–1)
(W)                                                                                                                      essary to teach physics courses. One meeting per week
                                                             Discussions of recent research in nonlinear and non-
                                                             equilibrium physics. (S/U grades only.) (F,W,S)             with course instructors, one meeting per week in
239. Special Topics (1–3)
                                                                                                                         an assigned recitation section, problem session, or
From time to time a member of the regular faculty or a
                                                             265. Neuronal Networks Topics Seminar (1)                   laboratory section. Students are required to take a
resident visitor will find it possible to give a self-
                                                             Discussion of current research on neuronal systems          total of two units of Physics 500. (F,W,S)
contained short course on an advanced topic in his or
                                                             and dynamics. (F,W,S)
her special area of research.This course is not offered on
a regular basis, but it is estimated that it will be given   266. Recent Topics in Condensed Matter Physics (1–3)
once each academic year. (S/U grades permitted.)             The course is dedicated to recent developments in
                                                             the area of condensed matter physics through lec-
141/241. Computational Physics I: Probabilistic Models       tures given by graduate students and postdocs. The
and Simulations (4-4)                                        course teaches practical skills, delivering research lec-
Project-based computational physics laboratory               tures, and answering questions in front of a research
course with student's choice of Fortran90/95 or              audience. Prerequisite: physics graduate students in
C/C++. Applications from materials science to the            good standing. (F,W,S)
structure of the early universe are chosen from molec-
ular dynamics, classical and quantum Monte Carlo             171/271. Biophysics of Neurons and Networks (4–4)
methods, physical Langevin/Fokker-Planck processes,          Fundamental limits to measurements on nervous sys-
and other modern topics. Graduate students will do           tems, the biophysics of excitable membranes and
advanced projects. Prerequisites: upper-division stand-      neurons, and the fundamentals of recurrent neuronal
ing or consent of instructor; graduate standing for 241.     networks. The emphasis is on information processing
(W)                                                          by the nervous system through physical reasoning
                                                             and mathematical anaylsis. Three hours lecture. The
142/242. Computational Physics II: PDE and Matrix            graduate version, Physics 271, will include a report at
Models (4-4)                                                 the level of a research proposal. Prerequisites: Physics
Project-based computational physics laboratory               100A and 110A, BILD 1, Chemistry 6C and Physics 140A,
course for modern physics and engineering problems           for graduate students, consent of instructor. The gradu-
with student's choice of Fortran90/95 or C/C++.              ate version, Physics 271, will include a report at the
Applications of finite element PDE models are chosen         level of a research proposal. (W)
from quantum mechanics and nanodevices, fluid
dynamics, electromagnetism, materials physics, and           172/272. Biophysics of Molecules (4–4)
other modern topics. Graduate students will do               Physical concepts and techniques used to study the
advanced projects. Prerequisites: upper-division stand-      structure and function of biological molecules, the
ing; graduate standing for 242. (S)                          thermodynamics and kinetics of biological activity,
                                                             and physical descriptions of biological processes.
250. Condensed Matter Physics Seminar (0–1)                  Examples from enzyme action, protein folding, photo-
Discussion of current research in physics of the solid       biology, and molecular motors. Three hours lecture.
state and of other condensed matter. (S/U grades             Prerequisites: Physics 100A and 110A, BILD 1, Chemistry
only.) (F,W,S)                                               6C and Physics 130A and graduate students consent of
                                                             instructor. The graduate version, Physics 272, will
251. High-Energy Physics Seminar (0–1)                       include a report at the level of a research proposal. (S)
Discussions of current research in nuclear physics,
principally in the field of elementary particles. (S/U       180/280. Teaching and Learning Physics (4)
grades only.) (F,W,S)                                        How people learn and understand key concepts in
                                                             physics. Readings in physics, physics education
                                                             research, and cognitive science. Field work teaching
                                                             and evaluating pre-college and college students.

				
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