Extremophile Collection and Identification - the Colorado Space by pptfiles

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									Extremophile Collection and
      Identification
   Trinidad State Junior College
         Balloon Satellite
               Extremophile
• Primitive prokaryotes –variety of archaea and
  bacteria
• Survive harsh environments
• Withstand high levels of acidity and alkalinity;
  extreme temperature and pressure
• ISRO-sponsored balloon flight-claimed new
  discovery( Janibacter hoylei, Bacillus
  isronensis, and Bacillus aryabhata
               The Objective
• Build satellite to launch at high altitude
  (25,000-30,000 m)
• Meet weight requirement (1.5 kg)
• Cost no more than 1,000$
• Instruments in spacecraft-functional and
  intact for the ascent and descent
• Collect an extremophile and Identify
                   Payload
• Equipped with data acquisition (2 Hobos) that
  measure temp. on both the heated and
  unheated sides of payload and pressure
• Two 9 volt batteries-power to heater and
  hobos
• 80m plastic nylon tube (internally coated with
  agar)
                   Design
• Based on Pieter Tan’s Aircore
• Balloon Satellite-80m plastic nylon tubing
  (963.36gm)
• Base and Top cover (99.08gm)
• Flight tube (17.9gm)
• Three 9volt batteries (128.31gm)
• Electonic wires (82.5gm)
• Two hobo datalogger devices(132.16gm)
• Aluminum wrap (77.28gm) Total =1500.68gm
    Balloon Satellite Vs Petier Tans’s
              instrument
• Aircore-record trace gases in air samples at
  atmospheric pressure)
• Balloon satellite plastic nylon tubing (collect
  gas with microbes-slugs)
      Test Plan and Flight Results
• Testing (agar coverage in tubing and viability,
  sterility)-no contamination
• Mission simulation testing-cooler
  (temperature) test (7- 10 lbs. of dry ice)-
  maintained integrity
• Cultured tubes
Flight
                                    Flight Data




                                           From P(t) and T(t), compute
                                           density from ideal gas law

                                           Multiply by tube volume gives
                                           mass of gas in tube at any
                                           altitude

                                           Thanks to Anna Karion and Jack Higgs
                                           At NOAA for sharing their data.
Thanks to EOSS for altitude data.
                        The Collection
• Colonies of growth in petri dish of N=nutrient
  broth, A=blood agar of anaerobes, O=blood
  agar of aerobes
L0-1 = highest sample
L1-2 = 2nd highest
…
L27-28 = lowest sample

Digits refer to clamp
position, 0=top,
28=bottom)
Results, Analysis, and Conclusion
                   Results
• Successfully incubated multiple different
  bacteria – no definitive identification
• Successfully demonstrated sterile technique
  – at least in some of the tube sections
• Did we collect extremophiles?
• Cross contamination-major concern
               Ready for Flight
• Simple design
• Easy access and
  retrieval of data
• Only satellite problem
  was pressure sensor
  failure
• Need new plastic
  nylon tube with
  interior of agar
  (replace)
               The Benefits
• New discoveries – life may thrive – harsh
  conditions
• Astrobiology ( development of life on distant
  planets
• Biology (Taq Polymerase-use of enzyme from
  extremophile)
      Potential Follow-on Work
• Worth continuing-significance of
  extremophiles
• Gram stains- overlooked bacteria-Potential for
  discovery
• Improve on identification of bacteria
• Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) -
  example from other missions – cryopump
  effect
• Use mixture of agars inside tube?
               BIG Question
• How do we discern with high confidence that
  cultured microbes are from high-altitude and
  not contaminants?




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