Docstoc

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS BINDER (DOC)

Document Sample
STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS BINDER (DOC) Powered By Docstoc
					STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

0

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE

2008
TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction SMCTC Purpose, Scope, and Prerequisites 3 4

CHAPTER 1 THE NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER History of Marksmanship in the United States NGMTC Mission Statement History of the National Guard Marksmanship Training Center CHAPTER 2 STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS Overview of the National Guard Marksmanship Program Unit Marksmanship Training Program Organization Duties and Responsibilities of the SMC Duties and Responsibilities of the UMC State SOP (Sample) Required Training Plans Sample Training Plan CHAPTER 3 MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING Small Arms Master Gunner Course (SAMGC) Squad Designated Marksman Course (SDM) Small Arms Simulations Course (SASC) Sniper School TATS Close Precision Engagement Course 35 36 37 38 39 13 14 16 17 19 29 32 5 10 11

1 1

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 4 NGMTC SUSTAINMENT TRAINING All Guard Marksmanship Teams All Guard Combat Team All Guard Sniper Team All Guard Rifle Team MAC Regions Marksmanship Advisory Council Regions Winston P. Wilson Championships Armed Forces Skill at Arms Meeting Army Excellence-in-Competition (EIC) CHAPTER 5 AIR GUARD INFORMATION ANG Work Days (Request for Orders) ANG Terms ANG Work Day Request Form ANG Competitive Training Fund Cites Letter Example ANG Close Precision Engagement Course (LOI, Additional Info) Air Force Information 34-227 (AF EIC) ANG Glossary and References APPENDICES Home Storage of Weapons State Marksmanship Coordinators Checklist Sample EIC Match Bulletin Sample Qualification Results Bulletin Glossary of Acronyms Glossary of Marksmanship Terms References Helpful Web Sites 64 75 77 78 79 80 85 89 49 50 51 52 53 57 62 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48

2

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

INTRODUCTION

This document provides guidance for the full range of duties for State Marksmanship Coordinators (SMC), to include knowledge and training that will enable them to manage, monitor and coordinate all marksmanship program activities within their state. This is not only for SMC’s but others that are charged with the responsibility for conducting marksmanship operations training. SMC’s are obligated to set clear objectives, define the mission, firmly guide marksmanship training and competitions, and measure progress and success within their state. This handout supports Soldiers, Airmen and leaders that execute marksmanship training and are involved in marksmanship competitive events. It serves as the foundation for further development of National Guard marksmanship programs, techniques and procedures and refinement of existing training support packages, mission training plans, training center and unit exercises, and service school curricula. Herein, you will receive a brief history of Marksmanship in the United States and a history of the National Guard Marksmanship Training Center and its programs. This will help in understanding how this organization can help the SMC in developing a productive marksmanship program for their state. The basis for this handout is the National Guard Marksmanship Training Center’s vast expertise in conducting marksmanship training and numerous competitive events.

3 3

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS COURSE (SMCTC) PURPOSE: To provide State Marksmanship Coordinators the knowledge and training that will enable them to manage, monitor and coordinate all marksmanship program activities within their state. SCOPE: Instruction includes duties of the SMC, marksmanship programs, ammunition forecasting and usage, battle focused combat training, school and training update, finance procedures, logistics support update, competitive activities, public affairs procedures, Excellence-In-Competition information, regulations update and procedures for requesting training assistance. PREREQUISITES:
To attend the SMCTC you must be assigned as the SMC, or be the representative designated to coordinate state marksmanship programs. Individual should be both knowledgeable and involved in marksmanship readiness training and National Guard Bureau (NGB) sponsored competitive programs.

4

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 1 The History of Marksmanship in the United States Marksmanship and the citizen soldier are two American traditions that were forged in the same crucible. They date from the earliest of colonial times and were born of necessity. Nearly every community organized and maintained a militia to provide defense; it was these militias and their skill with arms that secured independence and maintained order. This was a time when skill with a weapon could mean the difference between survival and perishing due to lack of food or because of your enemies. In the colonial days it was simply a way of life. The marksmanship skills of the citizen soldier played an important role in the outcome of the both the American Revolution and the War of 1812. Out of these two wars arose the myth that all Americans were “Born Marksmen.” During the period between the Revolution and the War of 1812, the frontier pushed from just beyond the Appalachian Mountains to the banks of the Mississippi River. The trend toward an urban society, which has continued until this day, was just gaining momentum in the East. This factor aided by European immigration diluted what had been an almost universal public familiarity with arms. The myth of the born marksman was nearly exploded by military setbacks suffered in the War of 1812, but the final battle gave new luster to the American reputation as marksmen. Andrew Jackson, with a force of 5, 000 Americans, routed a British force of 10, 000 at New Orleans and killed more than 2,000 British while the American losses in the battle numbered less than a hundred. The greater part of Jackson’s force was gathered from what was still the frontier. From early colonial days until the late 1850’s this country changed from a largely rural society to a more urban society. The need to hunt for wild game as necessity wasn’t as critical and most people didn’t frequently fire any type weapon. The myth of the born marksman continued into the outbreak of the American Civil War where commanders found themselves severely tested while leading troops that had little or no marksmanship experience. Pre-war training among the militia units generally ignored marksmanship, which was considered an inherited trait, and the militia concentrated on showy uniforms and marching drills. This oversight was to be a factor that prolonged one of history’s bloodiest wars. It was not uncommon during the Civil War for troops to go into battle never

5 5

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

having fired their weapons, and it is not surprising that a frequent complaint of commanders was that many of their men failed to fire in combat. Ordinance men who examined rifles salvaged from the battlefield after Gettysburg found that several thousand contained unfired cartridges; many of them had been disable by errors in loading. There were many rifles found on the Gettysburg battle field filled with, up to as many as, eight to ten Minnie balls without being fired. Skill with small arms had to be acquired in the most costly manner, in combat. At the close of the Civil War, the Army was reduced to near its pre-war strength, and the state militia units were more closely tied to the Army as units of the National Guard. Training, as before the war concentrated on drill and ceremonies while ignoring marksmanship. George W. Wingate, then a captain in the 22 nd Regiment of the New York National Guard and a Civil War veteran, felt responsible for preparing his men for combat. He saw first hand the many mistakes made by soldiers on both sides due to the lack of marksmanship training during the Civil War. He was convinced that all soldiers, especially the militia, must be given marksmanship training before they could be considered ready for combat. Wingate tried to find published material on how to teach his men to shoot. He found that there was none in existence, so he wrote his own. Wingate’s Manual of Rifle Practice stressed dry fire, because in the larger cities it was very difficult to find a place to actually shoot. Soon after the publication of his manual, Wingate was to become the driving force in the organization of the National Rifle Association (NRA). Wingate was joined in his effort in organizing the NRA by Colonial William C. Church, also a Civil War veteran. The primary goal of the association would be to “promote and encourage rifle shooting on a scientific basis,” according to a magazine editorial written by Church. Another one of the purposes stated in the charter of the NRA was “to promote the introduction of a system of aiming drill and target firing among the National Guard of New York and the militia of other states.” After being granted a charter by the state of New York on November 17, 1871 the NRA was founded. Civil War General Ambrose Burnside, who was also the former governor of Rhode Island and a U.S. Senator, became the fledgling NRA’s first president. In 1872 the NRA purchased Creed’s farm on Long Island and built a range capable of firing distances up to 1,000 yards and patterned it on the British range at Wimbledon. The range, called Creedmoor, was completed in 1873 with the help of the Army Engineers and the Central Railroad. The matches

6

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

held during the summer and fall of 1873 aroused great regional interest among shooting enthusiasts as teams and individuals vied for prizes that ranged from ornate trophies to a Gatling gun, but in 1874 Creedmoor brought both national and international attention to marksmanship. In November 1873, the New York Herald published an open challenge from the Irish Rifle Association to the riflemen of America: “...to shoot a match in the Autumn of 1874, under the following conditions: Targets and scoring same as adopted by the National Association of Great Britain (which was the same as those at Creedmoor); ranges, 800, 900, 1,000, and 1,100 yards; rifles any not exceeding ten pounds in weight, but without telescope sights or hair triggers. Position, any, but without artificial rest. Team to be from eight to six men, at the option of the Irish. The American team to be composed exclusively of riflemen born in the United States and to shoot with rifles of American manufacture, the Irish to shoot with rifles made by Rigby of Dublin.” It was not possible to shoot 1,100 yards at Creedmoor, and with that exception, the challenge was accepted by the Amateur Rifle Club, and affiliate of the NRA. George Wingate, who was president of the Amateur Rifle Club as well as secretary of the NRA at the time, acted as captain of the American team. The acceptance was an audacious move by the Americans, as they had no experience beyond 600 yards while the Irish had just won the championship of the British Isles. In addition, there was no rifle of American manufacture that was reliable at 1,000 yards. Both the Remington Arms Company and the Sharps Rifle Company put their best craftsmen to work to design and build a long-range rifle for this event. The New York Herald gave the match wide publicity even to the point of publishing the practice scores fired by the two teams during the summer. Betting odds heavily favored the Irish. The actual match drew a crowd of 10,000 and was followed shot by shot on both sides of the Atlantic. The score of each round fired was cabled to London and Dublin. To everyone’s surprise, the Americans lead 326 to 317 after the 800-yard stage. At the close of the 900-yard stage the Americans still held a narrow lead, 636 to 629. The competition at the 1,000-yard stage was intense as the teams alternated shots; with only one round remaining in the match, America trailed by a single point. The crowd held its breath as Colonel John Bodine squeezed off the last

7 7

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

shot. Moments later over half a mile away the bullet struck the iron target with an audible report, and a white disk went up over the bull's-eye. The United States had won 934 to 931. Winning this first international match catapulted marksmanship into the national consciousness as no other act could have done. During the last quarter of the 19 th century, members of the National Guard dominated competitive marksmanship in this country. Most and sometimes all of the members of the international teams fielded by the United States were Guardsmen. Wingate’s Manual of Rifle Practice was adopted as the approved training manual for all the state militias, and the active services used it as the basis for writing their own manuals. The poor showing of the active Army teams against the Guard in competition prompted the Army to initiate for the first time a marksmanship-training program. The War Department Appropriations Bill of 1903 authorized the National Rifle and Pistol Matches and the appropriations to send teams to the matches from the active services and the National Guard of each state. The NRA matches had been moved from Creedmoor to Sea Girt, New Jersey in 1892 due to political opposition to the promotion of marksmanship in New York. Creedmoor was deeded back to the state and the first National Matches were held at Sea Girt in conjunction with the NRA matches in 1903. In 1904 the National Matches were held at Fort Riley, Kansas, but the range was inadequate. It was the intention of the government to build and expand ranges there so that the National Matches could be held there annually. Brigadier General Ammon B. Critchfield, Adjutant General of Ohio, headed a group of Guard officials on a duck hunting trip west of Port Clinton in the fall of 1905. General Critchfield was impressed with the area’s adaptability for a rifle range, and he persuaded the state legislature to appropriate $25,000 to buy over 300 acres of land next to Lake Erie. The 1905 and 1906 National Matches that were held at Sea Girt were overwhelmed by an expanding shooting program and the National Board for the Promotion of Rifle Practice (NBPRP) was determined to move the matches for 1907. The War Department favored Fort Riley, but the range construction was moving very slowly. General Critchfield made a bid to the NBPRP that the 1907 matches be moved to Camp Perry, Ohio, and his bid was approved. The Ohio State Rifle Association raised $40,000 from National Guard companies throughout the state to build a clubhouse and a family housing area. The matches of 1907 were a success and since that time the National Matches have generally been held at Camp Perry. They have been cancelled ten times during wartime and national emergencies and on occasion have been held

8

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

elsewhere, but in the minds of most shooters Camp Perry is synonymous with the National Matches. The School of Musketry was established at Monterey, California in 1901, but was transferred to Fort Sill, Oklahoma in 1913. Students were trained as instructors of individual marksmanship as well as long range massed rifle fire. With the entry of the United States into World War I in 1917, the school was enlarged and redesignated the Infantry School of Arms. Instruction now expanded to cover all infantry weapons as well as the basics of trench warfare. Officers of the new machine gun units were sent to Fort Sill, Oklahoma for 3 months of intensive training, after which they returned to their divisions to establish their own machine gun schools. Near the end of the war, in October 1918, the Infantry School of Arms was relocated to its present location at Fort Benning, Georgia. In each of the major wars of the Twentieth Century, the United States has been woefully short of qualified marksmanship instructors and the time devoted to marksmanship instruction in basic training was compressed to a dangerous level. The fact that this has not been more damaging to combat effort is due in large part to the competitive marksmanship program, which has developed instructors and maintained interest in marksmanship during peacetime. Every Guardsman has a right to be proud of the part the citizen soldier has played in promoting marksmanship in the United States.

THE NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

MISSION ESSENTIAL TASK LIST 1. Conduct, manage and execute institutional small arms marksmanship training to military services. 2. Conduct, manage and execute small arms marksmanship evaluation and sustainment training to improve battlefield proficiency. 3. Conduct Force Protection and Anti-Terrorism training.

9 9

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

4. Conduct research and findings on marksmanship equipment, ammunition and weapons as required to enhance battlefield survivability.

VISION STATEMENT To be a nationally recognized leader in promoting and developing marksmanship as the cornerstone of combat readiness. To gain support for increased emphasis on weapons training and marksmanship proficiency skills. To improve individual and unit combat readiness within the National Guard.

MISSION STATEMENT To conduct marksmanship activities which enhance the effectiveness of unit level training in the Army and Air National Guard. To Administer NGB marksmanship training and sustainment programs at all levels. To execute relevant marksmanship training for enhanced combat survivability.

History of the National Guard Marksmanship Training Center

After the close of the National Matches, it was the tradition to send a group of three to five leaders within the marksmanship program to meet at NGB to review the states after-action reports from the matches and to make program recommendations to NGB for the following year. Marksmanship Committee Reports show that as far back as 1962 there was concern that a position at the national level should be established whose full-time responsibility is to improve the marksmanship program. Problems encountered by the All Guard Teams during their first two years of active competition clearly demonstrated the need for full-time support and coordination by a permanent agency. The weapons accurization program initiated in 1965, which employed an armorer on a 6-month basis, was a step in the right direction, but it did not go far enough.

10

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

The Marksmanship Committee Report of 1966 recommended that a National Guard Marksmanship Training Center (NGMTC) should be established as a unit semi-permanently attached to a suitable state headquarters and that the unit should provide the following for the All Guard Teams: (1) A training program and a match competitive schedule culminating annually in the National Matches. (2) A supply function covering procurement, storage, maintenance, and issue of suitable weapons, ammunition, optical and competitive equipment, individual distinctive team uniforms, etc. (3) A weapons accurization facility of the highest order to include machine rest and ammunition testing equipment. (4) Fiscal support to include allocation and payment of team expenses, equipment purchases, and travel expenses. (5) Command representation of suitable rank and background to represent the NGB at major matches, Army Area meetings, the National Rifle Association, Director of Civilian Marksmanship, NBPRP, and the National Match Staff. It was further recommended that criteria for the selection of a location for the NGMTC be the following: (1) Favorable climate (2) Availability of pistol and high power rifle ranges (3) Billet and Mess facilities (4) Ease of reaching by various means of transportation (5) The availability of qualified personnel to properly man the unit The states were invited to submit proposals for establishing the NGMTC, and after reviewing the proposals, the state of Tennessee was selected by the NGB. The NGMTC was established in Nashville, Tennessee at the National Guard Armory in February of 1968 with an Army Table of Distribution and Allowances (TDA) calling for 22 ARNG personnel (6 officers, 2 warrant officers, and 14 enlisted). The executive officer, two armorers, and an NCO had guard technician status. In the fall of 1968, the unit was augmented with eight ANG positions, which complemented the Army TDA. It was later moved from Nashville, Tennessee and reorganized effective 1 June 1990 at Camp Joseph T. Robinson in North Little Rock, Arkansas. The unit was housed in several buildings on Camp Robinson until 14 October 1992 when the Hebert R. Temple Marksmanship Center was dedicated at the present location. The National Guard Marksmanship Training Center is divided, primarily, into two divisions, which are schools and competitive training events. The NGMTC schoolhouse offers world

11 11

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

class instruction in the proper use of the various small arms weapon systems available to the National Guard through a variety of Small Arms Firing Schools and marksmanship oriented classes. The NGMTC schoolhouse trains hundreds of soldiers each year from all components. All NGMTC schoolhouse courses are listed in ATRRS under School Code 1029. The competitive training events held a the National Guard Marksmanship Training Center include the Winston P. Wilson Rifle, Pistol, Sniper and Light Machine Gun championships for the top shooters in all states and the U.S. territories. The Annual Armed Forces Skill-at-Arms Meeting (AFSAM), credited with being the world’s largest international combat rifle and pistol shooting event, runs simultaneously with the Winston P. Wilson Championships. The United States fields teams from the Active Army, Marine Corps, U.S. Army Reserve, and members of the All National Guard Team composed of both Army and Air National Guard. There are currently four buildings that make up the center. Three buildings make up the main complex on Maryland Avenue. The administration building is located in building 4904, the shop building is in 4900, and the CPEC building is located in building 4901. The Functional Schools building, which houses the Small Arms Master Gunner Course (SAMGC), the Squad Designated Marksman Course (SDM), and the ASI-B4 producing National Guard Sniper Course, is located on Range 3 in building 4960.

12

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 2

CHAPTER 2 OVERVIEW OF THE NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP PROGRAM The objectives of the National Guard Marksmanship Program are: a. Employ the Small Arms Training Team (SATT) to assist the Unit Commanders in the development of competent personnel. Identify state team members and other personnel who possess marksmanship knowledge and experience and involve them in qualification training at the unit level. b. Emphasize the Marksmanship Training Programs at all levels. Stress the relationship of competitive training events to development of combat skills. c. Attain within the National Guard a level of marksmanship proficiency above basic marksmanship requirements and increase battlefield survivability. d. Maintain and extend the National Guard’s leadership position in marksmanship training for qualification. e. Select unit and battalion level coordinators who are dynamic and possess knowledge and enthusiasm to establish and sustain effective programs. f. Brief key personnel at all levels to establish priorities for support of the marksmanship program. g. Promote training interest and elevate the individual’s confidence in their ability to perform with service weapons by exposing them to competitive training events. h. Develop the skills of selected guardsmen to the highest levels of ability for representing the National Guard in major national and international competitive training events. Unit Marksmanship Training Program Organization The organization model of the marksmanship program in the National Guard is a pyramid with three levels. All those who must qualify with small arms annually, nearly one-half million soldiers make up the base of the pyramid. Members of the state competitive rifle and pistol squads comprise the middle level, while the All-National Guard Team forms the top of the pyramid Members of the competitive squads act as instructors, coaches, and range officers for annual qualification. They are not only the best qualified individuals for this task, but this also gives them an opportunity to look for talent that could be recruited for the competitive squads.

13

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 2

This search for new members can never stop because team matches at the command, service, and national levels require that from one to three firing members of a team be a new shooter. As soon as a man fires in a given team match, he generally becomes an old shooter for that match or level of competition. This acts as a guarantee that new men are given an opportunity to earn a position on the competitive squads. Competitive squads are re-formed annually with the selection of new membership based on each shooters record of performance, potential, and ability to participate. Squads above the unit level are made up of the best possible combination of marksmen without regard to an individual’s affiliation with the Army or Air National Guard. Membership on a competitive squad is always voluntary, as practice may take from two to ten hours a week of off duty time and matches may be fired on weekends other than drill. Competition is the dynamic force that drives the marksmanship model, and it should permeate every aspect of the program. A shooter may be striving to be the best in his unit or squad, trying to make a squad at a higher level, or just trying to hold his own. Recognition, awards, and personal pride are all factors that stimulate and intensify the competitive spirit. The marksmanship organization is designed to push talent to the top, while knowledge and skill are passed down to those below. At each level of the organization model there are individuals tasked to coordinate the marksmanship program. The unit commander is responsible for the marksmanship training and qualification in this unit. If he does not have personnel in his unit capable of conducting training and qualification firing, the unit commander can contact the SMC for assistance. The SMC is the key person in the state marksmanship training program. He must promote unit competitions that generate interest in new shooters at the lowest levels, and must be available to advise unit commanders on marksmanship activities. The SMC is responsible for all activity of the state rifle and pistol squads to include planning, selection, training, and match scheduling. He must supervise a state property account for weapons and equipment. Many of his duties can be delegated, but the success or failure of the state program rests squarely on the SMC’s shoulders.

14

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 2

Duties and Responsibilities of the State Marksmanship Coordinator 1. Preparation of an Annual Marksmanship Training Plan and After Action Report. Establish guidelines and policies for the State Marksmanship Program. 2. Responsible for the selection of state combat rifle, pistol, sniper and machinegun squad members through state matches or some other valid method. 3. Develop a training program and match schedule for the state competitive shooting squads. 4. Procure, store, maintain, and issue necessary weapons, ammunition and supplies, in a cost-effective manner, as necessary to support all activities of the marksmanship programs. 5. Conduct a limited repair program for weapons and equipment. To keep weapons and equipment accurate and safe.

15

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 2

6. Promote interest in marksmanship throughout the state by an active information program, awards, recognition, and personnel contact. 7. Plan, organize, and supervise an active and aggressive program to recruit into the National Guard prior and non-prior service individuals with an interest in shooting. Keep National Guard Bureau (NGB), the National Guard Marksmanship Training Center (NGMTC), and the MAC region representative informed of current marksmanship activities within the state as required by these agencies. Duties

and Responsibilities of the Unit Marksmanship Coordinator
The UMC’s duties are outlined in NGB PAM 350-6/ANG Pam 50-57. Position summary: This position is established as an additional duty to coordinate marksmanship activity (qualification, competition, and Youth Outreach) within the unit, with other units and with the State Marksmanship Coordinator. The individual serving in this position is appointed by and serves the Unit Commander. Appointment is made by an Additional Duty Order from the Unit Commander to the SMC. These “units”, as referenced above, are separate companies, battalions or higher. 1. Duties:          SERVE as the commander’s subject mater expert for unit marksmanship readiness training. MANAGE the Unit Marksmanship Training Program (PMI and Qualification). MONITOR the unit’s strengths and weaknesses (driven by unit training assessment) (allows company commanders to plan training). COORDINATE training resources. REPRESENT the SMC as the liaison/POC for state marksmanship training issues.  ADVISE the commander on all matters relating to marksmanship readiness training and competition. ASSIST the qualification range OIC in planning of range operations and preliminary marksmanship training (PMI). PREPARE and post the unit Qualification Results Bulletins (QRB). COORDINATE the presentation of marksmanship awards, badges, ribbons, Top Gun and Progress Awards.

16

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 2

      

MAINTAIN a file of regulations, manuals, pamphlets, and correspondence, which pertains to marksmanship. MAINTAIN a unit historical file containing QRB’s, and match results bulletins. ENSURE that current marksmanship publications, opportunities and announcements are posted on the unit bulleting board. PROVIDE input into ammunition forecasting for qualification and competition. IDENTIFY and coordinate youth programs that the unit may become involved in within the community. BE the unit POC for the SMC for all unit marksmanship activities. VISIT the NGMTC website regularly to find out about developing trends in training and any new school or competition information. You can find it at www.arguard.org/mtu.

2. Qualifications:     
3.

Must be a member of the unit. Experience and interest in marksmanship activities. Willing to devote the required time to ensure that the unit marksmanship program is effective and rewarding to unit members. Recommend being a graduate of the National Guard Marksmanship Training Center (NGMTC) Small Arms Readiness/Mobilization Instructor Course (SAMGC). UMC’s should be a NCO or Junior Officer.

A copy of the UMC’s additional duty orders will be filled out correctly, signed by the unit commander and given to the SMC/SATT to be put on file.

Example of a State Training SOP (Cover Page)
Office of Military Affairs Department of Plans and Training SMALL ARMS TRAINING TEAM Santa Fe, New Mexico 87508-4695 SOP # 01 Oct 2004

Training

17

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 2

NEW MEXICO NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP PROGRAM STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES _______________________________________________________________ Scope. This SOP prescribes the current policies, procedures, and requirements for New Mexico guardsmen participating in the New Mexico National Guard advanced competitive marksmanship programs. Applicability. This SOP applies to all New Mexico Army and Air National Guard personnel, organizations, units, and activities. Suggested Improvements. The proponent of this SOP is the Small Arms Training Team, Dept of Plans and Training, New Mexico Army National Guard. Users are invited to send comments and suggestions improvements to SATT, DPT. New Mexico Army National Guard Attn: State Marksmanship Coordinator Neutral Language. Whenever used in this SOP, the masculine pronouns refer to both genders. A 'UNIT' as used in this SOP is classified as a Battalion or Wing sized element _________________________________________________________________

Possible Topics Covered in State Training SOP (Table of Contents)
CONTENTS page(s) 1. Objectives and Benefits of the New Mexico National Guard Marksmanship Program 2. Duties of the State Marksmanship Coordinator (SMC) 3. Duties of the Unit Marksmanship Coordinator (UMC) 4. Combat Match Squad Programs 5. National Match Squad Programs 6. Duties and Responsibilities of Squad Captains. 7. Duties and Responsibilities of Squad Members. 8. Property and Ammunition Accountability and Security 9. Issue and Accountability of Targets and miscellaneous equipment

18

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 2

10. Maintenance of Equipment 11. Transportation of Equipment 12. Funding 13. Levels of Competition 14. Match Data System 15. Awards 16. Small Arms Training Team Support 17. References 18. Blank Forms 19. Matches 20. Laser Marksmanship Training System (LMTS)

Example of State Training SOP (Layout)
Objectives and Benefits of the New Mexico National Guard (NMNG) Marksmanship Program. The Objectives and benefits of the NMNG Marksmanship programs are as follows: a. Train unit members on marksmanship skills in order to improve and enhance proficiency within the unit and increase combat effectiveness by conducting training within the unit. b. Train and develop marksmanship teams capable of competing at the National Match level. Duties and Responsibilities of the State Marksmanship Coordinator. 1. Preparation of an Annual Marksmanship Training Plan and After Action Report. Establish guidelines and policy for the New Mexico National Guard marksmanship program. 2. Responsible for the selection of NMNG combat rifle, pistol, and machinegun squad members and for the selection of NMNG national match/composite squad members through tryouts or some other valid method. 3. Develop a training program and match schedule for the NMNG competitive shooting squads.

19

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 2

4. Procure, store, maintain, and issue necessary weapons, ammunition and supplies, in a cost-effective manner, as necessary to support all activities of the marksmanship programs. 5. Conduct a limited repair program for weapons and equipment. To keep weapons and equipment accurate and safe. 6. Promote interest in marksmanship throughout the New Mexico National Guard by an active information program, awards, recognition, and personnel contact. 7. Plan, organize, and supervise an active and aggressive program to recruit into the New Mexico National Guard prior and non-prior service individuals with an interest in shooting. 8. Keep National Guard Bureau (NGB) and National Guard Marksmanship Training Center (NGMTC) informed of current marksmanship activities within the NMNG as required by these agencies.

Duties and Responsibilities of the Unit Marksmanship Coordinator 1. Position summary: This position is established as an additional duty to coordinate marksmanship activity (qualification, competition, and Youth Outreach) within the unit, with other units and with the State Marksmanship Coordinator. The individual serving in this position is appointed by and serves the Unit Commander. Appointment is made by an Additional Duty Order, Figure 1, from the Unit Commander to the SMC. These “units”, as referenced above, are battalions, separate companies or higher. 2. Duties: a. Advise the Unit Commander on all matters relating to marksmanship training. b. Assist the OIC/NCOIC for Qualification Training as required. c. Insure that Qualification Results Bulletins (QRBs) are prepared and posted in a timely manner. d. Coordinate the presentation of Marksmanship Award badges or ribbons, and TOP Gun and Progress Award certificates. e. Maintain a publications file of Regulations, Manuals, Pams, etc., which concern unit level marksmanship. f. Maintain a Unit Marksmanship Historical File containing QRBs, results of competition in which the unit takes part, names of individuals who joined the unit or were retained because of the marksmanship program, etc.

20

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 2

g. Forecast ammunition requirements for qualification and competition. h. Assist (as needed) the individuals in charge of the various competitive and youth programs in which the unit is involved. i. Keep the SMC/SATT advised of unit marksmanship activities. 1. Qualifications: Must be a member of the unit and will preferably be familiar with marksmanship, have a keen interest in competitive shooting and will be willing to devote the required effort to insure that the unit's small arms training program is effectively run and rewarding to unit members. UMCs should be an NCO or junior officer. 2. A copy of the UMC additional duty orders will be filled out correctly, signed by the unit commander and given to the SMC/SATT to be put on file.
SAMPLE APPOINTMENT ORDER Memorandum for Record SUBJECT: Appointment of Unit Marksmanship Coordinator

1. SFC Luke Jackson, SSN, has been appointed as the Unit Marksmanship Coordinator for this unit as an additional duty. 2. The following information is provided for the State Directory of UMC's: SFC Luke Jackson 1234 Park Place W (505) 827-1234 Santa Fe, NM 87502 H (505) 827-4321 3. SFC Luke Jackson is employed with Dewy, Cheatom, and Howe Real Estate where he serves as a Sales Representative.

Bud Lewis LTC, OD Commanding

Duties and Responsibilities of the Squad Captains The primary responsibility of the squad captain is to function as an administrator, facilitator, and planner for all squad activities. The squad captain will: 1. Promote, support, enforce, and carryout the policies of this SOP.

21

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 2

2. Keep the UMC informed of all squad activities on a timely basis. 3. Insure all squad members understand and comply with their duties and responsibilities at home unit level and within the squad. 4. Be responsible for the appearance, discipline, and development (training) of all squad personnel. 5. Be responsible for the care and maintenance of squad equipment, issued and non-issued, which is assigned to the Small Arms Training Team (SATT), and used by the squad. 6. Be responsible for the accurate preparation and maintenance of a squad roster to include: Name, Rank, SSN, Home and mailing address, Home and work phone numbers, MDS and National Rifle Association (NRA) numbers, NRA classification, and other information necessary to administer the squad program. 7. Be responsible for all squad ammunition to include its forecast, issue, brass turn in and record keeping. The squad captain will obtain and sign for the squad’s quarterly ammunition allotment within the first 5 working days of the new quarter. Brass will be turned in prior to the last 5 working days of the quarter. The squad captain may sub-hand receipt ammunition to squad members in amount not to exceed 1000 rounds except for .22 cal ammunition which may be issued in amounts up to 5000 rounds per individual. 8. Prepare an annual training plan and ammunition forecast for all squad activities. The annual training plan and ammunition forecast is for the fiscal year beginning 1 October and ending 31 September the following year. Training plans and ammunition forecasts are to be submitted to the UMC NLT one year in advance. 9. Insure that accurate and timely records of a shooters scores are maintained. The squad captain or his representative will collect the completed MDS cards from squad members prior to leaving the firing range and forward them to the UMC. 10. Announce and conduct annual combat squad tryout. The squad captain will submit the results of the squad tryout, with a list of individuals (name, rank, ssn, and unit) recommended for selection, to the UMC for his approval. 11. Insure that the selection of individuals to the New Mexico National Guard Marksmanship Squads is announced in Permanent Orders issued by the Office of the Adjutant Generals and that a copy of these orders are issued to each team member, their unit commander, and the unit marksmanship coordinator. 12. Be responsible for the preliminary selection and training of individuals, which are to represent the New Mexico National Guard in National Match phase of the W.P.Wilson and Reserve Components Championships. Individuals selected to participate in these matches must have approval of the SMC. 13. Insure that all requests for orders (NGB Form 102-10) and entry fees for Army Guard personnel are complete, accurate, and submitted to the UMC, or his representative, NLT 30 days prior to the scheduled event. Insure that requests for orders and entry fees for Air Guard personnel are coordinated with the appropriate air base personnel NLT 30 days prior to the scheduled event. Follow up on all requests for orders and funding.

22

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 2

14. Annually conduct competitive shooting events (with the help of squad members) sponsored by the NMNG Marksmanship Squad, which are designed to identify potential new Combat Rifle/Pistol/LMG/Sniper squad members. These competitive events include, but are not limited to the Adjutant General Combat Matches. 15. Prepare and submit to the UMC after action reports of competitive marksmanship events in which squad members participated and for whom fees were paid using National Guard Funds (army-air). Also submit after-action reports for matches participated in by members of the NMNG squads that the individual paid his own way. Duties and Responsibilities of Squad Members 1. Duties of Squad Members: a. Squad membership does not relieve an individual of the responsibilities inherent to their MTOE position within their home unit. b. Squad members are expected to assist their unit as marksmanship trainers. Team members will be expected to assist in range operations, instruction, coaching, safety briefings and other related duties required to operate qualification ranges. c. Squad members must be available to assist SATT personnel in the conducting of weapons schools, shooting clinics, sniper schools, statewide matches and youth clinics. d. Squad members that participate in unit level activities, as marksmanship trainers are required to submit after action reports to the unit UMC. Squad captains are required to submit after action reports following squad selection and all matches that the squad participates in. 2. Responsibilities of Squad Members: a. Squad members will be held responsible for all their assigned equipment and ammunition. Equipment will be issued on a hand receipt and updated annually. This will normally be done at the AG Combat Matches. b. Any property damaged hand receipted to a squad member, fair wear and tear accepted, are required to repair or replace the items. Failure to do so will result in dismissal from the squad and possible financial liability. c. Squad members will be issued ammunition according to squad policies. Ammunition and brass must be accounted for at all times. Squad members must return all residue and brass before receiving any more ammunition from the squad captain. All brass and residue must be turned in and accounted for at the AG Matches. Only the squads that are going to the Wilson Matches will be issued ammunition after that time. All ammunition and residue must be turned in before the end of the fiscal year. d. Squad members are required to make their squad captain aware of all requests for travel within three (3) working days of receiving notice of a match, practice or other marksmanship activity. e. Squad members are required to inform the squad captain and/or the UMC if they change home, work or unit phone numbers and addresses. If a squad member fails to do so, he/she may be dismissed from the squad.

23

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 2

f. National Match squad members must attend all mandatory matches and a minimum of fifty- (50)% of all team practices and fifty- (50)% of scheduled matches each fiscal year. Squad captains may approve exceptions on a case by case basis. All members of National Match squads are required to attend the Winston P. Wilson Matches. Combat Match Squad Programs 1. Purpose: These programs present a possible training scenario that can be used to prepare unit level shooters for the New Mexico Adjutant General's Marksmanship Matches. 2. Scope: Any battalion sized element in the NMNG can send a team to the annual AG matches which are held during the late spring or early summer. The requirements for team composite are listed under the specific weapon used. The SATT under NM JFHQ will coordinate match dates and location. The SATT will provide ammunition, targets and personnel to conduct the matches. 3. Eligibility: a. Normally, all members of the New Mexico Army and Air National Guard are eligible for membership on the Combat and National Match Marksmanship Squads. b. Have the approval of their unit commander. c. Soldiers must meet the weight standards as per AR 600-9. d. Soldiers not under any disciplinary action. e. Membership on any marksmanship team is a privilege. Any soldier whose performance in his/her unit is unsatisfactory may lose or be denied squad membership status upon the written request of his/her unit commander. f. Soldiers can only participate on one squad at a time. (Example, a member of the combat rifle squad cannot be on the combat pistol squad. This includes both Combat and National Match squads.) 4. Selection: a. Members of the Combat Rifle, Pistol and Sniper Rifle squads can hold the grade of E1 through E8 and O1 through O3. Members of the Machinegun squad can hold the grade of E1 through E6. b. Annual qualification scores can be used to determine the best shooters for rifle and pistol in each unit. All personnel that qualified as 'expert' who are interested in the marksmanship squads can compete for the available squad slots. This process is adequate for the rifle squad but prohibits many members from competing for the pistol and/or machinegun squads because it is not their assigned weapon. Any process that a unit wants to use for the selection of pistol and machinegun squads can be used with the approval of the SATT. c. Units should advertise the process and training goals within the unit have a short training session and then have a shoot off of all interested personnel. The top shooters will be selected for the unit squads. A unit may field as many squads as

24

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 2

they wish for the intra-battalion competition. Only one unit squad in each weapon category may attend the AG's match. d. The winning squad in each event of the Adjutant General's Combat Matches will represent the New Mexico National Guard at the Winston P. Wilson Matches held at Camp Robinson, North Little Rock, Arkansas. If the wining squad is not available for a certain match, the second place squad will take their place. e. Each unit is authorized to send two (2) non-firing coaches with each squad to the AG matches. These coaches may be members of the National Match squads. Coaches are not authorized to accompany the squads to higher level matches. 5. Combat Squad composition: a. The available combat weapons are: (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) Combat rifle using a rack grade M16A2/M4. Combat pistol using a rack grade M9. Machinegun using a rack grade M60/M240B. Light machinegun using the Squad Automatic Weapon M249. Sniper rifle using an M21/M24. MAX Combat Pistol Combat Rifle Machinegun Light Machinegun 8 10 4 4 MIN 8 8 3 3

Sniper Rifle 2 2 b. Squads are composed of the following sizes: c. Squads will have at least fifty (50)% 'NEW' Shooters on them. A new shooter is a person that has not competed at that level of match. National Match Squad Programs 1. Eligibility: a. Same as Combat Squad Program b. Individuals should have been a member of a Combat Marksmanship Squad for at least two (2) years. 2. Selection:

25

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 2

a. National Match squad tryouts will be conducted in the spring of each year. b. Members of the NM National Guard in any grade may tryout for the National Match squads. c. Each unit may send up to five (5) soldiers to the National Match Rifle tryouts and five (5) soldiers to the National Match Pistol tryouts. 3. National Match squad composition: a. The available National Match weapons are: (1) Pistol using a National Match grade M1911. (2) Rifle using a National Match grade M16A2. b. Squads are composed as follows:

MAX National Match Pistol National Match Rifle 18 18 8 10

MIN

Property and Ammunition Accountability and Security 1. Security of Weapons and Ammunition. a. Purpose: The following guidance is furnished to implement the MOST SECURE means of storing Marksmanship weapons and ammunition, while assuring availability of weapons and ammunition to competitive marksmen for practice and competition. b. Requirement: The SMC requires that the individual sign a consent form, (sample release Form Figure 2) to obtain a local law enforcement inquiry prior to appointing an individual to a state squad. The individual will incur all fees required for this check. The individual's unit will submit an inquiry to the individual local agency stating that the individual is being considered for appointment to a marksmanship squad and are there any reason why the individual should not be given access to weapons and ammunition. The individual’s unit will follow up an inquiry not returned within 30 days by phone. The UMC will keep the local law enforcement check on record. Prior to appointment of an individual to a state squad, the SMC will request a copy of the local check from the concerned UMC. Local law enforcement responses will be valid for a three (3) year period at which time it must be updated. c. Storage of Weapons and Ammunition. (1) Authorized Arms Rooms in accordance with NGR 190-11 and AGONM 19011. All other means of storing weapons require approval. Weapons can be

26

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 2

withdrawn from the arms room to be used during matches or practice away from the armory. (2) Civilian Police Arms Vault. This requires a letter request giving details for approval. This letter is to be submitted to the SMC. (3) Storage in a private residence. Should a shooter be unable to store issued weapons in one of the above, he/she may complete a Statement of Responsibility (NGMTC Form 1) and a request for exception (NGMTC Form 3) and forward them to the SATT for approval. The Adjutant General, State Security Officer and State Marksmanship Coordinator will determine if the individual can and will maintain a proper level of security over the weapons in his/her private residence.

Required Small Arms Training Teams (SATT) Training Plans

The Annual Marksmanship Training Plan is prepared by the SMC for the approval of the adjutant general, and it closely follows the competitive year. The SMC will submit a two-year plan by 1 October each year to the NGMTC. There are many routine procedures that are good to cover in the annual plan. One such procedure is the calling in of all equipment and weapons in the fall for inventory, cleaning, and repair as required. This also gives the SMC an opportunity to reissue the better equipment to the better marksmen at the proper time. In short the annual plan serves three main functions. It sets forth the goals of a state’s marksmanship training plan and spells out in detail the activities, which will accomplish these goals. Then the annual plan serves as a budget for the competitive year, and lastly it serves as a reference point for comparing the actual accomplishments against the plan. Once a good plan is written and put into effect, it is a simple matter to update and improve from year to year. This plan will outline all facets of the State program for the next two years to include:

(1) For National Match Competition (if planning to participate). (a) The selection and development of the shooters designated as members of the State squads for the Winston P. Wilson Championships. (b) The execution of a winter indoor Smallbore, air rifle, air pistol program to build proficiency for the spring season.

27

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 2

(c) The selection and development of the shooters designated as members of state squads. (d) A series of training sessions and NRA match competitions supported by the State to develop the squad and to provide continuity to the training program. (e) Plan for the use of members of state competitive squads to improve unit proficiency in marksmanship. (2) For Combat Competition: (a) The encouragement of the formation of battalion/battalion equivalent combat squads. (b) The support of training and practice for the combat squads. (c) Plans for intra-state competition to select squads for competition at the Winston P. Wilson Championships and higher levels of competition. (d) A series of training sessions and competitions support by the state to develop the squad and to provide continuity to the training program. (e) Plan for the use of members of State Combat Squads to improve unit proficiency in marksmanship. (3) Ammunition requirements to support the plan. (4) An after action report of the year just ended will also be included with the annual plan. Equipment and supplies available for issue and for use in the development of a marksmanship program are listed for the Army National Guard in AR 310-34, CTA 50-900, CTA 50-970 and Marksmanship Section of JFHQ TDA. Equipment authorization in AR 310-34 must be documented in a single paragraph of the applicable JFHQ Headquarters TDA. Available Air National Guard equipment is listed in TA 144, Part C and TA 016. Match grade and standard ammunition requirements for training and competitive purposes for the Army National Guard will be identified in accordance with AR 5-13 based on the State Marksmanship Training Plans by the SMC and sent to the State Ammunition Management Officer, NGMTC will be provided a copy. Requirements for match grade and training grade ammunition for the Air National Guard will be established in accordance with AFR 50-41.

28

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 2

Commanders at all levels will ensure training grade ammunition is available to support unit and state shooting programs. All ammunition used for competitive marksmanship purposes will be managed by the SMC in accordance with NGB Pam 350-3.
DEPARTMENTS OF THE ARMY AND THE AIR FORCE National Guard Marksmanship Training Center Camp Joseph T. Robinson North Little Rock, Arkansas 72199-9600

MTC-CMD MEMORANDUM FOR Plans, Operations, and Training Officers SUBJECT: Required Small Arms Training Team (SATT) Training Plans

02 January 2008

1. The State Marksmanship Coordinator (SMC) will submit an annual training plan to the National Guard Marksmanship Training Center by 1 December each year. It is my hope that by the SMC’s developing a coordinated plan, it will help accomplish the fundamental mission of the MTC, which is to develop a base of marksmanship knowledge that can be used to increase soldier readiness. 2. The enclosed training plan is a composite of ways that various Small Arms Training Teams have become a benefit to the readiness of their state. You may have some suggestions, which can be easily implemented. There are areas that are necessary for the NGMTC to provide good service to the States while adhering to all the applicable regulations. Physical Security of Arms, Ammunition & Explosives (AA&E) has become a high visibility issue lately and we must have justification for the ammunition that is provided to the States, as an example. There are States, which have enjoyed an increase in readiness, retention and enthusiasm for a basic battlefield survivability skill – marksmanship. This is a result of implementing and supporting their training and competitive marksmanship programs. 3. If you have suggestions to improve this plan, please contact the Operations Section of the NGMTC at DSN: 962-4541 or commercial (501) 212-4541. Your suggestions are greatly appreciated. Our goal is for the SMC’s to develop a State Marksmanship Training Plan. This will result in increased battlefield survivability and soldier readiness.

STEVEN E. MILES COL, QM, AR ARNG Commanding

SAMPLE TRAINING PLAN FORMAT “STATE OF” NATIONAL GUARD
29

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 2

SMALL ARMS TRAINING TEAM 2514 26th STREET
ANYPLACE, USA 12345

MM-SATT 350

10 September 2007

MEMORANDUM FOR NGMTC Commander, ATTN: Operations, Bldg 4904, Camp Joseph T Robinson, North Little Rock, Arkansas 72199-9600 SUBJECT: Training Plan for MM SATT Section for TY 2004 and After Action Review of TY 2003.
1. AFTER ACTION REVIEW OF TY (Current Training Year) a. Significant Competitive Events (1) Winston P. Wilson National Guard Championship Summary of participation and performance; including number of competitors in each discipline, how much time was spent training, method of training, transportation used; and the good and bad points of the matches. (2) State Championship Summary of participation and performance; including number of competitors in each discipline, how much time was spent training, method of training, transportation used; and the good and bad points of the matches. (3) Region Match Summary of participation and performance; including number of competitors in each discipline, how much time was spent training, method of training, transportation used; and the good and bad points of the matches.
(4) Other applicable events.

b. Training Received by SATT personnel (1) In state (describe in house training of SATT personnel) (2) Out of state (describe formal training of SATT personnel, whether by MTC or another agency including number of personnel trained.) (3) SATT personnel that are graduates of MTC courses; (i) (ii) Small Arms Master Gunner Course (SAMGC) (List by name and date of attendance) Squad Designated Marksman Course (SDMC) (List by name and date of attendance)

30

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 2

(iii) (iv)

National Guard Sniper Course (NGSC) (List by name and date of attendance) Small Arms Simulations Course (SASC) (List by name and date of attendance)

c. Training provided to units in your state.
(1) Units trained. (Number of units, numbers of soldiers, types of units, type of

weapons, type of training, any measurable improvement, etc.)
(2) Units requesting training that were not trained due to lack of SATT resources.

d. Competitive teams. (How successful were the teams, strong areas, weak areas, participation,
effectiveness of your training programs, etc.)

2. Training Plan for TY (Next training Year) a. Long range planning calendar (next three years) major events and scheduled training. b. SATT Yearly Training Calendar for TY (Next Training Year). c. State Championship. (1) (2) (3) (4) Training Schedule Anticipated participation How much command emphasis is there Anticipated ammunition required (By DODIC)

d. Competitive Teams. (1) Participation. (Turnover, interest, command emphasis, recruiting, etc.) (2) Training program. (Describe what techniques are being used, what is successful, what is not) (3) Types of competitions. (Service rifle, combat, pistol, smallbore, air gun, CNGB, etc.) e. Unit training. (1) Planned training to enhance operational readiness, pre-alert and pre-mobilization. (2) Planned training to increase unit qualification rates in individual and crew served weapons. (3) Training assistance and assessments to unit commanders. (4) Sustainment training assistance to unit commanders. (5) Establish a unit training priority list. (6) Team selection for Winston P. Wilson and region matches. f. SATT Training (1) Assess SATT section for skills deficiencies. (2) Schedule required training (formal schools, participation in competition) g. Administrative requirements. (1) Update POC’s (Name, address, E-Mail, phones – work & home) (2) Total ammunition requirements for the next training year. (By DODIC)

31

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 2

h. Equipment and facilities. (1) (2) (3) (4) Range capacities, requirements and limitations. (Range fans, tracers, etc) Types of weapons on TDA. Types of simulation equipment. Types of classrooms and buildings used.

32

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 3

CHAPTER 3 MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING Small Arms Master Gunner Course (SAMGC)
1. The Small Arms Master Gunner Course provides quality marksmanship training to all National Guard personnel. The course provides an intense learning experience with small arms weapons proficiency, range operations skills, and instructional expertise. Training is focused on Warrior Tasks 1-13, to include the M16/M4 rifle, M9 pistol, M203 grenade launcher, M240B light machine gun, M249 SAW, MK 19 and the M2HB machine gun. Students must develop and present instructional plans and conduct range operations for each weapon system. Students must pass hands-on evaluations on the aforementioned weapons, as well as pass two written examinations in order to graduate. Students receive instruction on the complete qualification and mobilization courses of fire for small arms weapons to include night vision devices, NBC, and night fire requirements. 2. SAMGC cadre work closely with student teams to ensure current standards are met and to maximize learning conditions. This course prepares students to conduct state level training programs for unit and higher headquarters marksmanship qualification, unit readiness, and unit mobilization training. Graduates of this course are intended to return to their state and conduct "Train the Trainer" clinics. 3. This two-week course is limited to E-4 through E-8 and O-1 through O-2. All attendees must have qualified with their individual weapon within the past year. This course is fast-paced and not recommended for individuals who have trouble qualifying with their assigned weapon. The SAMG course is listed in ATRRS under School Code 1029 and course number MTC-003. All applications must be made through the ATRRS system. The course is conducted by the National Guard Marksmanship Training Center (NGMTC) at Camp Joseph T. Robinson, North Little Rock, Arkansas. 4. Students must bring the following items: a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. LBE to include belt, suspenders, magazine pouch, canteen, poncho and helmet Wet/cold weather gear Enough uniforms to last two-weeks (one-day laundry service is available) Sunscreen and insect repellent Enough money for personal needs and for any emergencies Writing material for taking notes One copy of your orders, a copy of your flight itinerary if you arrived by aircraft. Copy of your pre-execution checklist.

5. The NGMTC provides Mobile Training Teams (MTTs) that conduct SAMGCs to the individual states. This expansion of the SAMGC program allows states to increase their instructor base of trainers to assist and conduct marksmanship qualification, unit readiness, and mobilization training on all small arms weapons. All states are eligible and encouraged to request the SAMG course to augment their state marksmanship and training program. 6. Questions concerning the SAMGC or SAMGC MTTs may be directed to the MTC Schools, (DSN) 962-4531/4505 or (Comm) (501) 212-4531/4505.

Squad Designated Marksman Course (SDMC)
1. The primary mission of the SDM is to deploy as a member of the rifle squad. The SDM is a vital member of his individual squad and not a squad sniper. He fires and maneuvers with this squad and performs all of the duties of the standard rifleman. The SDM has neither

33

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 3

the equipment nor training to operate individually or in a small team to engage targets at extended ranges with precision fire. 2. The secondary mission of the SDM is to engage key targets from 100 to 550 meters with effective, well-aimed fires using the standard weapon system and standard ammunition. He may or may not be equipped with an optic. Therefore the SDM must possess a thorough understanding and master of the fundamentals of rifle marksmanship as well as ballistics, elevation and windage hold-off, sight manipulation, and range estimation. 3. The SDM course will provide the squad with a designated marksman that has been trained to engage targets from 100 to 550 meters with and without optics. The SDM will operate and maneuver as a rifleman, but will have the added responsibility of engaging targets with effective, well-aimed fire out to 550 meters. The SDM can also be used to help direct the fire of other squad members into enemy positions. Due to the increased skill level required for his position, the SDM must maintain a high level of proficiency through continued training of the required skills. The SDM graduate will return to his/her unit to use the “Train the Trainer” concept and train additional SDMs. 4. The platoon sergeant and squad leaders must take special consideration in selecting the SDM. The SDM must have a solid marksmanship performance, must have a clear understanding of the fundamentals, and must be able to apply these fundamentals consistently during dry-fire and live-fire training. Even though the SDM in the field will be the junior enlisted, the immediate supervisor must know the capabilities of the SDM. Selected soldiers must bring a copy of their last M16 series qualification scorecard showing a qualification of at least Sharpshooter. Selected soldiers must be in the pay grade of E-2 through E-7 and O-1 through O-2. The SDMC is listed in the ATRRS system under School Code 1029 and course number MTC-005. All applications must be made through the ATRRS system. This course is conducted by the National Guard Marksmanship Training Center (NGMTC) at Camp Joseph T. Robinson, North Little Rock, Arkansas and accepts up to 24 students per class. 5. Students must bring the following items: a. b. c. d. e. f. g. LBE to include belt, suspenders, magazine pouch, canteen, poncho, and helmet Small calculator for Range Estimation Wet/cold weather gear Enough uniforms to last two- weeks (one-day laundry service is available) Enough money for your personal needs and for any emergencies Writing material for taking notes Two copies of your orders, a copy of your flight itinerary if you arrived by aircraft

h. Copy of your pre-execution checklist. i. Cleaning Kit 6. The NGMTC provides Mobile Training Teams (MTTs) that conduct SDMCs to the
individual states. All states are eligible and encouraged to request the SDM course to augment their state marksmanship and training program.

7. Questions concerning the SDMC or SDMC MTTs may be directed to the MTC Schools,
(DSN) 962-4531/4505 or (Comm) (501) 212-4531/4505.

Small Arms Simulations Course (SASC) 1. This course trains designated students in the set-up, operation, and maintenance of individual and squad level small arms trainers. Students become system operators and use the Fire Arms Training System (FATS), Engagement Skills Trainer (EST
34

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 3

2000), and the Beam Hit Laser Marksmanship Training System (LMTS) as a means of effectively training soldiers, teams, crews, and squads in the use of small and supporting arms. This SASC focuses on teaching operators to employ each system, to learn its operation, and how to train personnel on each system. Operators learn system maintenance and how to incorporate systems into qualification, unit readiness, and mobilization training. Training quality can be directly linked to operator effectiveness and their ability to maximize the capabilities of simulations. 2. Soldiers graduating from this course must complete the following tasks: Understand principles of small arms simulations in operation and in theory Conduct system set-up Activate and perform initial system operations checks Operate and train individual soldiers, crews, teams, and squads in a multitude of marksmanship, collective, and courses of fire scenarios e. Perform operator preventive maintenance f. Troubleshoot systems and weapon faults and apply corrective action. 3. The SASC course is listed in ATRRS under School Code 1029 and course number MTC-006. All applications must be made through the ATRRS system. This is a two-week course limited to E-4 through E-8 and O-1 through O-2. This course is conducted by the National Guard Marksmanship Training Center (NGMTC) at Camp Joseph T. Robinson, North Little Rock, Arkansas. 4. Students should bring the following items: a. b. c. d. Enough uniforms to last two-weeks (one-day laundry service is available) Money for personal needs and any emergencies Writing material for taking notes One copy of your orders, a copy of your flight itinerary if you arrived by aircraft e. Copy of your pre-execution checklist. 5. The NGMTC also provides Mobile Training Teams (MTTs) to conduct SASCs in individual states. This expansion of the SASC program allows states to increase their instructor base. All states are eligible and encouraged to request the SASC course to augment their state marksmanship and training programs. 6. Questions concerning the SASC course or SASC MTTs may be directed to the NGMTC, (DSN) 962-4531/4505 or (Comm) (501) 212-4531/4505. Sniper School TATS 1. The Sniper School TATS provides training in sniper specific skills to National Guard personnel. Subjects covered during the course include, but are not specific to, long range marksmanship, stalking and individual movement, call for fire and close air support, armor and weapon identification, basic ballistics and sniper employment options for specific mission requirements. a. b. c. d.

35

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 3

2. The Sniper School TATS is limited to E-3 through E-7 personnel. Exceptions are made to the grade requirements for personnel such as Scout Platoon Leaders, and Special Forces “A” team members. Soldiers must be in a combat arms MOS to attend. 3. The Sniper School TATS is listed in the ATRRS system under School Code 1029 and Course number 071-ASIB4 Phase I and Phase II. All applications must be made through the ATRRS system. Personnel must meet the following prerequisites to attend: minimum APFT score of 70% in each event, E-3 through E-7 grade restriction. 4. This course is primarily oriented toward Sniper Operations in support of infantry battalions with training on urban and civil disturbance operations. The course is now conducted in two 2-week phases. Phase I is primarily marksmanship training with the M24 weapon system while Phase II is a combination of marksmanship and field craft training. You must successfully complete Phase I before you can attend Phase II. 5. Graduates of the Sniper School TATS can be utilized to conduct state level sniper familiarization training and assist in the selection of other personnel within the state to attend the Sniper School TATS. Only successful graduates who hold the 11B MOS will be awarded the Additional Skill Identifier (ASI) B4 Sniper. 6. Each class is limited to 32 students and the quotas are in high demand. Therefore, states should plan at least 6 months prior to a class date to input prospective students into ATRRS. The NGMTC is responsible for providing Mobile Training Teams (MTT’s) that conduct Sniper School TATS’s upon approved requests, at individual states. This expansion of the Sniper School TATS program allows states to accelerate their instructor base of trainers to assist and conduct sniper training. Written requests are required NLT 120 days prior to the start date to allow for adequate planning and staffing. All states are eligible and encouraged to request the Sniper School TATS course to augment their state marksmanship and training program. 7. Questions concerning the Sniper course or Sniper MTTs may be directed to the NGMTC, (DSN) 962-4531/4505 or (Comm) (501) 212-4531/4505. Close Precision Engagement Course (CPEC)
1. The Close Precision Engagement Course (CPEC) is 19 days in length and is designed primarily to train US Air Force Security Forces and Special Operations personnel. What makes this course even more unique is that it is open to females. Students receive training in advanced marksmanship skills, firing at moving targets and precision firing. Students also are trained in intelligence gathering techniques, field craft techniques to include stalking, target detection, range estimation, land navigation utilizing the Leica Viper II global positioning system and more. Students will also receive training on the x4 Day Optic Sight (DOS) commercially known as the Advanced Combat Optical Gun site (ACOG). 2. Students are introduced to Sharpshooter employment options in support of Air Base Defense Operations, Operations Other than War, Nuclear Convoys, Nuclear Launch Facilities, Emergency Service Team and Counter-Terrorism support roles. In addition, students will participate in a 24-hour field training exercise utilizing all skills that have been taught during the course.

36

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 3

3. CPEC is funded by Headquarters Air Force Security Forces Center with travel and per diem for students coming from the student’s parent unit. Training is limited to A1C through MSgt. Exceptions to the grade requirements are made on a case-by-case basis by the schools NCOIC/OIC 4. All requests for active duty airmen must be schedule through Headquarters Air Force Security Forces Center Training Branch. All personnel must meet the following prerequisites to attend: must be a volunteer with commanders recommendation, rank of A1C to MSgt, AFSC of 3P0 or 3P1 (either may be waived by NCOIC/OIC), must consistently qualify expert with assigned weapon, 1 year retain ability in service, no history of drug or alcohol abuse, and must be dependable. In addition all students will be required to take the Air Force Fitness Evaluation and score a minimum of 75% in each event for his/her age group. 5. Graduates of CPEC may be utilized to conduct state and unit level CPE training and assist in the selection of other personnel within the state or unit to attend the CPEC. 6. Class load is a minimum of 24 students and the classes fill up quickly. 7. Please review the Letter of Instruction in Chapter 5 - Air Guard Information for detailed class requirements and more information. Questions concerning the course may be directed to the following: TSgt Sean Wallace at (DSN) 962-4559 or (Comm) (501) 212-4559 sean.wallace@ar.ngb.army.mil; or Maj. Victor Marcelle at (DSN) 962-4534 or (Comm) (501) 212-4534 victor.marcelle@ar.ngb.army.mil. 8. FY08 Course Dates: #08-001 #08-002 #08-003 #08-004 28 Nov – 9 Dec 07 18 Feb – 7 Mar 08 14 Apr – 2 May 08 18 Aug – 5 Sep 08

37

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 4

CHAPTER 4 COMPETITIVE TRAINING EVENTS SUBJECT: All Guard Marksmanship Teams 1. The following teams represent the National Guard in national and international level competitions: a. Combat Team b. Sniper Team c. Service Rifle Team 2. There are approximately 100 highly trained Guardsmen who compete with the above teams. Their mission is to develop the highest degree of marksmanship proficiency in competitive and training activities. Members of these teams are utilized as instructors to assist in the conduct of NGMTC Clinics, NGMTC Training Courses, and state weapons qualification programs. In addition, outstanding performers on these teams may be selected to represent the United States in international competitions such as Australian Army Skill at Arms Meeting (AASAM), Canadian Forces Small Arms Competition (CFSAC), and the Territorial Army Skill at Arms Meeting in Bisley, England. Currently the programs are not allowed to send team members OCONUS for any events as per the C, NGB guidance.SUBJECT: All Guard Combat Team 1. MISSION. The mission of the All Guard Combat Teams is to validate and sustain perishable marksmanship skills, while representing the National Guard in competitive marksmanship training events. 2. TASK. a. Compete Internationally & Nationally in realistic battle focused marksmanship training events b. Demonstrate proficiency with standard issue rifle & pistol in advanced courses of fire which replicate combat conditions 3. PURPOSE. a. Develop subject matter experts to enhance unit training, increase mobilization readiness, battlefield survivability b. Train, compete and win competitive marksmanship training events 4. COMPETITIONS. The All Guard Combat Team will participate in the following scheduled events based on funding availability, team priorities, and shooting performance. Not all team members or coaches attended all competitions or training sessions. a. Tryout/Training Session b. AFSAM c. Warrior Challenge d. D & L
38

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 4

5. Members of the All Guard Combat Team are also instructors at the National Guard Marksmanship Training Center School. Knowledge gained though competitive events has aided in the development of subject matter experts and more knowledgeable instructors. The All Guard Combat Team is an excellent example of how training is sustained and validated by the competitive program. 6. For additional information, contact CW3 Donnie Kinder, NGMTC Logistics Officer, (DSN) 962-4540 or (Comm) (501) 212-4540 or email at donnie.kinder@ar.ngb.army.mil. SUBJECT: All Guard Sniper Team 1. MISSION. The mission of the All Guard Sniper Teams is to validate and sustain perishable marksmanship skills, while representing the National Guard in competitive marksmanship training events. 2. TASK. a. Compete Internationally & Nationally in sniper craft and long range marksmanship training events. b. Demonstrate proficiency with sniper weapon systems and equipment. 3. PURPOSE. a. Develop subject matter experts to enhance unit training, increase mobilization readiness, battlefield survivability. b. Train, compete and win competitive marksmanship training events. 4. COMPETITIONS. The All Guard Sniper Team will participate in the following scheduled events based on funding availability, team priorities, and shooting performance. Not all team members or coaches attended all competitions or training sessions. a. Tryout Session b. International Sniper c. FNH USA Counter Sniper d. International Tactical Rifleman's Championship 5. Members of the All Guard Sniper Team are also instructors at the National Guard Sniper School or instructors for the Air Guard Close Precision Engagement Course. Knowledge gained though Sniper competitions has aided in more qualified and knowledgeable subject matter experts. Members of the All Guard Sniper team are responsible for training over 330 soldiers and airman this year. The All Guard Sniper Team is an excellent example of how training is sustained and validated by the competitive program. 6. For additional information, contact SFC Bret Boatright, NGMTC Sniper NCOIC, (DSN) 962-4549 or (Comm) (501) 212-4549 or email at bret.boatright@ar.ngb.army.mil. SUBJECT: All Guard Rifle Team 1. The mission of the All Guard Rifle team is to represent the National Guard in competitive events in the service rifle discipline. The All Guard team will provide knowledgeable

39

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 4

marksmanship trainers, and aid in the development of more efficient equipment for combat mobilizations. 2. The following soldiers and airmen represent the National Guard on the All Guard Service Rifle team in state, regional, national and international level competitions:
                 Maj Victor A. Marcelle, AR ANG Maj Shannon Jordan, OK ARNG Capt Rodney Jenkins, WV ANG WO1 David Kerin, PA ARNG MSG George Morgan, PA ARNG SFC J.R. Treharne, WI ARNG MSgt Claude Trahan, VT ANG MSgt Mitchell Clark, VT ARNG TSgt Malcolm Hayes, AL ANG TSgt Gregory Blackstock, MD ANG TSgt Garey Diefenderfer, PA ARNG SSgt Daniel Rodriquez, AZ ANG SSgt Stuart Mackey, UT ANG SGT Leigh Jenks, VA ARNG SGT Richard Zolnowski, SD ARNG SGT Allen Spiker, OR ARNG SGT Mark Prince, TN ARNG E-Mail: victor.marcelle@ar.ngb.army.mil  E-Mail: Shannon.jordan@us.army.mil  E-mail: rodney.jenkins@wv.mart.ang.af.mil  E-Mail: david.kerin@us.army.mil  E-Mail: GEMcoach@aol..com  E-mail: j.treharne@us.army.mil  E-Mail: claude.trahan@vtburl.ang.af.mil  E-Mail: Mitchell.clark@vtburl.ang.af.mil  E-Mail: sonny@hayeswasteoil.com  E-mail: Gregory.blackstock@mdbalt.ang.af.mil  Email: d12fam@comcast.net  E-Mail: Daniel.rodriquez@aztucs.ang.af.mil  DSN: 245-2410 E-mail: ljenks@ncis.navy.mil  E-mail: richard.zolnowski@us.army.mil  E-mail: allen.spiker@us.army.mil  E-mail: mark.a.prince@us.army.mil 

3. Members of these teams are utilized as instructors to assist in the conduct of Marksmanship Programs/Clinics, NGMTC Training Courses, and state weapons qualification programs. In addition, outstanding performers on these teams may be selected to represent the United States in international competitions. 4. If you have a soldier or airman that is interested in developing advanced marksmanship skills and competing against the best with the All Guard Rifle Team please contact: Major Vereen, All Guard Rifle Team Program Manager, (DSN) 962-4541 or (Comm) (501) 212-4541 or email at chuck.c.vereen@ar.ngb.army.mil. SUBJECT: MAC Regions 1. SCOPE: The MAC Region Matches are designed to provide a battle focused marksmanship competition in each of the seven MAC Regions. These matches are the second priority in the CNGB guidance for competitive training events. The matches are battle focused marksmanship competitions, designed to validate and sustain perishable marksmanship skills essential to mobilization readiness and success. 2. NGMTC Responsibilities: a. b. c. d. Provides planning guidance. Provides limited funding for support staff. Provides staff support assistance. Governs consistency in region competitions.

40

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 4

e. Provides ammunition. f. Provide feedback to the Match OIC 3. MAC Regional Chair Responsibilities: a. b. c. d. e. f. a. b. c. d. e. Coordinates and plans with NGMTC Publishes & distributes the Official Match Program and Official Results Bulletin Provides leadership and planning Insure adequate resources for match Execute AAR Assisting the MAC Chairman and Match Director Support and train their state teams Provides transportation for the teams Insure weapons and equipment are secure Insure all personnel are on orders

4. SMC’s Responsibilities:

5. For additional information, contact Major Victor Marcelle at DSN 962-4534 or commercial (501) 212-4534 or email at victor.marcelle@ar.ngb.army.mil.

Marksmanship Advisory Council Regions
41

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 4

SUBJECT: Winston P. Wilson Championships 1. The Winston P. Wilson (WPW) Championship Matches were named in honor of Major General Winston P. Wilson, former Chief, National Guard Bureau, as a tribute to his support and leadership in the National Guard Marksmanship Program. The matches are part of the competitive marksmanship program implemented by the National Guard Marksmanship Training Center. 2. It all began back in 1971 with the National Match Rifle and Pistol competition. Combat rifle, combat pistol and light machine gun were added in 1976. When the light machine gun competitive matches were first added, they were for teams only. Individual competition was added in 1978. Sniper competition was added in 1991. The number of competitors in the Wilson Matches has grown from 316 shooters in 1971 to over 2000 in the 1980's. 3. The WPW Matches are conducted annually in October at Camp Robinson, North Little Rock, Arkansas by the NGMTC. The matches are designed to promote marksmanship by providing high level training and competition among states. Particular emphasis is devoted to improving individual battle-focused shooting skills, team spirit, physical fitness and leadership qualities of the Army and Air National Guard participants. 4. Current competitions are focused towards combat rifle and combat pistol. Each of the fifty (50) states and four (4) territories are authorized to enter a team in each of the competitions. All competitors bring their own assigned military weapon(s). All teams must consist of not less than 50 percent new shooters for team match competition. 5. Safety is stressed on all ranges to shooters and support personnel during the Wilson Matches. 6. The Wilson Matches are the beginning of the National Guard’s shooting year, culminating

ONE
CONNECTICUT MAINE MASSACHUSETTS NEW HAMPSHIRE NEW JERSEY NEW YORK RHODE ISLAND VERMONT

TWO
D.C. DELAWARE MARYLAND PENNSYLVANIA VIRGINIA WEST VIRGINIA

THREE
ALABAMA FLORIDA GEORGIA KENTUCKY MISSISSIPPI NORTH CAROLINA PUERTO RICO SOUTH CAROLINA TENNESSE VIRGIN ISLANDS

FOUR
ILLINOIS INDIANA MICHIGAN MINNESOTA OHIO WISCONSIN

FIVE
ARKANSAS IOWA KANSAS LOUISIANA MISSOURI NEBRASKA NEW MEXICO OKLAHOMA TEXAS

SIX
ALASKA IDAHO MONTANA NORTH DAKOTA OREGON SOUTH DAKOTA WASHINGTON WYOMING

SEVEN
ARIZONA CALIFORNIA COLORADO GUAM HAWAII NEVADA UTAH

42

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 4

almost a year later at the National Championships at Camp Perry, Ohio. The opportunity to compete in the matches is earned through statewide championships. The National Guard marksmanship program is designed to enhance individual proficiency in small arms and at the same time improve overall combat readiness. 7. For additional information, contact NGMTC, ATTN: Operations Section, (DSN) 962-4500 or (Comm.) (501) 212-4500. SUBJECT: Armed Forces Skill at Arms Meeting 1. The Armed Forces Skills At Arms Meeting is a multinational competition that was created to incorporate allied nations and joint U.S. Military forces into the MTC’s competitive events program. In order to maintain the heritage of the Winston P. Wilson Championship Matches, which are limited to U.S. National Guard troops, a discussion ensued and AFSAM was born. 2. The Armed Forces Skills at Arms Meeting (AFSAM), also conducted by the NGMTC and held annually, was created to promote marksmanship training and competition between United States military forces and allied nations. The international marksmanship exchange program offers soldiers from the U. S. and allied nations an opportunity to test marksmanship skills and weapons systems in battle-focused competition. This meeting affords opportunities for cross training on the host nation’s weapons, systems, techniques, tactics, and procedures. 3. AFSAM began in 1991 with three countries and 49 competitors. The U. S., Australia, and United Kingdom participated in seven marksmanship matches including an Obstacle Course, Combat Rifleman’s Course, Fire Team Assault match, Minuteman Award, and a Commander-in-Chief’s match. In 1992, competitors were split into two categories, combat rifle and combat pistol. Competitors from Belgium and Germany were among the 136 present. This nearly tripled the entries from the previous year. AFSAM 2007 consisted of 16 National/International combined rifle and pistol teams. 4. For additional information, contact NGMTC, ATTN: Operations Section, (DSN) 962-4500 or (Comm.) (501) 212-4500.
SUBJECT: ARMY EXCELLENCE IN COMPETITION (EIC)

1. Information and issue regarding Excellence in competition are addressed in the Army Regulation 350-66. The regulation discusses the scoring and award of credit points for Excellence in Competition Badges and Distinguished Designation Badges and the award of Distinguished Designation. The regulation applies to the Active Army, the Army National Guard, and the Army Reserve. 2. Excellence in competitions matches: a. Each individual is authorized to fire for credit points not more than four recognized EIC matches with each weapon (service rifle and service pistol) during the calendar year. b. An individual who fires any portion of a match is considered to have participated in the entire match. c. Credit is awarded for unassisted individual performance using the service rifle or service pistol. d. Total credit points for any one match constitute a “Leg”, and credit points are awarded towards any of the following43

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 4

(1) Distinguished Designation (2) EIC Badges (3) Distinguished Designation Badges 3. Award for credit Points a. Competitors are ranked in order of merit by score b. Credit points are awarded to the highest 10 percent of eligible non-Distinguished participants. c. For credit points to be awarded, the match must meet the following criteria: (1) Conform to the regulations governing the conduct of the match (2) Include at least ten eligible non-Distinguished competitors. (3) Be completed. d. A Bronze EIC Badge is awarded to Army competitors who earn their first credit points, regardless a value. e. A Silver EIC Badge is awarded to individuals when 20 credit points have been earned. f. Award of the appropriate Distinguished Designation Badge is made when an individual has earned 30 EIC credit points in recognized matches. g. Upon completion of an EIC match, the match director will report EIC match results to the USAMU. Commander, U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit ATTN: Custodian, Excellence in Competition Awards P.O. Box 55810 Fort Benning, GA 31905-5810 h. Commanders conducting matches accordingly to this regulation must forward one copy of the official bulletin and separate registration lists of rifle and pistol competitors in accordance to AR 350-66, chapter 4-2.

44

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 5

CHAPTER 5 AIR GUARD ORDERS INFORMATION
1 OCT 2007 Standard Operating Procedures - ANG Request for Orders

1. OIC/ NCOIC determine that an ANG team member must attend a competition/event. 2. OIC/ NCOIC or team member figures the cost of transportation, entry fee, rental car, daily lodging, meals and pay & allowances at the competition location. 3. OIC/ NCOIC sends a copy of the request for orders to the team member to fill out and return a copy to NGMTC/AIR for the issue of a fund cite letter. 4. ANG team member obtains permission of the unit commander to attend the competition. 5. ANG team member presents orders request to the unit orders specialist to obtain orders. 6. Once a fund cite letter is received, the orders specialist then inputs the order request into AROWS using the correct funding information listed, using WUC Code of JK. 7. NGMTC/AIR (Resource Advisor) validates workdays through the AROWS system. 8. Unit publishes orders with AROWS. 9. Team member makes his/her travel arrangements with unit transportation management office (TMO) and obtains commercial air ticket and rental car, if needed and attends the competition. 10. Team member completes the 1351-2-travel voucher and a certified copy of orders and submits them to their finance office to get paid. 11. Team member receives a copy of the travel voucher summary when the travel/per diem are paid by finance. Member also receives a leave and earnings statement (LES) for their pay and allowances. 12. Team member MUST send a copy of their orders (both front & backside), a legible copy of the travel voucher summary (paid voucher) and an airline ticket itinerary showing cost of the ticket to NGMTC/AIR. ANG Workday Terms Terms Used Unit Orders Section POC - Orders Specialist. Resource Advisor - Primary and alternate individual appointed by ANGRC. NGMTC/AIR primary is Maj. Victor A. Marcelle and the alternate is MSgt Lindsey K. Edenfield AROWS - Air National Guard Reserve Orders Writing System: Computer system used by units to publish orders. They cannot publish orders unless the orders request is approved by NGMTC/AIR Resource Advisor.

45

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 5

CHECKLIST OF EXAMPLES PACKAGE A. Example of Workday request form that OIC or team member submits to unit and NGMTC. B. Example of fund cites letter sent to member's unit orders section POC.

ANG Workday Request Form (Attachment 1) THRU: Team OIC/NCOIC TO: Team Members Unit (A copy to each) _______________ Date & NGMTC/AIR-Box 0 1 7 Attn: Major Victor A. Marcelle And MSgt Lindsey K. Edenfield Camp Robinson - Bldg. 4904 North Little Rock, AR 72199-9600

_________________________________________________________________________ Rank first name MI last name AGR/Tech/Trad/ Title 10?: (pick one) _________________________________________________________________________ SSN home address (street, city, state, zip code) home phone and email address _________________________________________________________________________ Unit & address unit telephone number (DSN) _________________________________________________________________________ Report to: (name and rank) (location) _________________________________________________________________________ Report date & time release date and time name of event _________________________________________________________________________ Team name/type of event _________________________________________________________________________ Unit orders section POC (rank/name) DSN and commercial phone and fax / email address _________________________________________________________________________ Submitted by: individual’s rank/name (printed) signature _________________________________________________________________________ Approved by: Team OIC/NCOIC rank/name (printed) signature _________________________________________________________________________ Mode of travel cost POV mileage (if used) entry fee cost _________________________________________________________________________ Rental car (yes/no) cost daily lodging rate / daily meal rate / daily pay & allowances After each trip, always send two (2) copies of orders, travel voucher summary and your airline

46

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 5

itinerary showing the cost to the MTC address above. Any questions please contact Major Marcelle at DSN: 962-4534 or commercial: 501-212-4534 or MSgt Edenfield at DSN 962-4513 or commercial: 501212-4513. Fax: DSN 962-4532, commercial: 501-212-4532. (DRAFT)
DEPARTMENTS OF THE ARMY AND THE AIR FORCE NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER CAMP J. T. ROBINSON-BOX 017 NORTH LITTLE ROCK, AR 72199-9600 4 October 2007

MEMORANDUM FOR 179th AW, SD ANG FROM: NGMTC/AIR – MAJ MARCELLE
SUBJECT: Competitive Training Fund Cites – FY08 (Marksmanship) 1. The FY08 Air National Guard fund cite for competitive training support is listed below: Workday Utilization Code (WUC) = JK Special Training Enlisted Travel and Per Diem Enlisted NGMTU ST ENL WUC JK 189AW MTU ST ENL ESP JK

(08-01-21.wpw)

2. You must contact Maj Marcelle to have future workdays processed and validated before using the fund cite again. 3. Special Training Enlisted workdays will be approved via AROWS, using the above listed codes for the following individual(s) to attend the Winston P. Wilson Match (WPW)/Armed Forces Skill at Arms Meeting (AFSAM) at Camp Robinson, AR 72199 during the period duty dates indicated below. Dates include travel days.

SrA Nathan Morehead

6-13 Oct 07

Travel by military air is directed. If military air is not available, Travel by government vehicle, commercial air or POV up to the cost of commercial air is authorized. Team Captains are required to ensure there are at least two passengers per POV. Variations in travel itinerary authorized. Member is authorized POV mileage from HOR to mil air departure site and return. Government lodging provided at no cost to the individual. Government meals are not available. Member will be in per diem status for meals. Rental vehicle is not authorized. Excess baggage is authorized. Member(s) are authorized to possess and transport government owned weapons. Transportation of government weapons aboard commercial aircraft is authorized IAW Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) Part 108.11 and Code of Federal Regulation Number 49, Section 175.10. Receipts must be obtained and attached with the travel voucher. 4. Please fax a copy of the individual orders within 24 hours of publication to DSN 962-4532 or commercial 501-212-4532. Provide a copy of completed travel voucher with voucher number and commercial airfare cost if applicable, within five (5) days of duty completion. We will be unable to support future request for ANG Competitive Events if we do not receive the above requested information. 5. Questions may be directed to this office at DSN 962-4534/4513 or commercial 501-212-4534/4513.

47

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 5

Victor A. Marcelle
VICTOR A. MARCELLE, Major, AR ANG NGMTC/AIR Workday Control Officer

SUBJECT: Close Precision Engagement Course (CPEC) CLOSE PRECISION ENGAGEMENT COURSE (CPEC) LETTER OF INSTRUCTION Welcome to the USAF Close Precision Engagement Course. When you volunteer to undergo training here, you accept one of the most demanding challenges the USAF has to offer. Marksmen and Sharpshooters have a proud heritage, which can be traced back to the Revolutionary War. Upon completion of training you will be a member of that heritage. It takes a special type of individual to meet the challenge and continue this proud tradition. The highest standards have been set; it is now up to you to meet these standards. CPEC PURPOSE To conduct resident Sharpshooter team operations training by providing technical, tactical and leadership skills necessary to perform Sharpshooter tasks across the full spectrum of Security Forces Operations. CPEC SCOPE CPEC is 19 days in length with an average of 15 hours training each day, 7 days a week. The course is divided into 4 blocks of instruction. a. Advanced marksmanship designed to train individuals to engage point targets successfully with long range precision fire up to 850 meters. b. Intelligence gathering techniques and field craft c. Sharpshooter team planning and operational employment d. FTX (field training exercise) WHERE AND WHEN TO REPORT Students will report to the National Guard Marksmanship Training Center (NGMTC) Bldg. 4901 located at Camp Joseph T. Robinson, North Little Rock, AR no later than 0800 hrs on report date. In processing will begin at 0800 hrs in Bldg. 4901 on the report date. Any student arriving after 1300 hrs on the class reporting date will not be processed into the school. All students will take the Air Force Fitness Evaluation at 0600 hrs on day two of training. Students must achieve a 75% on the evaluation. Students failing to achieve a first time “GO” on the fitness evaluation will not be considered for “Honor Graduate” however may still successfully graduate the course. Graduation will be at approximately 0800 hrs, on the last day of training.

48

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 5

CPEC COMMANDER RESPONSIBILITIES Commanders are responsible to ensure that students meet all prerequisites. If students do not meet the prerequisites, they will be returned to their units. The following is a list of prerequisites for students attending CPEC: a. VOLUNTEER: (Non-waiverable) must be a volunteer with Commander's recommendation. b. RANK: A1C through MSgt (Waiverable through CPEC OIC/NCOIC). c. AFSC: 3P0 or 3P1 series (Waiverable through CPEC OIC/NCOIC). d. WEAPONS QUALIFICATION: (Non-waiverable) Consistent expert with M4/M16 or assigned service weapon. e. RETAINABILITY: (Non-waiverable) 1-year minimum. f. VISION: (Non-waiverable) 20/200 correctable to 20/20. g. DISCIPLINE: (Non-waiverable) No history of drug or alcohol abuse. h. No record(s) of disciplinary actions. i. DEPENDABLE: (Non-waiverable) must be capable of working alone under adverse conditions for extended periods of time. STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES The following items must be in the student’s possession at time of in processing or student will be returned to home station at unit expense. 5 copies of orders Deployment jacket for medical records Copy of last physical AF Form 522, USAF Ground Weapons Training Data Card (weapons qualification card that indicates M4/M16 expert within last six months) e. Identification cards and metal ID Tags w/chain CPEC REQUIRED PACKING LIST a. Sleeping bag and/or sheets blanket and pillowcase b. Large Rucksack complete w/frame c. Poncho w/ Poncho Liner d. 2 one-quart canteens or camelback e. Waterproof Bag f. Camouflage Face Paint g. BDU's 4 sets (hot weather or regular) h. Boots (combat or jungle), 2 pair
49

a. b. c. d.

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 5

i. BDU cap, 2 each j. Field jacket w/green liner or Gortex (seasonal but wet weather is common in AR) k. Undergarments, toiletries and additional items as necessary (seasonal) l. Earplugs with case m. Pad locks, 2 each (combination or key locks) n. 1 Boonie Hat o. Lensatic Compass (can be provided) p. Civilian clothes (suitable for 5 days) q. Calculator (non-solar), 2 each r. Medium weight Sleeping bag (issue) or Gortex sleep system s. Flight gloves (green or black) or cold weather gloves t. Red lens flashlight (any type) ADDITIONAL EQUIPMENT (OPTIONAL) a. Small handsaw and pruning shears b. Knife (No switchblades or knives with blades over 6 inches.) c. Camouflage sniper's veil d. Map protractor CPEC ADDITIONAL INFORMATION USAF Security Force MAJCOMS have first priority on all available class seats. All weapon systems and ammunition are provided by the NGMTC. However, if you prefer to train with your unit’s weapon this can be accomplished with prior approval from the course OIC/NCIOC. Note: Students are expected to be in top physical condition upon arrival. Students should be prepared to train 15 hours per day, 7 days per week in adverse field conditions with extreme physical and mental stress encountered. Students should begin heavy hydration one month prior to arrival.

50

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 5

Any questions should be directed to the following:
TSgt Sean Wallace at (DSN) 962-4559 or (Comm) (501) 212-4559 sean.wallace@ar.ngb.army.mil; or Maj. Victor Marcelle at (DSN) 962-4534 or (Comm) (501) 212-4534 victor.marcelle@ar.ngb.army.mil.

Mailing address: National Guard Marksmanship Training Center Attn: Close Precision Engagement Course Box 11, Bldg. 4901, Camp Robinson North Little Rock, Arkansas 72199-9600 EIC FOR ANG PERSONNEL All engraving of badges and input/verification of scores are handled at NGMTC. To access your information you will need to register (see below). All other questions can be directed to the personnel also listed below. 1. To register as an individual in SAIS go to the following URL: (https://sais.afsv.af.mil/SAISmil/AFServices/addUser.asp). Select Fitness for the area and complete the registration. You will then be prompted to request access. Select Excellence-in-Competition, get list, and select Lindsey Edenfield or Victor Marcelle as the contact. 2. Requests for information by ANG personnel concerning EIC credit point status or replacement of badges may be made by writing to: NGMTC ATTN: MSgt Lindsey K. Edenfield Bldg. 4904, Box 17 Camp Robinson, North Little Rock, Arkansas 72199-9600 or contact the following: Maj. Victor Marcelle DSN 962-4534 /Comm (501) 212-4534 victor.marcelle@ar.ngb.army.mil MSgt Lindsey K. Edenfield DSN 962-4513/Comm (501) 212-4513 lindsey.edenfield@ar.ngb.army.mil
BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF THE AIR FORCE AIR FORCE INSTRUCTION 34-227 15 NOVEMBER 2004 Services EXCELLENCE-IN-COMPETITION (EIC)

51

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 5

COMPLIANCE WITH THIS PUBLICTION IS MANDATORY NOTICE: This publication is available digitally on the AFDPO WWW site at: http://www.e-publishing.af.mil.

OPR:

AFSVA/SVPAF (SSgt Guillermo A. Salazar) Supersedes AFI 34-127, 1 March 1997

Certified by: HQ USAF/SVP (Col J. A. Swigart-Smith) Pages: 6 Distribution: F

This instruction implements AFPD 34-2, Air Force Community Service Programs. It explains Air Force qualifications and procedures for awarding United States Air Force Excellence-In-Competition (EIC) Badges and the Distinguished International Shooter Badge. Applies to all Air Force personnel, to include Air National Guard (ANG) and Air Force Reserve personnel who have earned or wish to earn the awards. Requires the collection and maintenance of information protected by the Privacy Act of 1974. SUMMARY OF REVISIONS This interim change (IC) 2004-1 (Attachment 2) expands and clarifies policies for eligible competitions, transfer of points for points earned in a non-military status, and package submission criteria. A bar (\) indicates revision since previous edition. This revision adds additional point earning potentials and allows for the transfer of points for distinguished designation for non-military personnel. It also updates criteria for eligibility and contact information. 1. Types of Awards. Unites States Air Force EIC Badges are awarded to eligible personnel who attain an outstanding degree of achievement in certain recognized, individual competitions with the service rifle and pistol. 1.1 The badges awarded are: The Air Force Distinguished Rifleman Badge. The Air Force Distinguished Pistol Shot Badge. The Air Force Silver Excellence-In-Competition Rifle Badge with Wreath. The Air Force Silver Excellence-In-Competition Pistol Badge with Wreath. The Air Force Bronze Excellence-In-Competition Rifle Badge with Wreath. The Air Force Bronze Excellence-In-Competition Pistol Badge with Wreath.

52

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 5

-

The Air Force Bronze Excellence-In-Competition Rifle Badge. The Air Force Bronze Excellence-In-Competition Pistol Badge. The Distinguished International Shooter Badge (awarded by the National Board for the Promotion of Rifle Practice [NBPRP] for outstanding performance in major international competition).

2. Qualifying for the Distinguished Rifleman or Distinguished Pistol Shot Badge. Personnel must earn at least 30 credit points in recognized EIC rifle or pistol matches (national match or combat match) and may be awarded both badges if they earn the required points. 3. Qualifying for EIC Badges. The Air Force awards EIC badges for excellence in individual competitions only. EIC badges or credit points earned by an eligible member of another military service, a civilian, or competing in another services EIC match, will be counted as credit toward the award of the appropriate distinguished badge. 3.1 Between 1 January and 31 December of each year, an eligible member may compete in no more than four EIC service pistol or rifle matches as listed below. If authorized and eligible under the rules established by the match sponsor, you may compete in: National Trophy Individual Match National Rifle Association (NRA) Regional or State Championships (limited to three a year) A service sponsored match (which will count as one of the three matches authorized above) 3.2 Individuals who have no points towards the distinguished badge for the weapon type being used in the competition, rifle or pistol, may compete in four elementary-level EIC competitions sponsored by Headquarters, United States Air Force (HQ USAF) and approved by Headquarters, Air Force Services Agency, Air Force Fitness and Sports Branch (HQ AFSVA/SVPAF), the United States Army, or the National Guard. Individuals may receive award points from Army and National Guard State Championships on the recommendation of the United States Army Marksmanship Unit EIC Custodian, Fort Benning GA 31905-5810. 3.3 Individuals may compete in military service sponsored Combat Rifle or Combat Pistol EIC matches, provided they do not compete in the National Match and EIC match with the same type weapon (rifle or pistol) at the same competition. 3.4 To take part in more than two NRA Regional or State Championship EIC matches in the same calendar year, with the same type of weapon, ANG personnel must obtain an advance waiver from the National Guard Marksmanship Training Center (NGMTC), and active duty personnel must obtain an advance waiver from HQ AFSVA/SVPAF. 4. Qualifying for the Distinguished International Shooter Badge. The NBPRP awards this badge to any United States citizen who places first, second, or third in rifle, pistol, or shotgun competition (individual or team). The badge is also awarded to members of United States international teams who place in the top 15 percent of all competitions in the Olympic Games,

53

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 5

Pan American Games, World Shooting Championship, World Shotgun Championship, Champions of the America's, and the World Air Gun Championships. 5. How Credit Points Are Awarded/Computed: 5.1 Credit points are awarded, based on score and standings, to the highest-scoring 10 percent of the non-distinguished (personnel with less than 30 points towards a distinguished badge) participants in an EIC match. The 10 percent includes all eligible non-distinguished competitors who begin the match. Credit points are awarded as follows: 5.1.1. Highest one-sixth of the top 10 percent credit points. 5.1.2. Remaining highest one-third of the top 10 percent 8 credit points. 5.1.3. Remainder of the top 10 percent 6 credit points. 5.1.4. All top 10 percent in elementary level EIC matches only will receive 4 credit points. 5.2 In computing both the number of participants to receive awards and the credit points to be awarded, officials resolve fractions of 0.6 or higher to the next higher number and drop smaller fractions. The total number of individuals to receive credit points cannot exceed the number determined by application of the 10 percent rule. For example, if total of 108 nondistinguished competitors began the match, 10.8 (or 11) individuals would be eligible for credit points. These points are awarded as follows: 5.2.1. Highest one sixth of the top 10 percent 2 (two 10-point winners) 5.2.2. Remaining highest one-third of the top 10 percent 3 (three 8-point winners) 5.2.3. Remainder of the top 10 percent 6 (six 6-point winners) 5.3 The package to conduct an EIC match can be downloaded from https://wwr.afsv.af.mil/FT/Sports/Shooting.htm, or requested from HQ AFSVA/SVPAF, DSN 487-5470. Once the package is in hand, use the samples in the package and request approval for the EIC match from HQ AFSVA/SVPAF. Credit points for elementary competition are awarded to participants who score in the top 10 percent of non-distinguished participants and have no credit points towards the distinguished badge for the weapon type being used in the competition. Credit points for national, state and regional level combat competitions are awarded to participants who score in the top 10 percent of all non-distinguished participants, and have less than 30 points towards a distinguished badge. 6. How Awards Are Granted. Ask the sponsor of each EIC match to send copies of the official match results to HQ AFSVA/SVPAF, 10100 Reunion Place, Suite 402, San Antonio TX 782164138. Copies must contain your full name, grade, social security number, organization, duty station, and home address. The Director of Civilian Marksmanship notifies HQ AFSVA/SVPAF when members achieve credit points in NBPRP-sponsored competitions. HQ AFSVA/SVPAF keeps a record of awards for each Air Force member who earns credit points in an EIC match. It awards appropriate badges as follows: 6.1 Individuals who earn the initial four credit points in elementary-level competitions with wither the service rifle, service pistol, combat rifle, or combat pistol, will receive a Bronze

54

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 5

EIC Rifle or Pistol Badge. Only individuals who have no credit points toward the distinguished badge are eligible for this award. 6.2 Individuals who earn six credit points with the service rifle, service pistol, combat rifle, or combat pistol, will receive a Bronze EIC Rifle or Pistol Badge with a distinctive wreath. 6.3 Individuals who earn 20 credit points with the service rifle, service pistol, combat rifle, or combat pistol, will receive a Silver EIC Rifle or Pistol Badge with a distinctive wreath. 6.4 Individuals who earn 30 credit points with the service rifle, service pistol, combat rifle, or combat pistol, will receive the Distinguished Rifleman or Distinguished Pistol Shot Badge. 6.5 Individuals may call DSN 487-5470 or write to HQ AFSVA/SVPAF to check on points earned; the match the points were earned; and the total number of credit points towards the distinguished rifle or pistol badge. 6.5.1 Transfer of Distinguished Designation. Credit points held by non-distinguished military personnel and civilians who become members of the U.S. Air Force may be transferred and applied toward Air Force Distinguished Designation. Civilians or military personnel from other services who attained Distinguished Designation prior to entry in the U. S. Air Force may be so recognized by the Air Force upon proper documentation and may be awarded a distinguished badge if appropriate.

7. Presentation, Disposition, and Recording of Awards(s). HQ AFSVA/SVPAF announces each award of an EIC badge, Air Force Distinguished Rifleman Badge, or Air Force Distinguished Pistol Shot Badge with an official memorandum. 1.1. HQ AFSVA/SVPAF mails the awards, together with a copy of the official memorandum, to the individual. 1.2. According to AFI 36-2608, Military Personnel Records Systems, badges awarded are not documented in the individual's Unit Personnel Record Group. 2. Control of Badges. HQ AFSVA/SVPAF distributes all badges by mail. For guidance on wearing badges, see AFI 36-2903, Dress and Personal Appearance of Air Force Personnel. 2.1. HQ AFSVA/SVPAF budgets, procures, and stocks the badges as necessary. 2.2. Badges are issued to Air Force members only. For information on replacement badges for active duty personnel, call HQ AFSVA/SVPAF at DSN 487-5470. ANG personnel may call the NGMTC at DSN 962-4534. Individuals may replace their badges at their own expense. ARTHUR J. MEYERS Director of Services Attachment 1 GLOSSARY OF REFERENCES AND SUPPORTING INFORMATION References

55

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 5

AFPD 34-23, Air Force Community Service Programs AFI 36-2608, Military Personnel Records System AFI 36-2903, Dress and Personal Appearance of Air Force Personnel Abbreviations and Acronyms AFI - Air Force Instruction AFPD – Air Force Policy Directive AFSVA – Air Force Services Agency ANG – Air National Guard EIC – Excellence-in-Competition HQ – Headquarters NBPRP – National Board of the Promotion of Rifle Practice NGMTC – National Guard Marksmanship Training Center NRA – National Rifle Association SVPAF – Air Force Fitness and Sports Branch USAF - United States Air ForceAttachment 2 INTERIM CHANGE 2004-1 TO AFI 34-227, EXCELLENCE IN COMPETITION (EIC) 15 NOVEMBER 2004 SUMMARY OF REVISIONS OPR: AFSVA/SVPAF (SSgt Guillermo A. Salazar Certified by: HQ USAF/SVP (Col J. A. Swigart-Smith) This interim change (IC) 2004-1 (Attachment 2) expands and clarifies policies for eligible competitions, transfer of points for points earned in a non-military status, and package submission criteria. A star (h) indicates revision since previous edition. This revision adds additional point earning potentials and allows for the transfer of points for distinguished designation for non-military personnel. It also updates criteria for eligibility and contact information. 1.1 Credit points are awarded, based on score and standings, to the highest-scoring 10 percent of the non-distinguished (personnel with less than 30 points towards a distinguished badge) participants in an EIC match. The 10 percent includes all eligible non-distinguished competitors who begin the match. Credit points are awarded as follows: 5.1.1. Highest one-sixth of the top 10 percent 10 credit points. 5.1.2. Remaining highest one-third of the top 10 percent 8 credit points. 5.1.3. Remainder of the top 10 percent 6 credit points.

56

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

CHAPTER 5

5.1.4. All top 10 percent in elementary level EIC matches only will receive 4 credit points. 5.3. The package to conduct an EIC match can be downloaded from https://www- r.afsv.af.mil/FT/Sports/Shooting.htm or requested from HA AFSVA/SVPAF, DSN 487-5470. Once the package is in hand, use the samples in the package and request approval for the EIC match from HA AFSVA/SVPAF. Credit points for elementary competition are awarded to participants who score in the top 10 present of non-distinguished participants and have no credit points towards the distinguished badge for the weapon type being used in the competition. Credit points for national, state and regional level combat competitions are awarded to participants who score in the top 10 percent of all nondistinguished participants, and have less than 30 points towards a distinguished badge. 1.6 Transfer of Distinguished Designation. Credit points held by non-distinguished military personnel and civilians who become members of the U. S. Air Force may be transferred and applied toward Air Force Distinguished Designation. Civilians or military personnel from other services who attained Distinguished Designation prior to entry in the U. S. Air Force may be so recognized by the Air Force upon proper documentation and may be awarded a distinguished badge if appropriate. 1.2 Badges are issued to Air Force members only. For information on replacement badges for active duty personnel, call HA AFSVA/SVPAF at DSN 487-5470. ANG personnel may call the NGMTC at DSN 962-4534. Individuals may replace their badges at their own expense.

57

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

APPENDIX

HOME WEAPONS STORAGE PROGRAM

(STATE OR UNIT EXAMPLE PACKET)

NOTE: The attached packet is IAW NGB PAM 350-6 / ANG PAM 50-57 and AR 190-11. The packet may be used as a guide to develop packets for state or unit marksmanship teams.
(State or Unit Letterhead) (Office Symbol) MEMORANDUM FOR SUBJECT: Weapons Security Requirements – Letter of Instruction 1. Enclosed you will find a complete packet which contains the following forms: - Letter of Appointment - Police Records Check (DD Fm 369) - DA Form 7281-R - DD Form 2760 - Standards of Conduct Policy - Request for Exception for Home Storage - Statement of Responsibility - Strip Map to weapons storage (Date)

2. Send a copy of the Appointment Letter through you SMC for TAG concurrence. 3. Complete Police Records Check form - Mail the form to local police agency with two return addressed envelopes, one to you and one to the SMC. 4. Attach completed Police Records Check form to DA Form 7281-R and take it to your unit commander. - Have unit commander complete DA Form 7281-R IAW AR 190-11, paragraph 2-11, Personnel, pages 5-6. - Reference the Police Records Check to complete Sections IV and V. - The unit commander (ANG/ARNG) may sign the reviewing official blocks.

58

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

APPENDIX

5. Complete DD Form 2760. 6. Read, sign and date Standards of Conduct Policy. 7. Complete Request for Exception for Home Storage. 8. Complete Statement of Responsibility and provide strip map. 9. Make copies for your records and return all completed forms to the SMC. The SMC will submit a copy of the completed forms to NGMTC. 10. POC is the NGMTC Physical Security Officer at Comm (501) 212-4500, DSN 962-4500, fax ext. 4509.

(SMC Signature Block)

(State or Unit Letterhead) (Office Symbol) MEMORANDUM FOR State Marksmanship Coordinator SUBJECT: Appointment of Marksmanship Team Member 1. The (State or Unit) request TAG concurrence in the appointment of the following individual(s) listed in the enclosed attachment from your state to serves as a marksmanship team member. Concurrence requires your endorsement of this memorandum. 2. The selected individual’s participation as a marksmanship team member should not conflict with his or her state duties and responsibilities. The state will take full advantage of the ability and knowledge this individual possesses to enhance the marksmanship training program. 3. Period of appointment is authorized for one (1) year. The State Marksmanship Coordinator will be notified in writing if the individual is released before this period expires. 4. POC is the NGMTC Physical Security Officer at Comm (501) 212-4500, DSN 962-4500, fax ext. 4509. (Date)

(Name, Rank, Title of Program Manager)

1st End

(SMC, Date: ____________)

59

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

APPENDIX

To: (State or Unit)

Concur / Non-Concur. (Circle one)
SMC Printed Name ___________________________ Signature __________________________

(State or Unit Request for Exception for Home Storage)
(State or Unit Letterhead) (Office Symbol) MEMORANDUM THRU STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATOR, (Name, Rank & Title) STATE PHYSICAL SECURITY OFFICER, (Name, Rank & Title)) FOR THE ADJUTANT GENERAL OF (State’s Name) SUBJECT: Request for Exception for Home Storage / Request Waiver for Home Storage of Marksmanship Weapon(s) 1. I have been assigned to the (State or Unit) Marksmanship Team. In accordance with AR 190-11, paragraph 4-6, I request a waiver to store weapons issued to me by the National Guard to participate in marksmanship training and competition. 2. I am unable to store the weapons in an authorized arms room for the following reasons: (List State or Unit Reasons) 3. The following supporting documents are enclosed: Appointment Letter, Police Records Check, DA Form 7281-R, DD Form 2760, Standards of Conduct Policy, Statement of Responsibility, and a strip map of the route to my residence and weapon(s) storage area. (Date)

7 Encls 1. Appointment Letter 2. Police Records Check 3. DA 7281-R

(Team Member’s Signature Block)

60

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

APPENDIX

4. 5. 6. 7.

DD 2760 Standards of Conduct Policy Statement of Responsibility Strip Map

Approved / Disapproved. (Circle one)
SMC Printed Name ______________________________ Signature _______________________________

STANDARDS OF CONDUCT POLICY: 1. The National Guard Marksmanship Training Center (NGMTC) uses discipline to ensure the conduct of a team member conforms to the standards of conduct as set forth in this document. Members will be disciplined for a proven violation of these standards. All disciplinary proceedings will be fair and impartial. The Team OIC will protect his/her members from false accusations, but will not hesitate to punish proven misconduct. 2. The NGMTC recognizes that positive discipline such as encouragement, recognition, training, and counseling is to be continually exercised and are a primary duty of the OIC. Discipline may also take the form of a reprimand or removal from duty. 3. In the context of this standard, the team captain is the OIC who has been designated by the NGMTC to exercise command authority over the team. The OIC will nominate an NCOIC. The NCOIC will be a member of the team who has been specifically designated by the OIC and of adequate rank to exercise supervisory authority. 4. TIME LIMITATIONS: Disciplinary action must be initiated within one year from the date of the act of misconduct. 5. NOTICE OF COMPLAINT: Any member who has had a written complaint made against him/her will be promptly provided with a copy of the complaint by the OIC. After receiving notice of written complaint, the team member has the opportunity to make a written response. If the OIC summarily suspends a team member, NGMTC will be notified of the action as soon as possible. This notification will be followed by a written report to the NGMTC and will describe the specific reason for the suspension. A copy of this report will be forwarded to the team member who was summarily suspended. 6. HONESTY: Team members will be honest and truthful in dealing with their fellow team members, match officials, or members of the public and in any written or oral communication. 7. INSUBORDINATION: Team members will promptly obey any lawful order of an OIC or other staff member. This includes orders relayed form the OIC through a staff member. This also includes orders and instructions received from range officials. Team members will not obey an order that would require them to commit an illegal act. 8. IMMORAL CONDUCT: Team members will maintain a high-level of moral conduct in their personal and Guard business. 9. USED OF INTOXICANTS: Team members will not report for duty, or be on duty, while under the influence of intoxicants to any degree, or with an odor of intoxicants on their breath, or in any condition that renders the member unfit to report for duty.

61

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

APPENDIX

10. OIC’s RESPONSIBILITY: The OIC is responsible for the proper enforcement of these standards of conduct. The OIC will not knowingly permit any violation to these standards of conduct by a team member. The OIC will recommend disciplinary action when a violation occurs. 11. CONFORMANCE TO RULES AND REGULATIONS: Team members will obey and abide by all the rules and regulations of the NGMTC, whether stated in the form of a general order, special order, memorandum, or any other written directive. 12. PERSONAL APPEARANCE: Team members will maintain a neat and orderly appearance at all times in accordance with all applicable Army and Air Force Regulations. 13. COURTESY: Team members will be courteous to the public and other team members. Team members will be tactful in the performance of their duties, will control their tempers, exercise patience and discretion, and will not engage in argumentative discussions even in the face of extreme provocation. Team members will not use coarse, violent, profane, or insolent language or gestures. Team members must remember that they are serving as goodwill ambassadors on behalf of the National Guard and the United States of America. 14. USE AND CARE OF EQUIPMENT: Team members will use issued equipment only for its intended purpose, in accordance with established procedures and training instructions, and will not abuse, damage, or lose any issued equipment. All issued equipment will be maintained in proper order. Members who violate this standard may be required to reimburse the National Guard for the replacement or repair cost of the damaged or lost equipment. 15. USE OF WEAPONS: No team member will use or handle weapons in a careless or imprudent manner. 16. IMPROPER CONDUCT: Team members will conduct themselves at all times in a manner that reflects favorably on the National Guard. Improper conduct includes any behavior, which brings the Guard into disrepute or reflects discredit upon the team or a team member. Team members will respect the customs of our hosts. Proper military courtesy and good manners are expected at all times. 17. I have read and understand the National Guard Marksmanship Team Standards of Conduct. PLEASE PRINT: NAME (LAST, FIRST, MI)_______________________________________RANK__________ SIGNATURE__________________________________________________DATE___________ (State or Unit Letterhead) MEMORANDUM FOR Members of Marksmanship Teams SUBJECT: Statement of Responsibility 1. Before equipment, weapons and ammunition are issued to you for use in the marksmanship training and competition you must:

62

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

APPENDIX

a. Read this memorandum and provide the following information. (PLEASE PRINT) Name (Last, First, MI)____________________________________________________________ Home Address (No PO Box)_______________________________________________________ City__________________________________ State________________ Zip Code____________ Unit__________________________________________________________________________ Unit Address_______________________________________________________________________ City__________________________________ State_______________ Zip Code_____________ Telephone Numbers Home________________________ Unit__________________ Work______________________ b. Submit Appointment Letter, Police Records Check, DA Form 7281-R, DD 2760, Standards of Conduct Policy, Statement of Responsibility, strip map, and an approved waiver for storage of weapons in other than authorized arms room (if applicable) to the issuing authority. 2. By signing this memorandum, you agree to do the following: a. Be able to identify all weapons issued to you by serial number, type and manufacture in case of loss or theft. You will carry this information on your person while traveling or have it readily available for prompt and positive identification to the proper authorities. b. Maintain a high level of security consciousness and help develop that among teammates particularly those new to marksmanship. Bring violations of security to the attention of the team member or advise the SMC, Team OIC or NGMTC, whichever is most appropriate. c. Immediately report any loss of weapon to the local civilian police and to the issuing authority who will respond IAW AR 190-11, AR 190-40, AF Instruction 31-209 and AF Handbook 31223. Contact the issuing authority before shipping arms or ammunition. d. Store weapons and ammunition in authorized storage areas. If home storage is approved, a container of no less than 12 gauge steel will be locked securely to a wall or bolted to the floor. Containers weighing less than 500 pounds will be secured to the structure. Chains and locks used to secure containers must meet AR 190-11 standards. If the house will be empty for more than seven (7) days, arrange to store weapons and ammunition in an authorized arms room. I will utilize a _______ issued storage container or a ________ commercial equivalent. (Check one). e. When traveling, lock weapons and ammunition in separate containers out of sight. Weapons will be attended by a team member at all times when not locked in an approved storage facility. Adhere to applicable rules and regulations imposed by commercial airlines. Signature_____________________________________________ Date_________________________

STRIP MAP FROM MAJOR AIRPORT, CITY OR HIGHWAY TO THE LOCATION OF WEAPONS AND AMMUNITION
DRAWING OF HOME OR FACILITY WHERE WEAPONS ARE STORED INCLUDING THE LOCATION OF WEAPONS. SMALL ARMS TRAINING TEAM (HEADER)

63

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

APPENDIX

MARKS NUMBER

DATE

MEMORANDUM THRU MTC, ATTN: Physical Security Officer, Bldg 4904, Camp Joseph T. Robinson, NLR, AR 72199-9600

FOR Chief, National Guard Bureau, ATTN: NGB-ARO-I, 111 South George Mason Drive, Arlington, VA 22204-1382 SUBJECT: 1. Request for Waiver Approval

In accordance with NGB-ARO Memorandum dated 7 April 2000, the (STATE) National Guard Small Arms Training Team requests approval of a waiver to allow the attached list of Marksmanship Team Members to participate in Home Storage of weapons. The SATT is the responsible agency for the National Guard Marksmanship Teams within each state. The SATT verifies that all regulatory requirements as established in AR 19011 reference the storage of Federal weapons in locations other than approved arms rooms have been met and are on file with this state. Point of contact for this office is the undersigned at commercial XXX-XXX-XXXX, fax XXX-XXX-XXXX; DSN XXX-XXXX, fax XXX-XXXX.

2.

3.

NAME RANK, ORGANIZATION State Marksmanship Coordinator Encl. –Team Member Roster
Enclosure 1 HOME STORAGE OF WEAPONS AND AMMUNITION ROSTER NAME RANK HOME OF RECORD Clark, Wesley GEN SSAN

123 MacArthur Drive, Little Rock, AR 72199 xxx-xx-xxxx

64

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

APPENDIX

65

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

APPENDIX

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATOR (SMC) CHECKLIST If item is completed check the box. Have appointment orders for the SMC been published? Has a training plan been developed as required by NGB Pam 350-6, para 1-8? Do all of the soldiers in the state that are appointed to marksmanship teams meet current physical security requirements? Does the SMC or SATT have small arms repair capabilities? Are repair parts for small arms being requisition, stored and maintained IAW AR 190-5? Are the current references on file by the SMC? Unit Supply Update - AR 710-20, DA Pam 710-2-1, AR 735-5 Physical Security Update - AR 190-11 Competitive Marksmanship - NGR 350-6 Trophies and Awards Program for the Army National Guard - NGR 672-1 National Guard Chief's 50 Marksmanship Badge - NGR 672-3/ANG Reg 900-1 Rules and Regulations for National Matches and Other Excellence-in-Competition (EIC) Matches AR 920-30/AFR 50-17 Promotion of Practice with Rifled Arms - AR 920-20 Are marksmanship files/records maintained IAW applicable regulations? Is the Ammunition Supply Point suspending DA Form 581 for the SMC to be cleared within 90 days? Is the requirement and requested distribution for SATT ammunition being entered into the Army Training Ammunition Management System (ATAMS) through the State Ammunition Manager (STAM)? Are hand receipts for weapons that are issued to team members being updated every six months and verified quarterly? Are monthly inventories of weapons being conducted? Are consecutive inventories being conducted by different people?
66

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

APPENDIX

Is the Document Register maintained and are all Property Book Records posted? Do the Property Book records match the authorization document (MTOE or TDA)? Are all DA Form 581's cleared within 90 days? Is ammunition issued below SATT on DA Form 5515? Are the quantities on the current DA Form 5515's less than or equal to the quantities on the open DA Form 581's? Is the DA Form 5023 (DODIC Master Lot Record) maintained (transactions posted and lot balance match with the quantities on hand)? Does the Document Register reflect all transactions (DA Form 581's and DA Form 5515's)? Is the current ammunition authorization reflected on the DA Form 5514?

67

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

APPENDIX

SAMPLE EXCELLENCE IN COMPETITION (EIC) MATCH BULLETIN L-1 EXCELLENCE IN COMPETITION MATCH BULLETINS a. Official bulletins for the EIC Matches will be prepared by the sample format in Paragraph L-2. b. EIC bulletins will include the following: (1) Match Directors will not establish or annotate the official bulletin with a cutoff score. c. Separate alphabetical competitor’s rosters will be prepared to provide additional information as follows: (1) Standard name line (last name, first name, middle initial, social security number, rank). (2) Parent Unit Address (company, battalion, regiment, division) and zip code. (3) Home address (USAR and NG competitors only) and zip code. (4) Competitor classification (open or novice). d. The following is a sample format for an EIC Match Bulletin. L-2 EIC BULLETIN (SAMPLE) OFFICIAL BULLETIN (Name of Tournament) MATCH NUMBER:____________________EXCELLENCE-IN-COMPETITION (LEG) MATCH, PISTOL COMPETITORS:_______________________Total participation in match. COURSE OF FIRE: Match 321, the Combat Rifle EIC Match RULES: This match was conducted by the rules prescribed in the NGMTC course of fire handbook for Match 321, the Combat Rifle EIC Match. DATE FIRED:__________________________LOCATION___________________________________ PLACE NAME RANK COMPONENT 1 *Borden, Jason T. SFC NG 2 *Monroe, Tom A. SSG AR 3 Lewis, Clyde C. CW3 NG 4 *Riley, Martin F. SGT NG 5 **Martin, Joseph T. CPT NG * Distinguished Competitor ** Competitors with credit points in the 4 point EIC match SCORE 283-32 283-31 264-22 257-19 255-25

68

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

APPENDIX

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AND THE AIR FORCE National Guard Marksmanship Training Center Camp Joseph T. Robinson North Little Rock , Arkansas 72199-9600 MTC-O
QUALIFICATION RESULTS BULLETIN WEAPON: M16 A2 COURSE: M16 Rifle Qualification Course CONDITIONS: 88F NCOIC: SGT REED LOCATION: Range 9, Camp Joseph T. Robinson, N. Little Rock, AR PLACE NAME: SCORE a. Expert (36-40 points) 1 Burkhart, John A. SGT 38 2 Guinn, Jason R. SGT 36 b. Sharpshooter (30-35 points) 3 McCombs, Jason p SSG 34 4 Grazioso, Dennis J. SSG 33 5 Morgan, George E. MSG 33 6 Wiesenbach, Michael E. SFC 32 7 Lawrence, Paul M. SGT 32 8 Brusky, Joseph SGT 32 9 Kingsley, Andrew T. SSG 32 10 Bayona, Rene D SGT 31 11 Spencer JR, Ronald E. SSG 31 12 Milner, David T. SGT 30 13 Fox, John A SPC 30 c. Marksman (23-29 points) 14 Ragan, John B. SSG 29 15 Hudgens, William D SPC 29 16 Sadd, Frank W. SFC 28 17 Bloom, Timothy L. SFC 28 18 Warren, Bob SSG 28 19 Henderson, Jason R. SGT 27 20 Dimatteo, Toni L. 1SG 27 21 Paradis, Scott SSG 26 22 Woodmansee, John B. SGT 25 23 Sullivan, Katrina D. SGT 25 24 Fitzback, Charles J. SGT 24 25 Auger, Michael SGT 23 26 Williams, Vernon A. SGT 23 d. Unqualified (22-Below) Date 21-Aug-03

69

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

APPENDIX

GLOSSARY OF ACRONYMS
AAR After Action Review AFSAM Armed Forces Skill at Arms Meeting ANG Air National Guard ARNG Army National Guard ATRRS Army Training Resource Requirement System BDU Battle Dress Uniform BMC Base Marksmanship Coordinator CATM Combat Arms Training and Maintenance CMP Civilian Marksmanship Program CNGB Chief, National Guard Bureau FM Field Manual GSU Geographically Separated Units JFHQ Joint Forces Headquarters JSC Junior Shooting Camps NGB National Guard Bureau NGPEC National Guard Professional Education Center NGMTC National Guard Marksmanship Training Center NGSS National Guard Sniper School NRA National Rifle Association MAC Marksmanship Advisory Council MTOE Modified Table of Organization and Equipment OMP Official Match Program ORE Operational Readiness Evaluation PAO Public Affairs Officer PBO Property Book Officer PMI Preliminary Marksmanship Instruction QRB Qualification Results Bulletin RCCAM Reserve Component Combat Arms Matches SAEMR USAF Small Arms Expert Marksmanship Ribbon SAFS Small Arms Firing School SAMGC Small Arms Instructor Range Operations Course SARTS Small Arms Readiness Training Section SASC Small Arms Simulations Course SATT Small Arms Training Team SDM Squad Designated Marksman Course SMC State Marksmanship Coordinator SMCTC State Marksmanship Coordinator Training Course TA Table of Allowances TDA Table of Distribution and Allowances UIC Unit Identification Code UMC Unit Marksmanship Coordinator USACAM United States Army Combat Arms Match USAR United States Army Reserve USPFO United States Property and Fiscal Officer WPW Winston P. Wilson

70

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

GLOSSARY OF MARKSMANSHIP TERMS Airgun - A rifle or pistol firing a lead pellet propelled by compressed air or gas. An effective and economical marksmanship training tool Action - A condition in combat courses of fire where a loaded magazine has been inserted in the weapon, there is a round in the chamber and the weapon is on safe Armed Forces Skill at Arms Meeting (AFSAM) - An invitational match held in conjunction with the Wilson Matches for teams representing friendly countries. Aggregate - total score for a competition, compiled from several different matches. Alibi - 1. Weapon or range malfunction necessitating a re-fire or "second chance" for the marksman. 2. A marksman's excuse for not shooting well. All-Guard Teams - Teams consisting of the best National Guard Marksmen in various shooting disciplines that represent the National Guard in regional, national and international competitions. Any sight - Type of rifle competition allowing any type of sight. Normally these matches are fired with optical sights. Aperture Sights - Metallic sights that align concentric circles around a circular bullseye. Most apertures are adjustable or allow the apertures to be changed to a different size for varying target size or light conditions. Ball - Generally refers to Full Metal Jacket (FMJ) service rifle and pistol ammunition. This ammunition is usually considered less accurate. In service pistol matches, ball is considered to have significantly more recoil and is more difficult to shoot well. Ball Gun - Service pistol. Berm - Mound of dirt which serve as protective barriers on a range Blacking the sights - Darkening metallic sights with paint or carbon smoke to reduce reflected light, which can distort the sight picture. Bull - Bullseye or "aiming black" circle or silhouette on the target Burned - When a shooter fires in a match that changes their status from "new shooter" to "old shooter". Call a shot - Estimating the strike of the round immediately after the shot is fired based on where the sight was last seen Chief's 50 - National Guard Badge awarded to top marksmen at the Winston P. Wilson Matches. Refer to NGR 672-3. Also an award given to top recruiters.

71

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

Combat Competition - Marksmanship contests with the individually assigned unit weapons (M16, M9, M11, M249, M240B, M60, etc.). A percentage of the team members must be from the same unit as set forth in the match program. Composite Competition - NRA style service rifle and pistol. Crossfire - A shot unintentionally fired at the wrong target which results in a miss. Distinguished Marksman - One who has earned one or more of the "Distinguished Rifleman," "Distinguished Pistol Shot" or "International Distinguished" badges. Dope - Sight settings put on the weapon for individual shooters and conditions. Duel - Pronounced 'DOO-EL'. A stage of pistol competition in which tests the firer's ability to rapidly engage a target that is exposed for a limited period of time. Elevation - Vertical sight adjustment made to compensate for bullet trajectory at different ranges. Favoring - Aiming off of you normal aiming area rather than making a sight adjustment. See "Kentucky windage". Normally used to adjust for changing wind conditions. 50% New Shooter Rule - Requirement that at least half of each team must be marksmen who have not previously shot in a competition or match that would make them an old shooter or "burned" based on the requirements of the Match Program Hardball - Slang for Full Metal Jacket (FMJ) service pistol ammunition. See "Ball". Generally considered to have more recoil and more difficult to shoot well. Also tends to cause more "wear and tear" on match grade weapons. Hard Holder - Slang for marksman who shoots consistently well. Highpower - Associated with NRA service rifle competition Instant - A condition in combat course of fire where a loaded magazine has been inserted in the weapon, there is a round in the chamber and the weapon is on fire. Iron Sight - Metallic sights. See "metallic Sight". An "iron sight match" allows metallic sights only, no optics. Junior - Young shooter, generally under 20 years old. Kentucky Windage - Aiming off of your normal aiming area rather than making a sight adjustment. See "favoring" Known distance (KD) range - A range with firing points set up at a know distance from the target, usually at 100 yard or meter increments. Leg - Points awarded at an Excellence-In-Competition (EIC) Match that count toward Distinguished Rifleman or Distinguished Pistol Shot.

72

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

Leg Match - EIC Match Load - A condition in combat courses of fire where a loaded magazine has been inserted in the weapon, but there is no round in the chamber and the weapon is on safe. Maggie's Drawers - Slang for miss. Derived from a scoring system where a red flag was waved in front of the target to designate a miss. Match Grade - Weapon or ammunition built or modified to improve its performance and consistency in competition Match Program - Publication announcing a competition detailing rules and pertinent information. Mechanical Zero - When the sights are mechanically adjusted to the center or their designated starting points. Does not take the shooter into account. Metallic Sight - A sight, usually metal, that requires the shooter to line up several reference points between the eye and the target. Normally there are no optics or magnification. Some metallic sights can be fitted with lenses (diopter) to correct vision or provide magnification. These lenses may or may not be legal depending upon the Match Program. Mirage - Heat waves. The intensity, direction and pattern of the wave between the target and firing line gives clues about the wind direction and velocity for sight adjustments. Miss - A shot that misses the scoring rings completely. Mound - Berm. NRA Classification - Skill level assigned to shooters in each NRA sponsored shooting discipline based on the average score of a minimum number of rounds fired in competition. Classification cards are assigned by the NRA. NRA 2700 - An NRA pistol competition firing 270 rounds using three pistols; .22 Cal., Centerfire and .45 Cal. The maximum possible points are 2700. New Shooter - Shooter that has not yet fired in a match which "burns" them. This designates them an "old shooter" the next time they shoot in the same match. Once burned, a shooter is usually "old" for all of the matches at a lower level than they were "burned" in. Offhand - Slang for the standing position in rifle marksmanship Old Shooter - When a shooter fires in a match that recognizes old and new shooters, an old shooter is someone who has fired in that match before. Changes their status from "new shooter" to "old shooter." Pair firing - Shot in team matches. A "pair" of team members that are on the line at the same time alternating shots at one target. This is a requirement during the slow fire of some team matches.

73

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

Pits - The area directly under the targets on a KD rifle range, from which the pit crews raise, lower and score targets for the shooters on the firing line. Plug - Device the same caliber as a bullet that can be inserted into a shot hole on a target to determine whether or not a shot touches a given scoring ring. Possible - Achieving the maximum number of points Postal - Match that is conducted in two or more locations and winners are determined by mail. Allows teams who can't fire shoulder-to-shoulder because of distance or scheduling problems to compete with each other. Preliminary Marksmanship Instruction - Marksmanship instruction conducted before a live fire President's Hundred - Brassard awarded to the top 15% of rifle and pistol competitors in the President's Match at the National Championships held annually, not to exceed one hundred awards in each discipline. Qualification Results Bulletin - Listing of unit qualification results in sequence from highest to lowest. Rapid Fire - Stage of a rifle or pistol match fired in a short period of time. Rattle Battle - Slang for the Infantry Trophy Rifle Match. The competition consists of rapid-fire engagement of multiple silhouette targets. Reduced Course - Modified course of fire allowing marksmen to fire at proportionately smaller targets at shorter ranges. May also mean firing fewer rounds. "Scope" - To observe the target using optics. Scoring disc - One, three or five inch colored disc attached to the target to indicate the value of the shot. Shoulder-To-Shoulder - Competition in which all participants compete together at one location. Skidder - A shot in a pistol match fired as the target is turning that makes an elongated hole Spotter - One, three, five or ten inch disk that is black on one side and white on the other used to indicate shot location. State Marksmanship Coordinator (SMC) - Appointed by the Adjutant General to oversee and administer the state's marksmanship program. String - Series of shots fired without a range interruption. Sustained Fire - Stages of fire when the marksman does not have time to scope each shot Timed fire - Stage in a pistol match fired in a limited period of time. More time is allotted than for a rapid fire.

74

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

Trace - Distortion visible through a scope made by the bullet as it travels downrange used by coaches to make sight adjustments Training Guide - Weapons, ammunition or equipment valuable for training that may not be accurate enough to be competitive in higher level competition. Valuable for unit level or developing shooters. "2600 shooter" - Pistol marksman who has achieved a 2600 or better score on a 2700 aggregate "495 shooter" - Service rifle shooter who has a 495 or better on a National Match Course United States Army Marksmanship Unit (USAMU) - Army counter to the NGMTC. V-ring - The tie breaking ring on five point targets. V - Shot that breaks the V-ring. Counts five points and are totaled to break ties Wadcutter - Type of bullet used in pistol competition which leaves a very clean hole Wilson Matches - The National Guard shooting championships held annually Weapons Training Battalion (WTBN) - Marine Corp counterpart to the NGMTC Wind shooter - Marksman who is adept at shooting in adverse wind conditions, particularly standing. Windage - Horizontal sight adjustments made to zero a weapon or compensate for wind conditions X-ring - The tie breaking ring on a ten point target X - Shot that breaks the X-ring. It counts ten points and are totaled to break ties Zero - The correct sight adjustment for a specific range. This is a combination of a specific weapon and specific shooter.

75

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER REFERENCES

REFERENCES
NGP350-7/ANGP50-36 AFI 34-227 AFI 36-2226 AFCAT 21-209 AFT PAM 7570.2 AFT PAM 7570.5 ANGR 50-59 AR 5-13 AR 59-21 AR 70-33 AR 71-13 AR 75-1 AR 190-11 AR 190-13 AR 190-51 AR 210-20 AR 210-21 AR 310-25 AR 310-50 AR 350-1 AR 350-66 AR 350-10 AR 350-38 AR 350-41 AR 351-9 AR 385-10 AR 385-40 AR 385-63 AR 385-64 AR 385-65 AR 415-15 AR 415-17 Guide to Unit Marksmanship Qualification Training, Competition and Youth Outreach Excellence in Competition (EIC) Combat Arms Training and Maintenance Program Management Munitions Allowances for Individual Training and Training Organizations Importation of Firearms and Ammunition Taken Out of the United States Importation of Firearms and Ammunition by Non-licensed Residents of the United States Ammunition Book Complete Small Arms Marksmanship Training Training Ammunition Systems MAC Transportation Authorization Mutual Weapons Development Data Exchange Program and Defense Development Exchange The Department of the Army Equipment Authorization and Usage Program Malfunctions Involving Ammunition and Explosives Physical Security of Weapons, Ammunition and Explosives The Army Physical Security Program Security of Unclassified Army Property (Sensitive and Non-sensitive) Master Planning for Army Installations Ranges and Training Areas Dictionary of U.S. Army Terms Authorized Abbreviations and Brevity Codes Army Training Army-Wide Small Arms Competitive Marksmanship Management of Army Individual Training Requirements and Resources Training Devices: Policies and Procedures Training in Units Inter-service Training Army Safety Program Accident Reporting and Records Policies and Procedures for firing Ammunition for Training, Target Practice and Combat Ammunition and Explosives Safety Standards Identification of Inert Ammunition and Ammunition Components Military Construction, Army (MCA) Program Development Cost Estimation for Military Programming

76

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER REFERENCES

AR 415-20 AR 415-28 AR 415-35 AR 6-22-10 AR 640-2 AR 672-5-1 AR 700-22 AR 740-13 AR 920-15 AR 920-20 AR 920-30/AFR 50-17 AR 920-35 AR 1-201 AR 1-1 AR 5-3 CEHND1110-1-5

Project Development and Design Approval Department of the Army Facility Classes and Construction Categories Minor Construction Competition in Small Arms (Civilian, Sec II, Pg. 4 & 5) Qualification and Familiarization Military Awards Worldwide Ammunition Reporting System Storage of Organizational Trophies and Related Objects National Board for the Promotion of Rifle Practice and Office of Director of Civilian Marksmanship Promotion of Practice with Rifled Arms Rules and Regulations for National Matches National Match Fund Army Inspection Policy Planning, Programming and Budgeting within the Department of the Army Installation Management and Organization Design Information for Remote Target System (RETS) Equipped Ranges: Sniper Field Fire Range, Multi-purpose Machine Gun Transition Range; and Combat Pistol Range USACE Design Manual for Indoor Firing Ranges USACE Design Manual for Indoor Firing Ranges Conventional Ammunition Substitutability/Interchangeability List Clothing and Individual Equipment Expendable Items Field and Garrison Furnishing Equipment Current Applicable NRA Regulations Visual Information Products Catalog Risk Analysis for Army Property Index and Description of Army Training Devices Standards in Weapons Training (JFHQ) Index of Graphic Training Aids Organizational Maintenance Operation Unit Supply Operations Physical Fitness Training Map Reading and Land Navigation

CEHND 1110-1-18 CTA 50-900 CTA 50-970 CTA 50-909 DA PAM 25-90 DA PAM 190-5 DA PAM 350-9 DA PAM 350-38 DA PAM 25-37 FM 29-2 FM 10-14 FM 21-20 FM 21-26

77

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER REFERENCES

FM 21-33 FM 23-5 FM 23-8 FM 3-22.9 FM 23-10 FM 23-27 FM 3-22.31 FM 3-23.35 FM 23-41 FM 23-65 FM 3-22.68 FM 23-71 FM 7-0 FM 7-1 FORSCOM Reg.350-2 FORSCOM/TRADOC FORSCOM PAM 350-60 FORSCOM PAM 350-61 FORSCOM PAM 350-62 FORSCOM PAM 350-63 FORSCOM PAM 350-64 FORSCOM Reg. 350-1 HNDM 1110-1-8 HNDM 1110-1-5

Terrain Analysis U.S. Rifle Cal. .30, M1 M14 and M14A1 Rifle Marksmanship Rifle Marksmanship M16A1, M16A2/3, M16A4, and M4 Carbine Sniper Training MK19 40 mm Grenade Machine Gun Mod 3 40mm Grenade Launchers M203 Combat Training with Pistols M9 and M11 Submachine Guns, Cal. .45 M3 and M3A1 Browning Machine Gun Cal. .50 HB, M2 Crew Served Machine Guns, 5.56-MM and 7.62-MM Rifle Marksmanship Training the Force Battle Focused Training Reserve Component Training Sup to AR 350-6 Combat Rifle M60/LMG Combat Pistol National Match Rifle National Match Pistol FORSCOM Marksmanship Unit Management Design Information for Multi-Purpose Range Complex (Light Infantry) Design Information for Infantry Rifle Marksmanship Ranges; Defense, Test, Fire and Movement, Modified Field Fire, Automated Field Fire, Automated Record Fire, Modified Defense Test, Modified Record Fire Design Information for Multi-Purpose Range Complex DOD Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms Training Site General Information Summary Army National Guard Training Competitive Marksmanship National Guard Chief’s 50 Marksmanship Badge / NRA Target Catalog Ammunition and Explosives Soldier’s Manual of Common Tasks Military Qualification Standards II Manual of Common Tasks Soldier’s Manual of Common Tasks, Skill Level 1 Infantryman Infantryman

HNDM 1110-1-6 JCS PUB 1-02 NGB PAM 25-1 NGR 350-1 NGR 350-6 NGR 672-3/ARNG 900-1 SC 1305-30-IL STP 21-24-SMCT STP 21-II-MQS STP 21-1-SMCT STP 7-11B1-SM STP 7-11B14-SM-TG

78

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER REFERENCES

TA 144 TB 9-1000-237-12 TB 9-1005-226-12 TC 25-8 TC 23-65-1 TC 23-14 TM 9-1005-211-12P TM 9-1005-222-14P/4 TM 9-1005-222-35 TM 9-1005-223-10

Small Arms Qualification, Marksmanship Training and Maintenance Serviceability Match Quality Weapons Training Ranges Browning Machine Gun Caliber .50 Heavy Barrel, M2 Sniper Training and Employment Match Grade .45 Cal. Pistol Parts List Operators Manual for Training Grade and Match Grade .22 Cal. Rifles DS and GS Depot Maintenance, Rifle Cal. 30 Operators Manual for Rifle M14 and M14A1

TM 9-1005-223-12P/11W3-5-4-24 ~ Operators and Organization Maintenance, TO Repair Parts, M14 Rifle TM 9-1005-223-20 TM 9-1005-224-34P TM 9-1005-249-10 TM 9-1005-249-20 TM 9-1300-206 TM 9-6650-212-12 TM 9-6650-212-20P TM 9-6920-210-14 TM 9-6920-210-24P TM 9-6920-363-12P TM 9-1005-211-12 TM 9-1005-211-35 TM 9-1005-206-14P/3 M14 Maintenance Including Repair Parts List Organization DS and GS for 7.62 mm, M60 MG Operators Manual, M16A1 Rifle Organization Maintenance Manual, M16A1 Rifle Ammunition and Explosives Standards Operators Maintenance and Parts Manual M49 Scope Maintenance Parts and Tools for M49 Scope Operators Organization, DS and GS Maintenance Manual; Small Arms Target and Target Repair Organizational ad Field Maintenance Repair Parts and Equipment for Small Arms Targets Conversion Kit (Cal. .22 Rimfire Adapter) M261 for M16 Rifle Organization Maintenance and Basic Issue Items List Repair Parts for .45 Cal. Pistol Operators Manual and Parts List for .45 Cal. Auto, .22 Cal. Auto, .32 Cal. Auto and .38 Cal. Auto

79

STATE MARKSMANSHIP COORDINATORS TRAINING COURSE (SMCTC)

NATIONAL GUARD MARKSMANSHIP TRAINING CENTER WEB SITE LISTING

Helpful WEB Sites
www.arguard.org/mtu www.ngb.army.mil https://gko.ngb.army.mil www.us.army.mil www.usapa.army.mil www.armystudyguide.com www.atrrs.army.mil www.pec.ngb.army.mil www.arng.army.mil www..tradoc.army.mil www.peostri.army.mil www.atsc.army.mil/ www.50states.com www.va.gov www.hrc.army.mil www.ngaus.org www.eangus.org https://atiam.train.army.mil www.odcmp.com www.usashooting.com www.daisy.com NGMTC Home Page National Guard Bureau Guard Knowledge Online United States Army Home Page Army Publishing Directorate (Forms, Pubs, FMs, etc.) Army Study Guide Army Training Requirements and Resources System Professional Education Center Army National Guard Home Page US Army Training Doctrine Command Army Training & Simulations Army Training Support Center - (Home of STRAC) Information concerning all 50 States Veterans Home Page U.S. Army Human Resources Command National Guard Association of the United States Enlisted Association of the National Guard of the U.S. General Reimer Training and Doctrine Digital Library Civilian Marksmanship Program Olympic Shooting Daisy Air Rifles and Pistols

80


				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:845
posted:11/5/2009
language:English
pages:81