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Educational Curriculum Guide - Madame Tussauds

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Educational Curriculum Guide - Madame Tussauds Powered By Docstoc
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Table of Contents
Introduction ................................................................................   2
Using the Resource ..................................................................           3
Before Coming ...........................................................................       3
        Your Students will meet ...........................................                     4
Lesson Plans ................................................................................   5
        1. Human Rights & Equality Exhibit ......................                               5
        2. White House & The Oval Office Exhibit ...........                                    7
        3. TV Room ....................................................................         9
        4. Founding Fathers Exhibit ....................................                        10
                Activity – Founding Fathers Quiz ...........                                    12
        5. Music Zone Exhibit ................................................                  13
        6. The Presidential Gallery .......................................                     14
        7. Scandals Exhibit .....................................................               16
                Activity – Watergate Report .....................                               17
        8. The War Room .........................................................               18
                Activity – Military .........................................                   20
Encompassing Activities ........................................................                21
        Crossword Puzzle .......................................................                23
        Assassins .......................................................................       24
        Mix & Match Worksheet ...........................................                       25
        Activity Answer Sheet ..............................................                    29
Private Group Packages ..........................................................               30
        Educational Seminars ...............................................                    30
        Enjoy a Night with the Stars! .................................                         31   Madame Tussauds Washington D.C.
        Sleepover at Madame Tussauds! ..........................                                32   1001 F St, Washington D.C. 20004
        Become a Hollywood Celebrity for a Day ..........                                       33   1-888-923-0334 (US & Canada) or
                                                                                                     1-212-512-9600 x607
                                                                                                     GroupSales@MadameTussaudsNY.com
Introduction
Within walking distance of the key tourist attractions, Madame Tussauds
D.C. offers interactive arena of history.

Madame Tussauds D.C. is themed around famous people, past and present,
with key attention on using new technology to bring the figures to life. We
offer an excellent visit to stimulate students’ adaptability and self direction in
key area of History and Social Studies in accordance of US Department of
National Social Studies Standards and National Council for the Social
Civil Rights Movement Studies Standards.

This resource is to provide you with inspirational course materials for your
core curriculum along with activities that focus on:
    • Collaboration
    • Productivity & accountability
    • Media literacy
    • Flexibility & adaptability
    • Social & cross cultural skills
    • Initiative & self direction
    • Critical thinking & problem solving
    • Communication                                                                                                Contact Information:
    • ICT literacy
                                                                                                                   Group Sales Department
This vibrant and well-researched resource will enrich your visit to Madame                                         OPEN: Monday – Friday
Tussauds D.C. With relevant background information, plus a wealth of high                                          PHONE: 1-888-923-0334 (US & Canada) or
quality activities, this imaginative and creative pack will truly support your trip                                        1-212-512-9600 x607
to one of the world’s premier attractions.                                                                         EMAIL: GroupSales@MadameTussaudsNY.com




    Madame Tussauds Washington D.C. 1001 F St NW, Washington D.C. 20004   1-888-923-0334 (US & Canada) or 1-212-512-9600 x607 GroupSales@MadameTussaudsNY.com   2
Using the Resource                                                                                          Before Coming
A visit to Madame Tussauds and the Educational resource pack boosts                                         By visiting Madame Tussauds, your students will not only interact with history
students’ passion for Social Studies, Art and Design and introduces key                                     but also will be able to develop entrepreneurial skills by undertaking a
areas of the curriculums.                                                                                   business project.

These classroom resources aim to provide the tools teachers need to deliver                                 Your students will learn to:
exciting lessons in today’s classrooms.
                                                                                                                 •    Set and meet high standards for delivering quality work on time
Our intention is to do much of the preparation and planning for you.                                             •    Demonstrate diligence and a positive work ethic (e.g., being
                                                                                                                      punctual and reliable)
Designed to be flexible, this resource offers a range of activities and ideas so
that you can select the topics and exercises suited to your students.

Throughout this booklet, you will see following symbols:                                                                           Let your students design their own field trip to
                                                                                                                                   Madame Tussauds in Washington D.C.!

                           Represents teaching ideas                                                                       1. Consider all aspects of the field trip and come up with
                                                                                                                              a final cost for your entire class to attend. Be sure to
                                                                                                                              remember transportation (cost of bus and gas
                           Symbolizes student activity                                                                        mileage), tickets, food, etc.

                           This symbol is for creative activity                                                            2. Once you have figured out how much it will cost to
                                                                                                                              take your entire class on a trip to Madame Tussauds’
                                                                                                                              in Washington, D.C., come up with a plan to raise the
                                                                                                                              needed funds. Create a plan including goals, a
By visiting Madame Tussauds D.C., students will be exposed to:                                                                process in which to monitor progress, and room to
                                                                                                                              modify the process as needed.
    •    Exploring and developing innovative ideas
    •    Making of history                                                                                                 3. Carry out the actual fundraising project by dividing
    •    Evaluating and developing work                                                                                       the responsibilities for sales, donations, record
    •    Investigating and understanding                                                                                      keeping, etc. Set individual and group goals and
                                                                                                                              monitor your progress, modifying as needed.



    Madame Tussauds Washington D.C. 1001 F St NW, Washington D.C. 20004   1-888-923-0334 (US & Canada) or 1-212-512-9600 x607 GroupSales@MadameTussaudsNY.com                                3
Your students will meet:

Abraham Lincoln                                     Dwight D. Eisenhower                                   Johnny Depp                                         Richard Nixon
Angelina Jolie                                      Ella Fitzgerald                                        Julia Roberts                                       Robert E. Lee
Annabelle the photographer                          Evander Holyfield                                      Katie Couric                                        Ronald Reagan
Babe Ruth                                           FBI Agent                                              King George III                                     Rosa Parks
Barack Obama                                        Franklin D. Roosevelt                                  Larry King                                          Samuel L. Jackson
Behind the Scenes                                   George Clooney                                         Lyndon B. Johnson                                   Thomas Jefferson
Benjamin Franklin                                   George H.W. Bush                                       Madame Tussaud                                      Tiger Woods
Beyonce Knowles                                     George W. Bush                                         Madonna                                             Tom Cruise
Bill Clinton                                        George Washington                                      Malcolm X                                           Tyra Banks
Bob Dylan                                           Harry Truman                                           Marion Barry                                        Washington Media
Bob Woodward (Watergate                             Hillary Clinton                                        Martin Luther King                                  Will Smith
journalist)                                         J. Edgar Hoover                                        Marvin Gaye                                         Winston Churchill
Brad Pitt                                           Jackie Kennedy Onassis                                 Morgan Freeman                                      Theodore Roosevelt (early 2009)
Denzel Washington                                   Jennifer Lopez                                         Muhammad Ali
Duane “The Rock” Johnson                            Joan Rivers                                            Miley Cyrus
Duke Ellington                                      John F. Kennedy                                        Piscataway Indian



                 Before touring Madame Tussauds’, have your
                 students research about their favorite area or celebrity
                 and post their reports on district approved wiki.




   Madame Tussauds Washington D.C. 1001 F St NW, Washington D.C. 20004   1-888-923-0334 (US & Canada) or 1-212-512-9600 x607 GroupSales@MadameTussaudsNY.com                                     4
Lesson Plans                                                                                                       •     Use knowledge of facts and concepts drawn from history, along with methods of
                                                                                                                         historical inquiry, to inform decision-making about and action-taking on public issue
1. Human Rights & Equality Exhibit                                                                            III. People, Places, & Environments
Featuring Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Yoko Ono,                                            Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of people,
Muhammad Ali                                                                                                  places, and environments, so that the learner can:
                                                                                                                    • Describe how people create places that reflect cultural values and ideals as they
                                                                                                                         build neighborhoods, parks, shopping centers, and the like
US Dept. of Education National Social Studies Standards
NSS-C.5-8.5 Roles of the Citizen                                                                                    • Examine, interpret, and analyze physical and cultural patterns and their interactions,
What are the Roles of the Citizen in American Democracy?                                                                 such as land use, settlement patterns, cultural transmission of customs and ideas,
                                                                                                                         and ecosystem changes
    • What is citizenship?
                                                                                                              IV. Individual Development & Identity
    • What are the rights of citizens?
                                                                                                              Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of individual
    • What are the responsibilities of citizens?                                                              development and identity, so that the learner can:
    • What dispositions or traits of character are important to the preservation and                                • Relate personal changes to social, cultural, and historical contexts
         improvement of American constitutional democracy?
                                                                                                                    • Describe personal connections to place – as associated with community, nation,
    • How can citizens take part in civic life?                                                                          and world
NSS-USH.5-12.9 Era 9: Post War United States (1945 to early 1970s)
                                                                                                                    • Describe the ways family, gender, ethnicity, nationality, and institutional affiliations
    • Understand the economic boom & social transformation of postwar United States                                      contribute to personal identity
    • Understand how the Cold War and conflicts in Koreas and Vietnam influenced                                    • Identify and describe the influence of perception, attitudes, values, and beliefs on
         domestic and international politics                                                                             personal identity
    • Understand domestic policies after World War II                                                               • Identify and interpret examples of stereotyping, conformity, and altruism
    • Understand the struggle for racial and gender equality and the extension of civil                       X. Civic Ideals & Practices
         liberties                                                                                            Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the ideals,
                                                                                                              principles, and practices of citizenship in a democratic republic, so that the learner can:
National Council for the Social Civil Rights Movement Studies Standards                                             • Examine the origins and continuing influence of key ideals of the democratic
I. Culture                                                                                                               republican form of government, such as individual human dignity, liberty, justice,
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of culture and                             equality, and the rule of law
cultural diversity, so that the learner can:
                                                                                                                    • Identify and interpret sources and examples of the rights and responsibilities of
      • Compare similarities and differences in the ways groups, societies, and cultures                                 citizens
           meet human needs and concerns
                                                                                                                    • Locate, access, analyze, organize, and apply information about selected public
      • Explain how information and experiences may be interpreted by people from diverse                                issues – recognizing and explaining multiple points of view
           cultural perspectives and frames of reference
                                                                                                                    • Practice forms of civic discussion and participation consistent with the ideals of
      • Articulate the implications of cultural diversity, as well as cohesion, within and                               citizens in a democratic republic.
           across groups
II. Time, Continuity, & Change
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the way
human beings view themselves in and over time, so that the learner can:
      • Identify and use key concepts such as chronology, causality, change, conflict, and
           complexity to explain, analyze, and show connections among patterns of historical
           change and continuity
      • Develop crucial sensitivities such as empathy and skepticism regarding attitudes,
           values, and behaviors of people in different historical contexts
    Madame Tussauds Washington D.C. 1001 F St NW, Washington D.C. 20004   1-888-923-0334 (US & Canada) or 1-212-512-9600 x607 GroupSales@MadameTussaudsNY.com                                                    5
           INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 1                                                                                       INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 2
           After experiencing the Human Rights & Equality Exhibit, work with                                            Choose an historic event (e.g., Civil Rights Movement or Vietnam
           several classmates and choose an issue related to one of the                                                 War) and interview members of your community that were part of
characters within the exhibit. Go online to research and read first-hand                                       the chosen event. Create a presentation using a multimedia tool (PowerPoint,
accounts of an event related the chosen issue (e.g., March on Washington).                                     Movie Maker, etc.) illustrating the effect this event had on your local
Create an online forum to discuss and compare interpretations of the event                                     community members.
with other groups within your class.
                                                                                                                               Use digitized resources to investigate and define political or social issues in
            As a group, work together to reach a decision and to explain the reasons for it.                                   the past and then illustrate, through a multimedia presentation, how such issue
                                                                                                                               relates to their community.
              Recognize and communicate diverse perspectives on an historical issue and
              demonstrate how diverse perspectives might lead to different interpretations.                    Students use a variety of electronic media to research and present an historic event that
(Articulating thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively through speaking and writing.)                        impacted the community (e.g., National History Day).
                                                                                                                   • Monitoring one’s own understanding and learning needs
Seek reasonable and ethical solutions to problems that arise when scientific advancement and                       • Going beyond basic mastery of skills and/or curriculum to explore and expand one’s
social norms or values come into conflict.                                                                              own learning and opportunities to gain expertise
                                                                                                                   • Utilizing time efficiently and managing workload
Communicate to school or community members about opportunities to assist with a group                              • Defining, prioritizing and completing tasks without direct oversight
project. Assess their performance as a group and develop and implement a plan to work                              • Demonstrating commitment to learning as a lifelong process
together more productively.                                                                                        • Demonstrating initiative to advance skill levels towards a professional level
     • Demonstrating ability to work effectively with diverse teams
     • Exercising flexibility and willingness to be helpful in making necessary compromises                              INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 3
          to accomplish a common goal                                                                                    Use the internet to research how court systems call citizens to jury
     • Assuming shared responsibility for collaborative work
                                                                                                                         duty. Simulate the process in your classroom and divide weekly
                                                                                                               tasks amongst classmates. Be sure to address how you will handle
                                                                                                               responsibilities when a student is absent.

                                                                                                                            Students understand how compromise is embedded in the legislative process of
                                                                                                                            the House of Representatives (e.g., writing and proposing bills, committee
                                                                                                                            hearings and amendments, bringing a bill to the floor for full House vote).

                                                                                                               Adapting to varied roles and responsibilities working effectively in a climate of ambiguity and
                                                                                                               changing priorities




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2. White House & The Oval Office                                                                               learner can:
                                                                                                                     • Identify and analyze examples of tensions between expressions of individuality and
Featuring Jackie Kennedy Onassis, John F. Kennedy, Hillary Rodham Clinton,                                                group or institutional efforts to promote social conformity
Bill Clinton, Ronald Reagan, Barack Obama, George W. Bush                                                            • Identify and describe examples of tensions between belief systems and government
                                                                                                                          policies and laws
US Dept. of Education National Social Studies Standards                                                              • Describe the role of institutions in furthering both continuity and change
NSS-USH.5-12.8 Era 8: The Great Depression and World War II (1929-1945)
                                                                                                                     • Apply knowledge of how groups and institutions work to meet individual needs and
      • Understand the causes of the Great Depression & how it affected American society                                  promote the common good
      • Understand how the New Deal addressed the Great Depression, transformed                                VI. Power, Authority & Governance
           American federalism, and initiated the welfare state                                                Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of how people
      • Understand the causes and course of World War II, the character of the war at                          create and change structures of power, authority, and governance, so that the learner can:
           home and abroad, and its reshaping of the U.S. role in world affairs                                      • Analyze and explain ideas and governmental mechanisms to meet needs and wants
NSS-USH.5-12.9 Era 9: Postwar United States (1945 to Early 1970s)                                                         of citizens, regulate territory, manage conflict, and establish order and security
      • Understand the economic boom and social transformation of postwar United States                              • Explain conditions, actions, and motivations that contribute to conflict and
      • Understand how the Cold War and conflicts in Korea and Vietnam influenced                                         cooperation within and among nations
           domestic and international politics                                                                       • Explain and apply concepts such as power, role, status, justice, and influence to the
      • Understand domestic policies after World War II                                                                   examination of persistent issues and social problems
      • Understand the struggle for racial, gender equality & the extension of civil liberties                       • Give examples and explain how governments attempt to achieve their stated ideals
NSS-USH.5-12.10 Era 10: Contemporary United States (1968 to Present)                                                      at home and abroad
Understand recent developments in foreign and domestic politics                                                VIII. Science, Technology, & Society
Understand economic, social, and cultural developments in contemporary United States                           Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of relationships
National Council for the Social Civil Rights Movement Studies Standards                                        among science, technology, and society, so that the learner can:
II. Time, Continuity, & Change                                                                                       • Describe examples in which values, beliefs, and attitudes have been influenced by
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the way                                  new scientific and technological knowledge, such as the invention of the printing
human beings view themselves in and over time, so that the learner can:                                                   press, conceptions of the universe, applications of atomic energy, and genetic
      • Identify and use key concepts such as chronology, causality, change, conflict, and                                discoveries
           complexity to explain, analyze, and show connections among patterns of historical                         • Seek reasonable and ethical solutions to problems that arise when scientific
           change and continuity                                                                                          advancements and social norms or values come into conflict
      • Identify and use processes important to reconstructing and reinterpreting the past,                    X. Civic Ideals & Practices
           such as using a variety of sources, providing, validating, and weighing evidence for                Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the ideals,
           claims, checking credibility of sources, and searching for causality                                principles, and practices of citizenship in a democratic republic, so that the learner can:
      • Develop crucial sensitivities such as empathy and skepticism regarding attitudes,                            • Analyze the effectiveness of selected public policies and citizen behaviors in
           values, and behaviors of people in different historical contexts                                               realizing the stated ideals of a democratic republican form of government
      • Use knowledge of facts and concepts drawn from history, along with methods of                                • Explain the relationship between policy statements and action plans used to
           historical inquiry, to inform decision-making about & action-taking on public issues.                          address issues of public concern
IV. Individual Development & Identity
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of individual
development and identity, so that the learner can:
      • Relate personal changes to social, cultural, and historical contexts
      • Identify and interpret examples of stereotyping, conformity, and altruism
Individuals, groups, & institutions social studies programs should include experiences that
provide for the study of interactions among individual, groups, and institutions, so that the
     Madame Tussauds Washington D.C. 1001 F St NW, Washington D.C. 20004   1-888-923-0334 (US & Canada) or 1-212-512-9600 x607 GroupSales@MadameTussaudsNY.com                                                  7
           INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 1                                                                                         INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 3
           Choose a conflict that involved one of the characters in Madame                                                Take photographs at Lincoln Theatre Box’ with a digital camera then
           Tussauds’ White House & The Oval Office exhibit. Research the                                                  upload them to a computer. Using Microsoft Photo Story or a similar
nation’s varying viewpoints on the chosen conflict. Choose a viewpoint and                                    digital resource to create newspaper of the day after assassination.
debate on the topic with classmates after intense research.
                                                                                                                           Interpret, organize and present information from American history in clear,
           Use digitized resources to investigate and define political or social issues in the                             complete and effective formats to other students/adults. Articulate thoughts and
           past and then illustrate, through a multimedia presentation, how one such issue                                 ideas clearly and efficiently through speaking and writing using digital technology.
           relates to their community.

Students use a variety of electronic media to research and present an historic event that
impacted the community (e.g., National History Day).
    • Monitoring one’s own understanding and learning needs
    • Going beyond basic mastery of skills and/or curriculum to explore and expand one’s
         own learning and opportunities to gain expertise
    • Utilizing time efficiently and managing workload
    • Defining, prioritizing and completing tasks without direct oversight
    • Demonstrating initiative to advance skill levels towards a professional level

           INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 2
           After viewing Hillary Clinton in Madame Tussauds’ Authentic exhibit,
           research a bill currently in congress sponsored by Clinton and an
opposing bill. Learn to navigate the government’s online resource by using
www.house.gov and create a sample compromise bill that includes attuned
parts of each of the bills.




    Madame Tussauds Washington D.C. 1001 F St NW, Washington D.C. 20004   1-888-923-0334 (US & Canada) or 1-212-512-9600 x607 GroupSales@MadameTussaudsNY.com                                                     8
3. TV Room                                                                                                    X. Civic Ideals & Practices
                                                                                                              Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the ideals,
Featuring Larry King, Dan Rather, Tyra Banks, Oprah Winfrey, Katie Couric,                                    principles, and practices of citizenship in a democratic republic, so that the learner can:
Joan Rivers                                                                                                        • Analyze the influence of diverse forms of public opinion on the development of
                                                                                                                         public policy and decision-making
US Dept. of Education National Social Studies Standards                                                            • Analyze the effectiveness of selected public policies and citizen behaviors in
NSS-USH.5-12.10 Era 10: Contemporary United States (1968 to Present)                                                     realizing the stated ideals of a democratic republican form of government
Understand recent developments in foreign and domestic politics
Understand economic, social, and cultural developments in contemporary United States
National Council for the Social Civil Rights Movement Studies Standards
V. Individuals, Groups, & Institutions
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of interactions                          INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 1
among individual, groups, and institutions, so that the learner can:                                                   Research and access a video news clip from the internet about an
     • Analyze group and institutional influences on people, events, and elements of                                   event associated with one of the individuals found in Madame
          culture                                                                                             Tussauds’ TV Room exhibit. Recognize the different interpretations recorded
     • Identify and analyze examples of tensions between expressions of individuality and
          group or institutional efforts to promote social conformity
                                                                                                              and suggest possible reasons for the differences.
     • Identify and describe examples of tensions between belief systems and government
          policies and laws                                                                                                Analyze how media format influences media messages (e.g., “The medium is the
     • Apply knowledge of how groups and institutions work to meet individual needs and                                    message.” McLuhan).
          promote the common good.
VI. Power, Authority & Governance                                                                             Analyze how the meaning of a message is influenced by the specific media and the historic
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of how people                   context in which the message is conveyed.
create and change structures of power, authority, and governance, so that the learner can:
     • Examine persistent issues involving the rights, roles, and status of the individual in
          relation to the general welfare
     • Describe the purpose of government and how its powers are acquired, used, and
          justified
     • Analyze and explain ideas and governmental mechanisms to meet needs and wants
          of citizens, regulate territory, manage conflict, and establish order and security
     • Describe the ways nations and organizations respond to forces of unity and diversity
          affecting order and security
     • Identify and describe the basic features of the political system in the United States,
          and identify representative leaders from various levels and branches of government
     • Describe and analyze the role of technology in communications, transportation,
          information-processing, weapons development, or other areas as it contributes to or
          helps resolve conflicts
     • Explain and apply concepts such as power, role, status, justice, and influence to the
          examination of persistent issues and social problems
     • Give examples and explain how governments attempt to achieve their stated ideals
          at home and abroad


    Madame Tussauds Washington D.C. 1001 F St NW, Washington D.C. 20004   1-888-923-0334 (US & Canada) or 1-212-512-9600 x607 GroupSales@MadameTussaudsNY.com                                                9
4. Founding Fathers Exhibit                                                                                             values, and behaviors of people in different historical contexts
                                                                                                              III. People, Places, & Environments
Featuring Piscataway Indian, George III, George Washington, Benjamin                                          Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of people,
Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Robert E. Lee                                                                     places, and environments, so that the learner can:
                                                                                                                    • Examine, interpret, and analyze physical and cultural patterns and their interactions,
US Dept. of Education National Social Studies Standards                                                                 such as land use, settlement patterns, cultural transmission of customs and ideas,
NSS-C.5-8.1 Civic Life, Politics, and Government                                                                        and ecosystem changes
      • What is civic life? What is politics? What is government?                                             V. Individuals, Groups, & Institutions
      • Why are government and politics necessary? What purposes should government                            Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of interactions
           serve?                                                                                             among individual, groups, and institutions, so that the learner can:
      • What are the essential characteristics of limited and unlimited government?                                 • Demonstrate an understanding of concepts such as role, status, and social class in
      • What are the nature and purposes of constitutions?                                                              describing the interactions of individuals and social groups
      • What are alternative ways of organizing constitutional governments?                                         • Analyze group and institutional influences on people, events, and elements of
NSS-C.5-8.2 Foundations of the Political System                                                                         culture
      • What are the foundations of the American Political System?                                                  • Describe the various forms institutions take and the interactions of people with
      • What is the American idea of constitutional government?                                                         institutions
      • What are the distinctive characteristics of American society?                                               • Identify and analyze examples of tensions between expressions of individuality and
                                                                                                                        group or institutional efforts to promote social conformity
      • What is American political culture?
                                                                                                                    • Identify and describe examples of tensions between belief systems and government
      • What values and principles are basic to American constitutional democracy?
                                                                                                                        policies and laws
NSS-C.5-8.3 Principles of Democracy
                                                                                                                    • Describe the role of institutions in furthering both continuity and change
      • How Does the Government Established by the Constitution Embody the Purposes,
           Values, and Principles of American Democracy?                                                            • Apply knowledge of how groups and institutions work to meet individual needs and
                                                                                                                        promote the common good
      • How are power and responsibility distributed, shared, and limited in the government
                                                                                                              VI. Power, Authority & Governance
           established by the United States Constitution?
                                                                                                              Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of how people
      • What does the national government do?
                                                                                                              create and change structures of power, authority, and governance, so that the learner can:
      • How are state and local governments organized and what do they do?
                                                                                                                    • Describe the purpose of government and how its powers are acquired, used, and
      • Who represents you in local, state, and national governments?
                                                                                                                        justified
      • What is the place of law in the American constitutional system?
                                                                                                                    • Analyze and explain ideas and governmental mechanisms to meet needs and wants
National Council for the Social Civil Rights Movement Studies Standards
                                                                                                                        of citizens, regulate territory, manage conflict, and establish order and security
I. Culture
                                                                                                              IX. Global Connections
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of culture and
                                                                                                              Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of global
cultural diversity, so that the learner can:
                                                                                                              connections and interdependence, so that the learner can:
      • Explain why individuals and groups respond differently to their physical and social
                                                                                                                    • Analyze examples of conflict, cooperation, and interdependence among groups
           environments and/or changes to them on the basis of shared assumptions, values,
                                                                                                                        societies, and nations
           and beliefs
      • Articulate the implications of cultural diversity, as well as cohesion, within and
           across groups
II. Time, Continuity, & Change
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the way
human beings view themselves in and over time, so that the learner can:
      • Develop crucial sensitivities such as empathy and skepticism regarding attitudes,

    Madame Tussauds Washington D.C. 1001 F St NW, Washington D.C. 20004   1-888-923-0334 (US & Canada) or 1-212-512-9600 x607 GroupSales@MadameTussaudsNY.com                                                  10
          INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 1
          After viewing the Human Rights & Equality and Founding Fathers
          exhibits at Madame Tussauds’, simulate a Congressional debate
over the westward expansion of slavery in the 1850s. Form political parties
and work together to create a message and deliver it to another group of
students by creating a short presentation supporting your position.

            Students simulate political organizations based on compromise and cooperation.

            Students produce representations of an historical figure using multiple
            presentation genres.

Students explore characteristics of dialect within their community or state, including
vocabulary, word use, grammar and cultural distinctions that reflect historical trends and
events.
    • Working appropriately and productively with others
    • Leveraging the collective intelligence of groups when appropriate
    • Bridging cultural differences and using differing perspectives to increase innovation
         and the quality of work




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           Founding Fathers Quiz

1) Which bill shows the signing of the Declaration of Independence?                                            6) Which architect designed the first street plan for the Federal City
       a. $2                                                                                                       in the US, now known as Washington D.C.?
       b. $5                                                                                                            a. Frank Lloyd Wright
       c. $10                                                                                                           b. Henry Bacon
       d. $100                                                                                                          c. Pierre L’Enfant
2) While President, which founding father ran up a personal wine bill                                                   d. James Hoban
   of $10,000?                                                                                                 7) What was the first capital of the USA?
       a. John Adams                                                                                                    a. New York City
       b. George Washington                                                                                             b. Philadelphia
       c. Thomas Jefferson                                                                                              c. Washington D.C.
       d. James Madison                                                                                                 d. Boston
3) A doctor attemped to resurrect this dead president with a                                                   8) On which monument in Washington D.C. are the following words
   transfusion of sheep blood:                                                                                     inscribed ‘I have sworn upon the arlar of God enternal hostility
       a. John Adams                                                                                               against every form of tyranny over the mind of man’?
       b. George Washington                                                                                             a. Washington Monument
       c. Thomas Jefferson                                                                                              b. Jefferson Memorial
       d. James Madison                                                                                                 c. Lincoln Memorial
4) What was George Washington rewarded with for his services                                                            d. Mount Rushmore
   during the French and Indian Wars (1754-1763)?                                                              9) What was the White House called in its original design?
       a. $1000                                                                                                         a. The President’s Palace
       b. Piece of land                                                                                                 b. The Giant House of Power
       c. Medal of Honor                                                                                                c. The White Castle
       d. Mansion in Washington D.C.                                                                                    d. The White Palace
5) Which animal did Benjamin Franklin want to use to represent the                                             10) Who was charged with the offense of misuing his power on the
   US?                                                                                                             Declaration of independence?
       a. Turkey                                                                                                        a. Abraham Lincoln
       b. Bald eagle                                                                                                    b. Benjamin Franklin
       c. Bison                                                                                                         c. Thomas Jefferson
       d. Grizzly bear                                                                                                  d. George III


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5. Music Zone Exhibit                                                                                                   INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 1
Featuring Aretha Franklin, Bob Dylan, Marvin Gaye, Duke Ellington, Ella                                                 After experiencing the Music Zone exhibit at Madame Tussauds’,
Fitzgerald                                                                                                              research the current issues and laws concerning copyright of
                                                                                                             digital music. Create a presentation on one of the individuals found in
US Dept. of Education National Social Studies Standards                                                      Madame Tussauds’ Music Zone exhibit (Aretha Franklin, Bob Dylan, Marvin
NSS-USH.5-12.9 Era 9: Postwar United States (1945 to Early 1970s)                                            Gaye, Duke Ellington, or Ella Fitzgerald). Express your understanding of the
      • Understand the economic boom and social transformation of postwar United States                      ethical issues related to the copyright of digital music by including digital
      • Understand how the Cold War and conflicts in Korea and Vietnam influenced
                                                                                                             music in your presentation.
           domestic and international politics
      • Understand domestic policies after World War II
      • Understand the struggle for racial, gender equality & the extension of civil liberties                             Students explore characteristics of dialect within their community or state,
National Council for the Social Civil Rights Movement Studies Standards                                                    including vocabulary, word use, grammar and cultural distinctions that reflect
I. Culture                                                                                                                 historical trends and events.
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of culture and
cultural diversity, so that the learner can:                                                                      •    Working appropriately and productively with others
      • Explain how information and experiences may be interpreted by people from diverse                         •    Leveraging the collective intelligence of groups when appropriate
           cultural perspectives and frames of reference
      • Explain and give examples of how language, literature, the arts, architecture, other                           INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 2
           artifacts, traditions, beliefs, values, and behaviors contribute to the development and                     Listen and research the lyrics to the songs of the artists found in
           transmission of culture                                                                                     Madame Tussauds’ Music Zone exhibit. Write a short paper
IV. Individual Development & Identity
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of individual
                                                                                                             analyzing each artist’s dialect and how it relates to their culture and historical
development and identity, so that the learner can:                                                           trends.
      • Identify and describe the influence of perception, attitudes, values, and beliefs on
           personal identity                                                                                            INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 3
      • Identify and interpret examples of stereotyping, conformity, and altruism                                       Research the life of one of the characters from Madame
V. Individuals, Groups, & Institutions                                                                                  Tussauds’ Music Zone exhibit. Take on the role of a radio disc
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of interactions
among individual, groups, and institutions, so that the learner can:                                         jockey and interview that character. Create a detailed script including thought
      • Analyze group and institutional influences on people, events & elements of culture                   provoking questions that your audience would find interesting and answers
      • Identify and analyze examples of tensions between expressions of individuality and                   from the character that they would most likely give. Create an audio podcast
           group or institutional efforts to promote social conformity                                       to simulate a radio talk show.
IX. Global Connections
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of global                                   Research, organize and present information in clear, complete and effective
connections and interdependence, so that the learner can:                                                                 formats.
      Describe instances in which language, art, music, belief systems, and other cultural
      elements can facilitate global understanding or cause misunderstanding                                            Interpret, organize and present information from American history in clear,
                                                                                                                  complete and effective formats to other students/adults.
                                                                                                                  • Articulate thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively through speaking and writing


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6. The Presidential Gallery                                                                                       •     Analyze and explain ideas and governmental mechanisms to meet needs and wants
                                                                                                                        of citizens, regulate territory, manage conflict, and establish order and security
Featuring George H.W. Bush, Richard Nixon, George Washington, Theodore
                                                                                                                  • Describe the ways nations and organizations respond to forces of unity and diversity
Roosevelt                                                                                                               affecting order and security
                                                                                                                  • Identify and describe the basic features of the political system in the United States,
 US Dept. of Education National Social Studies Standards                                                                and identify representative leaders from various levels and branches of government
NSS-USH.5-12.9 Era 9: Postwar United States (1945 to Early 1970s)
                                                                                                                  • Describe and analyze the role of technology in communications, transportation,
      • Understand the economic boom and social transformation of postwar United States                                 information-processing, weapons development, or other areas as it contributes to or
      • Understand how the Cold War and conflicts in Korea and Vietnam influenced                                       helps resolve conflicts
           domestic and international politics                                                                    • Explain and apply concepts such as power, role, status, justice, and influence to the
      • Understand domestic policies after World War II                                                                 examination of persistent issues and social problems
      • Understand the struggle for racial and gender equality and the extension of civil                         • Give examples and explain how governments attempt to achieve their stated ideals
           liberties                                                                                                    at home and abroad
NSS-USH.5-12.10 Era 10: Contemporary United States (1968 to Present)                                         X. Civic Ideals & Practices
      • Understand recent developments in foreign and domestic politics                                      Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the ideals,
      • Understand economic, social, and cultural developments in contemporary United                        principles, and practices of citizenship in a democratic republic, so that the learner can:
           States                                                                                                 • Analyze the influence of diverse forms of public opinion on the development of
National Council for the Social Civil Rights Movement Studies Standards                                                 public policy and decision-making
II. Time, Continuity, & Change                                                                                    • Analyze the effectiveness of selected public policies and citizen behaviors in
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the way                                realizing the stated ideals of a democratic republican form of government
human beings view themselves in and over time, so that the learner can:
      • Identify and use processes important to reconstructing and reinterpreting the past,
           such as using a variety of sources, providing, validating, and weighing evidence for
           claims, checking credibility of sources, and searching for causality
V. Individuals, Groups, & Institutions                                                                               INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 1
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of interactions                        Many of the presidents’ wives were involved in community service,
among individual, groups, and institutions, so that the learner can:                                                 including Jacqueline Kennedy. Working in pairs, choose an area of
      • Analyze group and institutional influences on people, events, and elements of
           culture
                                                                                                             community service to research then create and distribute a public service
      • Identify and analyze examples of tensions between expressions of individuality and                   announcement (via podcast, digital brochure, poster, etc.) that promotes
           group or institutional efforts to promote social conformity                                       community collaboration in the effort.
      • Identify and describe examples of tensions between belief systems and government
           policies and laws                                                                                               As a group, work together to reach a decision and to explain the reasons for it.
      • Apply knowledge of how groups and institutions work to meet individual needs and                                   Recognize and communicate diverse perspectives on an historical issue and
           promote the common good.                                                                                        demonstrate how diverse perspectives might lead to different interpretations.
VI. Power, Authority & Governance                                                                                          (Articulating thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively through speaking and
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of how people                  writing.)
create and change structures of power, authority, and governance, so that the learner can:
      • Examine persistent issues involving the rights, roles, and status of the individual in               Seek reasonable and ethical solutions to problems that arise when scientific advancement
           relation to the general welfare                                                                   and social norms or values come into conflict.
      • Describe the purpose of government and how its powers are acquired, used, and
           justified
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          INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 2                                                                                         INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 4
          Working in cooperative groups, choose a recent natural disaster                                                After completing Activity 3, in which you created a sample
          that took place during the presidency of Ronald Reagan, George                                                 compromise bill from two opposing bills, respond to presidential
H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton, or George W. Bush. Research the government’s                                       veto.
response to the disaster online, develop questions, and analyze/evaluate the
government’s reaction. Develop a summary of your findings and post to a                                                  Explain and demonstrate the importance of copyright law regarding the access
school-approved wiki.                                                                                                    and use of information.

                                                                                                                 •    Understand how media messages are constructed, for what purposes and using
             Communicate to school or community members about opportunities to assist
                                                                                                                      which tools, characteristics and conventions
             with a group project. Assess their performance as a group and develop and
                                                                                                                 •    Examine how individuals interpret messages differently, how values and points of
             implement a plan to work together more productively.
                                                                                                                      view are included or excluded, and how media can influence beliefs and behaviors
    •    Demonstrating ability to work effectively with diverse teams
                                                                                                            Possess a fundamental understanding of the ethical/legal issues surrounding the access
    •    Exercising flexibility and willingness to be helpful in making necessary                           and use of information
         compromises to accomplish a common goal
    •    Assuming shared responsibility for collaborative work

          INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 3
          Use history web sites to research 19th century and contemporary
          presidential election campaigns. Analyze the similarities and
differences among them then discuss the influence media has on political
campaigns in a short essay.

            Analyze how media format influences media messages (e.g., “The medium is the
            message.” McLuhan).

              Analyze how the meaning of a message is influenced by the specific media and
the historic context in which the message is conveyed.

Explain and demonstrate the importance of copyright law regarding the access and use of
information.
     • Understand how media messages are constructed, for what purposes and using
          which tools, characteristics and conventions
     • Examine how individuals interpret messages differently, how values and points of
          view are included or excluded, and how media can influence beliefs and behaviors
Possess a fundamental understanding of the ethical/legal issues surrounding the access
and use of information


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7. Scandals Exhibit                                                                                                    of citizens, regulate territory, manage conflict, and establish order and security
                                                                                                                 •     Describe the ways nations and organizations respond to forces of unity and diversity
Featuring Richard Nixon, J. Edgar Hoover, Bob Woodward                                                                 affecting order and security
                                                                                                                 • Describe and analyze the role of technology in communications, transportation,
US Dept. of Education National Social Studies Standards                                                                information-processing, weapons development, or other areas as it contributes to or
NSS-USH.5-12.8 Era 8: The Great Depression and World War II (1929-1945)                                                helps resolve conflicts
      • Understand the causes of the Great Depression and how it affected American                               • Explain and apply concepts such as power, role, status, justice, and influence to the
          society                                                                                                      examination of persistent issues and social problems
      • Understand how the New Deal addressed the Great Depression, transformed                                  • Give examples and explain how governments attempt to achieve their stated ideals
          American federalism, and initiated the welfare state                                                         at home and abroad
      • Understand the causes and course of World War II, the character of the war at                       X. Civic Ideals & Practices
          home and abroad, and its reshaping of the U.S. role in world affairs                              Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the ideals,
NSS-USH.5-12.9 Era 9: Postwar United States (1945 to Early 1970s)                                           principles, and practices of citizenship in a democratic republic, so that the learner can:
      • Understand the economic boom and social transformation of postwar United States                          • Analyze the influence of diverse forms of public opinion on the development of
      • Understand how the Cold War and conflicts in Korea and Vietnam influenced                                      public policy and decision-making
          domestic and international politics                                                                    • Analyze the effectiveness of selected public policies and citizen behaviors in
      • Understand domestic policies after World War II                                                                realizing the stated ideals of a democratic republican form of government
      • Understand the struggle for racial and gender equality and the extension of civil
          liberties
National Council for the Social Civil Rights Movement Studies Standards
IV. Individual Development & Identity                                                                                 INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 1
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of individual
development and identity, so that the learner can:
                                                                                                                      Access information online about an historical event depicted at
      • Identify and describe the influence of perception, attitudes, values, and beliefs on                          Scandals Exhibit. Critique the different sources taking into
          personal identity                                                                                 consideration any possible bias or political perspective while determining
V. Individuals, Groups, & Institutions                                                                      what is and isn’t factual. Compare/contrast the sources’ restrictions on
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of interactions               access to the information then create a short report related to the content of
among individual, groups, and institutions, so that the learner can:
                                                                                                            the information.
      • Demonstrate an understanding of concepts such as role, status, and social class in
          describing the interactions of individuals and social groups
                                                                                                                          Create and organize original information data sets about key issues in the
      • Identify and analyze examples of tensions between expressions of individuality and
                                                                                                                         community, state or nation using a variety of tools.
          group or institutional efforts to promote social conformity
      • Identify and describe examples of tensions between belief systems and government
          policies and laws                                                                                      •    Access and analyze visual digital primary information sources and digital maps.
VI. Power, Authority & Governance                                                                                •    Access and critique sources of information from various types of media, which
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of how people                           discuss an historic event. Students analyze the difference between public and
create and change structures of power, authority, and governance, so that the learner can:                            private sources of information.
      • Examine persistent issues involving the rights, roles, and status of the individual in                   •    Accessing information efficiently and effectively, evaluating information critically
          relation to the general welfare                                                                             and competently, and using information accurately and creatively for the issue or
                                                                                                                      problem at hand
      • Describe the purpose of government and how its powers are acquired, used, and
          justified                                                                                              •    Possessing a fundamental understanding of the ethical/legal issues surrounding
                                                                                                                      the access and use of information
      • Analyze and explain ideas and governmental mechanisms to meet needs and wants
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           Watergate Report

1. Which hotel was broken into in the early hours of the morning?
      a. The Gateshead Hotel
      b. The Watergate Hotel

2. The check that appeared in the account of the Watergate burglar was for?
      a. $25,000
      b. $50,0000

3. Which two former Nixon aides were convicted in the Watergate incident?
      a. Liddy & McCord Jr.
      b. Horkey & Joden

4. How many top White House staffs resigned over the scandal?
      a. Three
      b. Four

5. What did Nixon refuse to turn over to the Senate Watergate Committee?
     a. Confidential documents
     b. Tape recordings

6. Who became President when Nixon resigned from the position?
     a. Gerald R. Ford
     b. Jimmy Carter




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8. The War Room                                                                                                     •     Identify and describe examples of tensions between belief systems and government
                                                                                                                          policies and laws
Featuring Dwight D. Eisenhower, Harry Truman, Lyndon B. Johnson, Franklin
                                                                                                                     • Describe the role of institutions in furthering both continuity and change
D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill                                                                                      • Apply knowledge of how groups and institutions work to meet individual needs and
                                                                                                                          promote the common good
US Dept. of Education National Social Studies Standards                                                        VI. Power, Authority & Governance
NSS-USH.5-12.8 Era 8: The Great Depression and World War II (1929-1945)                                        Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of how people
      • Understand the causes of the Great Depression & how it affected American society                       create and change structures of power, authority, and governance, so that the learner can:
      • Understand how the New Deal addressed the Great Depression, transformed                                      • Analyze and explain ideas and governmental mechanisms to meet needs and wants
           American federalism, and initiated the welfare state                                                           of citizens, regulate territory, manage conflict, and establish order and security
      • Understand the causes and course of World War II, the character of the war at                                • Explain conditions, actions, and motivations that contribute to conflict and
           home and abroad, and its reshaping of the U.S. role in world affairs                                           cooperation within and among nations
NSS-USH.5-12.9 Era 9: Postwar United States (1945 to Early 1970s)                                                    • Explain and apply concepts such as power, role, status, justice, and influence to the
      • Understand the economic boom and social transformation of postwar United States                                   examination of persistent issues and social problems
      • Understand how the Cold War and conflicts in Korea and Vietnam influenced                                    • Give examples and explain how governments attempt to achieve their stated ideals
           domestic and international politics                                                                            at home and abroad
      • Understand domestic policies after World War II                                                        VIII. Science, Technology, & Society
      • Understand the struggle for racial, gender equality & the extension of civil liberties                 Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of relationships
National Council for the Social Civil Rights Movement Studies Standards                                        among science, technology, and society, so that the learner can:
II. Time, Continuity, & Change                                                                                       • Describe examples in which values, beliefs, and attitudes have been influenced by
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the way                                  new scientific and technological knowledge, such as the invention of the printing
human beings view themselves in and over time, so that the learner can:                                                   press, conceptions of the universe, applications of atomic energy, and genetic
      • Identify and use key concepts such as chronology, causality, change, conflict, and                                discoveries
           complexity to explain, analyze, and show connections among patterns of historical                         • Seek reasonable and ethical solutions to problems that arise when scientific
           change and continuity                                                                                          advancements and social norms or values come into conflict
      • Identify and use processes important to reconstructing and reinterpreting the past,                    IX. Global Connections
           such as using a variety of sources, providing, validating, and weighing evidence for                Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of global
           claims, checking credibility of sources, and searching for causality                                connections and interdependence, so that the learner can:
      • Develop crucial sensitivities such as empathy and skepticism regarding attitudes,                            • Analyze examples of conflict, cooperation, and interdependence among groups,
           values, and behaviors of people in different historical contexts                                               societies, and nations
      • Use knowledge of facts and concepts drawn from history, along with methods of                                • Describe and explain the relationships and tensions between national sovereignty
           historical inquiry, to inform decision-making about & action-taking on public issues.                          and global interests in such matters as territory, natural resources, trade, use of
IV. Individual Development & Identity                                                                                     technology, and welfare of people
Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of individual                          • Demonstrate understanding of concerns, standards, issues, and conflicts related
development and identity, so that the learner can:                                                                        to universal human rights
      • Relate personal changes to social, cultural, and historical contexts                                   X. Civic Ideals & Practices
      • Identify and interpret examples of stereotyping, conformity, and altruism                              Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the ideals,
Individuals, groups, & institutions social studies programs should include experiences that                    principles, and practices of citizenship in a democratic republic, so that the learner can:
provide for the study of interactions among individual, groups, and institutions, so that the                        • Analyze the effectiveness of selected public policies and citizen behaviors in
learner can:                                                                                                              realizing the stated ideals of a democratic republican form of government
      • Identify and analyze examples of tensions between expressions of individuality and                           Explain the relationship between policy statements and action plans used to address
           group or institutional efforts to promote social conformity                                               issues of public concern
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          INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 1
          Research one of history’s greatest communicators, Sir Winston
          Churchill, and information concerning why the Allies bombed
Dresden, whether Churchill was responsible for that decision, and why the
decision was made. Organize your thoughts into a persuasive essay that is to
be proof-read, peer edited, and summarized in a class blog.

           Research, organize and present information in clear, complete and effective
           formats.


           INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 2
           Choose two characters from The War Room. Using Inspiration (or
           other concept-mapping software), create a Venn diagram that
compares and contrasts the two individuals in terms of foundations, beliefs,
and relationship to various issues.

           Interpret, organize and present information from American history in clear,
           complete and effective formats to other students/adults. Articulate thoughts and
           ideas clearly and effectively through speaking and writing




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           Military
       1) Who is the highest military ranking president?                                                            6) Who was the first president to hold a pilot’s license?
              a. Dwight D. Eisenhower                                                                                       a. Dwight D. Eisenhower
              b. George W. Bush                                                                                             b. George W. Bush
              c. Thomas Jefferson                                                                                           c. Bill Clinton
              d. George Washington                                                                                          d. Theodore Roosevelt
       2) Who is the only U.S. president to receive the highest military                                            7) How many protest marches on Washington D.C. were held
          decoration, the Congressional Medal of Honor?                                                                 because of the Vietnam War?
              a. Theodore Roosevelt                                                                                         a. 4
              b. Thomas Jefferson                                                                                           b. 15
              c. Abraham Lincoln                                                                                            c. 8
              d. Dwight D. Eisenhower                                                                                       d. 13
       3) Who is the only president to serve in both World War I &                                                  8) What does the military nickname ‘G.I.’ stand for?
          World War II?                                                                                                     a. Gewy Iodine
              a. Harry S. Truman                                                                                            b. Giant Igloo
              b. Franklin D. Roosevelt                                                                                      c. Government Issue
              c. Dwight D. Eisenhower                                                                                       d. Great Injury
              d. Lyndon B. Johnson                                                                                  9) How many U.S. servicemen were killed during the Vietnam
       4) Why was Ronald Reagan banned from combat?                                                                     War?
              a. Flat feet                                                                                                  a. Less than 10,000
              b. Poor eyesight                                                                                              b. Over 58,000
              c. Claustrophobia                                                                                             c. 35,000
              d. Deafness in his left ear                                                                                   d. 35,231
       5) Which U.S. military decoration(s) did a young Lieutenant                                                  10) In which conflict did Abraham Lincoln serve as a Captain?
          John F. Kennedy earn for his actions saving his crew after                                                        a. Winnebago War
          the sinking of the PT109?                                                                                         b. Utah War
              a. Silver Star Medal                                                                                          c. Bear Flag Revolt
              b. Navy & Marine Corps Medal                                                                                  d. The Black Hawk War
              c. Medal of Freedom
              d. Purple Heart




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    Encompassing Activities                                                                                             INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 3
                                                                                                                        Create a social networking site for Madame Tussauds’ fans using
    In addition to the activities listed below, there are interactive quizzes that                                      a school-approved social networking tool (e.g., rsites, ning). Add
    will stimulate students can be found in Madame Tussauds’ exhibits                                       images, text, sound, and/or graphics to enhance the site. Invite your friends
    during your visit.                                                                                      and family to become part of the site and participate in blogs and other
                                                                                                            activities posted on the site.
                                                                                                                         Use digital technology and/or networks appropriately to access & integrate
                                                                                                                         information from various sources.

                                                                                                                         Use digital technology to evaluate information.
                                                                                                                 •    Using digital technology, communication tools information in order to function in a
                                                                                                                      knowledge economy
                                                                                                                 •    Using technology as a tool to research, organize, evaluate, and communicate
                                                                                                                      information and the possession of a fundamental understanding of the ethical/legal
                                                                                                                      issues surrounding the access and use of information and/or networks
                                                                                                                      appropriately to create information
                                                                                                                 •    Using digital technology, communication tools and/or networks appropriately to
                                                                                                                      access, manage, integrate, evaluate and create

            INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 1                                                                                     INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 4
            After taking one of the interactive quizzes found in one of Madame                                         After touring Madame Tussauds’, use a district-approved wiki to
            Tussauds’ exhibits, create a quiz that could be used in another                                            reflect on your experience. Working in groups of three to four
            exhibit. Uses the internet to research events related to one of the                             people, create a page for each exhibit room within the wiki. Finally, write a
exhibit rooms and create the interactive quiz using PowerPoint or a similar                                 well organized journal entry reflecting on your team’s interaction and
digital resource.                                                                                           productivity.

           INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 2                                                                                      Use digitized resources to investigate and define political or social issues in the
           Take photographs of the exhibits at Madame Tussauds’ with a                                                 past and then illustrate, through a multimedia presentation, how one such issue
                                                                                                                       relates to their community.
           digital camera then upload them to a computer.
                                                                                                            Recognize and communicate diverse perspectives on an historical issue and demonstrate
Interpret the photographs using Microsoft Photo Story or a similar digital                                  how diverse perspectives might lead to different interpretations. (Articulating thoughts and
resource. Add special effects, soundtracks, and your own voice narrations.                                  ideas clearly and effectively through speaking and writing.)
Be sure to personalize your photo story with titles and captions too.




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           INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 5
           Use an online survey tool (e.g., Zoomerang, Survey Monkey) to                                                INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 8
           create a survey that collects data about your class’s favorite                                               Within a small group, choose a character found at Madame
exhibit room at Madame Tussauds’. Store the data in a spreadsheet,                                                      Tussauds’ you can most relate to. Create a representation of that
analyze/evaluate, and present your findings using the spreadsheet’s                                          person’s life story using photographs, audio, video, poetry, music, etc. After
graphing tools. Use pictures from your visit to illustrate your class’s exhibit                              each group has created their representation, blend all projects together to
preference at Madame Tussauds’.                                                                              create a compilation of the characters.

          INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 6                                                                                          Students simulate political organizations based on compromise and
          Using the photographs of each exhibit, create a visual digital                                                  cooperation.
          information source for other classes going on a field trip to Madame                               Students produce representations of an historical figure using multiple presentation genres.
Tussauds’. Include a photograph of each wax figure, its significance, and an
interesting fact about it.                                                                                   Students explore characteristics of dialect within their community or state, including
                                                                                                             vocabulary, word use, grammar and cultural distinctions that reflect historical trends and
           Create and organize original information data sets about key issues in the                        events.
           community, state or nation using a variety of tools.                                                  • Working appropriately and productively with others
                                                                                                                 • Leveraging the collective intelligence of groups when appropriate
           Access and analyze visual digital primary information sources and digital maps.                       • Bridging cultural differences and using differing perspectives to increase
                                                                                                                      innovation and the quality of work
Access and critique sources of information from various types of media, which discuss an
historic event. Students analyze the difference between public and private sources of                                  INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 9
information.
                                                                                                                       Write a draft article for the school newspaper about your trip to
     • Accessing information efficiently and effectively, evaluating information critically
           and competently, and using information accurately and creatively for the issue or                           Madame Tussauds’. Share your letter with classmates in a writers’
           problem at hand                                                                                   workshop and set a goal to improve your writing (e.g., create a clear topic
     • Possessing a fundamental understanding of the ethical/legal issues surrounding                        sentence for each paragraph).
           the access and use of information
                                                                                                                          Students choose a research topic and seek additional resources to become
           INTERACTIVE ACTIVITY 7                                                                                         “experts” on their topic.
           Within a group, take on the role of publicists at Madame
                                                                                                             Students set short- and long-term goals to complete their research on time.
           Tussauds’. Create a pamphlet, poster, or short radio commercial                                       • Monitoring one’s own understanding and learning needs
to entice visitors to come to the exhibit. Take into consideration your time,                                    • Going beyond basic mastery of skills and/or curriculum to explore and expand
materials, and talents within your group when creating your advertisement.                                            one’s own learning a opportunities to gain expertise
                                                                                                                 • Utilizing time efficiently and managing workload
                                                                                                                 • Defining, prioritizing and completing tasks without direct oversight
                                                                                                                 • Demonstrating initiative to advance skill levels towards a professional level
                                                                                                                 • Demonstrating commitment to learning as a lifelong process

     Madame Tussauds Washington D.C. 1001 F St NW, Washington D.C. 20004   1-888-923-0334 (US & Canada) or 1-212-512-9600 x607 GroupSales@MadameTussaudsNY.com                                              22
          Assassins

1. John F. Kennedy was killed by Lee Harvey Oswald on November 22, 1963 in:
   1. Dallas, Texas
   2. Los Angeles, California
   3. Chicago, Illinois

2. Abraham Lincoln was killed on April 14, 1865 in Ford's Theatre, Washington D.C. by:
   1. James T. Duggan
   2. John W. Boothe
   3. Jim B. Wallis

3. Martin Luther King was killed by James Earl Ray in Memphis, Tennessee on:
   1. June 11, 1967
   2. April 4, 1968
   3. September 6, 1968

4. Malcolm X killed by: Norman 3x Butler, Thomas 15x Johnson & Talmadge Hayer on February 21, 1965 in:
   1. Chicago, Illinois
   2. Washington D.C.
   3. Manhattan, New York

5. Marvin Gaye was killed by: Rev. Marvin Gaye Sr in Los Angeles, CA on:
   1. April 1, 1984
   2. May 5, 1985
   3. August 11, 1986




   Madame Tussauds Washington D.C. 1001 F St NW, Washington D.C. 20004   1-888-923-0334 (US & Canada) or 1-212-512-9600 x607 GroupSales@MadameTussaudsNY.com   24
          Mix & Match Worksheet

Next three pages are information cards for some of the historical figures in Madame Tussauds Washington D.C.




     Steps:

          1. Divide your students into groups


          2. Print out next three pages and separate the
             names from description & mix them up.


          3. Have your students match names with the
             description!




   Madame Tussauds Washington D.C. 1001 F St NW, Washington D.C. 20004   1-888-923-0334 (US & Canada) or 1-212-512-9600 x607 GroupSales@MadameTussaudsNY.com   25
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Abraham Lincoln                                                          George Washington                                                   Thomas Jefferson


“In giving freedom to the slave, we assure                               “The time is now near at hand which most                            “I have sworn upon the altar of God eternal
freedom to the free – honorable alike in                                 probably will determine whether Americans                           hostility against every form of tyranny over
what we give and what we preserve”                                       are to be freemen or slaves”                                        the mind of man”

• First President born outside the 13 original colonies                  • Married a wealthy widow and eventually came to own 80,000         • Designed his own home at Monticello, which included
                                                                           acres, including a village and more than 300 slaves                 automatic doors and the first swivel chair
• At 6’4” the tallest President and wore a stovepipe hat to seem
  even taller                                                            • The only President to be elected unanimously by the Electoral     • As President kept grizzly bear cubs given by Meriwether Lewis
                                                                           College                                                             and William Clark in cages on the White House lawn
• Severe depression his whole life led to two mental breakdowns
  at ages 26 and 32                                                      • When inaugurated had only one tooth left. He wore dentures        • Founder of University of Virginia, the first American college to
                                                                           made of elk, human, and hippopotamus teeth                          separate higher education from religious doctrine
• Defeated twice for U.S. Senate before being elected President
                                                                         • Chose the site of the future capital along the banks of the       • Was the first President inaugurated in Washington, D.C.
• Assassinated on Good Friday, 1865 in Ford’s Theater,                     Potomac, near his own home, Mount Vernon
  Washington D.C.                                                                                                                            • Jefferson and John Adams were the only Presidents to sign the
                                                                         • After the Presidency, became one of the nation’s biggest            Declaration of Independence. Both men also died on the same
                                                                           whiskey distillers. In 1799 produced more than 11,000 gallons       day – its 50th anniversary
                                                                           of whiskey



  Born on February 12, 1809                                                Born on February 28, 1732                                           Born on April 13, 1743 in Albemarle
  in Hardin County, KY                                                     in Westmoreland County, VA                                          County, VA
  Died April 15, 1865 in Washington, D.C.                                  Died December 14, 1799 at Mount Vernon, VA                          Died July 4, 1826 at Monticello, VA




hggfhgfhgfh                                                              hggfhgfhgfh                                                         hggfhgfhgfh


The Piscataway Indian                                                    George III                                                          Jacqueline Kennedy


• Was the most powerful and numerous Native Americans nation in          “America is lost! Must we fall beneath                              “The one thing I do not want to be called is
  the Chesapeake area
                                                                         the blow? Or have we resources that may                             First Lady. It sounds like a saddle horse”
• Traditional enemy were the Iroquois – the two tribes frequently        repair the mischief?”
                                                                                                                                             • Jackie was the first First Lady born in a hospital
  fought over land

                                                                         • Nicknamed ‘Farmer George’ due to his interest in agriculture      • While at Vassar College she was named ‘Debutante of the Year’
• First contact with English colonists in 1608 later brought disaster.
                                                                           and model farms                                                     for the 1947-48 season
  By 1668 the Piscataway were confined to two reservations

                                                                         • The longest section of the Declaration of Independence lists of   • Before her marriage to Jack Kennedy, Jackie was the Inquiring
• Some groups fled to Pennsylvania and Canada to escape, others
                                                                           George III’s ‘injuries and usurpations’ against the colonies        Camera Girl for the Washington Post. She photographed
  stayed and assimilated with the colonists, neglecting their Native
                                                                                                                                               and interviewed prominent Washingtonians, including
  American roots
                                                                         • His refusal to accept the loss of America prolonged the             Vice-President Richard Nixon and Senator John F. Kennedy

• Chief Turkey Tupac was the last to learn the Piscataway language         war, although later he was gracious to the first American
                                                                                                                                             • She disliked the notoriously competitive Kennedy family
  orally from his family. He helped reorganize the tribe in the 1970s      ambassador to England, John Adams
                                                                                                                                               sporting events and refused to play any more after her leg was
  after years of neglect                                                                                                                       broken in one of their baseball games
                                                                         • Suffered from prolonged bouts of madness, probably caused
                                                                           by porphyria, a rare blood disease
                                                                                                                                             • During the presidential campaign Jackie was criticized as
                                                                                                                                               unpatriotic for favoring French clothes by Chanel, Givenchy,
                                                                         • Died blind, deaf, and insane, the longest ruling male monarch
                                                                                                                                               and Dior. She chose American designer Oleg Cassini to make
                                                                                                                                               her ‘official’ wardrobe in order to silence the criticism


                                                                           Born George William Frederick on June 4,                            Born Jacqueline Lee Bouvier on July 28,
                                                                           1738 in London, UK.                                                 1929 in Southampton, NY
                                                                           Died January 29, 1820 at Windsor Castle, UK                         Died May 19, 1994 in New York City




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George W. Bush                                                           George H.W. Bush                                                    Bill Clinton


“Terrorist attacks can shake the                                         “Read my lips: no new taxes.”                                       “There is nothing wrong with America
foundations of our biggest buildings,                                                                                                        which cannot be cured by what is right
but they cannot touch the foundation of                                  • Bush joined the US Navy on his 18th birthday. Within in the       with America”
America”                                                                   year he became the youngest naval aviator until that time
                                                                                                                                             • Assumed his stepfather’s name “Clinton” in elementary school,
                                                                         • He went on to fly 58 combat missions in WWII, in a squadron
• Bush was a managing general partner of the Texas Rangers                                                                                     but didn’t formally change his name until age 14
                                                                           with a 50% casualty rate, winning in the process the
  baseball team for five years
                                                                           Distinguished Flying Cross and the Presidential Unit Citation
                                                                                                                                             • As a talented saxophonist, Bill considered a career as a
• After a career in business, he was elected Governor of Texas,                                                                                professional musician until his visit to the Kennedy White
                                                                         • Before becoming Reagan’s Vice-President, Bush was a
  becoming the first to be elected to two consecutive four year                                                                                 House made him decide on a life in public service
                                                                           Congressman, Ambassador to the U.N., Chief Liaison Officer to
  terms
                                                                           China, and Head of the CIA
                                                                                                                                             • Secretly bought a house which Hillary had admired in Arkansas
• Bush was the first President to be elected despite losing the                                                                                 just before proposing marriage. When she accepted, he
                                                                         • In 1985, while President Reagan underwent an 8-hour surgery,
  popular vote since Benjamin Harrison in 1888                                                                                                 revealed that he already owned the property
                                                                           Bush became the first Vice-President to become Acting
• He is the first US President to ever run a marathon                       President. He spent much of the time playing tennis
                                                                                                                                             • Became the youngest person ever elected Governor of
                                                                                                                                               Arkansas in 1978, and after a defeat in 1980 became the
• Bush is the second son of a former President to become                 • In 2004 Bush went skydiving to celebrate his 80th birthday
                                                                                                                                               youngest ex-governor. Went on to win re-election and serve
  President. John Quincy Adams, son of John Adams, was                                                                                         four more terms
  elected in 1824
                                                                                                                                             • Ended his presidency with a 68% approval rating, the highest
                                                                                                                                               for a departing president since polling began

  Born George Walker Bush on July 6, 1946                                  Born George Herbert Walker Bush III on
  in New Haven, CT                                                         June 12, 1924 in Milton, MA                                         Born William Jefferson Blythe IV on
                                                                                                                                               August 19, 1946 in Hope, AR
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Richard Nixon                                                          J. Edgar Hoover                                                       Martin Luther King


“I am not a crook.”                                                    “There’s something addicting about a                                  “I have a dream…”
                                                                       secret”
• During the Second World War Nixon served in the Navy. He                                                                                   • In 1934 a visit to Germany inspired King’s father to change both
  became known as an excellent poker player, and used the              • The details of Hoover’s birthplace and early life are mysterious,     is own name and that of his son to Martin Luther
  winnings to finance his post-war Congressional campaign                 as his birth certificate was not filed until 1938, at age 43
                                                                                                                                             • The FBI under Hoover began wiretapping King in 1961. They
• In the 1950 California Senate race he called his opponent The        • Director of the FBI from 1924 until his death in 1972. After his      used the information to try to blackmail King by threatening to
  Pink Lady, alleging she was a Communist sympathiser                    death the term limit for FBI directors was set at 10 years            expose details of his private life

• Saved his political career in 1952 with the famous Checkers          • Kept secret files on the private lives of many public figures         • King was one of the leaders of The March on Washington in
  speech on TV, in which he denied financial wrongdoing                   such as the Kennedys, Martin Luther King, and Nixon                   1963, at that time the largest protest gathering in Washington
                                                                                                                                               history
• Resigned the presidency after the Watergate scandal was              • Truman, Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon all considered firing
  uncovered. He is the only president to do so                           Hoover, but each decided that the political cost would be too       • In 1964 he became the youngest ever recipient of the Nobel
                                                                         great                                                                 Peace Prize
• In the aftermath of Watergate, 25 of Nixon’s aides were indicted
  for criminal activity. Nixon himself was given an unconditional      • To protect Hoover’s body from vandals, he was buried in a           • After his assassination in 1968 there were riots in over 60 cities
  pardon by President Ford                                               lead-lined coffin, weighing more than 2000 pounds. Three               across the nation
                                                                         servicemen were injured while carrying it during the State
                                                                         funeral


  Born Richard Milhous Nixon on January 9,                               Born John Edgar Hoover on January 1,                                  Born Michael King on January 15, 1929
  1913 in Yorba Linda, CA                                                1895 in Washington, D.C.                                              in Atlanta, GA
  Died April 22, 1994 in New York City                                   Died May 2, 1972 in Washington, D.C.                                  Died April 4, 1968 in Memphis, TN




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Benjamin Franklin                                                      Bob Dylan                                                             Duke Ellington


“We must all hang together, or assuredly                               “How many years can some people exist,                                “I’m not a pianist. My instrument is the
we shall all hang separately”                                          before they’re allowed to be free”                                    orchestra”

• Franklin was the inventor of, among other things, bifocals, the      • In his 1959 high school yearbook wrote his ambition was             • Ellington’s father sometimes worked as a butler in the White
  lighting rod, the catheter, the glass harmonica, daylight savings      ‘to join Little Richard’                                              House to supplement the family’s income
  time, swimming fins, and the famous Franklin stove
                                                                       • Chose the name Dylan from his admiration of Welsh poet Dylan        • Nicknamed ‘Duke’ as a young man because of his personal
• Played a major role in the creation of the Declaration of              Thomas                                                                elegance and courtly style of dress
  Independence and the Constitution
                                                                       • In the early 60s was closely identified with the civil rights        • First job was selling peanuts at Washington Senators baseball
• Among the first to argue that colds and flu were spread                  movement. Sang at the March on Washington, where Martin               games. He later worked as a messenger at the War and State
  between people rather than by cold air and insisted on having          Luther King gave his “I have a dream” speech                          Departments
  the windows kept open even in winter
                                                                       • After 1963 feared being pigeon-holed as a protest-song writer       • Named his first band The Washingtonians. A later incarnation
• Established the first public library and the first public fire            and distanced himself completely from politics and folk music         of the band became famous through a regular gig at the Cotton
  department in America                                                                                                                        Club in Harlem
                                                                       • With 2006 album Modern Times became at age 65 the oldest
• The figure on display here was modelled from life by                    living person to top the U.S. Album Charts                          • Awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1969, the
  Madame Tussaud in 1783 when Franklin was serving as the                                                                                      highest civil honor in the U.S.
  U.S. envoy in Paris


                                                                                                                                               Born Edward Kennedy Ellington
  Born January 17, 1706 in Boston, MA                                    Born Robert Allen Zimmerman                                           on April 29, 1899 in Washington, D.C.
  Died April 17, 1790 in Philadelphia, PA                                on May 24, 1941 in Duluth, MN                                         Died May 24, 1974 in New York City




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Dwight D. Eisenhower                                                   Franklin D. Roosevelt                                                 Harry S. Truman


“A people that values its privileges above                             “We have nothing to fear except fear itself”                          “If you can’t stand the heat, get out of the
its principles soon loses both”                                                                                                              kitchen”
                                                                       • Already a successful politician when he contracted polio in 1921
                                                                                                                                             • Eyesight was so poor he had to memorize the eye chart to be
• As a professional soldier, lived in 27 different houses while          while swimming in a lake
                                                                                                                                               accepted into the Army during WWI
  serving 38 years in the Army. While in Washington he lived in the
                                                                       • Used a wheelchair in private, but never in public. Learned to       • Ran a men’s clothing store in Kansas City before entering
  Wyoming Apartments, where he would walk 12 blocks from the
                                                                         walk short distances with iron braces and could stand with help       politics
  streetcar to save the 10 cent fare
                                                                                                                                             • Was Vice-President for only 82 days before Roosevelt’s death
                                                                       • As President-Elect in 1933 barely escaped assassination.              made him President
• Within a year of the US entering WWII he was given command of
                                                                         The bullet meant for him killed the Mayor of Chicago instead
  the entire European theater
                                                                                                                                             • For two and a half years while the White House was being
                                                                       • In 1939 began a secret correspondence with Churchill to aid           renovated he walked to work from his temporary residence
• After victory, refused the Medal of Honor, saying it should only                                                                             across the street at Blair House
                                                                         Britain’s war effort. Personal friendship with Churchill was
  go to soldiers who risked their lives in the field
                                                                         instrumental in bringing the US into the war                        • The stalemate in the Korean War and Truman’s firing of
• As President had a mixed record on civil rights, but did send in                                                                             General MacArthur led to a 22% approval rating, the lowest for
                                                                       • Died in office two weeks before Germany’s surrender                    a sitting President. Truman was forced to cancel his bid for re-
  troops to uphold desegregation of Southern schools
                                                                                                                                               election
                                                                       • Washington D.C.’s Roosevelt memorial was opened along the
• First President to fly on Air Force One, and first to give televised                                                                         • Not independently wealthy, he still refused to accept corporate
                                                                         Tidal Basin in 1997
  press conferences                                                                                                                            or advertising work after being President. Instead lived
                                                                                                                                               modestly and wrote his memoirs


  Born David Dwight Eisenhower on                                        Born Franklin Delano Roosevelt on January                             Born on May 8, 1884 in Lamar, MO
  October 14, 1880 in Denison, TX                                        30, 1882 in Hyde Park, New York.                                      Died December 26, 1972
  Died March 28, 1969 in Gettysburg, PA                                  Died on April 12, 1945 in Warm Springs, GA                            in Kansas City, MO
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Hillary Rodham Clinton                                                  John F. Kennedy                                                          Lyndon B. Johnson


“I suppose I could have stayed at home                                  “Ask not what your country can do for you,                               “I seldom think of politics for more than 18
and baked cookies and had teas, but what                                but what you can do for your country”                                    hours a day”
I decided to do was to fulfill my profession                                                                                                      • Won a Senate seat in 1948 with only 87 votes, earning the ironic
                                                                        • All eight of John Kennedy’s great-grandparents were
which I entered before my husband was in                                  immigrants from Ireland                                                  nickname ‘Landslide Lyndon’
public life”
                                                                        • Became a war hero when his torpedo boat was sunk by the                • Johnson’s first Washington home was a modest one-bedroom
• Hillary’s father was a conservative Republican, and she began           Japanese. He led the rescue of the survivors, and was later              apartment for $42.50 a month. In 1943 he bought a $18,000
  her political life at age 16 by supporting Barry Goldwater’s            awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Medal                                  house across the street from J. Edgar Hoover. The house sold
  presidential candidacy                                                                                                                           for $3 million in 2005
                                                                        • Severely ill during large portions of his life, and he received the
• During the Nixon impeachment investigation, Hillary was part of         Catholic faith’s ‘last rites’ four times before he died                • In 1953 became the youngest Senate Minority Leader ever
  the impeachment inquiry staff which advised the House Judiciary       • In the first televised Presidential debate, Kennedy wore
  Committee                                                                                                                                      • Sworn in as President on Air Force One after JFK’s death by
                                                                          make-up under the bright lights, while his opponent Richard
                                                                                                                                                   Judge Sarah Hughes, making him the first President to be
• Her daughter Chelsea is named after the Joni Mitchell song              Nixon did not. The poll results showed that TV viewers
                                                                                                                                                   sworn in by a woman
  ‘Chelsea Morning’”                                                      preferred Kennedy, while radio listeners favored Nixon

                                                                        • The youngest person ever elected President at the age of 43            • Fought for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 which outlawed many
• Hillary was the first First Lady to have an independent
                                                                                                                                                   forms of racial segregation
  professional career prior to the White House (as a lawyer) as well    • In 1971 the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts was
  as the first to have a post-graduate degree                              opened as a living memorial to Kennedy’s Presidency and                • Faced with protests over Vietnam and dissention in his own
• In 2000 she was elected Senator from New York, making her the           desire to bring culture to Washington D.C.                               party, decided not to run for re-election
  first woman to be elected to state-wide office in New York
                                                                          Born John Fitzgerald Kennedy on May 29,                                  Born Lyndon Baines Johnson on August 27,
  Born Hillary Diane Rodham on October 17,                                1917 in Brookline, MA                                                    1908 in Stonewall, TX
  1947 in Chicago, IL                                                     Died November 22, 1963 in Dallas, TX                                     Died January 22, 1973 at Johnson Ranch, TX




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Muhammad Ali                                                            Robert E. Lee                                                            Winston Churchill


“Why should they ask me to put on a uniform                             “Duty is the sublimest word in our                                       “No lover ever studied the whims of
and go 10,000 miles from home to drop bombs                             language. Do your duty in all things. You                                his mistress as I did those of President
and bullets on Brown people in Vietnam while                            cannot do more. You should not wish to                                   Roosevelt”
so-called Negro people in Louisville are treated
                                                                        do less.”
like dogs and denied simple human rights?”                                                                                                       • Half-American – while his father was an English aristocrat, his
                                                                        • Grew up financially embarrassed after his father lost the family          mother was the daughter of an American millionaire
• As a boy he preferred basketball, but decided to learn boxing on        fortune and went to jail and later exile for debts
  the advice of a policeman after his bike was stolen                                                                                            • Became famous after his escape from a POW camp during the
                                                                        • Went to West Point Military Academy because he didn’t have               Boer War (1899-1902)
• After being presented with his 1960 Rome Olympics Gold Medal            enough money for university
  he wore it for 48 hours straight, even in bed                                                                                                  • Close relations with Roosevelt helped save Britain with a supply of
                                                                        • Lee’s pre-Civil War home, the Lee-Custis Mansion in Arlington,
                                                                                                                                                   American munitions, food, and oil during the darkest days of WWII
• He later threw the medal into the Ohio River in disgust at the          was part of Washington, D.C. until 1847, when the Congress
  racial situation in America after having been refused service at a      returned the area to Virginia. The grounds later became Arlington      • Seven different figures of Churchill were on display at Madame
  restaurant due to the color of his skin                                 National Cemetery                                                        Tussauds during his lifetime. The first appeared on his wedding
• Shortly after winning his first World Heavyweight Championship                                                                                    day in 1908
                                                                        • Opposed secession, but refused to fight against his home state.
  in 1964, he followed the advice of his friend Malcolm X and joined      Declined Lincoln’s offer of command to lead Virginia’s army            • In 1963 President Kennedy made him the first Honorary American
  the Nation of Islam, changing his name to Muhammad Ali
                                                                        • Last words were “Strike the tent”                                        Citizen. Too ill to travel to Washington D.C. for the ceremony, he
• Convicted of draft evasion during the Vietnam War in 1967. He                                                                                    watched via live satellite broadcast
  was stripped of his title and passport and banned from boxing         • Pardoned for his role in the war in 1868, but his citizenship wasn’t
  until the conviction was later overturned                               restored until the 1970s
                                                                                                                                                   Born Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on
  Born Cassius Marcellus Clay, Jr. on                                     Born Robert Edward Lee on January 19,                                    November 30, 1874 at Blenheim Palace, UK
  January 17, 1942 in Louisville, KY                                      1807 in Stratford, VA                                                    Died January 24, 1965 at Chartwell House
                                                                          Died October 12, 1870 in Lexington, VA                                   in Kent, UK




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Ronald Reagan                                                           Malcolm X                                                                Rosa Parks


“In the present crisis, government is                                   “Racism isn’t just a black and white                                     “When that driver…ordered us up and out
not the solution to the problem. It is the                              problem. It’s brought bloodbaths to every                                of our seats, I felt a determination cover
problem”                                                                nation on earth at one time or another.”                                 my body like a quilt on winter night”
                                                                        • His father was a preacher and civil rights activist. The family was    • She attended the Montgomery Industrial School, a school with
• Began his career as a radio sports announcer                                                                                                     white teachers for black girls. The school had been burnt down
                                                                          often harassed by white supremacists and had to move house
                                                                          twice before their house was burned down when Malcolm was                twice by arsonists
• Made more than 20 Hollywood films. On the set of his first
                                                                          four years old                                                         • For 14 years Rosa Parks was the secretary to the President of
  major role he met co-star Jane Wyman. They married, then later
                                                                                                                                                   the Montgomery chapter of the NAACP
  divorced, making Reagan the first divorced president                   • Worked for a time as a shoe-shiner at the Lindy Hop nightclub in
                                                                          Boston, where he shined the shoes of Duke Ellington and other          • On December 1, 1955 Parks refused to give up her seat to a
• Was reportedly rejected for a screen role as president in               black musicians                                                          white man. Her arrest led to the Montgomery Bus Boycott,
  The Best Man (1964) for “not having the presidential look”                                                                                       which catapulted Martin Luther King to the forefront of the Civil
                                                                        • In 1946 he was arrested for burglary and spent six years in              Rights Movement
• Lost more than 30% of his blood during the assassination attempt        prison, where he participated in the prison debating team, which       • Both she and her husband lost their jobs as a result of the case,
  in Washington D.C. in March 1981                                        competed against teams from Harvard and MIT                              and the harassment became so intolerable that they moved to
                                                                                                                                                   Detroit
• Elected at age 69, retiring at 78, Reagan was the oldest of all the   • In 1952 he changed his surname to ‘X’ to symbolize a rejection
  presidents                                                              of ‘slave names’ taken from white masters and the lack of an           • After her death in 2005, Parks was the first woman and the
                                                                          inherited African tribal name                                            first non-government official to lie in state in the U.S. Capitol
                                                                                                                                                   Rotunda


  Born Ronald Wilson Reagan on                                            Born Malcolm Little on May 19, 1925 in                                   Born Rosa Louise McCauley on
  February 6, 1911 in Tampico, IL                                         Omaha, NE                                                                February 4, 1913 in Tuskegee, AL
  Died June 5, 2004 in Bel-Air, CA                                        Died February 21, 1965 in New York City                                  Died October 24, 2005 in Detroit, MI
Creative Activity Answers

Founding Fathers Quiz (page 12)                                          Watergate Report (page 17)                                           Crossword Puzzle (page 23)
     1) a. $2                                                               1) b. The Watergate Hotel                                         Across
     2) c. Thomas Jefferson                                                 2) a. $25,000                                                         3) Jefferson
     3) b. George Washington                                                3) a. Liddy & McCord Jr.                                              4) Eisenhower
     4) b. Piece of land                                                    4) a. Three                                                           7) Piscataway
     5) a. Turkey                                                           5) b. Tape recordings                                                 9) Muhammad Ali
     6) c. Pierre L’Enfant                                                  6) b. Jimmy Carter                                                    11) Martin Luther King
     7) b. Philadelphia                                                                                                                           12) NAACP
     8) b. Jefferson Memorial                                                                                                                     13) Rosa Parks
     9) a. The President’s Palace                                                                                                                 14) Freedom Ride
     10) d. George III
Military (page 20)                                                       Assassins (page 25)                                                  Down
     1) d. George Washington                                                1) 1. Dallas, Texas                                                  1) Kennedy
     2) a. Theodore Roosevelt                                               2) 2. John W. Boothe                                                 2) Watergate
     3) c. Eisenhower                                                       3) 2. April 4, 1968                                                  5) Civil Rights
     4) b. Poor eyesight                                                    4) 3. Manhattan, New York                                            6) Malcolm X
     5) b. Navy & Marine Corps Medal /                                      5) 1. April 1, 1984                                                  8) Armstrong
          d. Purple Heart                                                                                                                        10) Churchill
     6) a. Dwight Eisenhower                                                                                                                     15) Reagan
     7) c. 8
     8) c. Government Issue
     9) b. Over 58,000
     10) d. The Black Hawk War




   Madame Tussauds Washington D.C. 1001 F St NW, Washington D.C. 20004    1-888-923-0334 (US & Canada) or 1-212-512-9600 x607 GroupSales@MadameTussaudsNY.com              29
                                     Private Group Packages:                                                                        Madame Tussauds Washington D.C.
                                                                                                                                    1001 F St, Washington D.C. 20004
                                                                                                                                    1-888-923-0334 (US & Canada) or
                                     Education Seminars                                                                             1-212-512-9600 x607
                                                                                                                                    GroupSales@MadameTussaudsNY.com




WHEN? Monday – Friday, 10:00am-10.45am,                                                           WHAT WORKSHOPS ARE AVAILABLE?
based upon demand and availability of staff.                                                      1. ART & DESIGN STUDIES: STUDIO SECRETS
                                                                                                     (Behind the Scenes at Madame Tussauds)
WHERE? Madame Tussauds Washington D.C.                                                            - Staff from the Studios, Marketing and Sales Departments
                                                                                                   gives guests an active insight in to how Madame Tussauds
WHO ARE THEY AVAILABLE TO?                                                                         decides what figures to create, how they are designed,
All the seminars are suitable for groups of 25 or more                                             created and maintained.
maximum capacity 65. The Studio Secrets workshop can be                                           - Guests are shown a video on the Making of a wax figure.
tailored for younger students or older adults.                                                    - Studios staff demonstrate techniques used to create and
                                                                                                   maintain the wax figures.
COST For Tour Operator clients: additional $3.00 per student,                                     - A select number of guests are invited from the audience to
chaperones and additional adults ($11.00 per person).                                              participate in a mock sitting for their own wax figure.
**Prices are subject to change without notice. Please call for pricing.

WHAT DOES THE COST OF THE WORKSHOPS INCLUDE?                                                      2. BUSINESS STUDIES: TRAVEL & TOURISM STUDIES
- 45-minute talk and A/V presentation                                                             - Attraction Marketing & Public Relations
- Presentation by Madame Tussauds D.C. staff on specific area                                     - Brand Name and Identity
- Question & Answer Session – 15 minutes                                                          - Product Development & Market Research
- Self-guided tour of Madame Tussauds Washington D.C.                                             - Direct Marketing & Website and Email Marketing
- Allow 1 ½ - 2 hours for the full experience
                                                                          Go behind the scenes!
                                                                          Ever wondered how are our figures look so life-like? Our studio artist will give your group a brief
                                                                          interactive presentation on what it takes to create and maintain one of Madame Tussauds
                                                                          world-renowned wax figures. This hands-on learning experience allows guests to touch pieces of
                                                                          our figures and get answers to questions from the expert! The trade secrets used to create these
                                                                          figures have been kept secret for over 200 years. Now your group can unlock the secrets in one of
                                                                          Madame Tussauds’ educational seminars! Plus, exclusive behind the scenes footage of one of our
                                                                          celebrities and the making of a wax figure.


                                                                                                                                                                                29
                         Private Group Packages:                                                              Madame Tussauds Washington D.C.
                                                                                                              1001 F St, Washington D.C. 20004
                                                                                                              1-888-923-0334 (US & Canada) or
                         Enjoy a Night with the Stars!                                                        1-212-512-9600 x607
                                                                                                              GroupSales@MadameTussaudsNY.com




An Entertaining & Memorable Evening Event with Madame Tussauds Washington D.C. and An American Musical Landscape
                                     5:30PM – 7PM Start your evening at Madame Tussauds
                                     Get up close and personal with legends of the political, sports, and entertainment world that helped shape
                                     our history. This fully interactive wax attraction offers a chance to test your knowledge with historical
                                     quizzes. Travel through history with the nation's Founding Fathers and put your feel up at the Oval office.

                                     Go Behind the Scenes to learn how our life-like wax figures are created, sculpted, and maintained
                                     as well as explore the exciting life story of Madame Marie Tussaud. $8 for students and chaperones.

                                     7:15PM Dinner on the way
                                     After departing Madame Tussauds Washington D.C., enjoy a catered boxed meal from Brown Bag catering
                                     to eat on your way to the show. You' will be driving by the U.S. Capitol, Washington Monument,
                                     Jefferson Memorial into historic Old Town Alexandria, Virginia. Upon arrival you will be greeted by our
                                     costumed historical re-enactors who will escort your groups through the Art Deco style of the magnificent
                                     Memorial & scenic points of interest from the venue’s panoramic location high atop historic “Shooter’s Hill”.
                                     $12 per person.

                                     8PM Celebrate our Nation’s Music with An American Musical Landscape
                                     An American Musical Landscape is an upbeat multimedia tour of American music, places, history & culture.
                                     The Washington area’s best musicians and vocalists transport you through the sites, sounds and cultures
                                     of the varied genres of American music and the regions where they were born. Listen as they perform
                                     more than 20 of America’s best loved songs during this exciting 90 minute show performed at the theatre
                                     within the George Washington Masonic Memorial. $39 per person.
                                     Book Madame Tussauds Washington D.C. 1-888-923-0334 or GroupSales@MadameTussaudsNY.com
                                     Book Brown Bag Catering 202-408-0777 or catering@brownbagonline.com
   $59 per person exclusive of tax   Book AMERICAN MUSICAL LANDSCAPE with Dorrie Schenkel 215-205-5308 or dorries@broadwayinbound.com
                                     **Prices are subject to change without notice.Please call for pricing.



                                                                                                                                                 30
                          Private Group Packages:                                                                          Madame Tussauds Washington D.C.
                                                                                                                           1001 F St, Washington D.C. 20004
                                                                                                                           1-888-923-0334 (US & Canada) or
                          Sleepover at Madame Tussauds!                                                                    1-212-512-9600 x607
                                                                                                                           GroupSales@MadameTussaudsNY.com




Madame Tussauds Washington D.C. hosts an evening filled with star studded events!
As the doors close and the lights dim, get ready to get up close and personal with past presidents, first ladies, and A-list celebrities
like Tyra Banks, George Clooney, and Miley Cyrus!

7:00PM
Your group will enjoy a catered Pizza Party! Includes pizza, soda, and dessert!

8:00PM
Grab your friends and enjoy a scavenger hunt at Madame Tussauds by flashlight!
Ever wondered which US president kept grizzly bears on the White house lawn? Or how long it takes to create a wax figure?
Explore this fully interactive wax attraction to find the answers! First group to complete the scavenger hunt receives a special prize!

9:00PM
Dress up to imitate your favorite pop star! Sing karaoke amongst the stars! We will pick three people from your group to score the singing
contestants on originality, fashion choice, and charisma! Can you carry a note like Beyonce, Will Smith, Madonna, and Elton John?

10:00PM
Let the show begin! Grab your sleeping bag and gather in Madame Tussauds Glamour Room to watch a feature film with the stars!
Enjoy popcorn and a night of excitement as you sleep next to Hollywood celebrities!
                                                                                       $115 per child / $57.50 per adult
Time 7:00PM – 8:00AM
                                                                                       Admission Price Includes:
                                                                                       Pizza party! – Two (2) slices of pizza per person, a soda and dessert
*Each child must complete a release form.                                              Madame Tussauds DC scavenger hunt by flashlight
*For details please see our FAQ form. Each person must bring their own sleeping bag.   Pajama Fashion show/karaoke
*One Adult chaperone is required for every four children,                              Madame Tussauds Goodie Bag and flashlight
 suggested for children ages 8-12.                                                     Sleep-IN-Movie & popcorn
*Each adult chaperone must be over 21 years old.                                       Continental breakfast at Madame Tussauds Washington DC
                                                                                       **Prices are subject to change without notice. Please call for pricing.



                                                                                                                                                                 32
Private Group Packages:                                                                          Madame Tussauds Washington D.C.
                                                                                                 1001 F St, Washington D.C. 20004
                                                                                                 1-888-923-0334 (US & Canada) or
Become a Hollywood Celebrity for a Day                                                           1-212-512-9600 x607
                                                                                                 GroupSales@MadameTussaudsNY.com




 Scene 1
 Washington D.C. TV and Movie Sites Tour provided by On Location Tours
 3PM
 Begin your guided coach tour visiting more than 30 locations used in movies & TV shows shot in Washington D.C.

 - Shop in the mall where No Way Out and True Lies were filmed
 - Stand on the steps of the house used in The Exorcist
 - Visit the bar used in St. Elmo’s Fire
 - Go to the park used in The Sentinel
 - See locations from Wedding Crashers, National Treasure II, Evan Almighty, Thank You For Smoking, Election,
 X Files, Independence Day, Forrest Gump, and many others!
 *Pick up location to be determined by the group. Drop off will take place at Madame Tussauds Washington D.C.

 Scene 2:
 Walk the red carpet with celebrities at Madame Tussauds Washington D.C.
 6PM
 Mingle with the stars and enjoy a “coketail” party featured in Madame Tussauds “Glamour” room.
 Rub elbows with A-list celebrities including Julia Roberts and Denzel Washington!

 - Ticket for self-guided tour of Madame Tussauds Washington D.C.
 - Madame Tussauds Washington D.C. Scavenger Hunt                                  Package offered to groups of 50 or more
 - Choice of Madame Tussauds Guide Book                                            ONLY - $24 per person
 - “Coketail” Party and Hors d'oeuvres at Madame Tussauds D.C.                     *inclusive of Washington D.C. tax at 5.75%
 *includes soda and light Hors d'oeuvres
                                                                               **Prices are subject to change without notice. Please call for pricing.




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