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					K-3 Reading and Mathematics Initiative Application Packet 2003-2004

Louisiana Department of Education Cecil J. Picard State Superintendent of Education August 2003

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Louisiana K-3 Reading and Math Initiative
Overview
During the 1997 Regular Session of the Louisiana Legislature, the Department of Education was allocated $30 million dollars to develop a balanced and comprehensive approach to improve the reading and mathematics performance of students in kindergarten through third grade. An additional $40 million was allocated during the 1998 and 1999 Legislative Sessions, and a total of $42.9 million was allocated during the 2000, 2001, and 2002 sessions to continue the Louisiana K-3 Reading and Math Initiative through June of 2003. The 2003 Legislature has continued K-3 funding with an allocation of $12,816,456 for the 2003-2004 academic year. The goal of the program is to improve the reading and mathematics achievement of Louisiana public school students in kindergarten through third grade through improvement in instruction. An additional focus is intervention for kindergarten through third grade students who are at risk of experiencing difficulty in reading and/or mathematics.

Focus of the K-3 Reading and Math Initiative Funds
The centerpiece of the entire initiative is prevention of reading difficulties through good instruction and early intervention to achieve expected progress for all students. Teachers should guide children‘s first learning experiences with knowledge of the most current research on how children learn best. Many refer to this approach as "good first teaching." According to Dr. Reid Lyon of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, ―…for 90% to 95% of poor readers, prevention and early intervention programs that combine instruction in phoneme awareness, phonics, fluency development, and reading comprehension strategies, provided by well-trained teachers, can increase reading skills to average reading levels. However, we have also learned that, if we delay intervention until nine-years-of age, (the time that most children with reading difficulties receive services), approximately 75% of the children will continue to have difficulties learning to read throughout high school.‖ Excellent instruction is a major prevention strategy. This excellent instruction requires teachers who are well prepared and highly knowledgeable, and who receive ongoing support (National Research Council, 1998). As researchers learn more about how young children develop reading and mathematical skills, that information must be shared with teachers. Teachers, through comprehensive and ongoing staff development, must learn effective strategies for reaching children with diverse learning differences and special needs. Since the K-3 Initiative was first funded, Louisiana has made much progress in education, including reading achievement. The average percentage of second and third graders reading on and above level on the Developmental Reading Assessment has improved from 54.49% in the fall of 1998 to 75.46% in the fall of 2002. However, more progress is necessary. One of every five pupils still exits third grade reading below level; in high-poverty districts, the number rises to four or even five of every ten. Nearly one of every three of last year‘s first graders will enter second grade reading below level. By the end of second grade, the number below level will have dropped to less than one student of every five. Though

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Louisiana teachers are working diligently to achieve success with every student, they need more assistance in reaching the students who are most difficult to help. Funding provided through the K-3 Reading and Mathematics Initiative assists districts in providing early intervention to pupils at risk for failure in reading and mathematics. Poverty lies at the heart of our state‘s problems in education; Louisiana has one of the highest rates of child poverty in the nation. Kindergarten and first grade teachers know that many of our children are already behind their peers when they enter kindergarten; they lack the oral language foundation that is needed for academic success. Although poverty is a reason for the challenge we face, it cannot be our excuse. Louisiana must do an even better job of educating the children we have. The State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education and the Legislature have instituted an accountability system that demands progress from every district and school. The K-3 Reading and Mathematics Initiative provides resources to assist districts in developing a sound academic foundation in the early grades, making later success possible for more children. Increased information on scientifically based reading research and the design features of effective instruction and early intervention is being made available to district planners so that they may develop plans that effectively incorporate the most recent research in early reading and math instruction.

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Amount of Funding for the K-3 Reading and Math Initiative 2003-2004: $12,816,456.

Allocation of Funds
The funds have been allocated based on an amount per October 1, 2002 membership of students in grades K-3, with a minimum allocation per school system of $67,500. School systems may use a portion of this allocation on regional activities. The charter school law provides that all such schools shall be eligible for all federal, state, or local funding for which the school or its pupils qualify. Since funding for this K-3 Reading and Math Initiative is distributed on a per pupil basis, the intent is that any Type 1, 3, or 4 charter school approved by the local board receive its appropriate share of this per pupil funding (equal to the number of students being served in those schools). Districts are requested to note within their application to the State, the total amount that will be passed on to any such Type 1, 3, or 4 charter school approved by their local board. Type 2 charter schools shall submit individual applications to the State and shall be allocated funds on an amount per October 1, 2002 membership of students in grades K-3. Type 2 charter schools whose first year of operation is 2003-2004 shall submit individual applications to the State by November 15, 2003. These schools shall be allocated funds based on an amount per the October 1, 2003 membership of students in students in grades K-3.

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Local School District Activities
School systems shall submit an application to the Department of Education by September 15, 2003, in order to receive funding. After the application has been reviewed and approved by the Department, funds will be provided on a reimbursement basis only. As outlined in these guidelines, funds may be used for approved expenditures only. Any expenditures, other than those listed in these guidelines, shall be approved by the Department of Education. School systems shall carefully consider the Louisiana School and District Accountability System in determining how these resources will be utilized at the local level. School systems shall clearly demonstrate how programs/services are being provided to assist lowperforming students in achieving the state content standards in reading and mathematics, including the five essential elements of early reading instruction. School systems may use start-up funds for the purpose of implementing the uniform assessment during the first 30 school days. These funds may be used for the purchase of the uniform assessment instrument adopted by the State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (the Developmental Reading Assessment) and to fulfill dyslexia screening requirements detailed in R.S. 17:392.1-392.3, as well as any expenses related to the use of these assessment instruments, such as stipends, substitute pay, and staff development. The K-3 Reading and Mathematics Initiative should be considered part of the School Improvement Plan for each school. Understanding that funds may not be sufficient to meet the needs of all at-risk students, priority for services should be provided to schools with the highest concentration of lowperforming students. If funding is not directed to these schools, districts must be able to demonstrate that the needs of students in these schools are being adequately met through other funding sources.

Regional Activities
In order to encourage and promote long range planning, identify best practices of comprehensive reading instruction, and support collaborative efforts, each school system may allocate funds that can be used for regional activities that support improvement in reading and/or mathematics. School systems planning regional activities shall work with their Regional Education Service Center staff to develop a regional plan that promotes professional development and other initiatives they determine will best meet identified needs and goals. Regional plans shall follow established guidelines developed by the Department and shall name one of the local school systems as the fiscal agent for the region.

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Use of Program Funds
Each K-3 Reading and Mathematics Initiative application shall be reviewed and approved by the Louisiana Department of Education prior to its implementation. Any expenditures not included on the "allowable expenses" list shall be approved in writing by the Louisiana Department of Education. In order to be eligible for funding, the applicant shall comply with the eligibility factors listed below: Note: Remember that the target population for these funds is those students who are atrisk of experiencing difficulty in reading and/or math, including students who are dyslexic or bilingual/ESL, receive services under 504 or IDEA plans, and those students that have other special needs.    The program shall be designed to improve student achievement in the areas outlined in the K-3 Reading and Mathematics Initiative only. The project period shall be concurrent with the fiscal year (July 2003– June 2004). All goods and services shall be received/rendered within that fiscal year. The application shall be received in the Louisiana Department of Education on or before September 15, 2003. (Applications submitted at any time prior to this date will be reviewed/approved in a timely manner to expedite funding and local implementation.)

Allowable Expenses   Classroom reading/mathematics materials and supplies needed to support a scientifically based, comprehensive, consistent K-3 reading or mathematics program within a school, including classroom library materials Professional development expenses and training materials for teachers, schoollevel administrators, paraprofessionals, and LEA administrators that are part of a scientifically based, comprehensive plan to improve K-3 reading and mathematics instruction, not isolated, disconnected activities (A plan detailing follow-up and support must be provided.) [NOTE: All professional development activities funded wholly or in-part with K-3 Reading and Mathematics Initiative funds must adhere to the standards of the National Staff Development Council available at http://www.nsdc.org.] Professional development expenses related to Whole Faculty Study Groups focusing on K-3 reading or mathematics instruction Substitute pay or stipends for approved staff development Summer institute training activities, with appropriate building level follow-up support throughout the academic year Parent education activities and materials in the area of reading and/or mathematics Evaluation and classroom-level assessment materials in the area of K-3 reading and/or mathematics, and in the area of dyslexia

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Teacher stipends and substitute pay for the administration of the Developmental Reading Assessment, dyslexia screening activities, or other scientifically-based reading assessments Certified, highly qualified reading or mathematics content leader (master teacher) who is directly involved on a daily basis (80% of time) in student instruction or working with teachers and students in classrooms to improve reading and /or mathematics instruction Retired teachers employed on a part-time basis (in accordance with retirement system guidelines) to work with low-performing students in reading and/or mathematics Software that is part of a comprehensive, consistent plan to improve K-3 reading and/or mathematics achievement Extended time (e.g., before/after-school instruction, summer programs) for reading and/or mathematics with a certified, highly qualified teacher housed within a public school setting, including expenses for snacks (must conform to guidelines for effective early intervention, including limiting size of groups to six or fewer children) Travel between schools for reading or mathematics teacher who is itinerant and provides daily instruction to children and/or coaching to teachers in K-3 classrooms Travel costs to attend professional development activities that are out-ofparish/city school system boundaries (must conform to staff development standards outlined elsewhere in this document and be part of a comprehensive professional development plan, not isolated, disconnected activities) Consultant costs for activities relating to a coherent school or district plan for improving reading and mathematics achievement

Unallowable Expenses  Any activities or materials that do not impact or support the K-3 Reading and Math Initiative, are not components of a comprehensive, consistent plan to improve reading or mathematics achievement, or do not conform to guidelines for effective teaching, intervention, or staff development Salaries and benefits of regular classroom teachers employed during the regular school day Salaries and benefits of administrators or central office staff Equipment, computers, or furniture for office use Equipment such as TVs, VCRs, camcorders, computers, computer accessories, telephone lines, Internet connections, digital cameras, copy machines Building, construction, rent, or other capital improvements Indirect costs Out-of-state travel or training Parent conferences Field trips Iowa Tests of Basic Skills (I.T.B.S.) testing and practice materials

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Textbooks and/or workbooks Refreshments/meals during staff development sessions Attendance at conferences including travel expenses and registration Salaries and benefits for paraprofessionals, teachers‘ aides, and other uncertified personnel

Application Requirements The application for the K-3 Reading and Math Initiative shall consist of the following: Part Part Part Part Part I. II. III. IV. V. Cover Page Assurances Application Summary (Microsoft EXCEL) Implementation of a Comprehensive Approach to Reading and Mathematics Overview of Systemwide Reading and Mathematics Programs in Grades K-3 Intervention Design 2002-2003 K-3 Reading and Mathematics Implementation Activities (Evaluation/Assessment, Preparation for High-Stakes Testing, and Professional Development: Reading/Mathematics Activities should be included in this section.) Budget (separate packet)

Part VI. Part VII

Part VIII. Part I. Cover Page

The cover page provides information on the school system and coordinator for the K-3 Reading and Mathematics Initiative. Part II. Assurances The school superintendent shall date and sign the assurance page in blue ink. Part III. Application Summary This section summarizes data that should be contained in your application. It is understood that the figures that you provide are only estimates. Actual data will be collected mid-year and in the End of Year Report. This section is in Microsoft EXCEL. This EXCEL workbook has seven sheets. You may access those by clicking on the tabs at the bottom of the screen. The last four sheets contain information needed only for the End-of-Year Report and are not to be included in the application for 2003-2004.

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Part IV. Implementation of a Comprehensive Approach to Reading and Mathematics Provide a one- or two-page narrative describing the way your school system is providing or plans to provide a scientifically based, comprehensive, consistent approach to reading and mathematics, addressing all the critical elements of an effective instructional program and grounded in scientifically based research, as outlined below. It should include information about instruction, programs (basals, etc.) and teaching practices. Describe previous policies and practices for guiding district reading and/or mathematics instruction, evaluate effectiveness, identify areas of strength and weakness, and clearly describe plans for improvement. Address the performance of subgroups including minorities and students in special categories (ESL, IDEA, 504), identifying any gaps in achievement and explaining how your district or school plans to address those gaps. Included in the support materials for this application is a copy of A Consumer’s Guide to Evaluating a Core Reading Program, Grades K-3: A Critical Element Analysis. This guide must be utilized to determine whether your current reading program meets the criteria for Scientifically Based Reading Instruction (SBRR). The K-3 Reading and Mathematics Initiative for 2002-2003 required that districts evaluate their reading instruction using the Consumer’s Guide. Include a summary of that evaluation with this application. The Louisiana Department of Education is conducting a K-3 Core Reading Program review for the purposes of Reading First. The results of this review will be available to LEAs by September 1, 2003, and may be used by LEAs to complete this portion of the application. LEAs will be required to provide longitudinal data on students served with K-3 funds.

READING:   

In the area of reading, a comprehensive approach includes Consistent presentation of the Louisiana Content Standards for reading; Materials, strategies, and practices grounded in scientifically based reading research Emphasis on each of the five essential elements of effective reading instruction as appropriate for various grade levels  Phonemic awareness - the ability to hear, identify and manipulate the individual sounds, or phonemes, in spoken words; the understanding that speech is composed of a sequence of sounds (phonemes) that are recombined to form other words and the ability to identify and manipulate these sounds  Phonics – the understanding of symbol-sound relationships, the understanding that there is a predictable relationship between phonemes; the sounds of spoken language, and graphemes, the letters and spelling that represent those sounds in written language  Fluency – the ability to read text accurately, quickly, and with expression

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 Vocabulary - stored information about the meaning and pronunciation of words necessary for communication. There are four types of vocabulary: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  Comprehension – understanding, remembering and communicating with others about what has been read   Assessment, including progress monitoring, that informs teaching Early intervention at various levels to provide adequate and timely support for children at risk of reading failure, including children of special categories (ESL, IDEA, 504,) and minorities. Gaps in performance between the entire population and the performance of subgroups should be noted and addressed.

Note: According to the NICHD research, "Beginning reading programs should be constructed to ensure that adequate instructional time is allotted to the teaching of phonemic awareness skills phonics skills, the development of reading fluency and automaticity, and the development of reading comprehension strategies. All of these components of reading are necessary but not sufficient in and of themselves. For children demonstrating difficulty in learning to read, it is imperative that each of these components be taught within an integrated context and that ample practice in reading familiar material be afforded. For some children, our research demonstrates that explicit, systematic instruction is crucial in helping them to understand and apply critical phonemic, phonics, fluency, and reading comprehension skills. Even for children who seem to grasp reading concepts easily, learning to read is not a natural process--reading instruction must be thoughtful, planned, and must incorporate the teaching of all the critical reading skills." (Lyon, 1998)

MATHEMATICS: In mathematics, a comprehensive approach consists of         Consistent presentation of the Louisiana Content Standards for mathematics; A conceptually oriented curriculum that emphasizes the development of mathematical understandings and relationships; The active involvement of students in doing mathematics as they construct, modify, and integrate ideas; An emphasis on the presentation of individual pieces of content in context of a broader perspective to develop children's mathematical thinking and reasoning abilities; The application of mathematics as it applies to a wide variety of real world problems; Assessment, including progress monitoring, that informs teaching A broad range of content that goes beyond arithmetic skills and include measurement, geometry, statistics, probability, and algebra; and Early intervention at various levels to provide adequate and timely support for children at risk of failure, including children of special categories (ESL, IDEA, 504,) and minorities. Gaps in performance between the entire population and the performance of subgroups should be noted and addressed.

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In documenting student achievement, the following data will be collected by the State: Fall 2003 the number of second and third grade students reading below, at, and above grade level at the beginning and end of the year as determined by the Developmental Reading Assessment; or other scientifically based assessments approved by SBESE on an individual basis upon request of the LEA superintendent, and Spring 2004 the number of first, second, and third grade students reading below, at, and above grade level at the end of the year as determined by the Developmental Reading Assessment. Pre- and post assessment documentation of the progress of children receiving intervention directly with K-3 funds. All results are subject to audit; they will be presented to the State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education in December of 2003 and August of 2004. Part V. Overview of Systemwide Reading and Mathematics Program(s) in K-3 In this section, provide an overview of a comprehensive plan for reading and mathematics instruction that will continue or that will be implemented in your system during the 2003-2004 school year, regardless of funding sources. In the area of reading, categorize your reading activities as follows:  The Core Reading Program: A scientifically based, comprehensive program in which most children will be successful in learning to read. Some children learn to read with ease in almost any program. Other children will read relatively easily once exposed to scientifically-based, comprehensive instruction. Excellent classroom instruction is a major prevention strategy. Reading is typically acquired relatively predictably by children who  have normal or above average language skills;  have had experiences in early childhood that foster motivation and provided exposure to literacy;  are given information about the nature of print via opportunities to learn letters and to recognize the structure of spoken words, as well as the contrasting nature of spoken and written language; and  attend schools that provide coherent reading instruction and opportunities to practice reading.  Strategic Intervention: A support plan for students not making expected progress in learning to read. They may include students with mild learning disabilities, ESL students, and those with environmental disadvantages who enter school already behind their peers in language development. These students will usually succeed in reading if their progress in reading is carefully monitored and strategic intervention is provided as needed. These students usually need systematic, explicit teaching and additional time to ―catch up;‖ thus, they may benefit from systematic programs such as the multisensory structured language programs already offered by districts to dyslexic students. Strategic intervention is offered in flexible grouping as needs are indicated by assessment and usually takes place in groups of no more than six or seven students who are given extra time as long as necessary.

 Four potential areas of difficulty for reading success are as follows:
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 deficits in phoneme awareness and the development of the alphabetic principle (and the accurate and fluent application of these skills to textual reading),  deficits in acquiring reading comprehension strategies and applying them to the reading of text,  deficits in the development and maintenance of motivation to learn to read, and  the inadequate preparation of teachers (Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children, 1998).  Students with dyslexia and other language-based learning disabilities may require strategic or more intensive intervention. These children do not learn to read using traditional methods. These children should be taught directly and explicitly by well-prepared and informed teachers. It is critical that these children begin to learn to read through the development of sequential phonological awareness, an understanding of the alphabetic principle, and the translation of these skills to phonics in reading and spelling.

All school systems must have a multisensory structured language program in regular education. If this program is funded using K-3 or 8(g) funds, then these programs should be from the following approved list: Wilson Language, Project Read, Alphabetic Phonics, LANGUAGE! (Primary), and Slingerland. (See attachment for additional information regarding these programs.) The Department will continue to research appropriate multisensory structured language programs and will add those found to meet the criteria outlined in R.S. 17:7 (11). If other funds are being used to fund the multisensory regular education program, the school system must show how this program meets the requirements addressed in Bulletin 1903. According to Bulletin 1903: Regulations for the Implementation of R.S. 17:7 (11), The Louisiana Dyslexia Law, students who exhibit characteristics associated with dyslexia and related disorders shall be eligible for a multisensory regular education program. "The multi-sensory regular education program(s) shall be one(s) in which the major instructional strategies are language-based, intensive phonetic, synthetic to analytic phonetics, linguistic, systematic, sequential, cumulative, individualized, meaning-based, and multi-sensory in approach." (Refer to Bulletin 1903 for further information regarding the implementation of the Louisiana Dyslexia Law.)  Intensive Intervention: A more intensive support plan for students not succeeding even with sound, scientifically based reading instruction and strategic intervention. Intensive intervention is provided for at least 30 minutes per day in groups of no more than three students assigned on the basis of common instructional needs. These groups may include students with cognitive impairments that interfere with reading. These children have great difficulty developing generalized reading skills. Explicit, systematic instruction is required to assist students in using print, pictures, objects, and other symbols to communicate wants and needs across multiple environments. In some cases, these children may benefit from systematic programs such as the multisensory structured language programs offered to dyslexic students, but will also need assistance beyond the usual program. Research indicates that these students can make progress with small group instruction, and intense,

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targeted instruction designed to meet the particular needs of the group. Schools should refer to the individual student evaluation and the IEP in developing a reading program for each individual student. Augmentative communication strategies and assistive devices may be needed.
Note: Students who are sensorially impaired (vision/hearing) may be found in any of the above categories. Students who are visually impaired may require instruction in Braille. Students who are hearing impaired require instruction in language acquisition to facilitate reading comprehension.

Excellent classroom instruction is a major prevention strategy (Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children, 1998). Excellent classroom instruction by well-trained teachers using appropriate methodology, materials and instructional strategies will help reduce the need for further intervention.

Part VI. Intervention Design Part VI requires that you state how you will identify and provide intervention for those students who are at risk of experiencing difficulty in reading and/or mathematics. Each school should consider the possible reasons that the child is experiencing difficulty, and then provide appropriate intervention. Some students may be struggling because of lack of experience or developmental delays, while other students may have a specific learning disability such as dyslexia. In addition, children whose native language is not English will need special interventions. No single intervention program/strategy fits all students who are experiencing difficulty. Effective intervention programs/ strategies are characterized by the following:  Instruction is delivered by well-trained teachers;  instruction is frequent, regular, and in sufficient duration to make a difference; more time is allowed for instruction, during the school day if possible;  Intervention begins with thorough assessment to determine explicit instructional needs for each child. (In the area of reading, assessment should include phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension.)  Instruction is more intense than typical classroom experience and targeted for specific needs revealed by assessment; and  Intervention may consist of an explicit, systematic program offered to all at-risk students in addition to the core program. In reading instruction, multisensory structured programs already offered by districts for dyslexic students may serve this purpose for other at-risk learners.  Progress in this program should be carefully monitored; and  Students failing to make expected progress should be offered immediate additional assistance. * Strategic Intervention, with students grouped according to targeted needs as revealed by assessment (These are flexible groups of no more than five-six students that change as indicated by progress monitoring).  Intensive Intervention should be designed for students failing to make progress even with short periods of additional assistance.

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Instruction is targeted to meet needs of specific groups having similar skill deficiencies identified by assessment (groups may change as indicated by progress monitoring). Groups are small (no more than three students). Instruction is more intense and is of longer duration. Children will not be isolated in these groups but will be included in wholeclass activities and participate other groups for other purposes during the remainder of the school day.

NOTE: Recent research syntheses funded by the Office of Special Education Programs and the National Center for Learning Disabilities examined all published and unpublished intervention research addressing students with LD. The authors searched for factors associated with high effects—regardless of the model of instruction or the content of instruction. The three most critical factors (those that produced the strongest impact on student learning) appear to be: (1) control of task difficulty (i.e., sequencing examples and problems to maintain high levels of student success), (2) teaching students with LD in small interactive groups of six or fewer students (interactive means actively engaging with peers and the teacher---not just sitting, doing worksheets), and (3) directed response questioning (involves the use of procedures that teach students to generate questions while reading or working on a scientific or mathematical problem). Directed response questioning includes all teaching procedures that promote ―thinking aloud‖ about text being read. Students with LD can be taught self-monitoring and self-questioning strategies based on text structures. However, there is little evidence that students with LD routinely transfer what they have learned in the face of reading new expository material. A comprehensive approach to strategy instruction that incorporates multiple strategies and uses peers to provide feedback represents the most promising instructional method for enhancing comprehension. Techniques or instructional arrangements, such as classwide peer tutoring, that increase students‘ opportunities to verbalize what they are learning and to receive feedback or encouragement from peers enhance comprehension performance and students‘ determination to persevere in the face of a difficult task. The role of task persistence may be at least as important as knowledge of strategies in making sense out of complex expository text. Students persist longer on a task when they are engaged in activities in which they take an active role in learning, and in which learning is mediated by a peer. There is some initial research that very small groups (n=3) with highly qualified teachers are as effective as one teacher with one student. The issue of group size is particularly relevant when considering two issues (1) reading instruction, and (2) students who struggle to learn or have identified disabilities. As increasing numbers of students with LD are provided their instruction for reading within the general education classroom, teachers must consider the most effective practices and procedures for enhancing the educational outcomes for students who are often achieving at several grade levels below their classmates. Using alternative instructional grouping formats is one of several critical variables linked to effective instruction in reading. When students with disabilities serve in the role of tutor for reading, regardless of whether it is in a cross-age or same-age situation, it is associated with reliably higher effects than when they are in an alternative grouping format (e.g., whole class) or when they serve in the role of tutee. The process of being a ―tutor‖ offers important instructional opportunities for students with LD that are implicit: (1) listening to a proficient model of reading, (2) silently following along while a peer reads orally, and (3) small chunks of silent reading. One researcher describes grouping as one of the instructional factors that is alterable and that can powerfully influence positively or negatively the levels of individual student engagement and hence academic progress. The most important finding of research on effective instructional interventions for students with LD is that in all cases where interventions have demonstrated significant positive effects, they have resulted in at least as high (and most often higher) effect sizes for all other students in the class, including average and high-achieving students. Most discussions of the critical elements of reading instruction, particularly as mandated by Reading First, focus on the first five: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. However, the

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sixth element, motivation, is addressed within the context of effective instructional interventions that include flexible grouping strategies. The benefits from small interactive groups extend beyond academic outcomes. A synthesis of 31 intervention studies for students with LD that provided self-concept as an outcome reveals that interventions focusing on academic skills within cooperative group structures were associated with exceedingly high outcomes in self-concept. [Vaughn, Sharon; Russell Gersten; David J. Chard. The underlying message in LD intervention research: Findings from research syntheses. Exceptional Children; Fall 2000, vol. 67, pp. 99-114]

Understanding that funds may not be sufficient to meet the needs of all at-risk students, priority for services should be provided to schools with the highest concentration of low-performing students.

Part VII. 2003-2004 K-3 Reading and Mathematics Initiative Implementation Activities The goal of this project is to improve the reading and mathematics skills of students in kindergarten through third grade, especially those students that have been identified as low-performing. With that understanding, describe how funds will be used to improve student achievement in reading and/or mathematics and provide intervention as needed. Identify the specific objectives (stated in measurable terms) that will be addressed using K-3 Reading and Mathematics Initiative funding. Include objectives that combine K-3 funds with other objectives. For each objective, indicate the research-based strategies, expected results, activities, person(s) responsible, the timeline, funding sources and cost, and the procedures for evaluating effectiveness of each activity. A form entitled Part VII: 2003-2004 K-3 Reading and Mathematics Initiative Implementation Activities is provided for the documentation of this required information. Use one copy of this form per objective. Note: one form for reading and one form for mathematics have been included. Copy forms as needed. The goals for reading and mathematics may not be changed. Specific objectives supporting the goal may be revised, but the format of the objectives must be maintained as given, including measurable results based on pre- and post assessment. Strategies other than those suggested may be selected, but a research base is required for each selected strategy. Professional Development objectives should be included as strategies using the Strategy Planning Worksheet. Professional development activities should meet standards set by the National Staff Development Council (i.e., job-embedded with appropriate follow-up; planned with opportunities for teachers to collaborate, observe each other and receive low-risk feedback; aligned with school and district strategic plans, etc.). Whole Faculty Study Groups following the LINCS model are strongly encouraged. Isolated activities not part of a coherent school or district plan to improve achievement should be avoided. Evaluation of professional development activities must focus on expected improvements in instruction or changes in teacher knowledge or behavior. Whole Faculty Study Group Process: Rationale for encouraging WFSG at each participating K-3 Initiative school In the first large-scale comparison of teacher development, researchers at the American Institutes of Research (AIR) identified six features that make professional development effective.

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1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Traditional classes or workshops or ‗hands-on activity‘ are less effective than teacher networks or study groups. Longer programs are better than shorter ones. Activities targeted for the same school, grade or subject are better than non-targeted programs. Professional development courses that focus on how to teach as well as what to teach are key. Active learning is fostered by observing and being observed teaching. Teachers need to perceive professional development as part of coherent programs of teacher learning and development that support other activities at their schools.

According to Michael Garet of AIR, ―If we are serious about professional development– which is voluntary–we need to invest in what research shows fosters improvements in teaching. Unfortunately, this is not happening.‖ (American Educational Research Journal, 2002 Winter Issue) How we educate teachers in Louisiana, both in content preparation through teacher preparation programs and in ongoing staff development, has everything to do with how well our students will achieve. Teachers must be given access to the latest research on effective reading instruction and assisted in classroom implementation. When staff development takes place during the course of the school day (job-embedded) teachers interact with one another to solve problems, work on projects, share expertise, and give one another feedback to improve student achievement. Teachers must be supported and encouraged to participate in job-embedded approaches such as mentoring, coaching, study groups, action research, curriculum development, reflective journaling with dialogue, examining student work, and learning portfolios. It is imperative that schools have in place specific criteria that serve as the foundation for implementing jobembedded approaches. These criteria include collaborative groups of two or more, having monthly meetings, with time to meet during the school day to focus on disaggregated student data to determine and prioritize teacher learning needs, monitor progress, and help sustain continuous improvement. ―Expert voices‖ are invited to work with study groups to strengthen content knowledge development as the staff reads books and articles, attends workshops, takes courses, and hosts content trainers. According to Dufour and Eaker (1998), ―the best hope for significant school improvement lies in transforming schools into professional learning communities.‖ Louisiana now has in place an accountability process that provides motivation for reform, and many schools are developing improvement plans that focus on the improvement of reading achievement. Additionally, Louisiana has developed a comprehensive professional development program for content area professional development known as Learning-Intensive Networking Communities for Success (LINCS) that has shown success in assisting teachers in an effort to improve their content knowledge and teaching practices in the areas of mathematics and science in order to increase student performance. The LINCS process is grounded by the following three contextual staff development standards: Learning Communities, Leadership, and Resources. The LINCS model may be used in conjunction with the K-3 Initiative to structure a strong professional development process to implement effective instructional strategies based on scientifically based reading research (SBRR).

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If schools want to enhance their organizational capacity to boost student learning, they should work on building a professional community that is characterized by shared purpose, collaborative activity, and collective responsibility among staff (Newmann & Wehlage, 1995). Administrators and School Level Reading Content Leaders will ensure that objectives and principles are clearly aligned with SBRR. WFSGs will receive professional development on specific programs and materials used in their schools and work together for improved implementation. The term study group as it is typically used in education is a small group of individuals joining together to increase their capacities through new learning for the direct benefit of the student. The term Whole-Faculty Study Groups (WFSGs), referred to above, is a schoolwide professional development process where every faculty member is a member of a study group. In WFSG schools, the faculty, through the consensus process, decides that the structure will enable every faculty member to collaboratively address student needs; therefore, each staff member, as a member of a study group, supports schoolwide improvement. No one is left out—everyone is responsible for student and school improvement. High-Stakes Testing objectives should be included as strategies using the Strategy Planning Worksheet. Schools in Corrective Action If any K-3 Initiative funds are provided to any school in Corrective Action, include from that school‘s improvement plan the strategy planning worksheet that states objectives to be accomplished through the use of K-3 funding. Assessment and/or Evaluation In view of the fact that the State will evaluate the overall effectiveness of the K-3 Reading and Mathematics Initiative, describe how the effectiveness of your activities will be evaluated. On the Strategy Planning Worksheet, include the procedure for evaluating the effectiveness of each activity and determining the degree of success in reaching each objective. Evaluation of effectiveness must be made on the basis of evidence demonstrating improvements in student achievement and changes in teacher behavior and/or knowledge.

Sample Objectives:  Increase the percent of first graders scoring on or above grade level on the Spring DRA from _______% in the spring of 2003 to ______% by the spring of 2004.  RESEARCH-BASED STRATEGY: Provide all first graders with a core reading program grounded in scientifically based reading research, with continuous monitoring of progress and intervention offered as needed.)  RESEARCH-BASED STRATEGY: All teachers at four low-performing schools will demonstrate competency in the grade-appropriate implementation of (name of core reading or mathematics program) in the classroom as indicated by the classroom observation tool for that program.

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 95% of pupils will demonstrate mastery of at least 25 of the 30 literacy behaviors on the
kindergarten checklist by the end of the kindergarten year as opposed to _____ % at the beginning of the year.  (RESEARCH-BASED STRATEGY: Provide all kindergarteners with a core program grounded in scientifically based reading research, with continuous monitoring of progress and intervention offered as needed.)

 The percent of kindergarten students achieving grade-level success in phonemic awareness as
measured by _______ will increase from _____% making expected progress in the fall of 2003 to ____ by Spring 2004.  RESEARCH-BASED STRATEGY: Kindergarten teachers will demonstrate competency in the implementation of techniques for developing phonemic awareness. (or oral language, fluency, phonics) utilizing (name of core reading program) as verified through classroom observation.  RESEARCH-BASED STRATEGY: Institute Whole Faculty Study Groups to support ongoing professional development in the element of _____ provided by program consultants.)  The percent of first grade students making expected progress in the area of phonics will increase from ______% in Fall 2003 to ____% Spring 2003. RESEARCH-BASED STRATEGY: Each first grade teacher will be able to demonstrate effective instructional strategies for the development of phonics as verified by classroom observation.  RESEARCH-BASED STRATEGY: Institute Whole Faculty Study Groups to support ongoing professional development provided by program consultants.) The average ITBS standard score in third-grade reading will increase by 4.5 points from ____ to _____ by Spring 2004.  RESEARCH-BASED STRATEGY: 1. Provide all third graders with a core program grounded in scientifically based research with continuous monitoring of progress and intervention offered as needed. 2. Institute Whole Faculty Study Groups to support ongoing professional development provided by program consultants) 



Tips on writing objectives:  Be very specific!  Do not write too many. Select fewer objectives and plan carefully to achieve them.  All objectives should be components of a district plan for improving reading and/or mathematics achievement.  Staff development strategies support achievement objectives and conform to standards for good professional development; focus on one or two objectives and provide the follow-up and support that teachers need to put learning into practice. Part VIII. Budget

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Directions for submitting the budget are included in the next section of this document. The complete Budget Summary and Budget Detail forms shall be submitted on or before September 15, 2003. All projects will be paid on a reimbursement basis. Systems will be allowed to request a portion of their funds for the purpose of implementing the uniform assessment prior to the application‘s being approved. Requests should be made only for goods or services received or rendered. Send completed Request for Funds Form (SDEB-3) and Request of Funds Continuation Sheet to Office Management and Finance Expenditure Control Unit P.O. Box 94064 Baton Rouge, LA 70804-9064 For information regarding the budget, contact the following: Budget Revisions: Buddy Goudeau (225) 342-01802 e-mail: Buddy.Goudeau@La.gov General Submission Information 1. The program shall be designed to improve student achievement in the areas outlined in the K-3 Reading and Mathematics Initiative only. The project period shall be concurrent with the fiscal year (July 2003- June 2004). All goods and services shall be received/rendered within that fiscal year. Format: The application shall include all parts described below:  Cover Page (Microsoft WORD)  Assurances (Microsoft WORD)  Application Summary completed in Microsoft EXCEL,  Chart: Implementation of a Balanced Approach to Reading and Mathematics (Microsoft WORD)  Chart: Overview of System Wide Reading and Mathematics Programs K-3  Chart: Intervention Design (Microsoft WORD)  Chart: Implementation Activities (Microsoft WORD)  Budget. (Microsoft EXCEL)  All sections should be clearly marked. Copies/Address: Applicants should submit three (3) paper copies of the completed application to the Louisiana Department of Education; Attn: Subgrant Assistance, Education Finance, 5-104; P.O. Box 94064; Baton Rouge, LA 70804-9064. One copy of the application in Word and EXCEL should be emailed to Patsy Palmer at Patsy.Palmer@La.gov . Budget Reimbursements Annette Landry Chutz (225) 342-6881 e-mail: Annette.Chutz@La.gov

2.

3.

4.

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5.

Date: Applications shall be submitted on or before September 15, 2003. No faxed copies will be accepted. (Applications submitted at any time prior to this date will be reviewed/approved in a timely manner to expedite funding and local implementation.) K-3 Reading and Mathematics Initiative End- of-Year Program Assessment Each K-3 Reading and Mathematics Initiative grantee shall submit an End of Year Report to the Department of Education within 30 days after the close of a project year. The evaluation report should focus on program impact as it relates to student achievement. Both qualitative and quantitative data should be included to document the effectiveness of reading and mathematics programs. A column for updating data for the End of Year Report is included in Part III: Application Summary.

6.

Persons to contact with questions or for assistance: K-3 Reading and Mathematics Initiative Program Coordinators: Patsy Palmer 225-342-3347 (Patsy.Palmer@La.gov) Betsy Delahaye 225-219-4553 (Betsy.Delahaye@La.gov) Keisha Thomas 225-342-6035 (Keisha.Thomas@La.gov ) Jane Grove 225-342-3809 (Jane.Grove@La.gov ) Kartina Roberts 225-342-9619 (Kartina.Roberts@La.gov )

Regional K-3 Coordinator (Regions V, VI, VII, and VIII) Debbie LaCaze 318-357-4189 (Debbie.LaCaze@La.gov ) Louisiana Department of Education School Assistance, Room 4-200C P.O. Box 94064 Baton Rouge, LA 70804 Telephone: (225)342-4776 Fax: (225)342-3463

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