CITY OF MURFREESBORO_ TENNESSEE FISCAL YEAR 2012 by yaofenjin

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                       Creating a better quality of life 
                                       




                                        

      CITY OF MURFREESBORO, TENNESSEE 
    FISCAL YEAR 2012‐2013 ANNUAL BUDGET
                                    
                   SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 
         STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 
                     A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 
                      ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 
                                    

                                        

 
                                                      
                                             FRONT COVER 

Murfreesboro’s City Employees 
The City of Murfreesboro employees are here for you. The City employs some of the best talent the 
State of Tennessee has to offer.  Murfreesboro looks for employees of character and strong mind and 
this year, as part of the budget message, the management team wanted to highlight some of that talent.
 
The front cover photo was taken by Officer Terry Spence, a 26‐year veteran of the Murfreesboro Police 
Department.  Officer Spence is a featured local photographer, whose works have been displayed in 
various venues and art shows around the City.  Officer Spence credits his photography skills to one of his 
mentors, Major Clyde Adkison, a 34‐year veteran of the Murfreesboro Police Department.  Officer 
Spence stated that he would not have been able to learn and develop his talent without the guidance 
and time Major Atkinson invested in him as a young officer.  Major Adkison taught him how to 
photograph, analyze and investigate scenes.  Major Adkison’s actions show what a commitment our 
employees not only make to each other, but the investment in talent they are making for the long‐term 
good of the City.  By empowering talent today, each generation of workers is preparing the next to serve 
Murfreesboro and its future.   
 
Pictured on the front of this budget document is a cross‐representation of the City staff, standing at City 
Hall in the rotunda.  These are the people providing the City services the community expects. They 
provide public safety so you feel secure to live, work and play in Murfreesboro; they respond when you 
call them, either for life’s emergencies or something routine; they keep our streets clean, our trash and 
brush picked up; our water safe; they issue permits and information on how to work through your 
projects, whether big or small; they pick you up on Rover if you need transportation; they provide clean 
and safe recreation facilities, state‐of‐the art soccer and ball fields, award‐winning recreation programs 
and one of the best municipal golf courses in the state; they help you find resources to buy your first 
home or start your own business; they provide top‐notch programming, an informative website, and 
technological solutions to your requests; and they provide services to each other so you, the community 
benefits.   
 
This year marks the 200th anniversary of Murfreesboro’s founding.  The community has changed greatly 
over the years.  It has had successes and failures, good times and bad, but has remained resilient, 
adaptable, and current.  Murfreesboro’s Mayor Tommy Bragg put it best, “Our City enjoys an 
outstanding location, long‐serving family traditions, friendly atmosphere and vibrant economy. 
Murfreesboro has been an integral part of regional growth, commerce and educational opportunity.” 
This is what makes Murfreesboro so dynamic.  It continues to outpace the rest of the state on 
population and economic growth, and while it has been trying the past few years, the employees of the 
City of Murfreesboro endeavor for continuous improvement to provide exceptional services.  
 
These are the faces of the City of Murfreesboro staff, here for you. The City’s team want to be your 
partners in the community; to provide the best services available; and to help Murfreesboro be the best 
place it can be, a place you choose to call home.  Simply put, “we’re here for you”.   
 
                                                         
                                                      
 
 
 
                                  
 
 

     
                        




                                         
      Fiscal Year 2012‐2013 
        Operating Budget 
                  
           City Council 
       Tommy Bragg, Mayor 
    Ron Washington, Vice‐Mayor 
            Toby Gilley 
       Madelyn Scales Harris 
         Shane McFarland 
        Eddie Smotherman 
           Doug Young 
 
 
               Robert J. Lyons 
                City Manager 
 
              James H. Crumley 
           Assistant City Manager 
                        
           Melissa B. Wright, CPA 
               Finance Director 
                        
             Erin E. Tucker, CPA 
          Assistant Finance Director 
                        

                        

 
                                                                 TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Table of Contents ..................................................................................................................................................................... 5 
    Budget Highlights ............................................................................................................................................................... 9 
Revenues ................................................................................................................................................................................... 11 
    Property Tax ....................................................................................................................................................................... 12 
    Local Sales Tax ................................................................................................................................................................... 13 
Expenditures ........................................................................................................................................................................... 14 
Community Profile ................................................................................................................................................................ 23 
    City Overview ..................................................................................................................................................................... 23 
    Demographics .................................................................................................................................................................... 24 
    Educational Facilities ...................................................................................................................................................... 26 
    Local Economy ................................................................................................................................................................... 29 
    City Government ............................................................................................................................................................... 29 
    City of Murfreesboro Organizational Chart ........................................................................................................... 30 
Budget Guide ........................................................................................................................................................................... 31 
    Overview .............................................................................................................................................................................. 31 
    Budget Process .................................................................................................................................................................. 31 
    Budget Calendar ................................................................................................................................................................ 32 
    Fund Overview ................................................................................................................................................................... 33 
    Fund Descriptions ............................................................................................................................................................ 33 
Capital Budget Summary .................................................................................................................................................... 35 
Consolidated Financial Overview ................................................................................................................................... 39 
    All Funds ............................................................................................................................................................................... 39 
General Fund ........................................................................................................................................................................... 47 
                                         .
    General Fund Revenue Line Item Detail ................................................................................................................. 47 
    General Fund Revenues ................................................................................................................................................. 50 
    Overview .............................................................................................................................................................................. 50 
    Major Revenue Descriptions, Analyses and Projections .................................................................................. 53 
    Property Tax ....................................................................................................................................................................... 53 
    Other Local Taxes ............................................................................................................................................................. 54 
    Licenses, Permits, Fines and Fees .............................................................................................................................. 57 
    Charges for Service .......................................................................................................................................................... 58 

                                                                                              5 

 
    Intergovernmental Revenue ........................................................................................................................................ 58 
    Miscellaneous Revenue .................................................................................................................................................. 61 
    Transfers & Reimbursements from Other Funds ................................................................................................ 62 
    General Fund Expenditures .......................................................................................................................................... 63 
    General Administrative .................................................................................................................................................. 66 
    Information Technology ................................................................................................................................................ 74 
    Communications Department ..................................................................................................................................... 79 
    Legal ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 85 
    Human Resources ............................................................................................................................................................. 90 
    Judicial ................................................................................................................................................................................... 95 
    Police ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 99 
    Fire & Rescue ................................................................................................................................................................... 109 
                      .
    Building and Codes ....................................................................................................................................................... 117 
    Planning and Engineering .......................................................................................................................................... 122 
    Transportation ................................................................................................................................................................ 132 
    Street ................................................................................................................................................................................... 140 
    Urban Environmental .................................................................................................................................................. 147 
    Civic Plaza ......................................................................................................................................................................... 153 
    Parking Garage ................................................................................................................................................................ 156 
    Parks and Recreation Department ......................................................................................................................... 159 
    Senior Citizens Department ...................................................................................................................................... 170 
                                 .
    Public Golf Course Department ............................................................................................................................... 176 
    Solid Waste Department ............................................................................................................................................. 185 
    Fuel Department ............................................................................................................................................................ 191 
    Health, Education and Welfare................................................................................................................................. 193 
                  .
    Fund Transfers ............................................................................................................................................................... 196 
    Non‐Departmental ........................................................................................................................................................ 199 
Debt Service Fund .............................................................................................................................................................. 202 
State Street Aid Fund ........................................................................................................................................................ 209 
Airport Fund ......................................................................................................................................................................... 213 
Drug Fund .............................................................................................................................................................................. 220 
Community Development ............................................................................................................................................... 223 
Capital improvement Fund ............................................................................................................................................. 229 
Gateway Fund ...................................................................................................................................................................... 233 

                                                                                                6 

 
TML loan Fund ..................................................................................................................................................................... 236 
Insurance Fund .................................................................................................................................................................... 238 
Risk Management Fund ................................................................................................................................................... 241 
              .
Fleet Services ....................................................................................................................................................................... 245 
Glossary .................................................................................................................................................................................. 250 
Appendix ................................................................................................................................................................................ 259 
    Non‐major Revenue Descriptions ........................................................................................................................... 259 
    Tax Rate Computation ................................................................................................................................................. 266 
                                 .
    Financial Management Policies ............................................................................................................................... 267 
    Operating Budget Policies .......................................................................................................................................... 268 
    Fund Balance Policies .................................................................................................................................................. 270 
    Capital Improvement Plan Policies ........................................................................................................................ 273 
    Debt Policies .................................................................................................................................................................... 274 
    Investment Policies ....................................................................................................................................................... 280 
                            .
    Cash Management Policies ........................................................................................................................................ 282 
    Job table from Classification and Compensation Plan .................................................................................... 283 
    Full Time Equivalent Personnel Summary .......................................................................................................... 288 


                                                                                                

                                                           




                                                                                              7 

 
                                          BUDGET MESSAGE 

                                                
  
May 14, 2012 
 
Honorable Mayor Bragg and Members of City Council:  
 
RE: Proposed FY 2012‐2013 Budget 
 
In accordance with the City Charter and on behalf of your management team, I am respectfully 
submitting the City’s Proposed Budget for Fiscal Year 2012‐13.   
 
Our community continues to celebrate its bicentennial and Middle Tennessee State University 
celebrated its centennial.  As the celebrations come to a close and we clean up from the party, it is time 
to go back to our normal day to day.  We’ve enjoyed the storytelling, events and reflection, but as with 
any celebration, life gets back to normal.   
 
The new normal is starting to come into focus.  While the rapid growth is no longer here, it is beginning 
to feel like the sharp downturn isn’t here either.  There are a number of indicators to show that 
Murfreesboro and Rutherford County are picking up steam, gaining momentum and building 
excitement.  Unemployment is down – that is good.  Building permits are up – that is good.  Sales tax 
collections are up – that is good.  Amazon’s 1.25 million square feet Distribution Center will be open in 
the fall – that is good.  Interest in the Gateway is up – that is good too.       
 
The FY 13 proposed budget continues to fund city services that will meet the needs of our residents and 
businesses.  It continues its focus on those goals established by City Council: public safety, 
neighborhoods, customer service, financial stability and economic growth and civic engagement.  These 
form the bedrock for the budget.  This spirit was also captured in a video produced by CityTV in 
conjunction with Service Excellence called, “We’re here for you.”  In the video, numerous city employees 
said to our residents, “When you need a service, we’re here for you.”  It was a great illustration of their 
can‐do attitude, helpfulness and professionalism.  

    “CHAMPIONS DON’T BECOME CHAMPIONS IN THE RING‐THEY ARE MERELY RECOGNIZED 
                              THERE” JOHN MAXWELL 

Our organization is filled with champions.  The City continues to receive national and state recognition at 
the departmental and individual level.  These include a top ten United Way campaign, 2011 Tennessee 
Ultimate Fire Fighting Challenge Champions, 2012 National Honor Guard competition champions, 
National Association of Telecommunications Officers and Advisors honorable mention awards, 
Tennessee Parks and Recreation President’s Award, Audrey Nelson Community Development 
Achievement Award, Government Finance Officers Awards for both the audit and the budget and 
numerous individual awards.  

We have also continued getting better.  This year’s budget will include two efforts aimed at getting 
better: Service Excellence and Employee Engagement with a focus on performance.   

                                                     8 

 
 
The Service Excellence program touched our entire staff during the first round of training.  The four core 
service values include: 1) treating the customer with respect; 2) exceeding standards that customers 
expect; 3) delivering value and quality service and 4) provide convenience and one‐stop shopping.  The 
program also provided a model to deal with conflict.  During FY 2013, we’ll continue to offer Service 
Excellence training to new hires and develop round two for the existing employees.   
 
Secondly, through our Employee Engagement effort, we want to shift the organizational culture to one 
that is performance‐driven.  This will transform the traditional top‐down management approach to one 
that engages in employees in the operation of the City.  Setting clear goals and expectations, 
communicating them, and rewarding performance will help us sharpen our skills and deliver more 
effective and efficient services to Murfreesboro.    
 
Champions know the importance of preparation, feedback and training.  Likewise, we want to formalize 
a means for getting feedback from those who do business with us.  A structured method for collecting 
information from customers will help identify areas for rewarding employees and for additional training. 
We’ll reinforce the many things we do well and learn when there is room to grow.   
 
Success is never final.  I know the dedicated men and women of the organization will continue to seek to 
be champions for our residents – and that is good.   


                                      BUDGET HIGHLIGHTS 

There are a number of initiatives in the Proposed Budget that will ensure Murfreesboro maintains its 
excellent quality of life, including:  
 
                              SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 
       Continuing a  focus on funding Police and Fire & Rescue departments 
       Implementing the zoning study of the Maney Avenue area 
       Initiating planning for a park in western Murfreesboro 
       Beginning construction of the Stones River Greenway extension to Barfield Crescent Park 
       Adding one detective and a crime analyst position 
       Utilizing social media to warn residents of severe weather and other emergencies 
       Beginning a transition to new Police and Fire & Rescue radio communications system 
       Funding 33 Police vehicles in the Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) 
       Replace two Fire & Rescue pumpers and a Snorkel truck; add a new heavy and a new light 
        rescue vehicle 
       Renovation and new signage at all Fire & Rescue stations 
       Continuing the community landscape awards and a tree appreciation program 
       Completing the Oakland Park renovation 
       Including recycled asphalt in the repaving program to extend the miles of streets completed 
       Replacing automated side loaders in the Solid Waste Department, which will improve reliability 
        and reduce maintenance costs 
 


                                                    9 

 
             STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL HEALTH 

       Maintaining the existing level of property tax, which is the 14th consecutive year without a 
        property tax increase;  
       Implementing of health insurance benefits design changes to drive consumerism and wellness 
       Reviewing zoning around Medical Center Parkway corridor 
       Producing new, state‐of‐the art marketing video for corporate headquarter property in 
        Gateway. 
       Beginning update of Major Thoroughfare Plan 
       Installing Phase II of the Historic Downtown landscape revitalization project 
       Auditing of the hotel motel tax and gas franchise fees 
       Begin the strategic assessment of the City’s Risk Management program 
       Fund a $48 million CIP while continuing to monitor debt ratios and other measurements as 
        adopted in the City’s Comprehensive Financial Policies 

               EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

       Recognizing our employees as our customers and better engage them in the workplace 
       Providing residents with electronic payment solutions for City services 
       Developing an information technology master plan that will create a roadmap for the acquisition 
        of computer hardware and software, including the replacement of the legacy system currently 
        used for the general ledger and human resources information systems  
       Continuing of “Service Excellence,” the City’s customer service training program for City 
        employees  
       Initiate an employee service award program 
       Continue night court sessions  
       Funding pay increases and longevity pay for full‐time personnel  
       Publish a Fire & Rescue Post Incident Care Guide to assist persons who suffer from fire loss 
       Increasing employee participation in wellness programs 
       Finalizing plans to construct a short golf course to be used as a teaching facility for youth  
       Conducting an Americans with Disabilities Act survey of all City buildings 
       Installing Rover passenger shelters 
       Beginning project to construct new headquarters for Rover   
       Replacing the Rover fleet of buses, enabling lower maintenance costs and improving customer 
        satisfaction 
       Additional funding for the Linebaugh and Glanton public libraries 
       Repaving $1.86 million in City streets from State gasoline taxes 

                                  ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

       Beginning Phase 1 of an Employee Engagement effort to focus on performance  
       Renaming the Communications Department to Communications Department to better capture 
        their role in providing information to the community 
       Creating an additional full‐time Video Journalist position to expand the availability of 
        information to the community 
       Creating a YouTube channel to cross promote City videos 
                                                    10 

 
       Continuing the City’s Facebook presence, Police and Fire academies, CityTV, Twitter and other 
        tools to reach out to our residents 
       Redesigning the City’s website 
       Conducting of neighborhood meetings on critical issues facing a neighborhood or the City  
       Obtaining community input on the renaming effort of the St. Clair Street Senior Center 


                                            REVENUES 

 
General Fund revenues total $112.05 million, reflecting a $2.87 million or a 2.63 percent increase from  
the FY 2012 budget.     
 




                                                                                                     
 
                                 



                                                   11 

 
                                            PROPERTY TAX  

The Proposed budget does not recommend a property tax increase and recommends adoption of 
$1.2703 as the tax rate. This is the 14th consecutive year without a property tax increase.   Property   
tax revenues are projected to be $35.74 million, which exceeds FY 2012 budget by approximately  
$142 thousand.  As shown below, the property tax has been relatively flat since FY 09. 
 




                                                                                                             
                                  




                                                     12 

 
                                        LOCAL SALES TAX 

The economy is showing signs of rebounding as evidenced in a projected growth of 9.4 percent in local 
sales tax for FY 2012 as compared to FY 2011.  As such, we have budgeted an approximate $2.83 million 
increase or 4.0% for the FY 2013 budget.  Although the property tax has been flat, sales taxes have been 
growing since FY 2010. 
 
 
 
                            City of Murfreesboro
                                       Local Sales Tax
                                               
         $35,000,000 

         $30,000,000 

         $25,000,000 

         $20,000,000 

         $15,000,000 

         $10,000,000 
                                                    Local Sales Taxes
                      FY 2002     FY 2003    FY 2004     FY 2005    FY 2006    FY 2007
                      FY 2008     FY 2009    FY 2010     FY 2011    FY 2012    FY 2013




                                                   13 

 
                                        EXPENDITURES 
The Proposed Budget also makes expenditure adjustments.  These include adjustments in expenditures 
beginning with a focus on the core issues of safety, financial health and excellent service.  

Total General Fund expenditures are $117 million, an increase of $3 million over FY 2012 budget.   

 




                                                                                                       
 
 




                                                   14 

 
                                                                                                     
 
                      PRIORITY 1: SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 
 
The City’s first goal remains safe and livable neighborhoods.  The Police Department continues to be the 
City’s largest operating department.  The proposed Police Department budget includes funding for a 
new Detective and Crime Analyst position, to help us use data to solve and prevent crime.  It continues 
several targeted enforcement efforts, including automated red lights, traffic and gang eradication.  The 
Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) includes funding for 25 fully‐equipped police cars and 8 detective 
vehicles.   
 
The CIP also includes funding for the replacement and upgrading of the mobile radios in both Public 
Safety Departments, which has been widely supported by the Chiefs and their employees.   By 
purchasing multi‐band radios now, the new devices will improve service on the existing radio system 
and be prepared to transfer to a new digital radio system when completed.  The CIP calls for the 
upgrade of transmitters, consoles and the backbone of the radio system in the 2013‐2014 Fiscal Year. 
 
Last year, the Fire Department was renamed the Fire & Rescue Department.  MFRD will study the 
department’s training needs, including coursework and facilities.  They are to prepare a strategic plan 
for training. During Service Excellence training, we heard that Fire & Rescue employees are interested in 
taking our training and facilities to the next level. This comprehensive approach will ensure we are well 
prepared for the future.  
 
The replacement of two pumpers and a snorkel truck, plus the purchase of two new rescue vehicles by 
the Fire & Rescue Department is funded in the CIP to insure Murfreesboro firefighters have appropriate 
and current equipment to perform their work. 
 

                                                   15 

 
Continuing our focus on livability, the Greenway extension to Barfield Crescent Park is expected to bid in 
2013.  Additionally, a master plan for bikeways, greenways and blueways will begin.  The Planning and 
Engineering Department budget continues its study of the corridors of Broad Street and South Church 
Street to improve the streetscape and storm drainage improvements in our neighborhoods and the 
review of zoning regulations in the Maney Avenue corridor.  The Transportation Department budget 
includes installation of transit shelters and GPS units on Rover vehicles, study of a site for a new transit 
facility and the kickoff of the Major Thoroughfare Plan update.      
 

      PRIORITY 2: STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

The City continues to be strong financially.  According to the last audit (FY 2011), the City’s actual 
revenues exceeded budgeted revenues by $800,000. The City’s General Fund spent $3.8 million less 
than budgeted.  
 
The City adopted comprehensive financial policies in 2010, which establish various performance 
measures.  A comparison of the City’s financial position against its policies shows that we remain well 
managed and that our financial condition is strong.  For instance, the City will pay off 92 percent of its 
debt in the next 10 years and the City is within our guidelines in terms of debt versus assessed value, 
debt per capita, variable debt ratios and debt as a percent of budget among others.  As shown on the 
graph below, we are only using about half of the City’s legal debt amount.   
 
 

                                        City of Murfreesboro
                                           Legal Debt Limit
                                       with $44.0M New Issue 
                      100%
                                  Outstanding GO Debt as a % of the Limit
                       80%

                       60%

                       40%

                       20%

                        0%
                             2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013



                                                                                                   
 
The City’s first new debt issue in nearly three years is scheduled for sale in late 2012 or early 2013.  
Based on the Capital Improvement Plan, this general obligation issue is sized at $44,000,000 and funds a 
variety of projects including the last segment of Veterans Parkway ($9,400,000); the replacement of 
                                                     16 

 
handheld and mobile two‐way radios and the construction of two new towers as the beginning of the 
complete upgrade of radio infrastructure for Public Safety and other departments ($5,250,000); the 
expansion of Hobgood Elementary plus the beginnings of a new elementary school in west 
Murfreesboro ($7,225,000); major renovation to SportsCom/McKnight/Starplex ($4,400,000); 
improvements to Old Fort Park, Patterson Community Center and Parks Administration buildings 
($1,275,000); beginning the search for a new park on the west side of Murfreesboro ($720,000) and the 
replacement  of pumpers and a snorkel plus the purchase of two new rescue vehicles by the Fire & 
Rescue Department ($5,200,000). 
 
The City’s first new debt issue in two years is projected for sale in late 2012 or early 2013.  Based on the 
Capital Improvement Plan, this general obligation issue is sized at $44,000,000 and funds a variety of 
projects including the last segment of Veterans Parkway ($9,400,000); the replacement of handheld and 
mobile two‐way radios and the construction of two new towers as the beginning of the complete 
upgrade of radio infrastructure for Public Safety and other departments ($5,250,000); the expansion of 
Hobgood Elementary plus the beginnings of a new elementary school in west Murfreesboro 
($7,225,000); major renovation to SportsCom/McKnight/Starplex ($4,400,000); improvements to Old 
Fort Park, Patterson Community Center and Parks Administration buildings ($1,275,000); beginning the 
search for a new park on the west side of Murfreesboro ($720,000) and the replacement  of pumpers 
and a snorkel plus the purchase of two new rescue vehicles by the Fire & Rescue Department 
($5,200,000). 
 
Currently, plans are to offer the debt as a fixed rate issue, with maturities matching the anticipated life 
of the assets purchased but not exceeding the City’s standard repayment schedule of fifteen years.  
Interest in the amount of $733,333 has been budgeted (approximately 8 months).  However, through 
the variations in annual principal and interest, the total debt service budget is up only $400,189 for the 
fiscal year. 
 
 
Health Insurance 
In its second year of a comprehensive review of the City’s $11 million health insurance program, the 
Proposed Budget recommends a number of changes.  A survey of the City’s health insurance benefits 
shows that we offer premium benefits and this will continue after the changes.  Since all employers are 
facing rising health insurance costs, we are looking for innovative and effective strategies to meet the 
dual goals of providing quality benefits and containing costs.  The Year 2 review focused on:  1) plan 
utilization; 2) number of persons on the plan and 3) the health of the persons on the plan.  
 
The recommendations include creating a single Preferred Provider Option (PPO Plan), an optional Health 
Reimbursement Arrangement (HRA), four tier premium structure, Flexible Spending Account debit card 
and a wellness program. Many employees will realize monthly premium decreases as they accept higher 
co‐insurance and use of deductibles. These changes will institute a level of consumerism that will make 
our employees a partner in our health insurance program. Details will be presented in a memorandum 
from Human Resources Director Glen Godwin in a separate document.  
 
Budgeted Use of Fund Balance 
In the past nine years the City has budgeted annually from $1.5 million to $4.8 million from fund balance 
to balance the General Fund’s budget. In that same period, the City has actually had to draw from fund 
balance only twice and it is anticipated by our revenue and expenditure projections that FY 12 may not 
                                                    17 

 
require the use of fund balance.  Fiscal year 2013 budget includes a use of $5.2 million from fund 
balance, similar to FY 2012. 
 




                                                                                                 
 
Actual Use of Fund Balance 
In 2007 the City budgeted and used fund balance to purchase the land for what later became the 
Gateway Project. This proved to be a wise investment for the City bringing jobs, new development and 
additional tax dollars.  It was also used in FY 2011; however, only 25 percent of the budgeted fund 
balance was needed due to better revenue collections and tight controls on expenditures.  The other 
years on the graph below show additions to fund balance.  In other words, even though the City 
budgeted to spend fund balance, we actually grew fund balance.  
 




                                                   18 

 
                                                                                                    

        PRIORITY 3: EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

The Service Excellence program was fully implemented in FY 2012.  A Service Excellence Coordinator was 
hired and it is expected that all city employees will receive training.  Additionally, the Service Excellence 
Coordinator will begin a one‐stop shop permitting process for certain developments and projects.   
 
This training is making a difference in our service delivery.  There have been other benefits as well: it has 
helped open up communications in the organization, employees have met employees from different 
departments and we’ve learned from one another.   This has been a very exciting and rewarding 
initiative.  
 
Moving forward with Service Excellence in FY 2013 we want to institute a rewards program to show our 
employees they are appreciated. Also, additional Service Excellence initiatives have been added to the 
FY 2013 budget as a result of the training classes. 
 
Information Technology 
In FY 2012, the City centralized its information technology personnel and resources and hired a 
department head.  This included Management Information Systems (MIS), Geographic Information 
Systems (GIS) and Police and Fire & Rescue technology personnel that were located within several 
departments in the budget.   
 
In FY 2013, the City will prepare a master plan for technology.  The master plan will include a survey of 
existing technology resources, identification of needs and selection of hardware and software to replace 
the legacy systems.  The IT Department will also be working towards a new city website, mobile service 
requests, citizen complaint tracking and more.  They will also be assisting with the deployment of the 
new Police and Fire & Rescue communications system and finding technology solutions to improve 
communications with employees.  
                                                      19 

 
     

                            PRIORITY 4: ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

The City already communicates with our residents in many ways.  City TV, the City’s website, press 
releases, parks and recreation user surveys, neighborhood open houses, public hearings, presentations 
to civic groups, and citizen police and fire academies are among the many ways the City reaches out to 
our residents and listens to our citizens.  We believe, through technology and social media, we can 
provide another outlet for telling the City’s story and for receiving input from residents who have ideas, 
comments and suggestions about our City.   
 
As a result, we are putting a focus on engaging our residents.  Even though we have been active in this 
area, we want to look for ways to establish new partnerships and bring residents together to help 
address and solve community challenges.  This is their community and we know they have a right, and a 
responsibility, to participate in the governance of the community.  Whether through old fashioned 
conversations or through new technology, we think providing access to information and encouraging 
conversations through multiple and convenient methods, civic engagement will result in a better city.  
 
In FY 2012, the City initiated a Facebook page that saw over 60,000 views in 3 months and the use of 
Twitter was started.  
 
In addition to the employee engagement effort discussed above, we want to increase our efforts at 
reaching our residents.  It is proposed that the Cable TV Department be re‐branded the Communications 
Department and to assume a broader role.  Additional programming, outreach and a redesigned website 
will all be part of this year’s work plan to help communicate the City’s work, accomplishments and 
successes as well as providing opportunities for input and dialogue.  

                                    EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION 

Classification and Compensation Plan 
Adopted in 2004, the City’s Classification and Compensation Plan is a market based plan.  It was built 
upon an analysis of the “market rate” for the positions within our organization based upon survey data 
of both public and private employers.  The pay plan targets the 60th percentile of the salary survey data 
for comparable jobs in other municipalities instead of the “average or 50th percentile.  By using the 
higher percentage of 60 percent, employees’ take home pay increased by 2 to 5 percent.   
 
The budget includes funds to complete a classification and compensation plan update.   
 
Pay Increases 
The Proposed FY 2013 budget includes step increases.  The cost of the pay increases, including the 
increased cost of FICA and retirement, is approximately $1.3 million annually.   
 
In addition to the full‐time employee pay increases, we are proposing a $0.15 per hour pay increase to 
all part‐time personnel, as well.  
 


                                                    20 

 
In last year’s budget, only one other city had a higher increase.   This year the City remains at the top of 
the class in terms of pay increases.  In combination, we are not aware of another Tennessee city that 
increased pay as much as Murfreesboro.  
 




                                                                                                 
 
 
 
Longevity Pay 
The Proposed FY 2012 budget includes the normal longevity pay.    
 
Retirement Plans  
The City initiated a defined contribution plan (retirement plan) on July 1, 2010 to replace the traditional 
defined benefit retirement (pension plan) for City employees.  At the current time, there are 75 
employees enrolled in the new retirement plan.  It requires employees to contribute 3 percent of salary 
to the program, with the City matching equally.  Employees may contribute up to an additional 5 
percent of salary, with the City matching 100 percent. 
 
The defined benefits pension plan continues to be stable and funded at actuarially prescribed rates.  The 
recommended percentage of salary for the defined benefits plan will decrease from 12.57 percent to 
12.10 percent in FY 2013 which the City has budgeted and will implement. The decrease is a result of 
moving contributions for employee life, long‐term disability and accidental death insurances from the 
pension plan to the annual operating costs of the budget funds.  
 

                                       BUDGET PRESENTATION   

Government Finance Officers Distinguished Budget Presentation Award 
As indicated last year, I have set a goal to earn the Government Finance Officer’s Distinguished Budget 
Award by FY 2012.  We were notified in May 2012 that we have received that award for the FY 2012 
                                                     21 

 
budget.  This is a companion to the award the City has won for 13 years for our comprehensive annual 
financial report.   
 
GFOA states that, “since 1984, the Distinguished Budget Presentation Awards Program recognizes 
exemplary budgeting practices among governmental entities in the US and Canada….and promotes 
improvements in public sector budgeting and enables governments of all sizes to provide citizens and 
other stakeholders with clear, understandable and complete budget documents.”  Budgets are 
evaluated in four major categories: as a policy document, a financial plan, an operations guide and a 
communication device.   

                                       ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

The budget process is long and hard.  Department heads, assistant managers and administrative staff 
work long hours developing their budget requests.  Melissa Wright and Erin Tucker devote a substantial 
part of their spring to budget.  Shannon Logan participated in her first budget and provided new insight. 
Ana Stovall also worked on her first budget and did all of the heavy lifting with spreadsheets and 
document production and she excelled.  Jim Crumley’s experience in the organization combined with his 
understanding of municipal finance is making a real difference.  The health insurance studies have 
required a great deal of time and we are thankful to Glen Godwin, Pam Russell and their staff.  Our work 
can be challenging, but it is often rewarding and this is a great group of employees to work with and 
make our city better.   
 
Finally, we also do not forget that once adopted, the budget is implemented by our hard working 
employees and we are grateful for them every day.  They are champions – and that is good.  
   
During this year’s budget, I asked our department heads to bring a song to budget review that captured 
the mood or reflected their budget requests.  We had a great time with that and there were some 
creative submissions.  Some of the songs included, “Help”, “I Work Hard for the Money” and “If I had a 
Million Dollars”.  So, as I submit my Proposed Budget to you, I will call upon the words of Mick Jagger, 
who said, “You can’t always get what you want, but if you try sometimes, you might find, you’ll get what 
you need.”  This budget isn’t perfect and there are more things we wish we could do, but we know that 
it takes care of the things we need.  Thank you in advance for your input, feedback and dialogue about 
the proposed budget.  And we’ll continue to be here for you.  
 
 
 
Robert J. Lyons 
City Manager 
                                    




                                                   22 

 
                                   COMMUNITY PROFILE 

                                          CITY OVERVIEW 

Overview 
 
The City of Murfreesboro, county seat of Rutherford County, is located at the geographic center of the 
State of Tennessee approximately 35 miles southeast of Nashville, the state capitol.  The City’s corporate 
boundary encompasses 55.94 square miles.  The July 1, 2012 census will certify the population at 
109,031 residents, up by 9,456 residents certified during the city's 2008 special census.  Murfreesboro’s 
population growth continues to be strong and is on pace to make Murfreesboro the fifth largest city in 
Tennessee by 2020.  The city is part of the Nashville Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes 
thirteen counties and a population of 1,617,142 (2011). 
 
Although Murfreesboro is sometimes considered a suburb or exurb of Nashville, Tennessee, at 35 miles 
it is far enough away and has a large enough population to maintain a separate identity from its larger 
neighbor. It is Tennessee's fastest growing major city and one of the fastest growing cities in the 
country, with a population growth from 68,816 to 109,031 between 2000 and 2012, a change of 58%. 
The city is also home to Middle Tennessee State University, the largest undergraduate university in the 
state of Tennessee, with a current undergraduate population of 23,878 students. 
 
In 2006, Murfreesboro was ranked by Money Magazine as the 84th best place to live in the United 
States, out of 745 cities with a population over 50,000. In addition, Murfreesboro ranked 20th in the 
nation for 2010 with the most affordable homes.  Finally, according to CNN/Money Magazine, 
Rutherford County saw a 37 percent job growth, the14th best in the country, between 2000 and 2010, 
exemplifying our strength and resilience during the economic downturn.  
 
History 
 
In 1811, the Tennessee State Legislature established a county seat for Rutherford County. The town was 
first named "Cannonsburgh" in honor of Tennessee politician Newton Cannon, but was soon renamed 
"Murfreesboro" for Revolutionary War hero Colonel Hardy Murfree. 
 
As Tennessee grew westward, it became clear that having the state capital in Knoxville would be a 
burden to those who had to travel from the western end of the state.  In 1818, Murfreesboro became 
the capital of Tennessee until 1826, when Nashville became the state capital. 
 
On December 31, 1862, the Battle of Stones River, also called the Battle of Murfreesboro, was fought 
near Murfreesboro between the Union Army of the Cumberland and the Confederate Army of 
Tennessee. This was a major engagement of the American Civil War. Between December 31 and January 
2, 1863, there were 23,515 casualties. It was the bloodiest battle of the war based on percentage of 
casualties.  Stones River National Battlefield is now a historical site that brings in many tourists to 
Murfreesboro. 
 
Murfreesboro had begun as a mainly agricultural community, but by 1853 the area was home to several 
colleges and academies, earning it the nickname "Athens of Tennessee".  Despite the trauma of the Civil 
                                                   23 

 
War, by the early 1900s its growth began to regain momentum, in contrast to large areas of the South. 
In 1911, the state created Middle Tennessee State Normal School, a two‐year school for training 
teachers. There was a subsequent merger with the Tennessee College for Women.  In 1925 the school 
was expanded to a four‐year institution. During and following World War II, it grew and evolved to 
become Middle Tennessee State University in 1965.  MTSU now has the highest undergraduate 
enrollment in the state. 
 
World War II resulted in Murfreesboro beginning to move away from an agriculture‐based economy and 
diversify economically with industry, manufacturing, and education contributing significantly. Since the 
end of World War II, growth has been steady giving rise to a stable economy. Murfreesboro has enjoyed 
substantial residential and commercial growth, with its population increasing 143% between 1990 and 
2012, from 44,922 to 109,031. 


                                         DEMOGRAPHICS 

                                                          

                                                Population


     2011                                       109,031 


     2010                                       108,755 


     2009                                     101,753 


     2008                                 100,575 


     2007                               92,559 


     2006                             86,976 


     2005                           81,393 


            ‐         20,000        40,000          60,000     80,000       100,000      120,000 
                                                                                                     
 

                                                          

                                                     24 

 
    Based on U. S. Census Bureau 2010 Population     108,755   100%
Single Race
 White Alone                                          82,240    75.6
 Black or African American Alone                      16,510    15.2
 American Indian and Alaska Native Alone                 378     0.3
 Asian Alone                                           3,658     3.4
 Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander Alone         47       0
 Some Other Race Alone                                 3,039     2.8
 Two or More Races                                     2,883     2.7

Hispanic or Latino by Origin
Not Hispanic or Latino                               102,302    94.1
Hispanic or Latino                                     6,453     5.9
 Mexican                                               4,005     3.7
 Puerto Rican                                            541     0.5
 Cuban                                                   183     0.2
 All Other Hispanic or Latino                          1,724     1.6
Age
 Age 0 - 4                                             7,697     7.1
 Age 5 - 9                                             7,178     6.6
 Age 10 - 14                                           6,685     6.1
 Age 15 - 19                                           9,350     8.6
 Age 20 - 24                                          14,950    13.7
 Age 25 - 29                                          10,402     9.6
 Age 30 - 39                                          15,615    14.3
 Age 40 - 49                                          13,206    12.2
 Age 50 - 59                                          10,753     9.9
 Age 60 - 69                                           6,810     6.2
 Age 70 - 79                                           3,681     3.9
 Age 80 - 84                                           1,260     1.2
 Age 85 and over                                       1,169     1.1

    Age 16 and over                                   85,880      79
    Age 18 and over                                   83,207    76.5
    Age 21 and over                                   74,548    68.5
    Age 62 and over                                   11,244    10.3
    Age 65 and over                                    8,873     8.2

 Age
  Median Age                                            29.0
  Median Age - Male                                     28.1
  Median Age - Female                                   30.1
 

                                               25 

 
    Households
    2010 Census                                                                                   41,940
    2000 Census                                                                                   26,511
                                                     
Households by Type
Total households                                                                        41,940        100
 Family households (families)                                                           25,108       59.9
 Nonfamily households (householder living alone)                                        16,832       40.1

Households with individuals under 18 years                                              14,059       33.5
Households with individuals over 65 years                                                6,436       15.3

Housing Occupancy
Total housing units                                                                     45,500        100
 Occupied housing units                                                                 41,940       92.2
 Vacant housing units                                                                    3,560         7.8
Homeowner vacancy rate (percent)                                                            2.7
Rental vacancy rate (percent)                                                               9.9
                                                     
    Source: Claritas



                                  EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 

Rutherford County has two public schools systems: Rutherford County Schools (pre‐K – 12) and 
Murfreesboro City Schools (pre‐K – 6). Private schools offer additional choices to citizens. 
 
Rutherford County Schools, with 38,500 K‐12 students in 45 schools, are 100 percent accredited by the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, with 99.91% of its core courses taught by highly qualified 
teachers (as defined by state and federal standards).  
 
Rutherford County Schools posted all A’s in achievement in grades 3‐8 for Math, 
Reading/Language, Social Studies and Science, according to the 2011 Tennessee Report Card. Rutherford 
County has six middle schools ranked in the state’s top 50 schools in a three‐way tie with two other 
Tennessee counties for top‐performing middle schools. 
 
Murfreesboro City Schools, which enrolls 7,200 pre‐K through 6 students in 12 schools, are 100 percent 
accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. On the Terra Nova test administered in 
the spring, the grade average at all levels exceeded the national norms. More than 68 percent of the 
licensed employees have Master’s degrees or higher.  
 
Murfreesboro’s elementary school system is #6 statewide, with the ratio of professional personnel to 
pupils approximately 1 to 14. The ratio of classroom teachers to pupils is less than 1 to 20.  
                                  
                                                   26 

 
Murfreesboro City Schools 
    More than 68 percent of the licensed employees have Master’s degrees or higher. 
    Annually sixth‐grade classes spend several days on a field trip in which their educational 
       program is conducted totally in an outdoor setting. 
    Licensed music, physical education, art and media specialists are provided in each K‐6 school. 
    Guidance counselors are available in all schools to assist students. 
    An extended school program is offered before and after school as well as during summer and 
       break sessions in all schools. 
    Special Education staffs are in all schools. Special Education preschool classes are located at 
       Bellwood/Bowdoin Preschool. 
    The Discovery School at Reeves‐Rogers serves 350 high‐achieving kindergarten through sixth‐
       grade students. 
    The City Schools Foundation was established in 2006 to support the educational programs of the 
       system. 
    City Schools has partnered with City’s Parks and Recreation Department to focus on nature 
       centers, outdoor learning, and wellness.  
 
Rutherford County Schools 
    The State of Tennessee’s Headquarters for the Virtual Enterprise program is at Rutherford 
       County’s Blackman High School. 
    Oakland High School offers an International Baccalaureate (IB) Program, and is one of just 13 
       schools in Tennessee certified to offer this unique educational opportunity to students. 
    Rutherford County Schools received “straight A’s” for learning gains and achievement for grades 
       3 – 8 on the most recent Tennessee Report Card on Education. Those grades made Rutherford 
       County Schools one of only nine other districts in the state to receive perfect scores for grades 3 
       – 8. 
    All K‐5 schools have after‐school programs. 
    All schools offer special education staffing. 
    Many of the K‐5 schools offer outdoor classrooms for science study. 
    Several high schools have ranked in the top 10 percent in Gateway and end‐of‐course exams for 
       value‐added (three‐year learning gains), including:  
    Siegel High ranking in the top 10 percent of ACT math; 
    Siegel High ranking in the top 10 percent for ACT composite scores; 
    Siegel High and Blackman High ranking in the top 10 percent for U.S. History for learning gains; 
    Oakland High, Siegel High and Holloway High ranking in the top 10 percent for Physical Science 
       learning gains; 
    Riverdale High ranks in the top 10 percent for English I learning gains; 
    Riverdale, Siegel and Blackman High ranking in the top 10 percent of English II learning gains and 
       Biology I learning gains; and 
    Siegel High scoring in the top 10 percent for writing assessment learning gains. 
 
                                  




                                                   27 

 
Middle Tennessee State University 
Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU) in Murfreesboro, founded in 1911, is a Tennessee Board of 
Regent institution and the largest public university in the state. Located on a 500+‐acre campus, the 
university has 109 permanent buildings (3.8 million square feet of space) and is one mile from the 
geographic center of Tennessee. This past year, MTSU dedicated its brand‐new, $30 million, 87,000‐
square‐foot, state‐of‐the‐art College of Education building as part of its Centennial Weekend 
celebration,  and construction began this spring on a Student Services building to be located east of the 
new Student Union, which is planned for occupancy this summer. In addition, the State of Tennessee 
recently approved funding for a new Science building.   
 
MTSU continues to be the number one producer of college graduates for the Greater Nashville job 
market. MTSU enrolls approximately 23,878 students annually in:
       Basic and applied sciences  
       Business 
       Education and behavioral science 
       Liberal arts  
       Mass communication 
       Continuing education and distance learning 
       Graduate studies 
       University honors 
 
The university offers more than 140 programs including Master’s degrees in ten areas. The university 
also has nationally and internationally recognized programs in aerospace, business, mass 
communication and the recording industry.  
 
MTSU has developed the nation’s only four‐year program of study and a degree in Concrete Industry 
Management. Some other highlights from the university include: 
 
     MTSU is a destination school and is the No. 1 choice of undergraduates in the state of 
        Tennessee. 
     The Honors College, with its prestigious Buchanan Fellowships ‐ the highest academic 
        scholarships awarded at MTSU ‐ provides talented students the atmosphere of a small select 
        college nestled within a major university. 
     PhD programs in English, Economics, Human Performance and Public History have been called 
        programs of the "highest quality"; and the programs in Economics and Public History are unique 
        in Tennessee. 
     Nationally recognized programs in aerospace, recording industry and concrete management 
        attract students from around the world. 
     The Center for Popular Music is nationally recognized as a repository of music, has one of the 
        largest sheet music collections in the country. It was listed as one of the top 100 things to visit in 
        Tennessee in the 20th century by the Tennessean. 
     MTSU has a diverse student body which is 54 percent female, 12 percent minority, and with 
        students from around the world. 
 
The City is also the location of the Tennessee Technology Center, Daymar Institute (formerly Draughons) 
and the University of Phoenix.                                    
                                                     28 

 
                                         LOCAL ECONOMY 

The City’s strong economy attracts a growing population, with in‐migration at twice the national 
average. Rutherford County ranks as the 20th fastest growing county in the country by the U. S. Census 
Bureau.  Murfreesboro was named the 12th fastest growing city in the country by msn.com.  Income 
levels have also risen steadily over the period with average household income of $57,003 per year.   
  
The City has a diversified employment base, which includes office, industrial, educational and retail 
employment.  Murfreesboro is home to Middle Tennessee State University with a student enrollment of 
over 23,878.  The City’s Gateway Project has created opportunities for Class A office and retail.  
 
Several large projects are underway, and should be completed in 2012, ready for occupancy.  The largest 
project currently under construction is the Amazon Fulfillment Center, located off Joe B. Jackson 
Parkway.  This building is over one (1) million square feet and will employee at least 1150 full‐time 
employees, with hopes of expanding that workforce in the future.  The City worked in partnership with 
the Chamber of Commerce on this recruitment effort, and the developer of the project told Destination 
Rutherford that Murfreesboro was selected because it was “infrastructure ready, builder friendly”. 
 
Another important project that is ongoing is the NHK campus located just west of the Amazon site.  NHK 
has constructed two buildings on site and has begun operations.  This manufacturer of automobile seat 
components is creating a campus with the addition of their new truck terminal facility.  As this important 
employer ramps up operations, they will be a fine addition to the City’s established and growing 
industrial base. 
 
The Gateway area continues to be successful.  Staff continues to promote the gateway area and CityTV 
is working with Service Excellence on a modern sales video marketing the corporate headquarter site.  
The Planning Commission recently approved a 400‐unit residential, mixed unit complex to be located 
close to the Avenue and Murfreesboro Medical Clinic is expanding their operations and facility along 
Gateway Boulevard to more than double its current size.  Murfreesboro Medical continues to provide 
innovative healthcare to this growing community.   
 
Moving forward into 2012, the City continues to expect economic growth.  With the increased industrial 
base, the City plans to see growth in both the retail and residential sectors. For example Wal‐Mart has 
just submitted plans for a new supercenter to be located on S. Church St.  This will be the City’s third 
Wal‐Mart and a large expansion of our retail market.  Construction on this building is anticipated to 
begin in the fall of 2012.  The City is excited to see what other economic opportunities will present 
themselves in 2012.  


                                        CITY GOVERNMENT 

The City operates under a Council‐Manager form of government.  The governing body is the City Council, 
which consists of seven members who serve four‐year terms of office.  Non‐partisan elections for City 
Council are held in even numbered years on a staggered basis.  City Council members are elected at 
large. The City Council is responsible for adopting ordinances, the annual budget, appointing 
committees and establishing policies. The City Council appoints a City Manager, who is responsible for 
carrying out the policies and ordinances of the City Council and the day‐to‐day operations.  The City 
Manager appoints and supervises the various department heads of the City. 
                                                     29 

 
    CITY OF MURFREESBORO ORGANIZATIONAL CHART 

                                Mufreesboro 
                                 Residents



                               Mayor and City 
                                  Council


           City 
      Recorder/City    City Judge             City Manager        City Attorney
        Treasurer


                                Assistant City 
                                  Manager



                                                        Building and 
                              Airport Manager
                                                       Codes Director


                                                        Parks and 
                               Director of Golf         Recreation 
                                                         Director



                                    Police Chief         Fire Chief



                                Solid Waste 
                                                       Street Director
                                  Director



                              Planning Director        City Engineer



                                 Community 
                                                       Transportation 
                                Development 
                                                          Director
                                  Director


                                   Urban 
                                                     Water and Sewer 
                               Environmental 
                                                        Director
                                  Director


                              Communications           Fleet Services 
                                 Director                 Director


                                                          Human 
                                Senior Center 
                                                         Resources 
                                  Director
                                                          Director



                                    IT Director
                                                                                   
                                        30 

 
                                          BUDGET GUIDE 

                                               OVERVIEW 

A budget is a financial and operating plan for a city for a period called a “fiscal year.”  The budget is a 
plan for the use of the City’s resources.  Through these resources, services are provided to meet the 
needs and desires of Murfreesboro’s residents, businesses and visitors.   
 
The City of Murfreesboro’s fiscal year begins on July 1 and ends on June 30.  The fiscal year that begins 
on July 1, 2012 is referred to as FY 2013.   
 


                                          BUDGET PROCESS 

At the start of the budget process, the City Council communicates its goals and objectives to the City 
Manager.  These goals and objectives are shaped by input members have received from Murfreesboro 
residents throughout the year.  The preliminary steps in the budget also include a review of current 
economic conditions, revenue projections, community input, program initiatives, long range plans and 
federal and state mandates.   
 
The City Manager will communicate the goals, objectives and priorities of the City Council and 
community to the department heads, who will prepare the budget estimates for their department.  
Several City departments have citizen boards or commissions who may also provide input into the 
budget.  The departmental budget requests are submitted to the Finance Department.  These budget 
requests are reviewed by the City Manager, Assistant City Manager, Finance Director and Assistant 
Finance Director.  The City Charter provides that the City Manager must prepare a proposed budget and 
submit it to the City Council not later than May 15 each year.   
 
The City Council reviews the proposed budget each spring through a series of meetings with the City 
Manager and department heads. The City Council makes changes to the City Manager’s proposed 
budget as it deems necessary.  Prior to adoption of the budget, the City Council conducts a public 
hearing on the proposed budget to obtain additional citizen input on the spending plan.  Following the 
public hearing, the City Council adopts a budget ordinance.  
 
Budget amendments are adopted by City Council on an as needed basis. 
 
The annual budget is adopted on a basis consistent with the basis of accounting as described in the 
Governmental Funds section on page 33. 

                        MONITORING OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 

Through the course of each fiscal year, the City Manager, Finance Director/City Recorder and 
department heads monitor the budget established by City Council.   
                                 


                                                     31 

 
                                     BUDGET CALENDAR 

Date           Responsible         Required Activity                         Reference     Status 
               Party 

January        City Manager        Obtain City Council input on FY 13         
                                   budget goals 
January 3­     Assistant City      Review performance measures and            
18             Manager             benchmarking with DH 
January 3­     City Manager        Review CIP request with DH                 
18             Assistant CM 
January 13     City Manager        Distribute budget calendar                 
January 17     Assistant City      Review of performance measures with        
               Manager             Department heads 
February 1     Finance Director    Distribute non‐city agency funding         
                                   request forms 
March 5        City Manager        Distribute Budget Instructions             
               Finance Director    Distribute Budget Worksheets 
March 26       Department          Submit Requested budget forms and          
               heads               list of goals to City Manager 
March 26­      City Manager        Input of departmental budget requests      
April 1        Finance Director 
March 30       Non‐city            Submit non‐city agency requests for        
               Agencies            funding 
Early April    City Manager        City Manager review of budget requests     
                
April 9­20     City Manager        Budget Review sessions with                
               Finance Director    department heads 
April 16       City Manager        Finalize revenue estimates and Risk        
               Finance Director    Mgmt estimates 
May 15         City Manager        Submit to Council the assessment of       Charter 
                                   taxable property in the City as           Section 83 
                                   determined by Assessor 
May 15         City Manager        Deadline to submit tentative budget to    Charter 
                                   City Council                              Section 74 
May 16­25      City Council        Budget and CIP Review Sessions             
May 27         City Manager        Budget Advertised in newspaper            Charter 
                                                                             Section 76 
June 7         City Council        Budget Public Hearing and First            
                                   Reading of Tax Rate Ordinance and 
                                   Appropriation Ordinance 
June 14        City Council        Second Reading of Ordinances               
June 21        City Council        Third Reading of Ordinances                
July 1         City Council        Start of FY 13                            Charter 
                                                                             Section 73 



                                                32 

 
                                                 FUND OVERVIEW 



                                                                       ALL 
                                                                      FUNDS



                                 Major                                  Proprietary        Fiduciary        Internal 
                              Governmental                                Funds              Funds        Service Fund
                                 Funds
                                                                              Water and        Pension 
    General        Special     City Schools      Debt                          Sewer                           Fleet 
                                                          Capital                               Fund
     Fund         Revenue          Fund         Service                                                       Services
                                                          Projects 
                   Funds                                   Fund               Murfreesboro 
                                                                                Electric    School Trust 
                                                                                                                Risk 
         State Street                                                                                        Management
             Aid             Drug                           TML Fund
                         Enforcement                                          Stormwater
                                                                                                              Insurance
            School                                          Gateway 
                         Extended                                             Cemetery
         Federal and      School 
             State       Program
           Projects

           School         Community 
          Cafeteria      Development


                                                                                                                           

                                               FUND DESCRIPTIONS 

A fund is established to account for a specific activity or purpose. Law mandates the creation 
of some funds. Other funds are established by management to demonstrate financial 
compliance with budget or legal requirements. All of the funds of the City of Murfreesboro 
can be divided into three categories: governmental funds, proprietary funds, and fiduciary 
funds. 

                                               GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS 

Governmental funds are used to account for most of the City's basic services.  Governmental fund 
information is useful in determining whether there are more or fewer financial resources that can be 
spent in the near future to finance the City's programs. The City of Murfreesboro maintains twenty‐nine 
(29) individual governmental funds.  The modified accrual accounting method is used to account for the 
City’s general government operations.  This accounting method measures cash and all other financial 
assets that can be readily converted into cash. 
 
Murfreesboro City Schools prepares a separate budget document.  While funds are appropriated by City 
Council, they are not presented in this budget document. 
                                                     33 

 
                                         PROPRIETARY FUNDS 

There are two types of proprietary funds: enterprise funds and internal service funds. 
 
Enterprise funds are used to account for operations that are financed and operated in a manner similar 
to private business enterprises. The City's water and sewer department and electric department are the 
largest of these funds and prepare their own budget documents.  While funds are appropriated by City 
Council, these enterprise funds are not presented in this document. 
 
Internal service funds are used to account for activities that provide supplies and services for the City's 
other programs and activities. These services predominantly benefit governmental functions such as the 
fleet maintenance of vehicles and for its self‐insurance programs.  
 

                                          FIDUCIARY FUNDS 

Fiduciary funds are used to account for resources held for the benefit of parties outside of the 
government. The resources of those funds are not available to support the City's own programs. The 
accounting used for fiduciary funds is much like that used for proprietary funds.  The Pension Fund is 
accounted for in this category. 
 

 

                                  




                                                    34 

 
                              CAPITAL BUDGET SUMMARY 

The debt funded capital improvements shown in the operating budgets for Fiscal Year 2012‐2013 are 
items included in the Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) for Fiscal Years 2012‐2016(the CIP is available on 
the City’s website, www.murfreesborotn.gov).  Projects listed beyond the current year of the CIP are not 
definite and may change as the plan is updated.  Only the items for the current year are approved as 
part of the annual operating budget.    

All capital funded by current income or grants are included in the operating budget for the various 
departments.  Maintenance and staffing impacts associated with requested projects are considered 
during the development of the operating budget.  Normal replacements of items less than $25,000 are 
not included in the capital budget summary. 

Brief descriptions of each capital expenditure included in the Fiscal 2012‐2013 budget are included 
below.  Funding amounts apply to only the FY 2013 year.  Anticipated operating budget impacts for 
staffing and maintenance associated with each project are noted. 

GENERAL FUND CAPITAL PROJECTS 

    1. The addition of a second non‐linear video editor in the Communications Department will 
       provide enhanced capability for the preparation of digital video material.  This machine is 
       budgeted at $24,900 and has no impact on staffing or operating costs. 
        
    2. The City Court office handles thousands of customer contacts annually.  The renovation of the 
       front counter space where employees meet the public is budgeted at $24,000.  No additional 
       staffing is required and a more convenient and pleasant environment for the public will result. 
        
    3. The Police Department is funded at a total of $420,900 for capital items from current General 
       Fund revenues.  Among the equipment fundedis; the conversion of the Computer Aided 
       Dispatch (CAD), mobile messaging ,text  and data to a virtual server at a cost of $150,000; the 
       replacement of twenty (20) aging computers in the Communications Center at an investment of 
       $63,000; the purchase of over $65,000 in equipment for the Criminal Investigations Division 
       (CID) including forensic lights, portable communications equipment, special drying cabinets  and 
       other equipment to upgrade the capabilities of CID; the funding of $57,500 to support an 
       additional wireless access point for the download of information from patrol cars and additional 
       storage capacity for the video camera systems.  There are no additional positions required to 
       support these equipment purchases and the increase to operating costs are minimal. 
        
    4. Fire & Rescue has $113,600 for the addition of lighted signs to all ten existing fire stations and 
       for the continued remodeling of older stations.  No additional maintenance expense or staffing 
       is anticipated from this project. 
        
        
    5. Building and Codes has budgeted $7,500 for equipping inspectors with tablet computers and 
       mobile print devices, enabling them to be more efficient while working in the field.  No 
       additional maintenance expense or staffing is anticipated from this project.  In a similar 
       efficiency investment, Planning and Engineering have budgeted for the purchase of eight tablet 

                                                   35 

 
         computers to provide inspectors in the field reporting capability and to move towards paperless 
         agendas for Planning Commission.  The anticipated investment is $8,200. 
          
          
    6.   Total capital funding for the Transportation Department is funded at $2,225,000 from a mix of 
         Federal, State and local dollars.  The largest purchase is the replacement of the Rover bus fleet 
         at an anticipated cost of $1,177,924.  Funding for the purchase is 80% Federal, 10% State and 
         10% local.  The maintenance expense of the aging fleet of Rover buses continued to escalate.  
         First year savings from the new buses in fleet maintenance are projected to be $52,000, with 
         additional savings to occur in FY 2014.  An additional $300,000 Federal dollars from the 
         American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) will be used to equip the buses with a 
         Geographic Positioning System (GPS) and better communication devices. 
          
         The Transportation Department continues work on a transit terminal.  Funding at the 80% 
         Federal, 10% State and 10% local ratio in the amount of $487,900 has been budgeted to 
         complete the preliminary engineering and architectural design of the new bus station.  
         Completion of the bus terminal construction is anticipated in FY 2015 and will require additional 
         expenditures for maintenance, utilities and supplies.  Staffing is as yet undetermined, but the 
         addition of personnel is expected. 
          
         ARRA funding in the amount of $179,300 is budgeted for use in preparing additional transit 
         shelters, benches and other amenities for the users of the Rover buses. 
          
    7.   Street Department capital funding in the amount of $102,072 is budgeted for the replacement 
         of five Street Department pickup trucks of various weights and cab configurations.  Fleet 
         maintenance data identified the replacement of these vehicles as a priority.  Maintenance 
         expense is projected to decline in future budgets.  No change in staffing is anticipated from the 
         replacement of these vehicles.  Similarly, three pickup trucks are budgeted for replacement in 
         the Solid Waste Department at an investment of $55,000.  Urban Environmental and the Civic 
         Plaza budgets each propose the replacement of pickup trucks at a budget of $24,300 each.  Both 
         Urban Environmental and Civic Plaza also budget for the purchase of vacuum baggers at a price 
         of $3,400 each. 
          
          
    8.   Funding of $1,910,750 is included in the State Street Aid Fund for annual repaving and 
         maintenance to the City’s system of streets and roads.  This budget increased $135,745 from the 
         previous year and all funding is derived by the State Shared Fuel Tax allocation.  The work is 
         performed by contract and does not impact the operating budget staffing. 
          
          
    9.   The Parks and Recreation Department budget has funding to acquire the land and to construct 
         Phase IV of Stones River Greenway.  This approximately 3 mile segment will complete the 
         linkage to Barfield Crescent Park from State Highway 99 and is estimated at a cost of 
         $4,750,000.  Funding for the project is 80% Federal from an Enhancement grant and a 20% local 
         match from borrowed funds.  The City funding is included in the Debt Service Fund as part of the 
         2012 Bond Fund financing.  No increase in staffing or maintenance expense is included in the FY 

                                                    36 

 
          2013 budget, although long term, the increased amount of paved path will increase the City’s 
          repaving expense. 
           
    10.   Additionally, the Parks and Recreation Department has approximately $208,000 for normal 
          replacement of equipment and the addition of new equipment.  Some $31,000 is budgeted for 
          the replacement of computer and computer related equipment and the expansion of Wi Fi 
          service in the park facilities.  No additional maintenance expense or staffing is anticipated from 
          these purchases. 
           
    11.   The Old Fort Golf Course is planning the use of $52,000 dollars to repair and seal the parking lots 
          and cart paths. The purchase of two fans for air circulation around golf course greens is 
          budgeted at a $17,500 investment.  An additional $30,000 is planned for purchase of small items 
          of equipment for use in golf course maintenance or the kitchen area of the clubhouse.  No 
          increase in operating costs or staffing is anticipated from the purchase. 
           
    12.   The use of the City’s entitlement Federal Vision 100 funds at Murfreesboro Municipal Airport 
          will be utilized to assist with funding for the design of a pavement overlay of the runway, 
          taxiway, and ramp ($62,000).  An additional $100,000 in capital funds will be used to replace the 
          roofs on a number of hangars.  These 90% Federal funds require a match of approximately 
          $10,000 local dollars from airport revenues.  An additional $15,000 is planned for the purchase 
          of an aircraft tug, utilizing 75% Federal funding and a 25% local match.  No increases in 
          operating costs or staffing are anticipated. 
           
    13.   Fleet Services has $44,000 budgeted for the purchase of a new vehicle lift designed for larger, 
          heavier equipment ($18,965), diagnostic computers for vehicles ($17,700) and the normal 
          replacement of equipment and computers.  No increases in operating costs or staffing are 
          anticipated. 
           
    14.   The Capital Improvement Fund has the following capital projects included in its expenditures: 
           
               a. State FasTrack Infrastructure Development and private funds of $1,820,000 are 
                   projected in FY 2013 capital to complete the site work and street improvements to serve 
                   Amazon's new distribution center.  Approximately $6,650,000 has been spent in the 
                   current year to improve City streets with turn lanes and traffic signals to better facilitate 
                   truck traffic on Joe B. Jackson Parkway, the extension of sanitary sewer service and site 
                   grading and drainage for the 1 million square foot building (Total project costs are 
                   $8,470,000).  There are no budgeted increases for maintenance, but long term the 
                   additional paving will add to the annual repaving costs. 
           
               b. The improvements to Middle Tennessee Boulevard between Main Street and Greenland 
                   Avenue are entering the right‐of‐way acquisition phase.  A total of $850,000 is budgeted 
                   to begin the purchase of property.  These are 80% Federal transportation dollars 
                   ($680,000) matched with 20% local funding ($170,000) obtained in‐kind from Middle 
                   Tennessee State University.  Construction is planned to begin in the FY 2012‐2013 
                   budget.  Increases in future street maintenance is anticipated from this widening and 
                   aesthetic improvement to Middle Tennessee Boulevard. 
           
                                                         37 

 
        c. The extension of Cherry Lane is designed as a five‐lane connector between State Route 
           840 and Memorial Boulevard (US 231) and includes an interchange at State Route 840.  
           Total costs of the project over the next five years are $29,915,000, of which $25,263,000 
           is local funding from bond proceeds or current City funds.  For Fiscal Year 2013, 
           engineering expense of $2,415, 000 is budgeted from $1,932,000 Federal highway 
           dollars and $483,000 in local match.  Increases in future street maintenance is 
           anticipated from this widening and aesthetic improvement to Cherry Lane. 
     
        d. Bradyville Pike (State Route 99) is planned for a 2.1 mile widening project, improving the 
           current two lane profile to a three lane section with sidewalks, bike lanes and 
           permanent transit shelters.  Total cost of the project is estimated at $7,378,400, of 
           which the City’s contribution is only $366,880.  For Fiscal Year 2013, engineering and 
           design expense of $554, 400 is included in the budget.  This amount is funded by 75% 
           Federal and 25% local matching dollars.  Increases in future street maintenance is 
           anticipated from this widening and aesthetic improvement to Bradyville Pike. 
     
        e. Murfreesboro City Schools has received $2,000,000 in 0% interest loans for energy 
           improvements at three City elementary schools.  While the City School budget is not 
           part of this document, the loan proceeds have been granted in the City’s name and the 
           approximately $700,000 in projected improvements appears in the City’s Capital 
           Improvement program.  No increases in operating costs or staffing are anticipated in the 
           City’s budget, although significant reductions in utility costs are expected for City 
           Schools. 

                             




                                               38 

 
                             CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL OVERVIEW 

                                                                   ALL FUNDS 
                                                              2012/2013 FUND SUMMARIES
                                       Projected Beg              Total                    Total      Projected Ending                         Change
                                       Fund Balance             Budgeted                Budgeted           Fund Balance                             In              Change as
                                          7/1/2012              Revenues             Expenditures            6/30/2012                          Dollars             Percentage
TOTAL GENERAL FUND                           48,675,528 $      
                                     $                          112,050,683        $      
                                                                                         117,311,137 $            43,415,074           $         (5,260,454)             ‐10.81%
DEBT SERVICE FUND                    $          3,939,289        26,851,609                                             939,289
                                                                                           29,851,609                                            (3,000,000)
                                                                                                                                                                         ‐76.16%
STATE STREET AID FUND                $          1,583,145          2,830,750                2,830,750                1,583,145                                ‐
                                                                                                                                                                           0.00%
AIRPORT FUND                         $             367,521         1,495,968                                            314,914
                                                                                            1,548,575                                                  (52,607)          ‐14.31%
DRUG FUND                            $             342,528           232,000                                            344,553
                                                                                              229,975                                                     2,025
                                                                                                                                                                           0.59%
CAPITAL IMPROV. & CONT. FUND         $          4,530,760          8,562,722                8,193,306                4,900,176                       369,416
                                                                                                                                                                           8.15%
COMMUNITY DEV. FUND                  $                       83      846,535                                                      83
                                                                                              846,535                                                         ‐
                                                                                                                                                                           0.00%
GATEWAY PROJECT FUND                 $         (1,103,980)                                     30,000               (1,133,980)                        (30,000)            2.72%
TML LOAN FUNDS                               19,193,194
                                     $                           44,680,560                40,908,770              22,964,984                      3,771,790              19.65%
INSURANCE FUND                       $          2,800,254        12,673,660                12,673,660                2,800,254                                ‐
                                                                                                                                                                           0.00%
RISK MANAGEMENT FUND                 $          2,870,007          4,102,346                4,102,346                2,870,007                                ‐
                                                                                                                                                                           0.00%
FLEET SERVICES FUND                  $             105,335         2,305,079                                            131,279
                                                                                            2,279,135                                                   25,944            24.63%

GRAND TOTALS                                   83,303,664            216,631,912           220,805,798                  79,129,778               (4,173,886)              ‐5.01%  
 
 
                                          Revenue Sources In Total
                                                  2012-2013
                                            City of Murfreesboro

                                   State of          Federal               Local             Transfers              Other                  Issuance
Fund                              Tennessee        Government              Taxes                 In                Sources                  of Debt                   Total

General Fund                      $ 11,170,835     $ 7,280,957        $ 77,440,573         $ 2,850,114         $ 13,308,204                                       $ 112,050,683
Debt Service Fund                                                                           26,851,609                                                               26,851,609
State Street Aid Fund                2,830,000                                                                          750                                           2,830,750
Airport Improvement Fund                13,000              163,625                                               1,319,343                                           1,495,968
Drug Fund                                                                                          90,000           142,000                                             232,000
Insurance Fund                                                                                                   12,673,660                                          12,673,660
Risk Management Fund                                                                                              4,102,346                                           4,102,346
Fleet Service Fund                                                                                                2,305,079                                           2,305,079
Community Development Fund                               821,535                                                     25,000                                             846,535
Capital Improvement Projects Fund    2,300,000         5,672,806                                                    589,916                                           8,562,722
Gateway Fund                                                                                                            -                                                   -
TML/Bond Fund                                                                                                       354,210            $    44,326,350               44,680,560
   Total Revenue from Sources $ 16,313,835         $ 13,938,923       $ 77,440,573         $ 29,791,723        $ 34,820,508            $    44,326,350            $ 216,631,912     
 
 
                                                                                




                                                                             39 

 
                                              Expenditures In Total
                                                    2012-2013
                                              City of Murfreesboro

                                     Personnel      Operating           Capital      Transfers
Fund                                   Costs         Costs             Expenses         Out            Other           Total

General Fund                        $ 55,621,993   $ 20,673,065    $    8,264,703   $ 31,039,925   $   1,711,451   $ 117,311,137
Debt Service Fund                                    26,628,676                        3,222,933                      29,851,609
State Street Aid Fund                                 2,830,750                                                        2,830,750
Airport Improvement Fund                 194,953        994,372           118,000       241,250                        1,548,575
Drug Fund                                 90,000        137,475             2,500                                        229,975
Insurance Fund                                       12,673,660                                                       12,673,660
Risk Management Fund                     275,787      3,823,559             3,000                                      4,102,346
Fleet Service Fund                       910,652      1,324,483            44,000                                      2,279,135
Community Development Fund               198,434        648,101                                                          846,535
Capital Improvement Projects Fund                     8,193,306                                                        8,193,306
Gateway Fund                                             30,000                                                           30,000
TML/Bond Fund                                                        40,596,560          312,210                      40,908,770
   Total Expenditures by Sources    $ 57,291,819   $ 77,957,448    $ 49,028,763     $ 34,816,318   $   1,711,451   $ 220,805,799




                                                             40 

 
                                                             Consolidated Fund Summary

                                                       FY 2009‐10        FY 2010‐11       FY 2011‐12       FY 2011‐12       FY 2012‐13      Budgeted
                                                         Actual            Actual           Budget          Estimated         Budget        Increase
                                                                                                                                           (Decrease)
GENERAL FUND:

Beginning Fund Balance                                    46,998,957      49,248,735        48,451,934      48,451,934        48,675,528
Accounting Change ‐ See Note

     REVENUES
       Property Tax                                      34,013,255       34,799,508        35,593,323      35,349,355       35,735,992        142,669
       Property Tax Equivalents                             948,820          861,544           635,057         635,916          631,205         (3,852)
       Local Option Sales Tax                            27,903,293       29,732,214        30,155,057      32,060,832       32,989,408      2,834,351
       Other Local Taxes                                  6,834,134        7,807,050         7,289,740       7,998,890        8,083,968        794,228
       Licenses, Permits, Fines                           4,407,336        3,430,795         3,961,950       4,478,724        4,541,000        579,050
       Charges for Services                                 995,423        1,022,296         3,477,747       1,085,649        1,086,600     (2,391,147)
       Charges for Services‐Parks                         6,669,928        1,513,995         1,252,737       1,290,000        1,298,637         45,900
       Charges for Services‐Public Golf                   1,764,295        1,790,476         1,929,172       1,857,972        1,920,974         (8,198)
       Charges for Services‐Senior Citizens                 923,436          183,328           375,020         123,914          142,500       (232,520)
       Charges for Services‐Solid Waste                   5,044,474           42,255            20,500          16,900           20,500              0
       Intergovernmental‐County                              67,963          256,540         1,299,267         251,996          273,459     (1,025,808)
       Intergovernmental‐County‐Parks                        96,000          108,995           100,000         105,000          105,000          5,000
       State Sales Tax Allocation                         6,434,388        6,714,432         7,031,010       7,230,062        7,519,264        488,254
       Intergovernmental‐Other State                      3,190,823        3,280,513         3,704,698       3,631,612        3,651,571        (53,127)
       Intergovernmental‐Federal                          2,367,852        2,799,330         3,341,495       1,927,079        2,530,957       (810,538)
       Intergovernmental‐Federal‐Parks                      715,207          518,884         2,247,274       1,000,000        4,750,000      2,502,726
       Miscellaneous revenues                             1,450,161        1,855,638         1,522,109       1,401,891        1,145,357       (376,752)
     Miscellaneous revenues ‐ Cable Franchise Fee         1,292,661        1,318,497         1,285,000       1,319,000        1,320,000         35,000
     Transfers from Other Funds                           3,642,684        3,773,494         4,322,578       4,158,886        4,304,291        (18,287)
                                                        108,762,133      101,809,784       109,543,734     105,923,678      112,050,683      2,506,949

     EXPENDITURES
        General Administrative                             4,542,623        4,984,439        4,859,420       4,729,746         4,186,746      (672,674)
        Information Technology                                                               1,067,402         836,799         1,171,576       104,174
        Communications                                       423,660         454,276           832,541         566,816           680,973      (151,568)
        Legal                                                681,668         750,236           764,698         778,924           816,187        51,489
        Human Resources                                      646,870         858,324           765,216         760,018           847,720        82,504
        Judicial                                             351,734         365,072           455,318         394,840           446,668        (8,650)
        Police                                            20,173,990      21,879,339        22,916,155      22,862,004        25,119,392     2,203,237
        Fire                                              13,316,531      14,023,025        14,501,195      14,184,635        15,348,699       847,504
        Building and Codes                                 1,700,106       1,666,961         1,752,468       1,711,478         1,719,422       (33,046)
        Planning and Engineering                           1,705,063       1,735,966         2,496,788       1,716,005         1,775,515      (721,273)
        Transportation                                     3,135,125       3,271,637         3,023,997       2,079,850         4,369,613     1,345,616
        Street                                             3,853,160       4,344,773         4,431,134       4,176,660         4,199,744      (231,390)
        Urban Environmental                                  909,214         926,237           951,565         898,101         1,030,820        79,255
        Civic Plaza                                           55,526          76,043            88,220          82,070           109,909        21,689
        Parking Garage                                       110,049         109,960           110,875         114,087           116,975         6,100
        Recreation                                         7,435,129       7,606,358        10,359,924       9,044,689        13,243,702     2,883,778
        Fuel Department                                                                      2,923,537           9,875                 0    (2,923,537)
        Senior Citizens                                      880,682         861,004           949,617         894,599           946,360        (3,257)
        Golf ‐ Old Fort                                    1,432,520       1,514,312         1,897,799       1,809,869         1,718,119      (179,680)
        Golf ‐ VA                                            296,868         321,817           333,977         319,170           305,285       (28,692)
        Solid Waste                                        5,089,255       4,191,427         4,208,146       4,142,817         4,683,442       475,296
        Public Health & Welfare                            2,024,825       1,502,385         1,595,832       1,626,640         1,711,450       115,618
        Departmental Transfers                            36,060,123      29,765,951        31,052,801      30,262,801        31,039,925       (12,876)
        Miscellaneous                                      1,687,634       1,397,043         1,646,616       1,697,591         1,722,895        76,279

     Total Expenditures                                 106,512,355      102,606,585       113,985,241     105,700,084      117,311,137      3,325,896



Ending Fund Balance                                       49,248,735      48,451,934        44,010,427      48,675,528        43,415,074

Note: As a result of the clarification of governmental fund type definitions, the Solid Waste Fund, City Recreation Fund, Old Fort Golf Course Fund, 
Cable Television Fund and Senior Citizens Fund (formerly special revenue funds) have been reclassified to the General Fund.  A portion of the Capital 
Improvement and Contingency Fund was also reclassified to the General Fund.  The information for the funds effected by the accounting change has 
been presented along with General Fund information for FY 09‐10 for fund balance purposes.

                                                                         41 

 
 
                                                     FY 2009‐10     FY 2010‐11    FY 2011‐12    FY 2011‐12    FY 2012‐13     Budgeted
                                                       Actual         Actual        Budget      Estimated       Budget       Increase
                                                                                                                            (Decrease)
Debt Service Fund
          Beginning Fund Balance                        4,245,654     4,790,767     4,799,289     4,799,289     3,939,289     (860,000)

          Revenues
               Transfers from Other Funds              25,485,350    25,051,104    26,451,420    26,411,357    26,851,609     400,189
               Refunding Bonds Issued                  53,280,128             0             0             0             0           0
               Premium on Refunding                     5,305,469             0             0             0             0           0
               All Other                                   15,666         9,522             0             0             0           0

          Total Debt Service Fund Revenue              84,086,613    25,060,626    26,451,420    26,411,357    26,851,609     400,189



          Expenditures
               Principal Retirement                    18,275,160    17,646,836    22,578,307    22,561,641    23,041,767     463,460
               Refunded Debt                           58,172,776             0             0             0             0           0
               Interest                                 2,723,665     3,727,889     6,753,113     4,605,316     6,699,842     (53,271)
               Transfers to Other Funds                 3,832,468     3,568,050             0             0             0           0
               Issuance Cost and Fees                     537,431       109,329       120,000       104,400       110,000     (10,000)

          Total Debt Service Fund Expenditures         83,541,500    25,052,104    29,451,420    27,271,357    29,851,609     400,189

          Ending Fund Balance                           4,790,767     4,799,289     1,799,289     3,939,289       939,289     (860,000)



                                                     FY 2009‐10     FY 2010‐11    FY 2011‐12    FY 2011‐12    FY 2012‐13     Budgeted
                                                       Actual         Actual        Budget      Estimated       Budget       Increase
                                                                                                                            (Decrease)
State Street Aid Fund
          Beginning Fund Balance                        1,286,595     1,465,288     1,583,145     1,583,145     1,583,145            0
          Prior Period Adjustment                          33,285             0             0             0             0            0

          Revenues
               State Gasoline Tax Allocation            2,671,320     2,750,030     2,693,005     2,784,520     2,830,000     136,995
               Federal Funds                              458,665       116,332                                                     0
               All Other                                      723         9,218           750          750            750           0

          Total State Street Aid Fund Revenue           3,130,708     2,875,580     2,693,755     2,785,270     2,830,750     136,995


          Expenditures
               Street Paving                            1,597,584     1,633,209     1,725,005     1,815,270     1,860,750     135,745
               ARRA Project                               458,665       116,332                                                     0
               Street Markings                            154,671       259,354       180,000      180,000        180,000           0
               Curbs and Gutters                          111,463       191,929       140,000      140,000        140,000           0
               Storm Drainage                              98,895       175,636       140,000      140,000        140,000           0
               Surveys and Engineering                     52,562        58,053        80,000       80,000         80,000           0
               Other Streets Related                      511,460       323,210       428,750      430,000        430,000       1,250

          Total State Street Aid Fund Expenditures      2,985,300     2,757,723     2,693,755     2,785,270     2,830,750     136,995

          Ending Fund Balance                           1,465,288     1,583,145     1,583,145     1,583,145     1,583,145            0




                                                                    42 

 
                                                           FY 2009‐10     FY 2010‐11     FY 2011‐12    FY 2011‐12    FY 2012‐13     Budgeted
                                                             Actual         Actual         Budget      Estimated       Budget       Increase
                                                                                                                                   (Decrease)
Airport Fund
          Beginning Fund Balance                               249,937        299,110        351,686      351,686        367,521      15,835

          Revenues
               Rentals (Hangars, Terminals, etc.)              381,395        428,184        391,066      413,275        450,393       59,327
               Fuel Sales                                      749,190        875,015        741,584      924,000        867,000      125,416
               State & Federal Funds                           192,159         50,448        417,240      142,410        176,625     (240,615)
               Other Airport Revenue                             4,907          3,945          1,750        2,256          1,950          200

          Total Airport Fund Revenue                          1,327,651     1,357,592      1,551,640     1,481,941     1,495,968      (55,672)



          Expenditures
               Labor                                            123,558       129,731        135,095      134,100        155,056       19,961
               Operations and Maintenance                        23,648        26,038         22,600       31,500         27,800        5,200
               Building and Grounds                              33,362        40,320         65,000       64,500         65,000            0
               Roof Replacement                                0                    0              0            0        100,000      100,000
               Items for Resale, Related Rebates & Taxes        649,210       759,414        651,965      810,287        759,000      107,035
               Surveys and Studies                               21,004        36,903        320,000      117,389         62,000     (258,000)
               Transfer to Debt Service Fund                    322,978       190,725        190,725      190,725        241,250       50,525
               All Other                                        104,718       121,885        204,269      117,605        138,469      (65,800)

          Total Airport Fund Expenditures                     1,278,478     1,305,016      1,589,654     1,466,106     1,548,575      (41,079)

          Ending Fund Balance                                  299,110        351,686        313,672      367,521        314,914        1,242


                                                           FY 2009‐10     FY 2010‐11     FY 2011‐12    FY 2011‐12    FY 2012‐13     Budgeted
                                                             Actual         Actual         Budget      Estimated       Budget       Increase
                                                                                                                                   (Decrease)
Drug Enforcement Fund
          Beginning Fund Balance                               273,445        368,351        288,780      288,780        342,528      53,748

          Revenues
               Court Fines                                     113,428          93,659       100,000        90,000        90,000      (10,000)
               Court Fines from General Fund                   113,427          93,659        80,000        90,000        90,000       10,000
               Seizure Awards                                   74,985          42,325        50,000        45,000        50,000            0
               Other Drug Enforcement Revenue                   16,160          28,024        29,742         1,625         2,000      (27,742)

          Total Drug Enforcement Fund Revenue                  318,000        257,667        259,742      226,625        232,000      (27,742)



          Expenditures
               Labor ‐ Overtime & Court                         65,413         69,915         90,000        90,000        90,000            0
               Operations and Maintenance                       11,506          4,093          7,200         5,000         7,200            0
               Vehicles‐Fleet                                   14,735         15,856         15,117        11,500        15,000         (117)
               Utilities                                         8,529         11,239         13,400         9,450        11,700       (1,700)
               Cellular Telephones                              14,178         16,492         23,000        12,000        15,000       (8,000)
               Rent                                             55,200         27,600              0             0             0            0
               Training Personnel                                    0              0         20,000         3,315        10,000      (10,000)
               Undercover Operations                            42,000         43,000         80,000        20,000        70,000      (10,000)
               Capital                                           5,669        119,744          2,500        13,412         2,500            0
               All Other                                         5,864         29,299          8,525         8,200         8,575           50

          Total Drug Enforcement Fund Expenditures             223,094        337,238        259,742      172,877        229,975      (29,767)

          Ending Fund Balance                                  368,351        288,780        288,780      342,528        344,553      55,773



                                                                          43 

 
                                                           FY 2009‐10     FY 2010‐11       FY 2011‐12     FY 2011‐12    FY 2012‐13     Budgeted
                                                             Actual         Actual           Budget       Estimated       Budget       Increase
                                                                                                                                      (Decrease)
Community Development Fund
          Beginning Fund Balance                                18,540             83               83            83             83            0

          Revenues
               Community Development Block Grant                975,379       483,311          838,000       997,744        711,535     (126,465)
               Emergency Shelter Grant                          108,884       110,543          111,482       111,482        110,000       (1,482)
               Neighborhood Stabilization Program             1,421,689       219,793                0       118,973              0            0
               Murfreesboro Housing Authority ARRA Pass          69,949       389,064                0             0              0            0
               HOME Grant                                             0       156,804           60,000       230,372              0      (60,000)
               Other Federal Funds                              104,945        64,371                0             0              0            0
               Program Income                                    35,199       120,832           20,000        26,000         25,000        5,000

          Total Community Development Fund Revenue            2,716,045     1,544,718         1,029,482     1,484,571       846,535     (182,947)


          Expenditures
               Administration                                    97,580       135,319          117,600       129,401        131,229       13,629
               Housing Rehabilitation                            57,327       350,806          386,330       530,544        304,707      (81,623)
               Housing Assistance                               301,321       107,123          157,513       287,995        159,875        2,362
               Economic Development                               8,526        58,110          130,000       109,100         10,000     (120,000)
               Emergency Shelter Grant                          108,884       110,543          111,482       106,173        110,000       (1,482)
               Neighborhood Stabilization Program             1,421,689       219,793                0             0              0            0
               Murfreesboro Housing Authority ARRA Pass          69,949       389,064                0        90,801              0            0
               Street Improvements                              406,360           231                0             0              0            0
               All Other                                        262,866       173,729          126,557       230,557        130,724        4,167



          Total Community Development Fund Expenditu          2,734,502     1,544,718         1,029,482     1,484,571       846,535     (182,947)

          Ending Fund Balance                                        83            83                83            83            83             0
                                                           FY 2009‐10     FY 2010‐11       FY 2011‐12     FY 2011‐12    FY 2012‐13     Budgeted
                                                             Actual         Actual           Budget       Estimated       Budget       Increase
                                                                                                                                      (Decrease)
Capital Improvement Fund
          Beginning Fund Balance                              7,272,093     4,274,396         4,274,393     4,274,393     4,530,760      256,367
          Transferred Fund Balance to General Fund

          Revenues
               Federal Funds                                  2,378,778       897,605          840,000                                  (840,000)
               Federal Grants ‐ Road Projects                                                                 102,043     5,672,806    5,672,806
               State Grants ‐ Economic Development                                                          3,150,145     1,300,000    1,300,000
               School Energy Loan Proceeds                                                                  1,000,000     1,000,000    1,000,000
               Designated Contributions ‐ Match                                                             3,500,015       520,000      520,000
               Donations                                      1,941,617             0                0              0             0            0
               Transfer from General Fund                             0     1,668,932            9,600              0             0       (9,600)
               Transfer from School Fund                              0             0                0         15,781             0            0
               Other Capital Improvement Revenue                 65,496        53,964          200,400         69,916        69,916     (130,484)

          Total Capital Improvement Fund Revenue              4,385,891     2,620,501         1,050,000     7,837,900     8,562,722    7,512,722



          Expenditures
               Economic Development                                   0                                                                        0
               Capital Projects                               4,327,931     2,133,893         1,050,000                               (1,050,000)
               Road Project Expenditures                                                              0       102,043     5,672,806    5,672,806
               Economic Dev Expenditures                                                              0     6,650,160     1,820,000    1,820,000
               School Energy Project                                          486,611                 0       829,170       700,000      700,000
               Other Miscellaneous                                                                    0           160           500          500
               Transfer to Debt Service Fund                  3,055,657                0              0             0             0            0

          Total Capital Improvement Fund Expenditures         7,383,588     2,620,504         1,050,000     7,581,533     8,193,306    7,143,306

          Ending Fund Balance                                 4,274,396     4,274,393         4,274,393     4,530,760     4,900,176      625,783     
                                                                          44 

 
                                                  FY 2009‐10       FY 2010‐11     FY 2011‐12       FY 2011‐12     FY 2012‐13        Budgeted
                                                    Actual           Actual         Budget         Estimated        Budget          Increase
                                                                                                                                   (Decrease)
Gateway Fund
          Beginning Fund Balance                    (1,107,457)     (1,266,169)     (1,073,980)     (1,073,980)     (1,103,980)       (30,000)

          Revenues
               Land Sales                                      0       219,699                 0             0                 0            0

          Total Gateway Fund Revenue                           0       219,699                 0             0                 0            0


          Expenditures
               Capital Outlay                         158,712                 0             0                0              0               0
               Transfer to Debt Service Fund                0                 0             0                0              0               0
               Other Expenditures                           0            27,510        30,000           30,000         30,000

          Total Gateway Fund Expenditures             158,712            27,510        30,000           30,000         30,000               0

          Ending Fund Balance                       (1,266,169)     (1,073,980)     (1,103,980)     (1,103,980)     (1,133,980)       (30,000)


                                                  FY 2009‐10       FY 2010‐11     FY 2011‐12       FY 2011‐12     FY 2012‐13        Budgeted
                                                    Actual           Actual         Budget         Estimated        Budget          Increase
                                                                                                                                   (Decrease)
TML Bond Fund
          Beginning Fund Balance                      (53,164)     (10,094,778)    26,800,749       26,800,749     19,193,194      (7,607,555)
          Prior Period Adjustment                     148,156                0              0                0              0               0

          Revenues
               Federal Funds                            48,436               0              0                0              0               0
               Issuance of Debt                      8,146,753      52,474,806        626,590          599,550     44,326,350      43,699,760
               Miscellaneous                           844,897       1,107,126         54,263        1,607,859        354,210         299,947

          Total TML Bond Fund Revenue                9,040,086      53,581,932        680,853        2,207,409     44,680,560      43,999,707


          Expenditures
               Capital Outlay                       18,457,864      16,686,405     28,766,485        9,014,964     40,596,560      11,830,075
               Transfer to Debt Service Fund           771,992               0         23,000          800,000        312,210         289,210

          Total TML Bond  Fund Expenditures         19,229,856      16,686,405     28,789,485        9,814,964     40,908,770      12,119,285

          Ending Fund Balance                      (10,094,778)     26,800,749      (1,307,883)     19,193,194     22,964,984      24,272,867


                                                  FY 2009‐10       FY 2010‐11     FY 2011‐12       FY 2011‐12     FY 2012‐13        Budgeted
                                                    Actual           Actual         Budget         Estimated        Budget          Increase
                                                                                                                                   (Decrease)
Insurance Fund
          Beginning Fund Balance                     2,189,744       2,055,533      2,543,911        2,543,911      2,800,254        256,343

          Revenues
               Insurance Premiums‐City               8,636,965       9,459,011     10,392,190       10,305,337     10,366,581         (25,609)
               Insurance Premiums‐Employees          1,868,302       1,960,835      2,204,165        2,100,703      2,152,874         (51,291)
               Miscellaneous                           378,812         205,896        179,600          198,530        154,205         (25,395)

          Total Insurance Fund Revenue              10,884,079      11,625,742     12,775,955       12,604,570     12,673,660        (102,295)


          Expenditures
               Health Claims and Administration     11,018,290      11,137,364     12,775,955       12,348,227     12,673,660        (102,295)

          Total Insurance  Fund Expenditures        11,018,290      11,137,364     12,775,955       12,348,227     12,673,660        (102,295)

          Ending Fund Balance                        2,055,533       2,543,911      2,543,911        2,800,254      2,800,254        256,343

                                                                   45 

 
                                                        FY 2009‐10     FY 2010‐11    FY 2011‐12    FY 2011‐12    FY 2012‐13     Budgeted
                                                          Actual         Actual        Budget      Estimated       Budget       Increase
                                                                                                                               (Decrease)
Risk Management Fund
          Beginning Fund Balance                           3,717,746     3,575,684     3,665,441     3,665,441     2,870,007     (795,434)

          Revenues
               Insurance Premiums‐City                     3,498,735     3,567,658     3,939,150     3,196,253     4,096,881     157,731
               Miscellaneous                                  33,380        38,493        31,500        61,465         5,465     (26,035)

          Total Risk Management Fund Revenue               3,532,115     3,606,151     3,970,650     3,257,718     4,102,346     131,696


          Expenditures
               Claims and Administrative Expenditures      2,908,785     2,659,227     2,825,583     2,959,497     2,818,812      (6,771)
               Labor                                         198,126       202,883       208,415       208,415       214,217       5,802
               Transfer to Other Funds                       471,152       552,966       546,698       546,698       599,991      53,293
               Excess Workers' Compensation Coverage               0             0       256,496       256,496       256,496           0
               Other Risk Management Expenditures             96,114       101,318       133,458        82,046       212,830      79,372

          Total Risk Management  Fund Expenditures         3,674,177     3,516,394     3,970,650     4,053,152     4,102,346     131,696

          Ending Fund Balance                              3,575,684     3,665,441     3,665,441     2,870,007     2,870,007     (795,434)


                                                        FY 2009‐10     FY 2010‐11    FY 2011‐12    FY 2011‐12    FY 2012‐13     Budgeted
                                                          Actual         Actual        Budget      Estimated       Budget       Increase
                                                                                                                               (Decrease)
Fleet Services Fund
          Beginning Fund Balance                            154,543        150,216       175,954      175,954        105,335      (70,619)

          Revenues
               Charges for Services                        1,811,181     2,126,835     2,250,788     2,122,999     2,305,079      54,291
               Miscellaneous                                     765         3,803         1,000         1,000             0      (1,000)

          Total Fleet Services Fund Revenue                1,811,946     2,130,638     2,251,788     2,123,999     2,305,079      53,291



          Expenditures
               Labor                                        548,357        572,034       595,471       595,471       607,204      11,733
               Health Insurance                             103,981        117,132       134,725       135,111       133,212      (1,513)
               Parts and Lubricants                         870,119      1,130,055     1,174,964     1,150,000     1,175,000          36
               Other Risk Management Expenditures           293,816        285,680       346,628       314,036       363,719      17,091

          Total Fleet Services  Fund Expenditures          1,816,273     2,104,900     2,251,788     2,194,618     2,279,135      27,347

          Ending Fund Balance                               150,216        175,954       175,954      105,335        131,279      (44,675)




                                                                       46 

 
                                           GENERAL FUND  

                         GENERAL FUND REVENUE LINE ITEM DETAIL 

                                   2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                   GENERAL FUND REVENUE

                                    2009/2010    2010/2011     2011/2012     2011/2012     2012/2013      INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                         ACTUAL       ACTUAL       BUDGET        ESTIMATE      BUDGET        (DECREASE)

REVENUES
REAL-PERSONAL                       33,270,022    34,077,696    34,871,523    34,562,010    34,983,339       111,816
PUBLIC UTILITY                         743,233       721,812       721,800       787,345       752,653        30,853
TOTAL PROPERTY TAX REVENUE          34,013,255    34,799,508    35,593,323    35,349,355    35,735,992       142,669

TAX EQUIVALENTS:
  HOUSING AUTHORITY                     80,015       93,197        93,197        89,345        89,345         (3,852)
  OTHER EQUIVALENTS                    868,805      768,347       541,860       546,571       541,860              0
RECOVERY OF RESERVED TAXES             512,108      491,359       450,000       450,000       450,000              0
PENALTY & INTEREST ON TAXES            246,355      269,499       200,000       276,000       225,000         25,000
OTHER LOCAL TAXES:
  LOCAL SALES TAX                   27,903,293    29,732,214    30,155,057    32,060,832    32,989,408      2,834,351
  LOCAL BEER TAX                     2,770,148     2,912,207     2,905,266     3,082,725     3,175,207        269,941
  LOCAL LIQUOR TAX                     735,816       793,004       753,474       841,030       866,261        112,787
  GROSS RECEIPTS TAX                 1,734,417     2,430,274     2,045,000     2,388,000     2,360,000        315,000
  BEER PRIVILEGE TAX                    29,705        27,037        26,000        26,900        26,500            500
  LIQUOR PRIVILEGE TAX                  58,062        61,284        60,000        63,875        61,000          1,000
  HOTEL-MOTEL TAX                      747,523       822,386       850,000       870,360       920,000         70,000
                                    35,686,247    38,400,808    38,079,854    40,695,638    41,704,581      3,624,727
LICENSES, PERMITS & FINES:
   ELECTRICAL LICENSE                   70,430        67,880        70,000        65,155        66,000        (4,000)
   GAS LICENSE                           5,690         6,670         7,000         7,060         7,000             0
   BUILDING PERMITS                  1,185,579       855,936       790,000     1,117,818     1,200,000       410,000
   PLUMBING PERMITS                     97,964        61,673        60,000        76,170        76,000        16,000
   ELECTRICAL PERMIT FEES              229,400       179,170       170,000       180,950       180,000        10,000
   MECHANICAL PERMITS                  125,625        78,164        60,000        63,149        65,000         5,000
   GAS PERMITS                          15,315        12,625        14,000        16,135        17,000         3,000
   LAND DISTURBANCE PERMIT              18,350        16,250        17,000        26,800        26,000         9,000
   FIREWORKS PERMITS                     8,500         8,000         1,000         5,000         5,000         4,000
   BEER PERMITS                         16,880        14,100        12,000        12,000        12,000             0
   BURGLAR ALARM PERMITS                53,315        55,360        54,000        48,600        54,000             0
   PLAT REVIEW FEE                      37,357        46,077        36,000        60,000        42,000         6,000
   G.I.S. FEES                           1,685         1,196         1,000           500           500          (500)
   ATTORNEY TAX FEES                    26,818        29,528        15,000        37,000        25,000        10,000
   COURT FINES                       1,620,133     1,448,253     1,700,000     2,000,000     1,900,000       200,000
    COURT FINES-RED LIGHT CAMERA       736,131       434,637       856,200       655,050       760,000       (96,200)
    COURT FINES - DRUG FUND            113,428        93,659        80,000        90,000        90,000        10,000
    BURGLAR FALSE ALARM FEES            27,989        17,485        15,000        16,452        15,000             0
    RECORDING FEE                       16,747         4,132         3,750           885           500        (3,250)
                                     4,407,336     3,430,795     3,961,950     4,478,724     4,541,000       579,050  


                                                       47 

 
                                   2012 - 2013 PROPOSED BUDGET
                                   GENERAL FUND REVENUE

                                    2009/2010    2010/2011     2011/2012     2011/2012     2012/2013      INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                         ACTUAL       ACTUAL       BUDGET        ESTIMATE      BUDGET        (DECREASE)
CHARGES FOR SERVICES:
  OFFICE SERVICE CHARGES                   279          470            300        1,050           500             200
  PLANNING DEPT. SERVICE CHGS           29,778       29,246         36,000       22,000        30,000          (6,000)
  PUBLIC TRANSIT FARES                  86,498      101,016         98,000      121,300       124,000          26,000
  POLICE DEPT. SERVICE CHGS             13,270       14,858         12,000       16,476        14,000           2,000
  FIRE DEPT. SERVICE CHGS              767,033      795,622        829,820      825,000       825,000          (4,820)
  STREET DEPT. SERVICE CHGS             38,813       31,284         29,000       36,000        29,000               0
  STREET DEPT-SUBDIVISION PAVING                                   428,290                                   (428,290)
  BUILDING DEPT. SERVICE CHGS           31,417        24,386        24,000        25,723        26,000          2,000
  URBAN ENVIRON. SERVICE CHGS            3,335             0         5,000         5,000         5,000              0
  CABLE TV                                 708           505             0           100           100            100
  RECREATION SERVICE CHARGES         1,117,726     1,513,995     1,252,737     1,290,000     1,298,637         45,900
  PUBLIC GOLF SERVICE CHARGES        1,761,482     1,790,476     1,929,172     1,857,972     1,920,974         (8,198)
  SOLID WASTE SERVICE CHARGES           40,747        42,255        20,500        16,900        20,500              0
  FUEL DEPT CHARGES                                              1,981,937             0             0     (1,981,937)
  SR CITIZENS SERVICE CHARGES          205,703       183,328       161,020       123,914       142,500        (18,520)
  G.I.S. MAINTENANCE                    25,000        24,909        33,000        33,000        33,000              0
                                     4,121,789     4,552,350     6,840,776     4,374,435     4,469,211     (2,371,565)

INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVENUES:
REVENUE FROM COUNTY:
   MAINT. COURT HOUSE CIRCLE             8,000       12,000        12,000        12,000        12,000               0
   MAINTENANCE CIVIC PLAZA              22,964       29,366        36,611        34,059        45,612           9,001
   MAINTENANCE PARKING GARAGE           34,666       36,260        34,926        35,937        36,847           1,921
    REC-HOTEL/MOTEL TAX                 96,000      108,995        100,000      105,000       105,000           5,000
    FUEL SALES                               0                   1,036,730            0             0      (1,036,730)
    SENIOR CITIZENS                    155,000      155,000       155,000       155,000       155,000             -
  DISPATCHER TRAINING                    2,333       23,914        24,000        15,000        24,000                 0
REVENUE FROM STATE GOVT:
  STATE SALES TAX ALLOCATION         6,434,388     6,714,432     7,031,010     7,230,062     7,519,264        488,254
  STATE BEER TAX ALLOCATION             49,841        52,469        52,865        56,775        56,000          3,135
  MIXED DRINK TAX                      588,972       658,590       669,500       662,350       666,350         (3,150)
  TVA GROSS RECEIPTS TAX             1,107,309     1,132,786     1,203,920     1,257,600     1,295,400         91,480
  STATE INCOME TAX ALLOCATION          580,453       587,087       565,000       581,163       580,000         15,000
  STATE EXCISE TAX                      83,185        32,890        34,150        29,157        30,000         (4,150)
  STREET & TRANSPORTATION              215,951       216,483       222,950       222,640       224,000          1,050
  STATE TELECOMM-SALES TAX               8,726         6,535         8,000         6,300         6,500         (1,500)
  STATE HIGHWAY MAINTENANCE            277,288       277,288       277,288       277,288       277,288              0
  PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION GRANT          245,876       251,233       339,264       292,086       464,780        125,516
  RECREATION GRANTS                     33,544        40,457       235,653       235,653        40,653       (195,000)
  SENIOR CITIZEN GRANTS                 10,600        11,100        10,600        10,600        10,600              0
  OTHER STATE FUNDS & GRANTS            33,349        13,595        85,508             0             0        (85,508)
REVENUE FROM FEDERAL GOVT.:
  PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION GRANT          679,750      807,754      1,007,969      738,432      2,196,957      1,188,988
  PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION - ARRA       1,321,896      312,768        616,271       84,774              0       (616,271)
  JAG GRANTS                            29,919      130,775         46,566       46,567         84,500         37,934
  JAG GRANTS - ARRA                    188,061        3,922
  POLICE - CADCOR GRANT                                           225,000       225,000       225,000               0
  EECBG GRANT - ARRA                    49,591       206,054      811,509       719,206             0        (811,509)
  CCTV GRANT - ARRA                          0       982,267
  FIRE GRANTS                                0        77,007        86,640        88,600             0        (86,640)
  RECREATION GREENWAY GRANTS           715,207       518,884     2,247,274     1,000,000     4,750,000      2,502,726
  SENIOR CITIZEN GRANTS                 24,800        26,194        24,500        24,500        24,500              0
  OTHER GRANTS                         100,911       252,589       523,040             0             0       (523,040)
                                    13,098,580    13,678,694    17,723,744    14,145,749    18,830,251      1,106,507




                                                        48 

 
                                     2012 - 2013 PROPOSED BUDGET
                                     GENERAL FUND REVENUE

                                      2009/2010    2010/2011     2011/2012     2011/2012     2012/2013      INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                           ACTUAL       ACTUAL       BUDGET        ESTIMATE      BUDGET        (DECREASE)
MISCELLANEOUS REVENUE:
   INTEREST                              153,748      132,288         95,000        49,400        36,850        (58,150)
   COUNTY SHARED BONDS                                                     0       102,722             0              0
   GAS FRANCHISE TAX                   1,146,810     1,062,290     1,105,000       883,400       925,000       (180,000)
   CABLE FRANCHISE FEE                 1,275,656     1,318,497     1,285,000     1,319,000     1,320,000         35,000
   RENTAL OF PROPERTY                     69,824        69,464        70,000        70,800        72,198          2,198
   DONATIONS-CONTRIBUTIONS                21,048        78,620             0         6,000         9,250          9,250
   SENIOR CITIZENS - AGENCIES             45,637        51,495        53,000        49,000        54,500          1,500
   POLICE - TRAINING SCHOOLS                   0         9,600           500             0           500              0
    SCHOOL TRAFFIC PATROL CONTRACT        25,409        25,409        25,409        25,409        25,409              0
    POLICE - KID'S CAMPS                   1,625           850         1,000         1,000         1,000              0
    FELONY FUNDS                               0        10,285
    SALE OF SCRAP MATERIAL                 6,179         2,743         2,000         4,950         3,000          1,000
    SALE OF FIXED ASSETS                  20,057        26,715         5,000         6,040         5,000              0
    TRANSIT-AGENCY MATCH                   8,577         8,354         8,500         8,500         9,300            800
    OTHER MISCELLANEOUS INCOME            34,802       377,525         1,700        39,670         3,350          1,650
                                       2,809,372     3,174,135     2,652,109     2,565,891     2,465,357       (186,752)
TRANSFERS/REIMBURSEMENTS FROM OTHER FUNDS:
  RISK MANAGEMENT FUND              471,152           512,830       546,698       546,698       601,187         54,489
  COMMUNITY DEV FUND                                                  5,979             0             0         (5,979)
  COMMUNITY DEV- SR. CENTER           6,000              6,000        6,000         6,000         6,000              0
  CABLE TELEVISION FUND              36,000
  CABLE TV FUND / UTILITIES           6,000
  ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT (LEGAL)        42,000             24,057        42,000        66,500        42,000              0
  ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT (TAX EQUIV) 2,677,676          2,706,122     2,786,120     2,820,981     2,850,114         63,994
  WATER & SEWER DEPT.               140,000            140,000       209,548       206,077       201,103         (8,445)
  WATER & SEWER - IT REIMB.                                           68,980         6,317        72,073          3,093
  STORMWATER FUND                         0            220,570       440,253       289,313       314,814       (125,439)
  CITY SCHOOLS                       94,000             94,000       127,000       127,000       127,000              0
  DRUG FUND                          65,413             69,915        90,000        90,000        90,000              0
                                  3,538,241          3,773,494     4,322,578     4,158,886     4,304,291        (18,287)
TOTAL NON-PROPERTY TAX REVENUE        63,661,565    67,010,276    73,581,011    70,419,323    76,314,691      2,733,680

TOTAL GENERAL FUND REVENUES           97,674,820   101,809,784   109,174,334   105,768,678   112,050,683      2,876,349     
 
Note: Items shaded in gray were previously classified as Special Revenue Funds.  For comparison 
purposes, they are listed above. 
                                 




                                                          49 

 
                                   GENERAL FUND REVENUES 
 


                                              OVERVIEW 

 
General Fund revenues for FY 2013 total $112.05 million, reflecting a $2.88 million or a 2.63 percent 
increase from the FY 2012 budget.     
 
In accordance with GASB 54 regulations, the City’s Recreation, Public Golf, Solid Waste, Senior Citizens, a 
portion of the Capital Improvement and Contingency, and Communications Funds have been moved 
into the General Fund.   
                                                     

                             Actual         Actual           Budget        Estimate      Budget        Budgeted
                            FY 2010        FY 2011           FY 2012       FY 2012       FY 2013       Variance
Revenue
 Property Tax                34,013,255     34,799,508        35,593,323    35,349,355    35,735,992      142,669
 Other Local Taxes           35,686,247     38,400,808        38,079,854    40,695,638    41,704,581    3,624,727
 Licenses, Permits, Fines     4,407,336      3,430,795         3,961,950     4,478,724     4,541,000      579,050
 Charges for Service          4,121,789      4,552,350         6,840,776     4,374,435     4,469,211   (2,371,565)
 Intergovernmental           13,098,580     13,678,694        17,723,744    14,145,749    18,830,251    1,106,507
 Miscellaneous                2,809,372      3,174,135         2,652,109     2,565,891     2,465,357     (186,752)
 Transfers                    3,538,241      3,773,494         4,322,578     4,158,886     4,304,291      (18,287)
Total                        97,674,820    101,809,784       109,174,334   105,768,678   112,050,683    2,876,349  

                                                          




                                                     50 

 
               
     




        51 

 
As you can see in the chart below, other local taxes (predominately local sales tax) represent 37 percent 
of general fund revenues, followed by property tax revenues at 32 percent.    
 




                                                                                                              
                                                      

 
 
                                 




                                                   52 

 
           MAJOR REVENUE DESCRIPTIONS, ANALYSES AND PROJECTIONS 
 
                                           PROPERTY TAX 
The City’s Property Tax rate is established by City Council.  The current property tax rate is $1.2703 for 
each $100 in assessed value. Property taxes are due and payable by December 31st each year. 
 
The Rutherford County Property Assessor locates and evaluates real property and tangible personal 
property for tax purposes.  A reassessment is conducted every 4 years and was last completed in 2010.  
The County Board of Equalization hears assessment appeals.    After completing the property 
reassessment, the certified tax rate is calculated, which is the tax rate on the new total assessment that 
would produce an equal amount of property tax levy as the preceding year.  The new total assessment 
does not include properties being added to the tax roll for the first time in the reassessment year for the 
purposes of determining the new certified rate.  
 
A city may not take an automatic windfall of increased revenue from a reappraisal.  However, if a city 
wants to increase its revenue after a reappraisal, it must formally advertise its intention before the 
Council votes to adopt a tax rate higher than the certified rate.  
 
The State Constitution provides that the following percentages of full value be used to determine 
assessments:  
         Residential and farm real property: 25 percent 
         Commercial and Industrial real property: 40 percent 
         Commercial and Industrial tangible personal property: 30 percent 
         Public utility real and tangible personal property: 55 percent 
         Other tangible personal property: 5 percent 
 
Property taxes are approximately 33 percent of total general fund revenue. 
 




                                                                                                 
 
                                                    53 

 
Public Utility – The property of privately owned public utilities (railroads, telephone, gas companies, etc) 
is assessed by the state Tennessee Regulatory Authority, subject to review and revision by the state 
Board of Equalization.  The assessment ratio is 55 percent of appraised value. 

    TAX EQUIVALENTS, RECOVERY OF RESERVED AND PENALTY & INTEREST ON TAXES 

Tax Equivalents, Recovery of Reserved Taxes and Penalty & Interest on Taxes make up approximately 
$1.3 million of budgeted General Fund revenues.    
 
The budgeted Tax Equivalents are determined based on previous agreements with the entity and/or the 
Rutherford County Industrial Development Board. The Industrial Development Board determines the 
payments based upon the economic impact of a project.  The Murfreesboro Housing Authority makes an 
in lieu of tax payment to the City based on gross rent receipts.   
 
According to state law, a municipality has an additional 10 years to collect property taxes once they 
become delinquent.  The recovery of reserved taxes represents property tax payments from previous 
years that are received by the City.  Between FY 06 and FY 11, the City’s average property tax collection 
rate was 97.1 percent.  This trend was utilized in determining this year’s budgeted amount. 
 
Penalties and interest are assessed and collected on property taxes that are paid after the due date.  The 
penalty is ½ percent and interest of 1 percent is imposed on the first day of each month.  Historical 
collection trends are used to determine this year’s budgeted amount. 


                                        OTHER LOCAL TAXES 

Other Local Taxes make up approximately $40.4 million of General Fund revenues.  These taxes include 
the local option sales tax, Gross Receipts Tax, Hotel/Motel Tax, and Beer & Liquor Taxes. 

                                               SALES TAX 

The local option sales tax is 2.75 percent on most retail purchases.  State law requires that the first half 
of all local option sales tax be distributed to County and City schools based on the average daily school 
attendance ratio between the two systems.  The second half is distributed to the jurisdiction where the 
sale was made or the service delivered.   
   
Unlike the state sales tax, the local option sales tax is not applied to the full purchase cost of expensive 
items.  The local sales tax only applies to the first $1,600 of the purchase price.  
 
The tax is determined by reviewing historical trends and expected economic growth or decline based on 
local, state and national forecasts.   
 
The local option sales tax is the general fund’s second largest source of revenue.  




                                                     54 

 
                                                                                                             

                                         BEER & LIQUOR TAXES 

Beer Taxes‐ The City levies a local beer tax, in the amount of 17 percent of wholesale prices, on 
wholesale beer deliveries to retail outlets in the City.  The tax is paid directly by each beer wholesaler in 
the City on a monthly basis.   The City receives 96.5 percent, the State receives 0.5 percent and the 
wholesaler retains 3 percent for collecting the tax.  It is the fourth largest source of general fund 
revenue. The tax is determined based on historical trends and anticipated growth or decline. 
 
Beer Privilege Tax ‐ Section 4‐44 of the City Code requires that businesses that sell, distribute, store or 
manufacture beer pay a beer privilege tax, in the amount of $100.  The beer privilege tax is due January 
1 of each year.  A one‐time beer permit is also required.  

 




                                                     55 

 
                                                                                                  
 

                                               LIQUOR TAX 

Liquor Tax ‐  
A 5 percent local liquor tax is levied against wholesale prices of liquor deliveries to package stores in the 
City.  The tax is paid directly by the wholesale dealer to the City on a monthly basis.  The City retains 95% 
of the tax with the balance being vendor compensation for the collections.  The tax is determined based 
on historical trends and anticipated growth or decline. 
 
Liquor Privilege Tax ‐ The City levies a privilege tax to be paid annually for on‐premise consumption.  
Section 4‐37 of the City Code provides a table of tax rates, which is calculated on the type of business.   
The tax ranges from $300 to $1,500.  The liquor privilege tax is due on October 1 of each year.  
 

                                          HOTEL MOTEL TAX 

The City has enacted a local hotel and motel tax in the amount of 2.5 percent of the room rate charged 
by the operator.  It is collected when the customer is invoiced and remitted by the hotel or motel 
operator no later than the 20th of the month to the City Treasurer. 
 
The Hotel Motel tax revenue is used to fund the Chamber of Commerce and other tourism‐related 
organizations or tourism activities of the City. 
 
The tax is determined based on historical trends and anticipated tourist events. 
                                    




                                                     56 

 
                             LICENSES, PERMITS, FINES AND FEES 

The City’s various departmental permits, fees, licenses and fines are included in this section.  They make 
up approximately $4.5 million of General Fund revenues.   

                                      BUILDING & DEVELOPMENT 

Anticipated developments, commercial additions and the expected economic growth or decline 
facilitate the amounts budgeted for the building and development licenses, permits and fees. 
 
Building Permits ‐ Building permits make up 26 percent of Licenses, Permits, Fines and Fees.  Building 
permit fees are based on square footage of heated areas plus one‐third of the square feet of unheated 
areas and areas under roof, such as garages, unfinished basements and carports. 
 
Electrical License ‐ The City requires electrical contractors to obtain a City of Murfreesboro electrical 
license to install, maintain or repair electrical wiring, devices, signs and appliances.  Section 11‐50 of the 
City Code sets forth the limitations of work permitted in each class of license.  The fees are due on 
October 1.  
 
Gas License ‐ The City requires gas contractors to obtain a City of Murfreesboro gas license to install or 
modify gas piping, venting or equipment. Section 15‐25 of the City Code sets forth the limitations of 
work permitted by each class of license. The City's Board of Gas Examiners is responsible for approving 
applicants to take the exams for the classes listed.   The fees are due and payable on October 1 of each 
year. 
 
Plumbing Permits Fee ‐ Plumbing permits are a flat fee of $20 plus $5 per fixture.   
 
Electrical Permit Fee ‐ Electrical permit fees are calculated based on service size and the number of 
inspections.  The base fee is $35.00. 
 
Mechanical Permit Fee ‐ Mechanical permits for residential units are $38.  Commercial units are a $30 
flat fee plus $20 for the first 1,000 square feet (sf) and $6/each additional 1,000 sf.  
 
Gas Permit Fee ‐ Gas permit are a $20 flat fee plus $5.00 per fixture. 
 
Land Disturbance Permit Fee ‐ New construction projects in the City of Murfreesboro such as new retail 
buildings, new subdivisions, or new roadways that include land disturbing activities like grading, 
excavation, clearing, and utility installation are required to obtain a City Land Disturbance Permit. The 
owner, developer, engineer or contractor can initiate the permitting process by completion and 
submittal of a Land Disturbance Permit application to the City Engineering Department.  Following 
approval of the application by the Engineering Department, a Land Disturbance Permit must be 
obtained by the contractor from the Building and Codes Department prior to beginning construction 
activities.  Fees for the permit are $150 plus $50 per acre of construction area.  
 
 
 

                                                      57 

 
                                             COURT FINES 

Court Fines ‐ Court Fines make up approximately 41.8 percent of Licenses, Permits, Fines and Fees.  
Budgeted amounts are determined based on population growth and historical trends. 
 
The Murfreesboro City Court has a cash appearance bond schedule for speeding, parking, alcohol 
possession and other violations.   
 
The minimum cash bond for speeding offenses is $130 plus $1 per mile in excess of 10 miles per hour 
over the posted speed limit.  The maximum amount is $175 excluding court costs and taxes. 
 
Automated Traffic Enforcement ‐ The Automated Traffic Enforcement citations are $50.  During FY 11, 
the City issued an Invitation to Bid on these services and as a result a new contract with our existing 
service provider was negotiated.  Under the new contract, the service provider will receive 100% ($50) 
of the citation amount on the first 1,200 citations paid and 50% ($25) on any additional citations paid.  
The City will continue to retain all court costs collected.  Budgeted amounts are determined based on 
historical trends. 
 
Court Fines – Drug Fund ‐ Drug fines collected by County Courts are distributed 50 percent to each the 
General Fund and Drug Fund in accordance with TCA 39‐17‐428.  It has been the City’s practice to 
transfer the General Fund portion to the Drug Fund to further assist the Police Department.  


                                      CHARGES FOR SERVICE 

Charges for Service make up approximately $4.5 million of General Fund revenues.  These are 
departmental charges to the public for use of facilities and/or services of the City. 

                         RECREATION DEPARTMENT SERVICE CHARGES 

The Recreation Department service charges include charges for use of Recreational facilities and 
participation in Recreational activities.  These charges make up approximately 30 percent of the Charges 
for Service category.  Amounts budgeted are determined based on historical trends, expected growth or 
decline and changes to Recreational events that may impact the department’s fees. 

                         PUBLIC GOLF DEPARTMENT SERVICE CHARGES 

The Public Golf Department service charges are charges for golf rounds, rental of carts, concessions and 
merchandise sales.  These charges make up 43 percent of the Charges for Service category.  Amounts 
budgeted are determined based on historical trends and anticipated growth. 


                               INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVENUE 

Intergovernmental Revenues are made up of revenues from Rutherford County, the State of Tennessee 
and the Federal Government.  This category is approximately $18.8 million of General Fund revenues.  


                                                    58 

 
                               STATE OF TENNESSEE SHARED TAXES  

State of Tennessee Shared Taxes make up approximately 57 percent of the Intergovernmental 
Revenues. 
 
State Sales Tax ‐ The current state sales tax rate is 7 percent (except food, on which the rate is 5.5 
percent), plus an additional 2.75 percent on the portion of the purchase price of single articles subject to 
local sales taxes from $1,600.01 through $3,200.  The state sales tax rate includes 0.5 percent 
earmarked for K‐12 education.  Cities receive 4.5925 percent of the remaining 5.5 percent after 
deductions.  It is distributed based on population and the City budgeted approximately $64.65 per City 
resident for FY 12. 
 
The state sales tax allocation is the general fund’s third largest source of revenue. 
 




                                                                                                   
 
Gross Receipts Tax ‐ The Gross Receipts Tax is often referred to as the Business License revenues.  
Businesses are required to file tax returns with the State listing the gross amount of sales tax owed to 
the State, the amount of deductions for sales tax purposes, and the total gross sales, accompanied by 
the appropriate business tax payment.  The State remits the City’s portion less an administrative fee on 
a monthly basis. 
 
Tennessee Code Annotated 67‐4‐708 defines the classifications.  The due dates are different for the 
various business classifications.  They are as follows: February 28 (Class 1), May 31 (Class 2), August 31 
(Class 3), November 30 (Class 4) and February 28 (Class 5). 
 
Gross Receipts Tax is the fifth largest source of operating revenue for the City. The budget amount for 
this tax is determined using historical trends and the economic climate.  



                                                    59 

 
                                                                                                   
 
TVA Gross Receipts Tax ‐ TVA pays 5 percent of gross power sale proceeds to the State in lieu of taxes.  
The State distributes 30 percent of the revenue generated above the benchmark year (1978).  The tax is 
distributed to cities based on population.  The State distributes this revenue quarterly.  For FY 12, the 
City budgeted approximately $11.07 per City resident in state gross receipts tax revenue. 
 
State Income Tax ‐ Three‐eighths of the 6 percent state tax on certain dividend and interest income paid 
by taxpayers is remitted by the State to the City in which the taxpayers live.  Payment is made for all 
such taxpayers no later than the following July 31 based on taxes collected in that city in the preceding 
fiscal year.  This is also referred to as the Hall Income Tax.   
 
State Beer Tax ‐ The state levies a $4.29 per barrel tax on the manufacture, sale, and transportation of 
beer.  Cities are allocated 10.05 percent of this money on a per capita basis without regard to legal beer 
sales in the City.  For FY 12, the City budgeted approximately $0.51 per City resident from the state in 
state beer tax. 
 
Mixed Drink Tax ‐ The state levies a 15 percent gross receipts tax on wine and spirit sales.  The tax is 
earmarked for education and local government.  Cities receive 25 percent of the tax collected from 
businesses in their boundaries.   
 
State Excise Tax ‐ The state corporate excise tax is collected from banks and is shared with municipalities 
and counties.  Generally, the excise tax on banks is 3 percent of net earnings (excluding interest from 
state bonds) minus 7 percent of ad valorem taxes, with a complicated formula for determining a 
minimum tax based on a bank’s capital stock.   
 
Street & Transportation ‐ The Special Petroleum Products Tax is levied by the State, in the amount of 1 
cent per gallon on all petroleum products.  It is distributed to cities based on population.  For FY 12, the 
City budgeted approximately $2.05 per City resident. 
 
                                                    60 

 
Telecom Sales Tax ‐ Public Chapter 719 of State law provides for taxation of mobile communication 
services.  Interstate telecommunications are subject to tax if the services originate in, or are received in, 
Tennessee and are billed or charged to a service address in Tennessee.  The sales tax rate is 2.5 percent.  
The state’s formula for distributing the telecom tax is half based on the service address and half based 
on the proportion of the City’s population with the aggregated population of the state.  
 
State Highway Maintenance ‐ The State contracts with the City annually to provide for maintenance of 
state rights‐of‐way within the City limits.  
 
                                                       
                                    STATE AND FEDERAL GRANTS 
 
State and Federal grants make up approximately 16.5 percent of General Fund Revenues. 
 
Public Transportation ‐ The Transportation Department receives several grants for the operation of 
Rover, the City’s public transit service.  The Federal and State portions of the grant are based on 
expected expenditures.  Funding is reimbursed at either 90 percent for capital items or 75 percent for 
operating expenditures. 

Recreation Greenway ‐ The Parks and Recreation Department is responsible for the development and 
maintenance of the City’s Greenway system.  The development of the Greenway is 80 percent funded by 
the Federal Government through the use of grants.  The remaining 20 percent is funded by the City.   

JAG Grant ‐ The Police Department received a Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) to fund police equipment 
not otherwise funded.   The amount budgeted for this grant is based on the grant award. 

Police‐CADCOR Grant ‐ The Police Department received a grant to help fund Police Officer work and 
training in relation to the Community Anti‐Drug Coalition of Rutherford (CADCOR).  This grant is 
specifically designed to assist in training and enforcement in regards to gangs.  The amount budgeted for 
this grant is based on the grant award. 


                                    MISCELLANEOUS REVENUE 

                                          GAS FRANCHISE TAX 

The current gas franchise with Atmos requires payment of a franchise fee in the amount of 3 percent of 
revenues.  The gas franchise is set to expire in 2015.  Amounts budgeted are based on historical trends, 
and the City anticipates having an audit performed in fiscal year 2013 to verify calculations of tax paid to 
the City. 

                                        CABLE FRANCHISE FEE 

Amounts budgeted are based on historical trends.   
 


                                                     61 

 
                TRANSFERS & REIMBURSEMENTS FROM OTHER FUNDS 

Transfers and Reimbursements from Other Funds include transfers for tax equivalents, legal services, 
reimbursement of Information Technology expenditures and various other miscellaneous items.   

                      FROM ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT – TAX EQUIVALENT 

The Electric Department transfer for Tax Equivalent is submitted in lieu of taxes on the electric system 
and electric operations.  The amount is equal to the property tax the system would pay if it were a 
private utility plus 4 percent of the average of revenue minus power cost for the preceding three fiscal 
years. 

 
 
 
                                 




                                                    62 

 
                                  GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURES 

                                 2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                 RECAPITULATION OF EXPENDITURES

                                  2009/2010      2010/2011      2011-2012    2011-2012    2012-2013     INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                       ACTUAL         ACTUAL        BUDGET       ESTIMATE     BUDGET       (DECREASE)

GENERAL FUND
GENERAL & ADMINISTRATIVE             4,542,623     4,984,439     4,859,420    4,729,746    4,186,746       (672,674)
LEGAL DEPARTMENT                       681,668       750,236       764,698      778,924      816,187         51,489
PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT                   646,870       858,324       765,216      760,018      847,720         82,504
PLANNING & ENGINEERING               1,705,063     1,735,966     2,496,788    1,716,005    1,775,515       (721,273)
TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT            3,135,125     3,271,637     3,023,997    2,079,850    4,369,613      1,345,616
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY                       0             0     1,067,402      836,799    1,171,576        104,174
CABLE TV DEPARTMENT                    423,660       454,276       832,541      566,816      680,973       (151,568)
BUILDING DEPARTMENT                  1,700,106     1,666,961     1,752,468    1,711,478    1,719,422        (33,046)
JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT                    351,734       365,072       455,318      394,840      446,668         (8,650)
POLICE DEPARTMENT                   20,175,069    21,879,339    22,916,155   22,862,004   25,119,392      2,203,237
FIRE DEPARTMENT                     13,316,531    14,023,025    14,501,195   14,184,635   15,348,699        847,504
STREET DEPARTMENT                    3,853,160     4,344,773     4,431,134    4,176,660    4,199,744       (231,390)
URBAN ENVIRONMENT DEPT.                909,214       926,237       951,565      898,101    1,030,820         79,255
CIVIC PLAZA                             55,526        76,043        88,220       82,070      109,909         21,689
PARKING GARAGE                         110,049       109,960       110,875      114,087      116,975          6,100
PARKS & RECREATION DEPT              7,435,129     7,606,358    10,359,924    9,044,689   13,243,702      2,883,778
PUBLIC GOLF COURSE DEPT:
  OLD FORT GOLF COURSE               1,432,510      1,514,312    1,897,799    1,809,869    1,718,119       (179,681)
  VET. ADM. GOLF COURSE                296,868        321,817      333,977      319,170      305,285        (28,692)
SOLID WASTE DEPT                     5,089,255      4,191,427    4,208,146    4,142,817    4,683,442        475,296
FUEL DEPARTMENT                                                  2,923,537        9,875            0      (2,923,537)
SENIOR CITIZENS DEPT                   880,682        861,004      949,617      894,599      946,360          (3,257)
DRUG FUND                              113,427         93,659       80,000       90,000       90,000          10,000
AIRPORT FUND                             1,961          1,810            0            0            0               0
CITY SCHOOLS                         4,810,103      4,810,103    4,810,103    4,810,103    4,810,103               0
EVERGREEN CEMETERY                     101,124
PUB HEALTH, EDUC & WELFARE:
OTHER GOV'T AGENCIES                  799,332        823,333      868,192      868,192      927,311          59,119
RUTHERFORD COUNTY CHAMBER:
   ECONOMIC DEVELP. DEPT.              97,250         97,250       97,250       97,250        97,250              0
    COMMUNITY NEEDS ASSESSMENT                                                                15,000         15,000
   M'BORO ECONOMIC DEV.                 45,000        22,500        22,500       22,500       22,500              0
   DESTINATION R'FORD                  125,000        62,500       120,000      120,000      120,000              0
   TOURISM                             219,877       269,148       255,000      260,808      264,000          9,000
OTHER TOURISM                          205,476       132,184       132,000      157,000      157,000         25,000
OUTSIDE AGENCIES                       109,596        95,470       100,890      100,890      108,390          7,500
RESERVE FOR UNCOLL. TAXES              682,600       694,672       711,866      709,076      714,720          2,854
ADJ & ALLOW - DELINQ TAXES              29,063        61,871       100,000      157,340      175,000         75,000
MIXED DRINK TAX-SCHOOLS                289,157       325,228       334,750      331,175      333,175         (1,575)
UNFORESEEN CONTINGENCIES               520,590       315,273       500,000      500,000      500,000              0
DEBT SERVICE                        20,534,723    24,860,379    26,162,698   25,362,698   26,139,822        (22,876)

TOTAL GENERAL FUND                  95,425,121   102,606,587 113,985,241 105,700,084 117,311,137          3,325,896      
Note: Items shaded in gray were previously classified as Special Revenue Funds.  For comparison 
purposes, they are listed above. 

                                                     63 

 
                            GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

Total General Fund expenditures are $117 million, an increase of $3 million over FY 2012 budget.  We 
are proposing a 3.5% pay increase to all full‐time employees again this year as well as a $0.15 raise to all 
part‐time employees. 

 




                                                                                                        
 




                                                                                                  

                                                     64 

 
                                                                                            
Fund transfers include funding for City schools and debt service.  

The City budgeted a decrease in General Fund balance of approximately 10.8 percent for FY 2013.  The 
majority of this decrease is attributed to the increased expenditures for automobile insurance of 
approximately $500,000 and employee pay raises of $3.5 million.  In addition, the Police Department 
has included a meal expenditure line item of $1 million that has not previously been budgeted.  A 
discussion of this expenditure can be found in the Police Department budget. 

 

                                                      




                                                    65 

 
                                                                  

                                  GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE 

                                     DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The General and Administrative budget includes funding for City Council, City Manager’s Office, Finance 
Department and City Hall maintenance and operation.   

The City Manager's Office provides centralized direction and leadership for the effective administration 
serves as the focal point for the management of the City staff departments. The City Manager's Office 
prepares and submits to the City Council a balanced budget of municipal services in adherence with the 
policy goals and objectives established by the City Council while employing such managerial techniques 
as needed to assure efficient and effective utilization of the City's resources. 

The council‐manager form of local government combines the strong political leadership of elected 
officials in the form of a council or other governing body with the strong managerial experience of an 
appointed local government manager. Approximately 59% of US cities with populations of 25,000 or 
more, and 47% of US cities with populations of 5,000 or more, have adopted the council‐manager form. 

The primary responsibility of a city manager is to implement the policies of the elected City Council. In 
addition, in the council‐manager government, the manager assumes responsibility for: preparing the 
annual budget, hiring personnel, directing day‐to‐day operations, attending council meetings, 
recommending policies or programs to the City Council and keeping the council fully advised on financial 
and other conditions of the city.  

The Finance Department, while accounted for within the General Administration function, has 
significant duties and responsibilities.  The Finance Department is charged with the prudent 
management and monitoring of the City’s financial position.  They maintain accurate and timely 
reporting of revenues and expenditures for all City financial activities.  They are responsible for cash 
management, debt planning and long‐range financial planning. 
 
There are several individual line items in the General Administrative budget that skew normal operating 
costs.  The expenditures of this department are projected to decrease by $679,122 due to the 
completion of the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block grant of $811,500 used to replace the 
heating and cooling systems of City Hall with new, energy efficient equipment. 
 
General Administrative is the home for a number of risk management and retirement related expenses 
for the entire organization.  All expenses of the retired workforce’s medical and dental coverage 
($769,027) and all retirement administration expenses ($433,167) are included in this budget.  The 
                                                   66 

 
retirement medical costs are projected to decrease by $49,000, as strategic changes to the employee 
health plan are implemented.  Retirement administration expenses are increasing by $6,500 as the value 
of the plan increases. 
 
Additionally, dollars are budgeted in General Administration for auditing the hotel/motel tax ($39,500) 
and the gas franchise fee ($25,000).  Both of these revenues are dependent on outside agencies for 
collection and submittal of correct amounts.  By auditing, the City could recover additional income for 
previous and future years. 
 
The Service Excellence customer service training program is budgeted for $25,000 in FY 2013, having 
been moved from the Human Resource Department.  New dollars are budgeted for an employee picnic 
($20,000) and the continuation of a Christmas gift to employees ($42,500). 
 

                                               ORGANIZATION CHART 



                                                           City Manager




                                               Assistant City 
                                                 Manager



    Implementing City 
                         Management of                                  Economic 
    Council Goals and                           Budget                                  Civic Engagement       Service Excellence
                          Operations                                   Development
        Directives




                                                            Finance 
                                                         Director/City 
                                                         Recorder and 
                                                          Treasurer


                                          Assistant Finance 
                                               Director


                                                                                                           Council  Minutes 
                                                                                        Cash 
          Accounting         Financial Planning          Tax Collection                                      and Meeting 
                                                                                     Management
                                                                                                               Support
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                   
                                                                   
                                                                   
 


                                                                 67 

 
                          IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

                              SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

       Respond effectively to citizen concerns 
       Continue re‐investment and focus of the City’s neighborhoods 
       Expansion of mass notification technologies to warn residents of weather or other emergencies 

              STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

       Update the capital improvement plan 
       Monitor revenue and expenditures and recommend appropriate adjustments 
       In conjunction with the Chamber of Commerce, continue regular meetings with large employers 
        and attract new investment and jobs 
       Co‐manage the development of the Information Technology Master Plan 
       Work with departments to process grant reimbursement requests to ensure funds due the City 
        are requested and received 

               EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

       Support City employees on a daily basis and in their professional development  
       Continue Service Excellence training, including the development of the next phase of training 
       Continue to support City departments in the innovative manner in which Murfreesboro delivers 
        services 
       Identify supplemental ways for Murfreesboro residents to communicate with and interact with 
        its City government 
       Continue participation in customer service training for City personnel  
       Maintains records and storage requirements to make public records available for requests 
       Assist business owners with filing business tax information with the State 

                                   ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

       Provide quality methods for citizens to communicate and dialogue with their City government 
       Identify other social media vehicles to engage our residents 

                                   FY 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

       Initiated the  Information Technology Department and hired a Director to oversee the 
        Department and manage the new software purchase and implementation 
        Initiated “Service Excellence”, a customer training program 
       Launched the City’s social media presence on Facebook and Twitter 
       Refined the  new capital improvement project financial monitoring program 
       Received the Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting from the 
        Government Finance Officers Association for the 13th consecutive year 


                                                   68 

 
       Received the Distinguished Budget Presentation Award from the Government Finance Officers 
        Association 
       Began electronic agenda for City Council meetings 

                                         FY 2013 DEPARTMENT GOALS 

       Initiate an employee engagement project that focuses on performance 
       Co‐manage the development of an information technology master plan, including acquisition of 
        a new financial software system 
       Explore additional payment acceptance options with the new financial software system 
       Redesign the City’s website 
       Develop a “one‐stop” shop permitting process for non‐routine developments and projects  
       Update the marketing video for the Gateway corporate headquarters sites 
       Conduct compliance audits on the hotel/motel and gas franchise taxes 
       Continue regular communications with City Council in providing information about the City 
       Continue to recruit the best and brightest persons for positions with the City and ensure that 
        the City’s workforce is representative of the City’s demographics 
       Daily publicize, promote and support the mission, goals, services, accomplishments and 
        programs of the City and its departments 

                                      PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS 

    1. Apply for the Distinguished Budget Award from the Government Finance Officers Association 
    2. Apply for the Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting from the 
       Government Finance Officers Association 
 

                                             EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

                                                                          General & Administrative
                                       Actual                  Actual             Budget           Estimated                         Budget
                                      FY 2010                 FY 2011             FY 2012           FY 2012                          FY 2013

Personnel Costs                  $          2,379,105     $        2,169,196     $        1,734,502     $         1,764,732     $         1,827,291
Operating Costs                  $          2,146,779     $        2,795,727     $        3,108,543     $         2,953,014     $         2,342,155
Capital Expense                  $               16,739                 19,516
                                                          $                      $              
                                                                                               16,375   $              12,000                  17,300
                                                                                                                                $               
Total General & Administrative   $          4,542,623     $        4,984,439     $        4,859,420     $         4,729,746     $         4,186,746      




                                                                   69 

 
           




    70 

 
                                    HUMAN RESOURCE SUMMARY 

                                                                  Actual    Actual Estimated Proposed
                                                                 FY 2010   FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013
Job Description
     Mayor                                                          1        1         1        1
     City Council                                                   6        6         6        6
       Total Mayor and Council                                      7        7         7        7

                                   General and Administrative Department
    City Manager                                                     1       1         1        1
    Assistant City Manager                                           1       1         1        1
    Administrative Assistant                                         2       2         1        1
    Service Excellence Coordinator                                   0       0         1        1
    Public Information Officer (moved to Cable Dept)                 1       1         0        0
      Subtotal City Administration                                   5       5         4        4

    City Recorder                                                  1         1        1         1
    Assistant City Recorder                                        1         1        1         1
    Administrative Assistant                                       1         1        1         1
    Fixed Asset Manager                                            1         1        1         1
    Accountant                                                     3         3        4         4
    Administrative Support Specialist                              3         3        3         3
    Administrative Secretary                                       0         0        1         1
    Secretary/Receptionist                                         2         2        1         1
      Subtotal Finance                                             12        12       13        13

    GIS Coordinator (moved to IT Dept)                              1        1         0        0
    GIS Application Specialist  (moved to IT Dept)                  2        2         0        0
    MIS Coordinator  (moved to IT Dept)                             1        1         0        0
    Technical Support Specialist  (moved to IT Dept)                1        1         0        0
    Software Specialist (moved to IT Dept)                          1        1         0        0
     Subtotal Technology                                            6        6         0        0

    Maintenance Foreman                                             1        1         1        1
    Custodian                                                       2        2         2        2
     Subtotal Maintenance Positions                                 3        3         3        3

       Full‐Time Positions                                         26        26       20        20

    Security                                                        1        1         1        1
    Supervisor of Maintenance Workers                               2        2         2        2
    Courier                                                         2        2         2        2
       Part‐Time Positions                                          5        5         5        5

Total General & Administrative Human Resource Allocation           38        38       32        32       
                                                       71 

 
 
                                        2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                        GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE DEPARTMENT

                                         2009/2010    2010/2011    2011/2012    2011/2012    2012/2013     INCREASE
    DESCRIPTIONS                          ACTUAL       ACTUAL      BUDGET       ESTIMATE     BUDGET       (DECREASE)

    EXPENDITURES
    PERSONNEL COSTS**
    SALARIES & WAGES                                                1,227,055    1,255,450    1,292,809       65,754
       SALARIES & WAGES                   1,709,471    1,515,455    1,227,055    1,255,450    1,292,809       65,754
    SOCIAL SECURITY                         122,720      113,310       92,722       90,360       99,221        6,499
    MEDICAL - DENTAL                        278,304      297,247      244,970      247,080      266,950       21,980
    PENSION PLAN                            201,776      175,120      140,313      139,050      133,239       (7,074)
    RETIREMENT (401A)                                                                1,860        5,077        5,077
    LIFE INSURANCE                                                                     240        8,511        8,511
    WORKERS' COMPENSATION                    66,834       68,064       29,442       30,692       21,484       (7,958)
    TOTAL PERSONNEL COSTS                 2,379,105    2,169,196    1,734,502    1,764,732    1,827,291       92,789

    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
    VEHICLES & MACHINERY-FLEET                5,550        4,573        3,081          990        1,057        (2,024)
    VEHICLES & MACHINERY                        129          271          500          250          500             0
    OFFICE EQUIPMENT                         17,999       17,607       21,500       18,000       20,000        (1,500)
    FUEL EQUIPMENT                            8,798        6,680
    NETWORK AND INTERNET WEB SITE            20,962       26,599
    COMPUTER SOFTWARE MAINT. - G.I.S.        55,850       58,568
    OFFSITE BACKUP SERVICE                                 5,600
    BUILDINGS                                37,098       31,992       45,000       35,000       41,000        (4,000)
                                            146,386      151,890       70,081       54,240       62,557        (7,524)

    SUPPLIES
    POSTAGE                                  20,861       28,818       28,000       31,800       30,000        2,000
    OFFICE                                   21,975       23,045       23,000       22,500       23,500
    G.I.S. SUPPLIES                          11,435        8,464                                                    0
    PRINTING-BINDING                                                    1,000            0        1,000             0
    NEWSPAPER-MAGAZINES                         926        1,141          950          952          975            25
    ADVERTISING                              10,941       10,176       15,000       10,500       12,000        (3,000)
    EMPLOYEE                                  5,599        4,463        6,000        5,515        6,000             0
    JANITORIAL                               12,156       12,259       12,000       12,500       13,000         1,000
    BULK GASOLINE                            15,736        4,301        5,200        4,543        5,919           719
    ART COMMITTEE EXPENSE                       665          726          700          900          800           100
    CLOTHING                                  1,718        1,409        1,800        1,400        1,800             0
    MISCELLANEOUS SUPPLIES                      467        1,344        1,500          950        1,500             0
                                            102,479       96,146       95,150       91,560       96,494           844

    INSURANCE
    GENERAL (NOT PRORATED)                    2,293        2,299        2,299        2,101        2,101         (198)
    GENERAL LIABILITY (NOT PRORATED)        142,092      142,092      142,092      142,092      142,092            0
    BONDS                                     2,822        2,868        2,500        2,918        2,918          418
    AUTOMOBILE                                2,966        2,966            0            0        2,966        2,966
    PROPERTY INSURANCE (NOT PRORATED)        22,712       22,722       22,722       21,800       21,800         (922)
    FIRE (NOT PRORATED)                      35,181       28,733       35,180       42,723       45,000        9,820
    UNEMPLOYMENT (NOT PRORATED)              67,338       76,969      100,000       80,600      100,000            0
                                            275,404      278,649      304,793      292,234      316,877       12,084

    RETIREE EXPENSES
    RETIREE MEDICAL - DENTAL                615,119      703,332      818,120      805,000      769,027       (49,093)
    RETIREMENT ADMIN. (NOT PRORATED)        320,634      336,508      375,000      365,000      381,500         6,500
                                            935,753    1,039,840    1,193,120    1,170,000    1,150,527       (42,593)

    UTILITY SERVICE
    ELECTRIC                                112,519      134,324      115,000      136,000      122,400         7,400
    WATER AND SEWER                          14,157       14,272       15,000       16,200       12,000        (3,000)
    TELEPHONE                                40,244       40,210       40,000       39,700       41,000         1,000
    CELLULAR TELEPHONE                       11,158       10,769       11,540        2,500        3,000        (8,540)
    INTERNET SERVICE                         20,966       18,662
                                            199,044      218,237      181,540      194,400      178,400        (3,140)

                                                         72 

 
                                  2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                  GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE DEPARTMENT

                                   2009/2010    2010/2011    2011/2012    2011/2012    2012/2013     INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                        ACTUAL       ACTUAL      BUDGET       ESTIMATE     BUDGET       (DECREASE)
TRAVEL AND SUBSISTENCE
USE OF EMPLOYEE'S AUTO:
  MAYOR & COUNCIL                      19,200       19,200       19,200       19,200       19,200             0
  OTHERS - MILEAGE ONLY                 1,210        1,601        2,000        1,500        2,000             0
OUT OF TOWN TRAVEL                                   1,357        1,500          850        1,500             0
MEALS DURING MEETINGS                   2,741        2,247        3,000        2,825        3,000             0
                                       23,151       24,405       25,700       24,375       25,700             0

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
VENDING MACHINES                          850        1,028          750          985        1,000           250
ASSOCIATION DUES                       59,613       61,426       62,500       66,100       69,200         6,700
AUDIT SERVICE                         171,800      171,000      173,400      173,400      173,400             0
AUDIT SERVICE-HOTEL/MOTEL                                                                  39,500        39,500
AUDIT SERVICE-GAS FRANCHISE FEE                                                            25,000        25,000
ELECTIONS-REFERENDUMS                  34,366                    35,000       70,000            0       (35,000)
FLOWERS                                   251
TRAINING PERSONNEL                     10,087       17,312       15,000       15,000       18,000        3,000
SERVICE EXCELLENCE TRAINING                                                                25,000       25,000
COMPUTER SOFTWARE                       6,000        3,449        3,000        3,000        3,000            0
INTERLOCAL G.I.S. AGREEMENT            14,506        7,418
COUNTY SHARED COSTS                    27,381      392,790       53,000       51,700       53,000             0
EECBG GRANT EXPENSE                    49,591      199,203      811,509      680,000            0      (811,509)
CHRISTMAS - GIFT CERTIFICATES          42,008       40,238       44,000       41,020       42,500        (1,500)
EMPLOYEE PICNIC                                                                            20,000        20,000
OTHER MISCELLANEOUS                    48,109       92,696       40,000       25,000       42,000         2,000
                                      464,562      986,560    1,238,159    1,126,205      511,600      (726,559)

OPERATING BUDGET                    4,525,884    4,964,923    4,843,045    4,717,746    4,169,446      (674,099)

ADDITION TO FIXED ASSETS
NORMAL REPLACEMENT-FURN & EQUIP                                                             7,200
(2) COMPUTERS                                                                               2,000
(1) Ipad                                                                                      600
PRINTER                                                                                     1,200
FAX MACHINE                                                                                   800
PRINTER                                                                                     2,500
BILL COUNTING MACHINE                                                                       2,000
(3) DESK CHAIRS                                                                             1,000
                                       16,739       19,516       16,375       12,000       17,300          925

TOTAL GENERAL & ADMINISTRATIVE      4,542,623    4,984,439    4,859,420    4,729,746    4,186,746      (673,174)




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                                INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 

                                    DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The Information Technology Department is responsible for acquisition, installation, maintenance, 
training and planning for the City’s technology needs.  This includes hardware, software, mobile 
technology, geographic information systems and other computers and devices.  
 
The City’s existing personnel that support management information systems (MIS), geographic 
information systems (GIS) and public safety software and technology have performed exceptionally.  
However, the current organization of these resources is decentralized.  They have been managed and 
funded over the years in multiple departments, including Administration, Planning and Engineering, 
Police, Water and Sewer, MIS and GIS.   
 
In order to provide for a unified outlook, plan and allocation of resources, the proposed budget 
recommends the creation of a new city department: Information Technology.  All of the positions below 
will be reassigned to the IT Department, but will be under the direction of a new Information 
Technology Director.  While they may not change work locations or overall responsibilities, the 
centralization of these resources will improve efficiencies and help the City plan more globally for 
technology. 
 
The creation of a Master Plan for Information Technology will be one of the principal goals for the 
Director during the fiscal year.  There is $75,000 budgeted for the use of a consultant in the 
development of the technology master plan. 
                                    




                                                 74 

 
                                                 ORGANIZATION CHART 

 
                                                           Information 
                                                           Technology



                                                 Governance 
                                                 Committee


        Information                                                                        Website  and 
                                                  Network           Acquisition and 
        Technology           Applications                                                                  Support
                                                Administration     Implementation             E‐Gov
        Master Plan

           Assessment of 
              Existing         Financial Mgmt          Security             Hardware                         Help Desk
            Technology


           Identify goals          Human              Disaster 
                                                                            Software                          Training
           and strategies         Resources           Recovery



                                  Customer 
          Implementation                                                  Mobile Devices
                                   Service


                                                                               Office 
                                Departmental                              Equipment and 
                                                                            Electronics


                                Records Mgmt




                                     GIS
                                                                                                                          
 

                                 IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                                      SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

       Examination of mass notification technologies, which can be used to warn residents of severe 
        weather or other emergencies 
       Assisting city departments in increasing effectiveness and efficiency in the delivery of services 
 

                STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

       Development of Information Technology Master Plan 
       Development of capital improvement plan for hardware, software and other technology 
                                                                  75 

 
 

                 EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMERS SERVICE 

       Implementation of financial software package to assist departments in monitoring expenditures 
        in a real‐time basis 
       Developing tools to facilitate service delivery for city departments 
       Utilization of mapping to analyze service delivery needs and requirements 

                                           ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

       Contributor to development and maintenance of City’s social media presence 
       Identifying methods to obtain citizen input on City issues and decisions 

                                           FY 2011 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

       As this is a newly created department, no accomplishments exist for FY 11 

                                          FY 2012 DEPARTMENT GOALS 

       Creation of Information Technology Department  
       Development of an Information Technology Master Plan 
       Acquisition of financial software package and associated training 

                                      PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS 

       As this is a newly created department, no measures exist for FY 11 

                                               EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

                                                                                   Information Technology
                                       Actual                   Budget                     Budget         Estimated                       Budget
                                      FY 2010                   FY 2011                   FY 2012          FY 2012                        FY 2013

Personnel Costs                $                      ‐   $                    ‐      $           710,302    $            630,205    $            752,026
Operating Costs                $                      ‐   $                    ‐      $        1,018,202     $            818,946    $            384,050
Capital Expense                $                      ‐   $                    ‐                    49,200
                                                                                      $                      $              17,853                  35,500
                                                                                                                                     $               
Total Information Technology   $                      ‐   $                    ‐      $        1,777,704     $         1,467,004     $         1,171,576      
                                                                         




                                                                      76 

 
                                                                                                     
 

                                   HUMAN RESOURCES SUMMARY 

 
                                           Information Technology
                                                                      Actual    Actual Estimated Proposed
                                                                     FY 2010   FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013
Job Description
   IT Director                                                                            1         1
   GIS Coordinator (from General & Administrative Dept)                                   1         1
   GIS Application Specialist (from General & Administrative Dept)                        2         2
   MIS Coordinator (from General & Administrative Dept)                                   1         1
   Public Safety MIS Coordinator (from Police Dept)                                       1         1
   Technical Support Specialist (from Police Dept)                                        3         3
   Software Specialist (from General & Administrative Dept)                               1         1
                                                                                          10        10

    Geo‐Coding Position                                                                    1        1
      Part‐Time Positions                                              0         0         1        1

Total Information Technology Allocation                                                   11        11




                                                      77 

 
                                    2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                    INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT

                                        2009/2010   2010/2011   2011/2012    2011/2012    2012/2013     INCREASE
    DESCRIPTIONS                         ACTUAL      ACTUAL     BUDGET       ESTIMATE     BUDGET       (DECREASE)

    EXPENDITURES
    PERSONNEL COSTS**
    SALARIES & WAGES                                               515,007      456,011      542,782       27,775
       TOTAL SALARIES & WAGES                                      515,007      456,011      542,782       27,775
    SOCIAL SECURITY                                                 39,398       33,697       41,523        2,125
    MEDICAL - DENTAL                                                97,981       85,413      104,588        6,607
    PENSION PLAN                                                    57,002       54,002       55,352       (1,650)
    RETIREMENT (401A)                                                                 0        2,977        2,977
    LIFE INSURANCE                                                                    0        3,699        3,699
    WORKERS' COMPENSATION                                              914        1,082        1,105          191
    TOTAL PERSONNEL COSTS                                          710,302      630,205      752,026       41,724

    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
    NETWORK EQUIPMENT                                               35,000       30,000       36,200        1,200
    OFFICE EQUIPMENT                                                 2,400          150        2,400            0
    OFFSITE DATA BACKUP                                              9,000        7,917       10,000        1,000
    COMPUTER SOFTWARE MAINT. - G.I.S.                               73,000       74,750       74,750        1,750
    ELECTRONIC STORAGE                                              42,000       34,591       42,000            0
                                                                   161,400      147,408      165,350        3,950

    SUPPLIES
    OFFICE                                                           1,500          250        2,200          700
    G.I.S. SUPPLIES                                                  8,000       10,500       10,500        2,500
    MISCELLANEOUS SUPPLIES                                             500          100          500            0
                                                                    10,000       10,850       13,200        3,200

    UTILITY SERVICE
    INTERNET SERVICE                                                40,000       18,183       23,000       (17,000)
                                                                    40,000       18,183       23,000       (17,000)

    TRAVEL AND SUBSISTENCE
    USE OF EMPLOYEE'S AUTO                                             500            0          500             0
    OUT OF TOWN TRAVEL                                               2,500        1,300            0        (2,500)
                                                                     3,000        1,300          500        (2,500)

    MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
    TRAINING PERSONNEL                                               8,000        3,500        6,500       (1,500)
    COMPUTER SOFTWARE                                                3,000            0       93,000       90,000
    INTERLOCAL G.I.S. AGREEMENT                                      7,500        7,500        7,500            0
    CONSULTANT (IT)                                                 75,000            0       75,000            0
                                                                    93,500       11,000      182,000       88,500

    OPERATING BUDGET                                             1,018,202      818,946    1,136,076      117,874

    ADDITION TO FIXED ASSETS
    NORMAL REPLACEMENT-FURN & EQUIP                                                            2,000
    GIS (3 COMPS & 1 SERVER)                                                                  13,500
    VIRTUAL SERVER EQUIPMENT                                                                  10,000
    SERVER PERIPHERAL REPLACEMENT                                                             10,000
                                                                    49,200       17,853       35,500       (13,700)

    TOTAL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY                                 1,067,402      836,799    1,171,576      104,174      
                                                         78 

 
                                                                  

                              COMMUNICATIONS DEPARTMENT 

                                      DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The Communications Department disseminates city information to the public via television, internet, 
and, print through the utilization of Murfreesboro City TV, the city website, social media networks, city 
YouTube channel, press releases, and media interviews.  Additionally, the department is responsible for 
disseminating internal communications with city employees through training videos and employee 
newsletter’s.  The department also oversees and enforces the local Communications franchise and 
assists citizens in resolving Comcast Communications issues.   
 
The mission of Murfreesboro City TV is to promote the education of City residents concerning local 
government by cablecasting and video web streaming meetings of the City Council, and their sub‐
committees, commissions, and boards; inform residents about programs and public services offered by 
the City; present educational and cultural programs; provide forums for discussion on Murfreesboro 
issues; provide information on public health, safety and welfare issues. 
 
To enhance capabilities of the Communications Department, the increase of a part‐time video journalist 
to a full time position has been budgeted.  Also, a non‐linear video editing system has been budgeted at 
a cost of $24,900. 
                                   




                                                   79 

 
                                        ORGANIZATION CHART 

 
                                             Communications 
                                               Department


                               Communications 
                                 Commission


                          Cable Franchise                                           Media 
            Television      Monitoring
                                                 Internet         Print
                                                                                   Relations


                City TV                           City Website    Press Releases


                Internal                          Social Media     Employee 
               Training/                           Networks        Newsletter
             Communication
                 Videos
                                                    Youtube 
                                                    Channel
                                                                                                 

                          IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                              SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

       Provide information on public safety, health and welfare issues 
       Utilizing City TV and social media to warn residences of severe weather and other emergencies 
       Present educational information on fire and police safety, city emergency preparedness plan, 
        etc. 
       Promote safe livable neighborhoods through educational information from various city 
        departments such Building and Codes, Street Department, Water and Sewer, Community 
        Development, Planning Department, Parks and Recreation Department, etc.   
       Providing traffic camera views on City TV during peak drive times and anytime on the city 
        website 

              STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

       Present economic development programming and other similar types of programming 

                EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

       Present current information on activities of the City government and its commissions and 
        boards 

                                                      80 

 
       Inform City residents about programs and services provided by City Departments and City‐
        sponsored agencies 
       Explain opportunities for citizen participation in City programs and services 
       Assist Murfreesboro Comcast Xfinity cable TV subscribers with resolving complaints when they 
        are unable to do so on their own 

                                   ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

       Increasing the City presence through City TV, social media networks, and the city website 
       Enlightening citizens with thought provoking programming featuring various perspectives 
        including historical, social, and economic   
       Providing meeting notices, public events notices, and city contact information, through City TV’s 
        video bulletin board messages and city website 
       Direct contact with citizens groups, such as civic clubs, through presentations about the City 
       Publishing a citizens report for the public which highlights accomplishments of the City 

                                    FY 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

       Provided a way for citizens to share our archived video web streaming meetings and videos on 
        social media networks such as Facebook 
       Consolidated Public Information and Media Information activities into one department 
       Made video streaming of City meetings/videos and accompanying documents available on 
        mobile devices such as smart phones and media tablets 
       Created new original programming on City TV such as the Bicentennial Storytellers series 
       Procured a backup power generator for City TV, Management Information Systems, and Traffic 
        Lab facilities within City Hall so in the event of a power outage and/or emergency City TV, the 
        city website, the Institution Network, and traffic cameras will continue to operate 
       Renovated the Council Chambers and Communications offices 
       Achieved over 60,000 view/hits from the publication of archived video web streaming content
       Over 830 likes/followers on City Facebook page 
       Over 1 million visits to the city website 
       Received national government television programming awards for In the City and Telling the 
        Story series programs from the National Association of Telecommunications Officers and 
        Advisors

                                  FY 2013 DEPARTMENT GOALS 

       It is recommended to change the name of the Communications Department to the 
        Communications Department 
       Create and maintain a City YouTube page for cross promotions of city videos, the city website, 
        and the city Facebook page. 
       Work with the Information Technology department in redesigning and launching a new city 
        website 
       Produce a City Council agenda video highlighting some of the agenda items coming up for each 
        upcoming meeting  
       Create a citizens report which highlights accomplishments of the City 
                                                    81 

 
         Move from a quarterly to a monthly employee newsletter 
         Support the Service Excellence Coordinator through training videos and economic development 
          videos 
         Produce a “State of the City” featuring the Mayor 
         Produce a “State of City Schools” featuring the Director of Schools 
         Produce instructional health and wellness features collaborating with the Parks and Recreation 
          Department, City Schools, and St. Clair Street Senior Center 
         Continue and expand the Murfreesboro Storytellers monthly program after the City Bicentennial 
          ends to include feature episodes with council members, department heads, and other people of 
          interest in Murfreesboro to promote the City 
         Produce feature programs highlighting city departments functions along with featuring staff 
          members and their duties 
         Utilizing Comcast Spotlight Advertising to promote City TV programming 

                                        PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS 

                                                                                 Actual   Actual    Budget Estimated Proposed
                                                                                 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012       FY 2011 FY 2013
Hours of coverage of City public meetings and locally produced productions         179     160     165              161     175
Number of covered City public meetings and locally produced productions            343     352     325              349     350
Number of webstreaming views                                                      8180    53321   45000           55000   60000
Number of press releases                                                                                                    105



                                              EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

 
                                                                         Communications
                                          Actual            Budget          Budget                 Estimated         Budget
                                         FY 2010            FY 2011         FY 2012                 FY 2012          FY 2013

 Personnel Costs                    $       307,285     $      317,088       $      431,099   $       426,102    $      496,049
 Operating Costs                    $        97,766     $       67,802       $      128,342   $        85,970    $      135,024
 Capital Expense                    $        18,609     $       69,386       $      273,100   $        54,744    $       49,900
 Total Cable Television Fund        $       423,660     $      454,276       $      832,541   $       566,816    $      680,973    
 
                                                                  




                                                               82 

 
                                                                                                      

                                    HUMAN RESOURCE SUMMARY 

                                       Communications Department
                                                               Actual    Actual Estimated Proposed
                                                              FY 2010   FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013
Job Description
Cable Television Coordinator                                     1        1         1        1
Public Information Officer (from General & Admin. Dept)                             1        1
Video Production Specialist                                      3        3         3        4
       Full‐Time Positions                                       4        4         5        6

Part‐Time Video Journalist                                       2        2         2        2
       Part‐Time Positions                                       2        2         2        2

Total Cable Television Allocation                                6        6         7        8        
 




                                                    83 

 
                                                                                         
                                                    2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                                    COMMUNICATIONS DEPARTMENT

                                                      2009/2010           2010/2011             2011/2012            2011/2012          2012/2013      INCREASE
    DESCRIPTIONS                                       ACTUAL              ACTUAL               BUDGET               ESTIMATE           BUDGET        (DECREASE)

    REVENUES
    CABLE FRANCHISE FEE                                  1,275,656      See General
    INTEREST                                                16,297     Fund Revenues
    OTHER MISCELLANEOUS                                        708
    TOTAL REVENUE                                        1,292,661                      0

    EXPENDITURES
    PERSONNEL COSTS
    SALARIES & WAGES                                                                                  316,346                 316,346       365,872       49,526
    OVERTIME PAY                                                                                        7,000                   2,000         7,000            0
       TOTAL SALARIES & WAGES                              240,375              243,574               323,346                 318,346       372,872       49,526
    SOCIAL SECURITY                                         18,060               18,157                24,200                  24,200        27,989        3,789
    MEDICAL - DENTAL                                        22,711               28,832                47,139                  47,139        55,314        8,175
    PENSION PLAN                                            24,781               25,360                35,200                  35,200        34,977         (223)
    EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT (401A MATCH)                                                                                                          1,476        1,476
    LIFE INSURANCE                                                                                                                            2,055        2,055
    WORKER'S COMPENSATION                                    1,358                1,165                 1,214                   1,217         1,366          152
    TOTAL PERSONNEL COSTS                                  307,285              317,088               431,099                 426,102       496,049       64,950

    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
    VEHICLES & MACHINERY-FLEET                                  54                    68                1,008                      99         1,067           59
    VEHICLES & MACHINERY                                        94                    23                  600                     100           600            0
    OFFICE EQUIPMENT                                         1,427                   944                2,200                   1,800         2,200            0
    TELEVISION EQUIPMENT                                    14,716                12,158               30,000                  21,000        30,000            0
                                                            16,291                13,193               33,808                  22,999        33,867           59

    SUPPLIES
    POSTAGE                                                    180                   217                  500                     325           500             0
    OFFICE                                                   1,582                 1,602                2,500                   2,000         2,500             0
    ADVERTISING                                              2,446                 1,252               10,000                   2,000         7,000        (3,000)
    AUDIO/VIDEO                                              8,672                17,390               20,000                  21,000        25,000         5,000
    FUEL                                                       296                   186                1,000                     390         1,000             0
                                                            13,176                20,647               34,000                  25,715        36,000         2,000

    INSURANCE
    GENERAL                                                     496                  379                   496                      0             0          (496)
    PROPERTY INSURANCE                                          283                  278                   278                      0             0          (278)
    FIELD VIDEO EQUIPMENT                                     1,068                1,098                 1,700                  1,100         1,700             0
    GENERAL LIABILITY                                           200                  200                   200                      0             0          (200)
    AUTOMOBILE                                                1,657                1,657                     0                      0           607           607
                                                              3,704                3,612                 2,674                  1,100         2,307          (367)

    UTILITY SERVICE
    ELECTRIC AND WATER/SEWER                                  6,000
    TELEPHONE                                                   554                  556                   600                    556           600             0
    CELLULAR TELEPHONE                                        2,285                2,377                 3,360                  2,800         3,650           290
    DIESEL FUEL (BACK-UP GENERATOR)                                                                      1,200                  1,900         5,000         3,800
                                                              8,839                2,933                 5,160                  5,256         9,250         4,090

    TRAVEL AND SUBSISTENCE
    MILEAGE REIMBURSEMENT                                       293                   114                1,000                    400         1,000             0
    MEALS DURING MEETINGS                                     1,305                   606                1,700                  1,000         1,600          (100)
                                                              1,598                   720                2,700                  1,400         2,600          (100)

    MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
    ASSOCIATION DUES                                          1,125                1,750                 2,000                  1,800         2,000             0
    TRAINING PERSONNEL                                                             1,426                 8,000                  4,000         9,000         1,000
    OUTSIDE LEGAL SERVICES                                                                               3,000                      0         3,000             0
    COMPUTER SOFTWARE                                         2,084                4,563                 6,000                  1,000         6,000             0
    CONTRACT SERVICES                                                                800                 3,000                      0         3,000             0
    TRANSFER TO OTHER FUNDS                                 36,000
    VIDEO WEBSTREAMING/ARCHIVING                            11,313                14,681               19,000                  17,000        19,000             0
    OTHER MISCELLANEOUS                                      3,636                 3,477                9,000                   5,700         9,000             0
                                                            54,158                26,697               50,000                  29,500        51,000         1,000

    OPERATING BUDGET                                       405,051              384,890               559,441                 512,072       631,073       71,632



    ADDITION TO FIXED ASSETS
    NORMAL REPLACEMENT - FURN & EQUIP                                                                                                        25,000
    NON LINEAR VIDEO EDITOR SYSTEM                                                                                                           24,900
                                                            18,609                69,386              273,100                  54,744        49,900      (223,200)

    TOTAL CABLE TV DEPARTMENT                              423,660              454,276               832,541                 566,816       680,973      (151,568)

    NOTE: The first column is presented for comparison purposes only as Cable TV Fund was a Special Revenue Fund that year.
    Also, beginning FY13, Cable TV Fund was re-named Communications Department.                                                                                       
                                                                                      84 

 
 




                                                                         

                                                     LEGAL 

                                         DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The  Legal  Department  serves  as  the  primary  source  of  legal  advice  to  the  City  Council,  City  Manager,   
the City's various boards and commissions and City employees.  It provides research and information on 
a  wide  variety  of  legal  issues  and  prepares  documents  needed  for  municipal  operations  including: 
contracts  for  sale  or  purchase  of  land,  goods  and  services;  lease  agreements;  use  agreements; 
easements;  forms;  policies;  ordinances;  resolutions;  and  letters.    Outside  counsel  may  be  retained  for 
specialized areas.  The Legal Department does not provide legal advice or representation to individual 
citizens on any matter. 
 
The Legal Department provides legal services required by the City as an employer, landowner, builder, 
regulator,  educator,  utility  provider,  public  communicator,  taxing  authority,  and  emergency  service 
provider.  It manages the City's self‐insurance fund and its operations.  It also generates revenues for the 
City  by  serving  as  the  general  counsel  of  the  Murfreesboro  City  School  System,  the  Murfreesboro 
Electric Department and the Murfreesboro Water and Sewer Department.  
 
The  re‐codification  of  the  City  Code  is  reflected  through  a  $15,000  increase  in  the  line  item  for 
Professional Services. 

                                            ORGANIZATION CHART 

                                                      Legal 
                                                   Department


       Contracts and                             Legal Information                               Risk 
                              Real Estate                                   Litigation
        Documents                                   and Advice                                Management


                                                           City 


                                                       Boards and 
                                                      Commissions
                                                                                                                

                                                         85 

 
                           IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                               SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

       Research  and  draft  ordinances  that  maintain  and  improve  neighborhood  livability  and  public 
        safety 
       Assist  Building  and  Codes,  Planning  and  Police  departments  in  enforcing  applicable  laws 
        affecting neighborhoods 
       Assist  City  Engineer  and  City  departments  with  approved  projects  and  grants  for  construction 
        and improvement of infrastructure 
       Assist Parks and Recreation Department with community facilities and programs 

              STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

       Acquire interests in real estate required for City projects at the lowest reasonable price 
       Prevent  or  minimize  financial  losses  caused  by  claims  against  the  City  through  advice  and 
        document preparation 
       Enforce  performance and assist in collecting funds  owed to the  City under contracts, forms of 
        security and taxes 

               EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMERS SERVICE 

       Assist employees in complying with public record requests 
       Assist in accessibility review of City facilities and programs 

                                     ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

       Continue implementation of policies and guidelines for social media 
       Provide ordinances and resolutions for posting to City website 
       Provide content describing powers and functions of City government 

                                    FY 2013 DEPARTMENT GOALS 

       Promptly prepare and review contracts and other legal documents 
       Update development contracts 
       Complete the update to the City Code 
       Manage litigation in which City is a party 
 
 
 
 
 


                                                      86 

 
                                 PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS 

                                                                                      Actual              Actual             Actual
                                                                                     FY 2010             FY 2011            FY 2012
       Number of ordinances and resolutions written                                     73                  65                 57
       Number of real estate transactions                                              485                 224                201
       Number of public meetings attended                                                *                 165                172
       Number of contracts written or reviewed                                           *                 290                390
        * information not tracked during this time period                                                                                    
 

                                        EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

                                                                  
                                                                                    Legal
                                  Actual                  Budget                   Budget                  Estimated                 Budget
                                 FY 2010                  FY 2011                  FY 2012                  FY 2012                  FY 2013

Personnel Costs            $             633,128     $           691,423      $           692,848      $            689,914     $            715,732
Operating Costs            $               46,697                  57,672
                                                     $                        $              
                                                                                            69,250     $              86,710                   85,855
                                                                                                                                $               
Capital Expense                              1,843
                           $                         $                1,141   $                2,600                    2,300
                                                                                                       $                                       14,600
                                                                                                                                $               
Total Legal                $             681,668     $           750,236      $           764,698      $            778,924     $            816,187     
 




                                                                                                                                      
                                                                  
                                                                  
                                                                  
                                                                  


                                                               87 

 
                                   HUMAN RESOURCES SUMMARY 

                                           Legal Department
                                                               Actual    Actual Estimated Proposed
                                                              FY 2010   FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013
Job Description
     City Attorney                                              1         1         1        1
     Assistant City Attorney                                    1         1         1        1
     Staff Attorney                                             2         2         2        2
     Legal Assistant                                            3         2         2        3
     Administrative Assistant                                   0         1         1        0
Total Legal Department Human Resource Allocation                7         7         7        7        
                                




                                                   88 

 
                                    2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                    LEGAL DEPARTMENT

                                     2009/2010    2010/2011    2011/2012    2011/2012    2012/2013     INCREASE
    DESCRIPTIONS                      ACTUAL       ACTUAL      BUDGET       ESTIMATE     BUDGET       (DECREASE)

    PERSONNEL COSTS
    SALARIES & WAGES                                              511,932      511,932      530,977       19,045
       TOTAL SALARIES & WAGES           491,818      515,324      511,932      511,932      530,977       19,045
    SOCIAL SECURITY                      34,958       36,190       39,163       35,597       40,620        1,457
    MEDICAL - DENTAL                     48,411       68,693       74,446       74,328       71,414       (3,032)
    PENSION PLAN                         57,667       56,086       60,883       55,501       55,395       (5,488)
    RETIREMENT (401A)                                  2,998                     5,382        5,570        5,570
    LIFE INSURANCE                                       530                       478        3,720        3,720
    WORKERS' COMPENSATION                   274       11,602        6,424        6,696        8,036        1,612
    TOTAL PERSONNEL COSTS               633,128      691,423      692,848      689,914      715,732       22,884

    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
    OFFICE EQUIPMENT                      2,989        3,112        3,400        3,400        3,400            0
                                          2,989        3,112        3,400        3,400        3,400            0

    SUPPLIES
    POSTAGE                               1,285        1,431        1,400        1,400        1,400            0
    OFFICE                                3,547        3,471        5,500        4,000        5,000         (500)
    LIBRARY                              19,362       21,681       19,500       22,000       22,000        2,500
                                         24,194       26,583       26,400       27,400       28,400        2,000

    UTILITY SERVICE
    TELEPHONE                               961          924        1,000         800         1,000            0
    CELLULAR TELEPHONE                      517          355            0          10             0            0
                                          1,478        1,279        1,000         810         1,000            0

    TRAVEL AND SUBSISTENCE
    MILEAGE REIMBURSEMENT                    74          102          200          50           200            0
                                             74          102          200          50           200            0

    MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
    ASSOCIATION DUES                      3,430        5,095        5,250        5,400        5,855          605
    TRAINING PERSONNEL                    5,198        6,282        7,500        8,500        7,500            0
    LEGAL / PROFESSIONAL EXPENSES         4,378        4,872        6,000        3,000        6,000            0
    LEGAL / PROFESSIONAL SERVICES         3,727        6,307       15,000       35,000       30,000       15,000
    REAL ESTATE SERVICES                  1,215        2,858        3,500        2,000        2,500       (1,000)
    COMPUTER SOFTWARE                                    634          500          650          500            0
    OTHER MISCELLANEOUS                      14          548          500          500          500            0
                                         17,962       26,596       38,250       55,050       52,855       14,605

    OPERATING BUDGET                    679,825      749,095      762,098      776,624      801,587       39,489

    ADDITION TO FIXED ASSETS
    NORMAL REPLACEMENT-FURN & EQUIP                                                           2,600
    COPIER REPLACEMENT                                                                       12,000
                                          1,843        1,141        2,600        2,300       14,600       12,000

    TOTAL LEGAL DEPARTMENT              681,668      750,236      764,698      778,924      816,187       51,489     
                                                        89 

 
                                                                 

                                       HUMAN RESOURCES 

                                     DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The Human Resources Department is charged with recruiting, training and retaining a diverse and 
effective work force.  To accomplish this, Human Resources partners with departments and employees 
in: employee recruitment and staffing, payroll and benefits administration, wellness, employee training, 
employee relations and organizational development. 
 
Human Resources will continue the implementation of employee health insurance benefits that are 
designed to attract and retain the highest quality employees while maintaining strong and sustainable 
financial results.  Employee engagement and leadership training and development will be new initiatives 
in 2012‐2013.  Payroll operational efficiencies will be reviewed in preparation for a new Enterprise 
Resource Program (ERP) and Human Resources Information System (HRIS) as a multi‐year plan. 
 
Employee engagement is one of the principal goals for the City in the FY 2012‐2013 year.  Human 
Resources has budgeted $51,000 to plan, facilitate and deliver the first phase of programs designed to 
bring employees into better communications with the organization.   
 
In FY 2012, Human Resources introduced NeoGov to improve the process of applying, evaluating and 
hiring of City employees.  As phase two of an overall recruitment strategy, the Department is also 
implementing background checks ($15,000) and reviewing options for pre‐employment drug screening 
($7,500) of applicants. 

                                      ORGANIZATION CHART 



                                              Human 
                                             Resources


                        Employee                                                      Benefits 
    Recruitment                               Training              Payroll
                        Relations                                                   Administration

                                                                                                        

                                                   90 

 
                          IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                              SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

       Support other departments in recruiting, training and retaining the most effective work force for 
        the delivery of services 

              STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

       Implementation of Health Insurance benefits design in order to drive consumerism and wellness 
       Preparation of payroll operations for new HRIS system 

                EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

       Completion of the first phase of the Service Excellence training program for City 

                                   ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

       Communication and guidance with internal and external customers of NeoGov; applicant 
        tracking system 

                                   FY 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

       Implemented new Employee benefits programs resulting in administrative savings of 
        approximately $500,000 
       Implemented NeoGov as the City’s new applicant tracking software for employment; 
        redesigned/revised City of Murfreesboro paper employment application 
       Transitioned Water & Sewer benefits and payroll administration to Human Resources 
       Implemented E‐Verify in coordination with employment eligibility for new hires 
       Redesigned entrance area of the HR department for more efficient space utilization and 
        customer service 
       Co‐facilitated multiple Service Excellence courses with city departments 

       Completion and communication of revised attendance & absenteeism policy, revised sick 
        leave and bereavement policy 

                                            FY 2013 GOALS 

        Implement additional employee health benefits strategies focusing on consumerism and 
         wellness 
        Begin Phase I of Employee Engagement including research,  design and development of city‐
         wide employee engagement survey  
        Design, delivery of front line supervisor training to include FLSA, FMLA, and Managing 
         employee performance, to include (NeoGov)performance management tools  
                                                   91 

 
          Participate in multi‐year interface options with HRIS task force 
          Employee Service Award Program‐ Review and Propose options to City Administration 

                                    PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS 

                                                                                             Actual  Budget Estimated Proposed
                                                                                            FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013

    Number of applicants                                                                       2694             2400                 3334             4000
    Number of new hires                                                                         145             139                  123               130
    Rate of voluntary separation                                                              3.32%            3.32%                5.25%            5.00%
    Number of service excellence training hours delivered                                        0              700                  160               50
    Number of payrolls produced (including Water & Sewer)                                       77               77                  148               150

                                           EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

 
                                                                                 Human Resources
                                        Actual               Budget                  Budget                    Estimated                  Budget
                                       FY 2010               FY 2011                FY 2012                     FY 2012                   FY 2013

Personnel Costs               $             565,691     $           726,043       $           649,632      $            651,028      $            648,608
Operating Costs               $               77,352    $           128,483       $           110,584      $            105,391      $            194,932
Capital Expense                                 3,827
                              $                         $                3,798    $                5,000                    3,599
                                                                                                           $                         $                 4,180
Total Human Resources         $             646,870     $           858,324       $           765,216      $            760,018      $            847,720       
                                                                     




                                                                                                                                           
 
                                                                     
                                    
                                                                  92 

 
                                  HUMAN RESOURCES SUMMARY 

                                        Human Resources Department
                                                                 Actual    Actual Estimated Proposed
                                                                FY 2010   FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013
Job Description
     Human Resources Director                                      1        1         1        1
     Assistant Human Resources Director                            1        1         1        1
     Payroll Supervisor/Human Resource Specialist                  1        1         1        1
     Administrative Assistant                                      1        1         1        1
     Human Resources Assistants                                    5        5         5        5
Total Human Resources Department Allocation                        9        9         9        9
                                                                                 




                                                    93 

 
                                 2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                 HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT

                                  2009/2010       2010/2011     2011/2012   2011/2012   2012/2013    INCREASE
    DESCRIPTIONS                   ACTUAL          ACTUAL       BUDGET      ESTIMATE    BUDGET      (DECREASE)

    PERSONNEL COSTS
    SALARIES & WAGES                                              424,328     424,328     429,677         5,349
    OVERTIME                                                        6,000       5,000       6,000             0
       TOTAL SALARIES & WAGES         404,653       496,045       430,328     429,328     435,677         5,349
    SOCIAL SECURITY                    29,093        35,550        32,920      32,920      33,329           409
    MEDICAL - DENTAL                   83,109       106,147       106,650     106,650     104,628        (2,022)
    PENSION PLAN                       45,275        56,847        51,631      52,833      51,439          (192)
    LIFE INSURANCE                                                                  0       3,027         3,027
    WORKERS' COMPENSATION               3,561        31,454        28,103      29,297      20,508        (7,595)
    TOTAL PERSONNEL COSTS             565,691       726,043       649,632     651,028     648,608        (1,024)

    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
    OFFICE EQUIPMENT                   10,645        16,434        28,156      27,681      28,387          231
                                       10,645        16,434        28,156      27,681      28,387          231

    SUPPLIES
    POSTAGE                             1,587         1,212         1,500         400         200        (1,300)
    OFFICE                             11,234        11,765        12,400      13,188      12,545           145
    NEWSPAPERS-MAGAZINES                1,411                       1,428         428       1,000          (428)
    ADVERTISING                         7,390         6,596         4,700       6,100       5,000           300
                                       21,622        19,573        20,028      20,116      18,745        (1,283)

    INSURANCE
    BONDS                                376                           80           0           0           (80)
                                         376                0          80           0           0           (80)

    UTILITY SERVICE
    TELEPHONE                           1,408         1,534         1,500       1,600       1,600          100
    CELLULAR TELEPHONE                    137           776         1,200         909       1,000         (200)
                                        1,545         2,310         2,700       2,509       2,600         (100)

    CONTRACTUAL SERVICES
    BACKGROUND CHECKS                                                                      15,000       15,000
                                              0             0           0           0      15,000       15,000

    TRAVEL AND SUBSISTENCE
    MILEAGE REIMBURSEMENT                 47            267           250          31         100         (150)
                                          47            267           250          31         100         (150)

    MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
    ASSOCIATION DUES                      145           864           720         615         870          150
    TRAINING PERSONNEL                    193         3,995         6,000       5,000       6,000            0
    DRUG SCREENING                     35,871        34,526        37,500      37,500      45,000        7,500
    PHYSICAL AGILITY TESTING            4,626         5,576         5,500       5,700       5,500            0
    COMPUTER SOFTWARE                     892         9,653         1,150           0       5,330        4,180
    SURVEYS AND STUDIES                   945         4,585         2,500         500       8,400        5,900
    EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT                              19,991         5,000       5,600      51,000       46,000
    OTHER MISCELLANEOUS                   445        10,709         1,000         139       8,000        7,000
                                       43,117        89,899        59,370      55,054     130,100       70,730

    OPERATING BUDGET                  643,043       854,526       760,216     756,419     843,540       83,324

    ADDITION TO FIXED ASSETS
    NORMAL REPLACEMENT-FURN & EQUIP                                                         2,000
    (3) PCs                                                                                 2,180
                                        3,827         3,798         5,000       3,599       4,180         (820)

    TOTAL HUMAN RESOURCES DEPT        646,870       858,324       765,216     760,018     847,720       82,504      
                                                      94 

 
                                                                  

                                              JUDICIAL 

 

                                     DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The City Judge is the head of the Judicial Department and determines whether City Ordinances have 
been violated through a hearing and testimony from all necessary parties.  The Judge also determines 
the fine to be imposed if he determines an ordinance has been violated.  The City Judge oversees a staff 
of administrators who are responsible for maintaining the records of the Court, collection of fines and 
submitting all required reports to the State of Tennessee and other agencies. 
 
The renovation of the front counter where employees meet the public is budgeted at $24,000.  
Collection costs have been decreased by $45,000 to better reflect the first year results of the program.  
Through the expenditure of approximately $20,000 with a collection service, over $73,000 in delinquent 
fines were recovered in FY 2011‐2012. 

                                       ORGANIZATION CHART 



                                              City Judge

                     Court                               Collection 
                                     City Court                           Reporting
                    Records                               of fines
                                                                                         

                          IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                              SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

       Enforces codes that keep neighborhoods clean and well maintained 
                                


                                                   95 

 
                  STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

       Continue employment of collection agency for the collection of delinquent fines, costs and 
        interest related to City ordinance violations 

                   EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

       Continue participating in customer service training for City personnel  
       Continue to provide expanded court hours (night court) and monitor for effectiveness 
       Develop new City Court related topics monthly for the City’s website to inform citizens of new 
        laws, court procedures, etc. 

                                       FY 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

       Implemented two new night courts per month 
       During the first six months of night court 107 cases were adjudicated. 
       Implemented court scheduling changes to eliminate officer appearances on all but contested 
        cases so as to reduce officer overtime pay 

                                      FY 2013 DEPARTMENT GOALS 

       Reduce court fines receivable by 25% 
       Continue  to  investigate  more  automated,  paperless  court  management  software,  including 
        online credit card payment of citations 

                                   PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS 

                                            Actual    Actual  Budget Estimated Proposed
                                          FY 2010    FY 2011  FY 2012  FY 2011   FY 2013
        Court Fines Receivable          3,015,086 3,263,353 2,425,000 3,800,000 3,000,000
        Citations Processed                                                         70,000  
                                              68,289   57,012   54,660    77,000     
 

                                          EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

                                                                                       Judicial
                                    Actual                   Budget                    Budget                  Estimated                  Budget
                                   FY 2010                   FY 2011                   FY 2012                  FY 2012                   FY 2013

Personnel Costs              $             315,283      $           336,411       $           349,393      $            347,825       $            362,743
Operating Costs              $               33,873     $              28,342     $           103,925      $              46,145      $               57,925
Capital Expense              $                  2,578   $                   319   $                2,000   $                    870   $               26,000
Total Judicial               $             351,734      $           365,072       $           455,318      $            394,840       $            446,668  
                                                                     



                                                                  96 

 
                                                                                                  

                                       HUMAN RESOURCES SUMMARY 

                                            Judicial Department
                                                                   Actual    Actual Estimated Proposed
                                                                  FY 2010   FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013
    Job Description
       City Judge                                                   1         1         1        1
       Chief Court Clerk                                            1         1         1        1
       Administrative Support Specialist                            3         3         3        3
       Administrative Secretary                                     1         1         1        1
    Total Judicial Allocation                                       6         6         6        6        




                                                    97 

 
                                    2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                    JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT

                                     2009/2010    2010/2011     2011/2012   2011/2012   2012/2013    INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                          ACTUAL       ACTUAL       BUDGET      ESTIMATE    BUDGET      (DECREASE)

PERSONNEL COSTS
SALARIES & WAGES                                                  237,421     237,181     246,052         8,631
   TOTAL SALARIES & WAGES               230,274     233,286       237,421     237,181     246,052         8,631
SOCIAL SECURITY                          16,771      16,640        18,163      16,864      18,823           660
MEDICAL - DENTAL                         41,010      58,451        63,980      63,980      66,398         2,418
PENSION PLAN                             26,343      27,420        29,331      29,301      29,235           (96)
LIFE INSURANCE                                                                      0       1,718         1,718
WORKERS' COMPENSATION                       885         614           498         499         517            19
TOTAL PERSONNEL COSTS                   315,283     336,411       349,393     347,825     362,743        13,350

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
OFFICE EQUIPMENT                          1,628       3,238         5,000       4,100       5,000             0
                                          1,628       3,238         5,000       4,100       5,000             0

SUPPLIES
POSTAGE                                   3,652       3,680         6,000       3,000       5,000        (1,000)
OFFICE                                   11,083      12,471        14,500      12,500      14,500             0
                                         14,735      16,151        20,500      15,500      19,500        (1,000)

UTILITY SERVICE
TELEPHONE                                 1,486       1,467         1,600       1,550       1,600             0
                                          1,486       1,467         1,600       1,550       1,600             0

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
ASSOCIATION DUES                            405         405           825         805         825             0
PART TIME - JUDICIAL SERVICES             2,490       6,030         8,000       5,500       8,000             0
TRAINING PERSONNEL                          818         901         2,500         990       2,500             0
COLLECTION COSTS                         11,746          50        65,000      17,500      20,000       (45,000)
COMPUTER SOFTWARE                           317
OTHER MISCELLANEOUS                         248         100           500         200         500             0
                                         16,024       7,486        76,825      24,995      31,825       (45,000)

OPERATING BUDGET                        349,156     364,753       453,318     393,970     420,668       (32,650)

ADDITION TO FIXED ASSETS
NORMAL REPLACEMENT-FURN & EQUIP                                                             2,000
FRONT COUNTER REMODEL                                                                      24,000
                                          2,578           319       2,000         870      26,000        24,000

TOTAL JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT               351,734     365,072       455,318     394,840     446,668        (8,650)  
                                 




                                                    98 

 
                                                                           

                                                      POLICE 

                                          DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The Murfreesboro Police Department is committed to the protection of life and the prevention of crime 
and disorder. With an emphasis on community policing,  the Police Department  will  build  partnerships  
and  seek  proactive  approaches and innovative  solutions  to  address  crime  and  other  safety  issues  
in  Murfreesboro, which adversely affect the daily lives of our residents, neighbors and visitors.  
 
Through prompt, efficient, and courteous service, the Police Department will strive towards the ultimate 
goal  of  creating  a  better  quality  of  life.    This  is  being  accomplished  by  providing  proactive  community 
oriented police services, strategic and innovative responses to safety concerns or criminal activity, and 
the hard work of dedicated employees who strive to make a difference.   
 
The  228  police  officers,  32  dispatchers,  and  20  non‐sworn  support  staff  contribute  to  the  always 
challenging  fight  against  crime.    In  2011,  Part  I  crimes  reported  to  the  Police  increase  overall  by  1%, 
primarily  due  to  the  increase  in  assaults  and  motor  vehicle  theft  (MVT).    The  number  of  reported 
homicides, rapes, robberies, larcenies and arsons all declined.  Officers responded to 101,194 calls for 
service  (an  11%  increase  over  2010),  completed  13,974  official  police  reports,  initiated  9,565  criminal 
charges  against  defendants,  and  issued  30,723  citations  (including  16,547  violations  and  14,176 
warnings).   
 
The department is organized into six (6) divisions/sections; Uniformed Division, Criminal Investigations 
Division,  Administrative  Services  Division,  Operations  Division,  Communications  Section,  and 
Information Systems. 
 
The Uniformed Division, consisting of 163 sworn officers, is the largest single division of the Department 
and provides all uniformed police services for the citizens of Murfreesboro.  Operating 24 hours a day, 
the three (3) traditional patrol shifts provide police services by patrol car, motorcycle, bicycle, and foot 
of the 55.9 square miles included in the City limits of Murfreesboro.  This division includes the Special 
Operations  Unit  (S.O.U),  Fatal  Accident  Crash  Team  (F.A.C.T.),  Murfreesboro  Police  Alcohol  Counter‐
Measures Team (M.P.A.C.T.), Canine unit, Crime Suppression Unit, and Automated Traffic Enforcement.   
           
The Criminal Investigations Division is responsible for the investigation of crimes reported to police.  The 
division  is  divided  into  five  (5)  sections:  General  Investigations,  Vice/Narcotics,  Domestic  Violence, 
Intelligence,  Gang  Unit  and  Pawn  Shop  detail.    These  sections  are  supported  by  detectives  that  also 
serve on Crime Scene Investigation Team (C.S.I.) and Sexual Assault Response Team (S.A.R.T.). Together, 


                                                          99 

 
they process crime scenes, gather evidence, and interview victims, witnesses and suspects of crimes.  In 
2011, the CID was assigned 2,955 cases that ranged from theft to homicide. 
 
The  Administrative  Services  Division  is  responsible  for  many  of  the  business  functions,  as  well  as  the 
public relation services for the Department.  Alarms Enforcement, Personnel, Training, Firearms, Supply, 
Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.), Crime Prevention, School Patrol, and Media Relations are all 
based out of this division.  In 2011, we used grant funding to add a two officer team to implement the 
Gang Resistance Education and Training (G.R.E.A.T.) program to 4th grade students in four Murfreesboro 
City Schools.  In 2011, the training section provided or coordinated a total of 37,604 hours of training for 
Department personnel and outside law enforcement agencies.  Over 200 community events were either 
attended  or  hosted  by  department  personnel.    Firearms  training  resulted  in  97,952  rounds  of 
ammunition fired during training exercises. 
 
The  Operations  Division  consists  of  Internal  Affairs,  Records  Management,  Grant  Writing,  and  Front 
Desk.    Internal  Affairs  completed  thirty  (30)  internal  affairs  investigations  in  2011,  processed  154  off 
duty jobs, and provided 709 copies of in‐car video to officers and defense attorneys.   
 
The  Murfreesboro  Police  and  Fire  Communications  Center  serves  the  community  by  answering 
emergency and nonemergency calls for service, coordinating responses for those calls, and assisting the 
emergency  service  providers  in  protecting  life  and  property.    In  2011,  more  than  249,000  calls  were 
received and 101,194 calls for service were dispatched by Police and Fire Dispatchers. 
 
Information  Systems  consists  of  three  computer/IT  specialists,  working  under  the  direction  of  the 
Information Technology Department, with the goal of providing the most recent technology for police 
officers  and  dispatchers  to  utilize  during  day  to  day  operations.    In  2011,  traffic  crash  reports  began 
being completed on computer (TITAN) and e‐citation were implemented.  During the remainder of the 
2011‐2012  fiscal  year,  the  IT  staff  will  continue  work  towards  the  implementation  of  Field‐Based 
reporting and continued improvements to existing technology‐based systems and infrastructure for the 
Police and Fire Departments.  
 
The addition of paid meal time for eligible officers was added during FY 2012 as a mid‐year adjustment.  
The  FY  2013  budget  projects  an  additional  $1,000,000  for  continuing  the  practice  of  paying  for  meal 
time of eligible officers. 
 
An  additional  Detective  and  the  Department’s  first  Crime  Data  Analyst  have  been  added  as  new 
positions in this budget. 
 
In FY 2012, the Department will continue to monitor fuel usage as costs increase.  For the calendar year 
2011,  Murfreesboro  Police  logged  approximately  2,000,000  miles  on  department  vehicles.    The 
projected  fuel  costs  for  FY  2013  are  $765,159  based  on  the  best  estimates  available.    If  fuel  prices 
continue  to  increase,  the  Department  will  be  forced  to  adopt  additional  measures  to  reduce  fuel 
consumption.  Such measures would likely target discretionary use of vehicles, carpooling for non‐patrol 
functions, etc. 
 
For  FY  2012,  we  have  adjusted  the  revenue  projections  from  the  Automated  Red  Light  Enforcement 
program.  The City accepted a bid that eliminates financial risk to the City.  The program provider will be 
paid 100% ($50.00) up to the first 1,200 citations paid and 50% ($25.00) of all paid citations over and 
                                                         100 

 
above the initial 1,200 for the expected 3‐5 year term of the contract.  The City is not responsible for any 
other  costs  to  the  vendor.    The  City  has  budgeted  $856,200  in  revenues  and  $736,000  in  related 
expenses that will be paid to the program provider. 
 
Operating capital of $420,000 has been included in this budget, with the largest investment of $150,000 
planned to convert the Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD), remote messaging and mobile data systems to 
virtual servers. 
 

                                             ORGANIZATION CHART 

                                                          Police


          Uniformed          Criminal         Administrativ                           Communicatio   Information 
                                                                   Operations
           Division       Investigations       e Services                                 ns           Systems


                                General                               Policies and 
               Patrol                               Training
                             Investigations                           Procedures


              Special           Domestic          Community             Internal 
             Operations         Violence           Relations         Investigations


                                                    School             Records/
               Traffic            Vice                                 Evidence
                                                   Programs
                                                                       Property

                                                     Public 
                 K‐9          Intelligence
                                                  Information


                                                    Human 
                                                   Resources
                                                                                                                     
 

                             IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                                 SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

 
       Make Murfreesboro a safe place to live, work and visit 
       Address quality of life issues through the reduction of calls at repeat locations and the use of 
        special units 
       Addition of supervisory positions to the Criminal Investigation Division in order to improve the 
        overall span of control 
       Addition  of  police  positions  to  provide  additional  resources  for  department  programs  and 
        initiatives 
                                                     101 

 
         

              STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

       The relentless work of the department in crime prevention and law enforcement has created a 
        safe environment for investment and economic development 
         

                EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

       A second communications frequency for police has been initiated for better distribution of 
        messages 
       The continued use of Teleserve has improved efficiency by diverting non‐emergency calls  
       Purchase  and  replacement  of  police  vehicles  to  revive  the  take‐home  vehicle  program  and 
        replace high mileage police vehicles; 
       Participate in specialized customer service training 

                                     ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

       For  FY  2013,  Murfreesboro  Police  will  continue  existing  community  engagement  efforts  which 
        include:    Citizens  Police  Academy;  participation  in  the  Community  Anti‐Drug  Coalition  of 
        Rutherford  County;  the  Patterson  Park  Coalition;  Read  to  Succeed;  the  Wellness  Council  of 
        Rutherford County, the Rutherford County Child Advocacy Center; the Rutherford County Child 
        Abuse Coalition; and Leadership Rutherford (Adult and Youth). 
        “A Child is Missing” (ACIM), a free national broadcast service has been implemented to engage 
        the community in helping the police to locate missing children and elderly residents as quickly as 
        possible.   
       To  assist  with  the  prevention  of  property  crimes,  the  Department  has  historically  offered 
        neighborhood watch meetings to community groups.  These free programs provide information 
        on  home  security,  observation  and  reporting  of  suspicious  activity  in  neighborhoods,  and 
        inventory and identification of personal property.  Last year the Department added “Report It”, 
        an online service that allows people to record serial numbers and images of jewelry, electronics, 
        and any other valuables. Should those items ever be stolen, the information is easily available to 
        give  to  law  enforcement  investigators.   Citizens  can  store  an  unlimited  number  of  serial 
        numbers, item descriptions, and pictures, so items may be more easily identified in the event of 
        theft. This record may also be useful when filing claims with insurance providers.   
       The Department has also added CrimeMapping.com in 2011, an interactive website that allows 
        citizens  to  view  crimes  reported  to  Murfreesboro  Police  using  an  interactive  mapping 
        application driven by a street address.  This tool should assist citizens and neighborhood watch 
        members to be better informed about criminal activity in their neighborhoods and assist police 
        with reporting and prevention efforts. 
       In  2012,  we  anticipate  the  launch  of  an  on‐line  crime  reporting  program  offered  by  COPLogic, 
        Inc.  This program will allow citizens to report specific types of crimes to police via the internet. 

                                     FY 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

                                                      102 

 
       Hired thirteen (13) new Police employees, five (5) Police/Fire dispatchers, one (1) administrative 
        assistant,    one  (1)  parking  enforcement  officer,  one  (1)  Information  Desk  Clerk,  and  four  (4) 
        School Traffic Enforcement employees 
       Department  also  promoted  two  (2)  Majors,  one  (1)  Captain,  three  (3)  Lieutenants,  and  six  (6) 
        Sergeants as a result of retirements and vacancies 
       Six (6) police officers were reassigned to the Criminal Investigations Division as detectives 
       Continued  the  implementation  of  the  Gang  Resistance  Education  Training  (G.R.E.A.T.) 
        curriculum. G.R.E.A.T. was designed to strengthen life skills and decision making for at‐risk youth 
        susceptible  to  gang  recruitment.    This  program  was  formally  introduced  into  classrooms  of 
        selected city schools in January 2011.  
       Achieved reductions in five (5) of the eight (8) Part I crime categories, including homicide, rape, 
        robbery, larceny and arson 
       Achieved  reduction  in  fatal  accident  crashes  from  six  (6)  in  2010  to  two  (2)  in  2011,  a  67% 
        decrease 
       Launched the Automated Citation process for the electronic issuance of traffic violations 
       Relocated the Criminal Investigations Division to larger facilities 

                                     FY 2013 DEPARTMENT GOALS 

       Continue and enhance an aggressive gang interdiction strategy using existing police resources as 
        well as local, state and federal partnerships, and any available funding which may expand these 
        efforts; 
       Continuation  of  the  Automated  Traffic  Enforcement  program  to  include  increased  targeting  of 
        violators which contribute to traffic crashes while establishing the City of Murfreesboro program 
        as a model for other municipalities; 
       Continuation of Selective Traffic Enforcement Program to target traffic enforcement areas based 
        on crash data; 
       Launch of Field‐Based Reporting (FBR) for Police incident, arrest and crash reports; 
       Initial excavation and fencing for Police K‐9 training facility at the Coleman Property; 
       Research and implementation of a data‐driven policing model for Murfreesboro Police; 
       Continue working toward State Accreditation; 
       Feasibility study of  700 MHz P25 digital two‐way radio system; 
       Continued development and implementation of wrecker ordinance; 
       Consider  a  compressed  workweek  program  for  the  Uniformed  Division  and  Communications 
        Section of the department. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

                                   PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS 

                                                       103 

 
                                                              Actual          Actual          Budget Estimated Proposed
       Workload Indicator                                    FY 2010         FY 2011          FY 2012        FY 2012          FY 2013
       Telephone Calls Received                              188,823         185,673          200,000         230,504   240,000
       Calls For Service                                       87,474          94,942         102,000         105,340   110,000
       Traffic Crashes ‐ Total                                   8,461
                                                                                 4,453
                                                                                                  4,200        4,708        
                                                                                                                                   4,754
           Fatalities                                                  10                6                3                4               4
           Injury                                                2,083
                                                                                    928
                                                                                                  1,000        1,302        
                                                                                                                                   1,000
           Non‐Injury                                            6,368
                                                                                 3,521
                                                                                                  4,000        3,402        
                                                                                                                                   3,750
       Incident Reports                                        23,532          17,323           17,000      14,288     16,000
       Arrests                                                    
                                                                 8,026           7,944
                                                                                                  8,500        8,350        
                                                                                                                                   8,500
       Traffic Citations                                       13,683          13,930           18,000      19,846     19,000
       Firearms Training (Rounds Fired)                      144,538         103,757          100,000         104,150   100,000
       Training Hours ‐ Total                                  20,963          22,228           27,000      30,000     30,000
       D.A.R.E. Classes                                             246
                                                                                     
                                                                                    236              240            
                                                                                                                      236             240
       Community Education Classes                                  238
                                                                                     
                                                                                    116              120            
                                                                                                                      140             120
       Citizens Police Academy (C.P.A.) 
       Graduates                                                       35              13               25                 30
                                                                                                                                                25
       Internal Investigation                                          38              27               32                 35
                                                                                                                                                30
       Video Tapes (VHS) Copied                                      
                                                                    631              
                                                                                    545               
                                                                                                     575                  
                                                                                                                         600                 575
                                                                                                                                                      
 
                                     Service           FY 10                    FY 11               FY 12                  FY 12              FY 13
Service                             Standard           Actual                   Actual             Budget                Estimated          Projected
                                                                                                                               
P.O.S.T. Certification             100% of all         100%                        99%              100%                   100%                100%
Response to Emergencies          4.5 minutes*           3.5                        4.3               4.4                     4.5                4.4
Police Resources                   3.0 FT Per           2.8                        2.6               2.6                     2.6                2.6
Reduction in Fatal Crashes             20%                7                         4                 4                       3                  4
   *includes 56 priority one call for service classifications                                                                               
 

                                               EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

                                                                                          Police
                                         Actual                   Budget                 Budget                 Estimated                  Budget
                                        FY 2010                   FY 2011                FY 2012                 FY 2012                   FY 2013

Personnel Costs                            16,791,815
                                   $                         $      17,898,213      $      18,688,103               18,609,599
                                                                                                             $                        $       20,114,644
Operating Costs                    $          3,361,154      $        3,484,687     $        3,833,432       $         3,785,582      $         4,583,805
Capital Expense                    $               22,100    $           496,439    $           394,620      $            466,823     $            420,943
Total Police                       $        
                                           20,175,069        $      21,879,339      $      22,916,155        $       
                                                                                                                    22,862,004        $       25,119,392      




                                                                     104 

 
    105 

 
                                    HUMAN RESOURCES SUMMARY 

                                              Police Department
                                                                   Actual    Actual Estimated Proposed
                                                                  FY 2010   FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013
Job Description
   Chief                                                            1         1         1        1
   Deputy Chief                                                     1         1         1        1
   Assistant Chief                                                  1         1         1        1
   Major                                                            4         4         4        4
   Captain                                                          4         4         4        3
   Lieutenant                                                       9         9         9        10
   Sergeant                                                         30        30        31       30
   Detective                                                        30        33        33       32
   Police Officers I and II                                        139       145       144      147
      Sworn Personnel                                              219       228       228      229

Civilian
    Communications Supervisor                                       4         4        4         7
    Dispatcher                                                      28        28       28        25
    Parking Officer                                                 2         2        2         2
    Crime Analyst                                                                                1
    Administrative Assistant                                                                     1
    Department Coordinator                                          2         2        2         1
    Administrative Support Specialist                               5         5        5         5
    Administrative Secretary                                        1         1        1         2
    Secretary                                                       3         3        3         2
    MIS Coordinator (moved to IT Dept)                              1         1        0         0
    Technical Support Specialist (moved to IT Dept)                 2         2        0         0
    Police Clerk                                                    5         0        0         0
    Police Evidence Technician                                      0         5        5         5
   Custodian                                                        2         2        2         2
        Civilian Personnel                                          55        55       52        53

    Information Desk                                                7         7        7         7
    Private School Traffic Patrol                                   3         3        3         3
    School Traffic Patrol                                           24        24       24        24
        Total Part‐Time Positions                                   34        34       34        34

       Total Police Allocation                                     308       317       314      316       
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                      106 

 
                                          2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                          POLICE DEPARTMENT

                                           2009/2010    2010/2011    2011/2012     2011/2012    2012/2013      INCREASE
    DESCRIPTIONS                            ACTUAL       ACTUAL      BUDGET        ESTIMATE     BUDGET        (DECREASE)

    PERSONNEL COSTS
    SALARIES & WAGES                                                 11,925,505                 12,195,140         269,635
    ALLOWANCE FOR VACANCIES - 1.5%                                     (178,883)                  (182,927)         (4,044)
    ESTIMATED OVERTIME PAY                                              650,000                    650,000               0
    MEAL TIME PAY                                                                                1,000,000       1,000,000
    HOLIDAY PAY                                                         340,000                    338,202          (1,798)
    ALLOWANCE FOR MILITARY LEAVE                                       (147,911)                  (187,564)        (39,653)
       TOTAL NET SALARIES & WAGES          11,655,484   12,359,868   12,588,711 12,717,192      13,812,851       1,224,140
    SOCIAL SECURITY                           866,807      905,048      966,504    904,549         987,131          20,627
    MEDICAL - DENTAL                        2,142,132    2,333,128    2,693,528  2,477,429       2,684,418          (9,110)
    PENSION PLAN                            1,262,383    1,275,021    1,338,783  1,314,281       1,201,908        (136,875)
    RETIREMENT (401A)                                        6,936                  41,527          84,986          84,986
    LIFE INSURANCE                                           1,888                   7,307          82,407          82,407
    WORKERS' COMPENSATION                     865,009    1,016,324    1,100,577  1,147,314       1,260,943         160,366
    TOTAL PERSONNEL COSTS                  16,791,815   17,898,213   18,688,103 18,609,599      20,114,644       1,426,541

    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
    VEHICLES & MACHINERY-FLEET                264,703     321,891      328,715       314,538      343,926          15,211
    VEHICLES & MACHINERY                       62,776     100,039      110,000       110,000      110,000               0
    RADIOS                                     26,431      31,124       20,000        13,000       15,000          (5,000)
    GUNS                                        1,996         294        4,200         4,000        6,000           1,800
    OFFICE EQUIPMENT                          157,477     135,539      130,000       130,000      140,000          10,000
    FIRE EXTINGUISHERS                            532       1,462        4,500         4,500        4,500               0
    TRAFFIC TIMERS                              3,316       6,008        5,000         7,110        5,000               0
    K-9                                         4,749       5,630        6,500         3,500        6,500               0
    VIDEO EQUIPMENT                            12,079      15,321       15,000        24,500       15,000               0
    MOBILE DATA TERMINALS                      94,583      74,118       75,000        85,500       90,000          15,000
    INTERNET AND NETWORK                       11,120      12,284       20,000        20,000       20,000               0
    BUILDINGS                                  65,091      85,771       75,000        75,000       75,000               0
                                              704,853     789,481      793,915       791,648      830,926          37,011

    SUPPLIES
    POSTAGE                                     6,776       7,168         6,000         2,500        6,000              0
    OFFICE                                     56,496      75,447        65,975        69,500       65,975              0
    EMPLOYEE                                    8,977       9,528         8,000         8,700        8,000              0
    JANITORIAL                                 18,808      12,804        17,000        15,000       20,000          3,000
    FUEL                                      407,097     507,719       671,225       581,201      765,159         93,934
    AMMUNITION                                 30,642      47,399        55,000        55,000       55,000              0
    FLASHLIGHTS, BATTERIES, VIDEO TAPES        15,803       1,495        20,000        20,000       20,000              0
    CRIME PREVENTION                            3,202       3,236         3,250         3,250        5,000          1,750
    CLOTHING                                  144,517     204,371       204,000       204,000      224,975         20,975
    CLOTHING - CLEANING                        65,832      68,013        60,000        56,295       60,000              0
    MISCELLANEOUS SUPPLIES                      6,100       9,215        10,000        10,000       10,000              0
                                              764,250     946,395     1,120,450     1,025,446    1,240,109        119,659

    INSURANCE
    AUTOMOBILE                                205,456     180,929            0             0      185,949         185,949
    POLICE LIABILITY                          120,922     149,319      175,000       176,821      196,821          21,821
                                              326,378     330,248      175,000       176,821      382,770         207,770      

                                                            107 

 
                               2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                               POLICE DEPARTMENT

                                2009/2010    2010/2011    2011/2012    2011/2012    2012/2013     INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                     ACTUAL       ACTUAL      BUDGET       ESTIMATE     BUDGET       (DECREASE)
UTILITY SERVICE
ELECTRIC                           153,564     180,640      185,000      145,000      185,000              0
WATER AND SEWER                      8,773       6,961        8,000        6,500        8,000              0
GAS                                 10,980       9,675       15,000       12,000       15,000              0
TELEPHONE                           61,073      66,667       51,000       58,500       55,000          4,000
CELLULAR PHONE                     103,905     103,369      105,000      105,000      105,000              0
MDT - CELLULAR COMMUNICATION        70,998      74,489       81,000       81,000       85,000          4,000
                                   409,293     441,801      445,000      408,000      453,000          8,000

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
EMPLOYEE MED/PSYCHOLOGICAL          18,093      21,763       15,000       20,000       15,000              0
SEX OFFENDER EXPENSE                 1,079       2,425                                  2,500          2,500
PAROLE OPPOSITION TRAVEL                                      3,000            0        3,000              0
ASSOCIATION DUES                     3,102       4,128        3,000        4,300        5,000          2,000
TRAINING PERSONNEL                  61,296     118,529      120,000      120,000      135,000         15,000
DISPATCHER TRAINING                  2,334      23,914       24,000       15,000       24,000              0
CADCOR TRAINING & SUPPLIES                                   25,000            0       25,000              0
LABORATORY FEES                                              25,000            0       25,000              0
STATE FINES - PASS-THRU            222,131     178,543      220,000      201,000      220,000              0
MEDICAL SERVICE - ARRESTEES                         42        3,000            0        3,000              0
PRINTRAK - ANNUAL AGREEMENT         25,000      25,000       25,000       25,000       25,000              0
DRUG PROGRAMS                        1,502                    1,500        1,500        3,000          1,500
FELONY FUNDS                                     1,000        5,000        5,000       15,000         10,000
RENT - CID                                                                39,750       76,500         76,500
D.A.R.E. PROGRAMS                   16,433      12,722       10,000       10,000       10,000              0
JAG GRANT                           22,715      28,726       46,567       46,567       84,500         37,933
JAG GRANTS - ARRA                  188,061       3,922                                                     0
GANG PASS-THRU GRANT - MHA                       4,874                    225,000      225,000       225,000
GRAFFITI ERADICATION                   280         227         2,000          500        2,000             0
COMPUTER SOFTWARE                   15,137      37,451        15,000       15,000       18,500         3,500
RED LIGHT CAMERA PROGRAM           556,054     365,633       736,000      635,050      740,000         4,000
OTHER MISCELLANEOUS                 23,163     147,863        20,000       20,000       20,000             0
                                 1,156,380     976,762     1,299,067    1,383,667    1,677,000       377,933

OPERATING BUDGET                20,152,969   21,382,900   22,521,535   22,395,181   24,698,449      2,176,914

ADDITION TO FIXED ASSETS
NORMAL REPLACEMENT - FURN & EQUIP                                                      59,357
EVIDENCE DRYING CABINET - CID                                                           8,995
FUMING CHAMBER - CID                                                                    5,695
DOWN-FLOW WORKSTATION - CID                                                             3,693
FUME CHAMBER / HOOD - CID                                                               5,580
ACT 7000 MOBILE COMM CTR - CID                                                          8,995
ACT 7000IP MOBILE COMM CTR - CID                                                       11,195
PL500 FORENSIC LIGHT - CID                                                             18,933
CONVERT CAD/RMS/MOBILE SYSTEM TO VIRTUAL SERVER                                       150,000
MULTI-FUNCITON COPIER - RECORDS                                                        20,000
(20) COMPUTERS - COMM                                                                  63,000
VID STORAGE - KUSTOM SIGNAL SYSTEMS                                                    23,000
VID STORAGE - PANASONIC SYSTEMS                                                        21,000
WIRELESS ACCESS PT FOR MDTs                                                            13,500
TRAILER - 20' - FLAT BED                                                                8,000
                                    22,100   496,439        394,620      466,823      420,943         26,323

TOTAL POLICE DEPARTMENT         20,175,069   21,879,339   22,916,155   22,862,004   25,119,392      2,203,237    


                                                 108 

 
                                                                      

                                             FIRE & RESCUE 

                                       DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The mission of the Murfreesboro Fire & Rescue Department is to deliver the highest level of emergency 
response with the greatest margin of safety in the most fiscally responsible way.  Personnel are 
dedicated to providing progressive fire protection, rescue, medical first responder, codes enforcement 
and inspection, and public fire safety education.  The Department also provides the community with a 
coordinated and planned response to natural and man‐made disasters. 
 
The Murfreesboro Fire & Rescue Department maintains an Insurance Services Office (ISO) rating of Class 
2, placing the department in the top 1% of fire protection agencies in the United States.  Nine stations 
and 187 employees provide fire suppression, medical first responder, rescue, hazardous material 
response, inspections, plans review of commercial structures, and public education on a full time basis.  
The department responded to 10,921 calls for service during Fiscal Year 2011 and is projected to have 
responded to 11,566 by the end of FY 2012.  
 
After review of the pace of development, the Fire & Rescue Department management recommended 
not to open Station 10.  Only 65 single family dwelling building permits have been issued in Station 10’s 
service area.  Station 9 can still meet average response times to fire calls in Station 10’s district. 
 
MFRD  was  awarded  the  Fire  Prevention  and  Safety  Grant  in  February  2011.    This  grant  funded  2500 
dual‐sensor smoke alarms, 100 smoke alarms/detectors with a visual signal, and 100 bedside fire alarms 
with  motion  sensors.    Total  cost  for  the  smoke  alarms  was  $54,755  with  the  City’s  portion  being 
approximately $10,995. 
 
In February 2012, MFRD began installing the three types of smoke alarms.  The dual detection device 
consists of a photoelectric and an ionization detector combined in one unit.  The bedside fire alarms are 
a “bed shaker” device which activates when existing “T3” detectors activate.  The third unit is a smoke 
detector with an integrated strobe light that flashes when the unit is activated by smoke.  These 
detection devices are available to the citizens of Murfreesboro.  The “bed shaker” devices and the 
strobe units are primarily for the hearing impaired.   
 
The citizens of Murfreesboro have been made aware of Project SAFE through several media outlets 
including DNJ, WGNS, CityTV, WKRN Channel 2, WSMV Channel 4, and News Channel 5.  CityTV also did 
a video segment on Project SAFE.  In addition, we have several signs located at select fire stations.  
Citizens must call Fire Administration to participate.  Their name, address, and information on which 


                                                     109 

 
detector they are interested in is taken and distributed to the appropriate personnel.  The citizens are 
contacted and an appointment is scheduled for installation. 
 
To date, we have installed 181 dual detectors, 42 “bed shakers”, seven strobe detectors, and have 
replaced 107 batteries for existing detectors.  We anticipate these numbers to increase as we continue 
with Project SAFE. 
 
The department is organized into four divisions:  Administration, Fire Suppression and Emergency 
Response, Prevention, and Training. 
 
        The Administration Division is responsible for day‐to‐day management and supervision of the 
        fire department; oversees, directs and evaluates fire suppression and emergency response, fire 
        prevention, and training; assures operational readiness with proper staffing, equipment and 
        training.  It also is responsible for general policies and administration for the protection of life 
        and property, evaluates needs and makes recommendations on facilities, apparatus, and 
        equipment and plans capital improvement projects and timetables for implementation. 
 
        Fire Suppression and Emergency Response Division is  responsible for the 24‐hour per day 
        provision of emergency services including medical first responder, extrication, structure fires, 
        hazardous materials response, structural collapse response, water rescue, and major disasters.   
 
        The Fire Prevention Division provides fire inspection, codes enforcement and site plans review 
        and approval.  The Division conducts investigations to determine the origin and cause of fires, 
        and receives and distributes smoke detectors within the City.  The division leads in the 
        education of youth and adults in fire prevention and safety through programs such as “Freddie 
        the Fire Truck,” the Fire Safety house, “Dante’s Dance”, and participation in National Fire 
        Prevention Week. 
 
        The Training Division provides fire, medical, rescue, hazardous material and leadership training 
        to meet all department, state, and federal standards.  It conducts daily training to ensure that 
        responding personnel are competent in their duties, safe in the manner of their response, and 
        productive under difficult circumstances. 
 
As the role of the Department moves towards responding to medical emergencies, the need for 
additional training has been identified.  Funding for increased off‐duty training of $35,000 has been 
included and will commence in January 2013. 
 
All ten stations have been budgeted for lighted, ground level identification signs at a budget of $82,500.  
Several stations have been scheduled for minor renovations at an investment of $31,600. 
 
 
                                  




                                                    110 

 
                                       ORGANIZATION CHART 

                                                Murfreesboro 
                                                Fire & Rescue


                                     Fire Suppression 
                                                            Fire Prevention 
                    Administration    and Emergency                            Training
                                                            and Education
                                         Response


                                          Fire Suppression



                                           Medical First 
                                           Responder


                                         Extrication and 
                                             Rescue



                                          Water Rescue
                                                                                                            

                          IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                              SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

       Maintain a Class 2 rating from the Insurance Services Office (ISO), which places the Department 
        in the top 1 percent in the nation 
       Superior response times in emergencies due to adequate staffing and studied location of 
        stations and manpower 
       Conduct routine fire inspections on existing buildings 
       Distribute free smoke detectors to seniors, burn out victims and others in need 
       Provide fire safety education programs in the schools 

              STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

       Strong fire rating assists with the recruitment of industry and other business 
       Maintain an excellent response time to continue to save buildings and property from fire losses 

               EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

       Continue to provide excellent training programs for fire personnel 
       Maintain an average response time of four minutes for all emergency calls 

                                                     111 

 
       Maintain the City’s ISO rating, which places in the top 1 percent of fire departments in the 
        nation 
       Participate in the second phase of a customer service training for City personnel  
         

                                      ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

 
       Broadcast Fire Safety Public Service Announcements (PSAs) on City TV to educate our citizens on 
        home fire hazards such as the safe use of oxygen, wall heaters, candles, etc.  Post these PSAs on 
        Facebook.  Also post weekly fire safety tips and messages such as “Never leave cooking 
        unattended.”  Engage with the community by answering questions arising from the PSAs and 
        safety tips. 
       Post pictures and video of the Citizens Fire Academy on Facebook to inspire interest in Academy 
        attendance 
       Post the department’s monthly newsletter, annual report, monthly statistics, training pictures 
        and other interesting information and facts about the department on Facebook to teach the 
        public more about the Department’s role in the community 

                                      FY 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

       Modified department’s name to Murfreesboro Fire & Rescue Department 
       Remodeled HQ to include a women’s locker room 
       Installed an emergency generator at Headquarters (59% funded by a federal grant) 
       Updated Transponder boxes at all fire stations and Dispatch 
       Achieved 100% state certified officers 
       Trained  additional  personnel  on  structural  collapse  and  technical  rescue  to  prepare  for  Heavy 
        Rescue Service 
       Revamped and conducted Project SAFE, “Smoke Alarms for Everyone” 
       Participated in numerous events for the public, including annual smoke detector program, 
        National Night Out, and Toys for Tots 
       Launched first annual Years of Service Awards Presentation for employees 
       The estimated property value saved by MFD was $7.8 million in FY 2011 

                                      FY 2013 DEPARTMENT GOALS 

       Provide citizens with a “Post‐Incident Care Guide” to further enhance our effort for service 
        excellence 
       Continue study of a Training Facility to help maintain ISO 2 rating and facilitate training of 
        personnel 
       Ladder Truck Replacement 
       Conduct a Citizens Fire Academy during the fiscal year 
       Conduct a technical rescue refresher course for existing personnel 
       Update policies and job descriptions to reflect current services 
 
                                   
                                                      112 

 
                                     PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS 

                                                    Actual              Actual             Budget             Estimate            Proposed
Workload Indicator                                 FY 2010             FY 2011            FY 2012              FY 2012            FY 2013

Number of emergency calls                          9,718                10,921               10,800     11,566                        12,248
Estimated property saved from fire              $9,119,253            $7,837,134         $6,000,000 $6,000,000                    $6,000,000
Personnel training hours                          69,346                62,313               69,000     54,000                        58,000
Number of inspections                              4,837                 4,723                5,300      4,250                         4,500
Fire education contacts                           25,335                27,450               26,500     27,000                        26,500
                                                                   
                                                                                    Actual Actual Budget Estimate Proposed
              Service                            Service Standard                  FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2012 FY 2013

Response to emergency incidents      4 minute standard response time                 3:50            4:08       < 4:00       < 4:00        < 4:00
Estimated property saved from fire   % of property value                              75%           76%           75%          75%           75%
Personnel training hours             20 hours per person, per month                  100%           100%         100%         100%          100%
State certified officers             100%                                             98%           100%         100%         100%          100%
Plans reviewed by due date           100%                                            100%           100%         100%         100%          100%
Fire education contacts              15% of the population                           25%            25%           24%          24%           25%
Residential structure fire cause 
determined rate                      82% national average                             92%           89%            90%          90%           90%
                                                                   

                                            EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

                                                                                    Fire
                                      Actual                Budget                Budget                Estimated                Budget
                                     FY 2010                FY 2011               FY 2012                FY 2012                 FY 2013

Personnel Costs                         12,206,172
                                $                       $      12,456,952     $      13,086,102             12,829,901
                                                                                                     $                      $       13,793,603
Operating Costs                 $             964,665   $        1,353,064    $        1,311,393     $         1,203,934    $         1,391,721
Capital Expense                 $             145,694   $           213,009   $           103,700    $            150,800   $            163,375
Total Fire                      $        
                                        13,316,531      $      14,023,025     $      14,501,195      $       
                                                                                                            14,184,635      $       15,348,699      




                                                               113 

 
                                                                                             

                                   HUMAN RESOURCES SUMMARY 

                                       Fire & Rescue Department
                                                               Actual    Actual Estimated Proposed
                                                              FY 2010   FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013
Job Description
   Chief                                                           1      1         1        1
   Deputy Chief                                                    1      1         1        1
   Assistant Chief                                                 3      3         3        3
   Shift Commander                                                 3      3         3        3
   Assistant Fire Marshal                                          3      3         3        3
   Training Coordinator                                            2      2         2        2
   Department Coordinator                                          2      2         2        2
   Administrative Support Specialist                               1      1         1        1
   Captain                                                         33     33        33       32
   Driver                                                          48     48        48       48
   Firefighter II                                                  28     28        27       35
   Firefighter I                                                   62     64        63       56
         Full‐Time Positions                                      187    189       187      187

    Clerk                                                          1      1         1           1
    Supply and Maintenance Personnel                               1      1         1           1
         Part‐Time Positions                                       2      2         2           2

        Total Fire Allocation                                     189    191       189      189       
 
 
                                                114 

 
                                2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                FIRE & RESCUE DEPARTMENT

                                 2009/2010    2010/2011    2011/2012     2011/2012    2012/2013     INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                      ACTUAL       ACTUAL      BUDGET        ESTIMATE     BUDGET       (DECREASE)

PERSONNEL COSTS
SALARIES & WAGES:
   SALARIED EMPLOYEES                                         968,642                  1,056,405       87,763
   HOURLY EMPLOYEES                                         7,820,333                  7,957,555      137,222
ESTIMATED OVERTIME PAY                                         92,000                    122,000       30,000
HOLIDAY PAY                                                   306,000                    307,000        1,000
ALLOWANCE FOR MILITARY LEAVE                                  (10,103)                                 10,103
   TOTAL NET SALARIES & WAGES     8,732,925    8,864,951    9,176,872     8,940,932    9,442,960      266,088
SOCIAL SECURITY                     650,426      647,358      701,809       690,551      719,020       17,211
MEDICAL - DENTAL                  1,644,001    1,800,552    1,969,778     1,905,028    2,177,074      207,296
PENSION PLAN                        989,822      993,095    1,043,597     1,080,715    1,011,635      (31,962)
RETIREMENT (401A)                                    456                      9,477       22,710       22,710
LIFE INSURANCE                                       231                        911       62,492       62,492
WORKERS' COMPENSATION               188,998      150,309      194,046       202,287      357,712      163,666
TOTAL PERSONNEL COSTS            12,206,172   12,456,952   13,086,102    12,829,901   13,793,603      707,501

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
VEHICLES & MACHINERY-FLEET          200,965      230,569      267,081       231,669      264,558       (2,523)
VEHICLES & MACHINERY                 16,107       19,484       35,000        32,000       58,000       23,000
RADIOS                                4,335        4,633        4,700         3,000        4,700            0
OFFICE EQUIPMENT                      3,856        3,147        4,200         3,600        5,200        1,000
FIRE EXTINGUISHERS                      961          776        1,500         1,000        1,500            0
APPLIANCE REPAIR                      1,651        2,311        2,700         2,406        2,700            0
HOSE & NOZZLES                           96        5,460        7,500         7,500        8,500        1,000
VIDEO EQUIPMENT                          55          379          500           218          500            0
MOBILE DATA TERMINALS                   215                       500           200          500            0
BUILDINGS                            48,467       70,168       54,700        54,700       86,300       31,600
                                    276,708      336,927      378,381       336,293      432,458       54,077

SUPPLIES
POSTAGE                                 223          251          350           250          350            0
OFFICE                               17,429       18,395       20,000        18,320       18,000       (2,000)
NEWSPAPERS - MAGAZINES                1,715        1,721        1,750         1,720        1,750            0
EMPLOYEE                                562          474          600           600          750          150
JANITORIAL                           40,183       29,018       39,000        33,800       35,500       (3,500)
RAGS, TOWELS, ETC.                                   295          300           300          400          100
RESPONSE SUPPLIES                    30,085       29,185       30,000        30,000       39,985        9,985
FUEL                                 82,911      108,469      138,112       126,091      169,538       31,426
FLASHLIGHTS, BATTERIES, ETC.          3,763        4,366        6,000         5,000        5,000       (1,000)
FIRE PREVENTION                      12,343        7,948       10,000         7,500        8,000       (2,000)
CHEMICALS                             1,215        2,483        2,500         2,500        2,500            0
HAND TOOLS & HARDWARE                 1,602        1,980        2,000         1,500        2,000            0
STATION/HOUSE SUPPLIES                2,464        2,935        3,000         3,000        3,000            0
CLOTHING                            118,287      150,167      152,000       152,000      183,400       31,400
CLOTHING - CLEANING                  23,932       22,798       24,500        24,250       25,500        1,000
MISCELLANEOUS SUPPLIES                  484          535          600           600        1,000          400
SMOKE DETECTORS                         491          500        5,500         5,500          500       (5,000)
                                    337,689      381,520      436,212       412,931      497,173       60,961  
 




                                                   115 

 
                            2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                            FIRE & RESCUE DEPARTMENT

                              2009/2010     2010/2011    2011/2012       2011/2012    2012/2013     INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                   ACTUAL        ACTUAL      BUDGET          ESTIMATE     BUDGET       (DECREASE)
INSURANCE
AUTOMOBILE                         74,383       78,119                                    82,390       82,390
                                   74,383       78,119               0           0        82,390       82,390

UTILITY SERVICE
ELECTRIC                          125,445      144,694      175,000         145,000      168,000        (7,000)
WATER AND SEWER                    14,484       16,099       16,500          16,500       20,500         4,000
TELEPHONE                          41,417       45,704       50,000          50,000       54,000         4,000
CELLULAR PHONE                     15,730       16,144       18,800          13,500       14,200        (4,600)
FIRE HYDRANT                                                 10,000               0       10,000             0
                                  197,076      222,641      270,300         225,000      266,700        (3,600)

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
USE OF EMPLOYEE'S CAR                  13          178          300             225          300             0
PSYCHOLOGICAL                         702          936        2,000           2,000        2,500           500
ASSOCIATION DUES                    1,700        1,730        1,900           1,900        2,200           300
COMPUTER SOFTWARE                               18,889        1,000             180        7,000         6,000
TRAINING PERSONNEL                 50,632       58,727       77,000          73,000       75,000        (2,000)
RESPIRATORY PROJECT                14,977       13,277       16,000          14,000       14,500        (1,500)
OTHER FEDERAL GRANTS                6,758       96,259      121,300         130,905            0      (121,300)
OTHER MISC GRANTS                              138,952                            0            0             0
OTHER MISCELLANEOUS                 4,027        4,909        7,000           7,500       11,500         4,500
                                   78,809      333,857      226,500         229,710      113,000      (113,500)

OPERATING BUDGET              13,170,837    13,810,016   14,397,495      14,033,835   15,185,324      787,829

ADDITION TO FIXED ASSETS
NORMAL REPLACEMENT-FURN & EQUIP                                                           70,675
COPIER - ADMINISTRATION                                                                   10,200
LIGHTED SIGNS FOR STATIONS                                                                82,500
                                  145,694      213,009      103,700         150,800      163,375       59,675

TOTAL FIRE DEPARTMENT         13,316,531    14,023,025   14,501,195      14,184,635   15,348,699      847,504      




                                                 116 

 
                                                                 

                                     BUILDING AND CODES 

                                     DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The Building and Codes Department insures the health and safety of Murfreesboro residents through 
the consistent application of adopted building codes, inspections of new and renovated structures and 
property maintenance standards.  The department oversees all residential and commercial construction 
beginning with the review of plans, through onsite inspections to the issuance of a certificate of 
occupancy for the safe use and habitation of the structure.  The department is also charged with the 
enforcement of the City’s sign ordinance and assists the Community Development program with 
inspection on the repair and replacement of affordable homes.  
 
The Department has experienced an increase in the number of permits issued for the calendar year of 
2011.  For example:  Residential Single Family Permits increased from 346 in 2010 to 406 in 2011 and 
the total valuation of construction increased by $2,529,972.  Additionally our 2011‐2012 revenues will 
exceed our projections by an estimated $548,000. 
 
During the 2011‐2012 Budget year construction and development showed signs of growth in both 
Residential and Commercial construction.  Our projection for the 2012‐2013 Budget year reflects an 
increase of 5% over our 2011‐2012 revenue projections. 
 
Despite the apparent increase in construction, a vacant Building Inspector position has been eliminated 
in an effort to match the work force with the work load.  Estimated savings from the position is 
approximately $70,000 (salary of $48,000 plus benefits).  
                                  




                                                  117 

 
 

                                                  ORGANIZATION CHART 

 

                                                      Building and Codes




                                        Construction Boards 
                                                                     Gas Examiners
                                            of Appeals




                                        Electrical Examiners




                                        Codes Enforcement 
                                                                                     Sign Administratgion 
          Building Inspections            and Property               Plans Review
                                                                                       and Enforcement
                                          Maintenance


                   Residential, 
                   Commercial, 
               Electrical, Plumbing, 
               Gas and Mecahnical                                                                             

                                 IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                                        SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

       Proper enforcement of building codes to ensure safe structures for homes, commercial business 
        and industry 
       Proper enforcement of neighborhood maintenance codes to provide high standards for 
        homeowners and residents 

               STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

       Support the development and construction industries with consistent, predictable information 
        in the regulation of new construction and renovations 

                 EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

       Complete plans review in a prompt and efficient manner and provide timely comments  
       Conduct inspections in a fair, equitable and just manner 
       Participate in the first phase of a customer service training for City personnel  

                                                                 118 

 
         Complete all required continuing education needed to maintain high proficiency in building 
          codes 
         Assist the public when visiting the Department 

                                     ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

         Continue the attendance of Association meetings such as the Property Managers Association to 
          get feedback on property maintenance issues 
         Work with organizations such as the Rutherford County Homebuilders Association 
         Conduct stakeholders meetings to engage the public and receive feedback prior to proposing 
          changes to the sign ordinance 
         Conduct public hearings for proposed sign ordinance changes 

                                     FY 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

         Amended the Weeds and Grass Ordinance to allow tracks of land, which meets specific 
          guidelines, located within the City of Murfreesboro to return to natural areas 
         Worked with the Chamber of Commerce to help recruit new industry 
         Completed drafting and adoption of updates to the City Sign Ordinance 
         Completed contract with John Bouchard and Son’s Co. for City Hall Energy Efficiency Retrofits 
         Reviewed approximately 305 commercial plans for permit issuance 
         Remodeled City Council Chambers 

                                    FY 2013 DEPARTMENT GOALS 

         Continue to conduct accessibility survey for compliance with Federal ADA requirements for all 
          City buildings 
         Continue to review and update the City Sign Ordinance in conjunction with the Planning and 
          Legal Department 
         Continue to provide efficient, timely reviews of construction projects and provide assistance to 
          contractors throughout the process 
         Expand cities website content information for Property Maintenance and Substandard Housing 
         Utilize the cities social media site to inform citizens about Weeds and Grass Ordinance 
           

                                   PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS 

                                                       
                                                           Actual   Actual   Budget Estimated Proposed
                                                          FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2011         FY 2012


    Residential Permits (new one and two family)              335      344       325        290         290
    Residential Permits (additions and renovations)           719      689       630        570         550
    Commercial Permits (new)                                   41      321        25         20          20
    Commercial Permits (additions and renovations)            332      298       275        245         245  

                                                    119 

 
                                               EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

                                                                                     Building & Codes
                                         Actual                  Budget                   Budget                   Estimated                Budget
                                        FY 2010                  FY 2011                  FY 2012                   FY 2012                 FY 2013

Personnel Costs                   $          1,579,545      $        1,551,819       $        1,610,668       $         1,586,978      $         1,574,278
Operating Costs                   $             118,163     $           110,392      $           137,800      $            122,000     $            132,894
Capital Expense                                     2,398
                                  $                         $                4,750   $                4,000                    2,500
                                                                                                              $                                       12,250
                                                                                                                                       $               
Total Building & Codes            $          1,700,106      $        1,666,961       $        1,752,468       $         1,711,478      $         1,719,422      
                                                                         




                                                                                                                                                    

                                         HUMAN RESOURCES SUMMARY 

                                                            Building and Codes
                                                                                           Actual          Actual Estimated Proposed
                                                                                          FY 2010         FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013
      Job Description
         Director                                                                             1               1              1              1
         Deputy Director                                                                      1               1              1              1
         Codes Inspector                                                                      10              9              8              8
         Plans Examiner                                                                       2               1              1              1
         Department Coordinator                                                               2               2              2              2
         Electrical Inspector                                                                 1               1              2              2
         Sign Administrator                                                                   1               1              1              1
         Administrative Support Specialist                                                    6               5              5              5
            Full‐Time Positions                                                               24              21             21             21

         Electrical Inspector                                                                  1              1               1              1
            Part‐Time Positions                                                                1              1               1              1

      Total Building and Codes Allocation                                                     25              22             22             22          
                                                                     120 

 
                              2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                              BUILDING & CODES DEPARTMENT

                                  2009/2010    2010/2011    2011/2012    2011/2012    2012/2013     INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                       ACTUAL       ACTUAL      BUDGET       ESTIMATE     BUDGET       (DECREASE)

PERSONNEL COSTS
SALARIES & WAGES                                             1,105,242    1,100,000    1,096,342        (8,900)
   TOTAL SALARIES & WAGES          1,153,396    1,102,440    1,105,242    1,100,000    1,096,342        (8,900)
SOCIAL SECURITY                       84,169       80,183       84,551       85,000       83,870          (681)
MEDICAL - DENTAL                     207,743      234,014      270,653      250,000      252,958       (17,695)
PENSION PLAN                         131,224      122,807      142,728      142,728      119,947       (22,781)
RETIREMENT (401A)                                                             1,349        3,922         3,922
LIFE INSURANCE                                                                  407        7,864         7,864
WORKERS' COMPENSATION                  3,013       12,375        7,494        7,494        9,375         1,881
TOTAL PERSONNEL COSTS              1,579,545    1,551,819    1,610,668    1,586,978    1,574,278       (36,390)

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
OFFICE EQUIPMENT                      10,334       9,060       10,000       10,000        2,500         (7,500)
                                      10,334       9,060       10,000       10,000        2,500         (7,500)

SUPPLIES
POSTAGE                                6,022       5,257        7,500        5,750        7,500              0
OFFICE                                16,264      10,719       18,000       15,000       18,000              0
ADVERTISING                                                                                 750            750
CLOTHING                               1,025         940        1,000          950        1,000              0
FIELD                                    342          80        1,000          500          750           (250)
                                      23,653      16,996       27,500       22,200       28,000            500

INSURANCE
AUTOMOBILE                                                                                  344            344
                                                                                            344            344

UTILITY SERVICE
TELEPHONE                              2,710       2,614        3,000        3,000        3,000              0
CELLULAR TELEPHONE                    12,373      12,120       14,600       12,000       14,600              0
                                      15,083      14,734       17,600       15,000       17,600              0

TRAVEL AND SUBSISTENCE
MILEAGE REIMBURSEMENT                 61,987      56,735       70,000       63,000       70,000              0
MEALS DURING MEETINGS                    518         542        1,000          700        1,000              0
                                      62,505      57,277       71,000       63,700       71,000              0

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
ASSOCIATION DUES                       1,389       1,819        2,000        2,000        2,250            250
ADA SURVEY                                                                                1,000          1,000
TRAINING PERSONNEL                     4,598      10,355        8,000        8,000        8,500            500
COMPUTER SOFTWARE                        310                      700          600          700              0
OTHER MISCELLANEOUS                      291         151        1,000          500        1,000              0
                                       6,588      12,325       11,700       11,100       13,450          1,750

OPERATING BUDGET                   1,697,708    1,662,211    1,748,468    1,708,978    1,707,172       (41,296)

ADDITION TO FIXED ASSETS
NORMAL REPLACEMENT-FURN & EQUIP                                                           4,000
(1) COMPUTER                                                                                750
TABLET COMP & MOBILE PRINTERS                                                             7,500
                                       2,398       4,750        4,000        2,500       12,250          8,250

TOTAL BUILDING DEPARTMENT          1,700,106    1,666,961    1,752,468    1,711,478    1,719,422       (33,046)  


                                                    121 

 
                                                               

                               PLANNING AND ENGINEERING 

                                    DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The Planning and Engineering Departments operate under one budget code.  For the narrative, there are 
separate descriptions of the activities of each division.  For financial data, the two divisions are 
combined. 

                                            PLANNING 

 
The Planning Department is charged with coordinating the physical development of the community and 
managing long‐term growth to create a well‐designed, high quality community.  This is accomplished 
through effective planning, zoning, plan review and ordinance enforcement activities to preserve and 
enhance the quality of life for all residents and guests of Murfreesboro. 
 
The Planning section also serves as staff and prepares recommendations for the Planning Commission, 
Board of Zoning Appeals and the Historic Zoning Commission.  Planning oversees the City’s Flood 
Insurance Program.                                     




                                                122 

 
                                         ORGANIZATION CHART 

 
                                                      Planning



                                           Planning            Board of Zoning 
                                          Commission              Appeals


                                         Historic Zoning 
                                          Commission



                             Administration       Current Planning         Future Planning


                                 Planning and 
                                                       Site Plans and 
                                 Zoning Code                                       Annexation
                                                            Plats
                                 Enforcement


                                   Floodplain               Rezoning              Master Plans
                                  Management


                                                                                  Gateway Design 
                                                                                      Review



                                                                                   Special Plans
                                                                                                         
 

                          IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                             SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

       Manage long‐term growth to create a well‐designed, high quality community 
       Maintain  and implement the land use plans for the Blackman area, New Salem Road area and 
        Maney Avenue 
       Maintain and implement subdivision regulations to create well‐designed public infrastructure 
       Coordinate implementation of Gateway Streetscape Master Plan 
       Coordinate development plans to anticipate a high level of service delivery 
       Properly name streets and number properties for effective service delivery and emergency 
        response 
       Manage the Flood Insurance Program 

             STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

       Focus on long range planning to provide adequate, properly zoned land for development 
       Develop master plans for transportation and utilities 
       Keep subdivision and other development regulations current and at high standards 
                                                             123 

 
       Analyze development impacts for possible influence on projects in the CIP 
       Enforce zoning regulations to maintain the community as an attractive place to live and invest 
       Maintain the City’s participation and good standing in the National flood Insurance Program to 
        make low cost flood insurance available throughout the community. 

                EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

       Provide prompt review of applications for permits and development plans 
       Conduct neighborhood meetings to receive citizen input on all major projects 
       Ensure prompt review of construction plans, including excellent communication with developers 
        and builders 
       Provide notice of public meetings 
       Provide access to City’s GIS at front counter of Planning Department to assist public in accessing 
        information and to expedite permit approvals 
       Discuss development plans and zoning applications with interested citizens, property owners, 
        builders, and developers 
       Attend meetings of civic and educational organizations as featured speakers 
       Provide information regarding Flood Insurance Program to interested citizens and property 
        owners 

                                   ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

       Conduct neighborhood meetings for major zoning and annexation applications 
       Conduct public hearings with notification to the public for each 
       Provide direct assistance to visitors to the department 
       Make GIS Applications more available to the public who are visiting the Planning Office for 
        assistance 
       Welcome new City residents in the settled annexation litigation area using a variety of means 
        including social media 
       Held a neighborhood meeting for the South Maney Study Area 
       Utilize social media for public notification and for public participation in Planning related 
        projects 
       Participated in the first phase of a customer service training for City personnel 
       Attend meetings of civic and educational organizations as featured speakers 

                                   FY 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

       Continued implementation of the adopted Subdivision Regulations and Street Design 
        Specifications 
       Completed one annexation study 
       Reviewed 154 site plans, 84 preliminary and final subdivision plats and 17 rezoning applications  
       Published 48 agendas for the Planning Commission, Board of Zoning Appeals, and Historic 
        Zoning Commission. 
       Prepared minutes for all public meetings 
       Provided notices of meetings for all public meetings 

                                                   124 

 
        Implemented the revised Gateway Streetscape Master Plan  
        Implemented Veterans Parkway street renaming and property renumbering plan 
        Implemented Fortress Blvd., Manson Pike, Gresham Lane street renaming and property 
         numbering plan 
        Participated in the first phase of a customer service training for City personnel  
        Prepared the Broad Street Streetscape Report 
        Conducted a special census of the settled annexation litigation area 
        Prepared a zoning study for the South Maney Area  
        Attended four neighborhood meetings involving rezoning applications 

                                            FY 2013 DEPARTMENT GOALS 

        Manage development to ensure high quality growth 
        Undertake amendments to the zoning ordinance to implement the South Maney Zoning Study 
        Provide quality review and assistance on development issues in a timely manner 
        Review and rezone as needed the area around Medical Center Parkway and Middle Tennessee 
         Medical Center 
        Make GIS more available to the public who are visiting the Planning office for assistance 
        Use the City’s website to more effectively assist the public 
        Implement the street naming and property numbering study for Veterans Parkway 
        Implement paperless agendas for the Planning Commission and Board of Zoning Appeals.  
        Review approx. 100 preliminary and final plats, 150 site plans, and 25 rezoning applications 
        Publish 48 agendas for the Planning Commission, Board of Zoning Appeals, and Historic Zoning 
         Commission  
        Prepare minutes for all public meetings within three weeks of the meeting date and make them 
         available for review by the public 
        Advertise all public meetings and send notices for all public hearings 
        Attend neighborhood meetings that involve annexation or rezoning applications in which 
         affected property owners may have questions 
        Assist FEMA in updating Flood Insurance Rate Maps for Stones River watershed 

                                        PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS 

                                                    Actual        Actual   Budget    Estimated   Proposed
                                                   FY 2010       FY 2011   FY 2012    FY 2012     FY 2013

    Number of plats reviewed and approved           67             81       90         84          95
    Number of agendas published                     47            45        48         48          48
    Number of Public Hearings                       102           115       125        108         130
    Number of Zoning Violation Cases                132           125       130        74          140
    Number of Annexation Studies                     2             1         3          3           2
    Number of Zoning Applications                    28           28        30          17          32
    Number of Gateway Design Review Items             9           14        15          12          15
    Number of Ordinance Amendments                   11           10        10          10          10
    Number of Mandatory Referrals and R.O.W.         24           12        15          16          12
    Number of Home Occupations                      280           275       250        339         300
    Number of Site Plans reviewed                   100           110       70         154         150       
                                                          125 

 
                                                          




                                                                          
 
 

                                             ENGINEERING 

The mission of the Engineering Department is to provide adequate, safe and quality infrastructure for 
the citizens of Murfreesboro by utilizing the skills of the department’s employees in the design, review, 
construction and inspection of all private and public developments and capital improvement projects. 

                                        ORGANIZATION CHART 

                                                 City Engineer


                                           Capital 
                        Private                              Citizen Requests 
                                        Improvement                              Special Projects
                      Development                               for Service
                                          Projects


                         Plans Review         Design                Sidewalks



                                           Right of way 
                         Stormwater                                 Drainage
                                           acquisitions



                         Inspections      Project bidding




                                           Inspections
                                                                                                              
                                 




                                                     126 

 
                                     FY 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

       Construction inspection and management of Veterans Parkway Phases 2a extending from the 
        intersection of Kimbro Road/Barfield Road to Barfield Crescent Park, widening of Fortress 
        Boulevard, realignment of Manson Pike, Fortress Boulevard, and Gresham Drive, and the 
        reconstruction of Maney Avenue from Broad Street to College Street. 
       Provided review of all site plans, plats and annexation requests 
       Implemented and managed construction related to the stormwater quality program 
       Processed approximately 170 fence applications including site visits to review potential 
        easement encroachments 

                          IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                              SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

       Provide adequate and safe infrastructure 
       Continue to enhance the City’s sidewalks and bicycle route systems 
       Manage encroachments in easements to prevent drainage problems 
       Receive drainage requests and recommend improvements based on priority 
       Review all residential permit applications for drainage and FEMA issues 

              STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

       Provide coordination on the City’s Capital Improvement Program 
       Design and provide project management and construction inspection as necessary to lower total 
        cost of the  Capital Improvement Program  
       Improvement of capital project management through use of staff‐developed monitoring 
        software 

                EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

       100% participation in the first phase of a customer service training for City personnel  
       Ensure prompt review of construction plans, including excellent communication with developers 
        and builders 
       Process fence permits and conduct site visit within 2 business days 

                                   ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

       Hold public meetings to receive community input on major projects 
       Provide timely information to the public on ongoing construction projects through multiple 
        sources including the local newspapers, CityTV, the City’s website, social networks and social 
        media sites and project newsletters delivered to the impacted residents 
       Complete informational segments with CityTV on topics that impact residents such as 
        obstructions in drainage ditches 
                                                  127 

 
                                           FY 2013 DEPARTMENT GOALS 

        Construction inspection and management of the Veterans Parkway project Phase 2b, Joe B. 
         Jackson Parkway widening and extension, Middle Tennessee Boulevard from Main Street to 
         Greenland Drive, and Phase 4 of the Stones River Greenway.  
        Develop designs for future projects on John Rice Boulevard/Gresham Lane, Bradyville Pike, and 
         Cherry Lane. 
        Provide professional review services on all developments 
        Continue landfill monitoring study in accordance with TDEC mandates 
        Develop a regional drainage plan for the Lees Spring Branch and Bear Branch  

                                        PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS 

        Work to ensure post‐design cost estimates are within 5% of project bids 
        Ensure final cost of construction costs are within 5% of the original bid, less scope changes 
        Ensure total project cost is within 15% of budgeted amount, less scope changes 

                                           WORKLOAD MEASUREMENTS 
                                                                 Engineering
                                                              Actual          Actual                   Budget              Estimated            Proposed
                                                             FY 2010         FY 2011                  FY 2012               FY 2012             FY 2013
Number of bids                                                   4              4                        3                     1                    6
Number of Capital Improvement Projects completed                 8              4                        1                     2                    3
Value of projects completed                                 $25,474,297    $24,026,284                $6,400,000            $8,300,000         $16,300,000
Value of bids awarded                                       $22,300,000    $24,850,000               $14,300,000            $7,300,000         $29,900,000
Number of development plans reviewed                           142             125                      150                   168                  175      
 

                                                     PROPOSED BUDGET 

The total Planning and Engineering budget has decreased.    In FY 2012 the Planning Section lost a 
Principal Planner position for a salary adjustment of $60,513.   A new Planner position is requested 
in the 2013 Budget.  

                                               EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

Note: In FY 10, GIS personnel and expenditures were moved to Administration and Traffic personnel and 
expenditures moved to Transportation.   
 
                                                                                Planning & Engineering
                                         Actual                  Budget                 Budget         Estimated                            Budget
                                        FY 2010                  FY 2011               FY 2012          FY 2012                             FY 2013

Personnel Costs                   $          1,458,732      $        1,461,798       $        1,497,834       $         1,480,960      $         1,476,815
Operating Costs                   $             245,176     $           268,992      $           990,454      $            231,045     $            285,500
Capital Expense                                     1,155
                                  $                         $                5,176   $                8,500                    4,000
                                                                                                              $                                       13,200
                                                                                                                                       $               
Total Planning & Engineering      $          1,705,063      $        1,735,966       $        2,496,788       $         1,716,005      $         1,775,515      
                                                                     128 

 
                                                            
                                                            




                                                                                                           
 

                                       HUMAN RESOURCES SUMMARY 

                                                Planning and Engineering
                                                                            Actual    Actual Estimated Proposed
                                                                           FY 2010   FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013
    Job Description
      Planning Commission                                                    7         7        7         7
      Board of Zoning Appeals                                                5         5        5         5
                                                                             12        12       12        12

     Planning Section
       Planning Director                                                     1         1         1        1
       Principal Planner                                                     2         2         2        2
       Planner                                                               2         2         1        1
       Administrative Support Specialist                                     3         2         2        2

     Engineering Section
       City Engineer                                                         1         1        1         1
       Environmental Engineer                                                1         1        1         1
       Engineer in Training                                                  1         1        1         1
       Project Coordinator                                                   2         2        2         2
       Senior Public Works Inspector                                         0         0        2         2
       Public Works Inspector                                                5         5        3         3
       Administrative Support Specialist                                     2         2        2         2
    Total Planning and Engineering Allocation                                20        19       18        18       
                                                         129 

 
 
 
 
 
In response to the May, 2010 floods, the City of Murfreesboro is applying for a FEMA Hazard Mitigation 
Grant to purchase a group of five residential rental properties located along the West Fork of the Stones 
River at Bridge Avenue.  The structures will be demolished and the area will be stabilized.  The total 
grant amount of $684,054 is included in the Planning and Engineering budget with only a 12.5% or 
$85,507 match.  The local match will be paid for out of the Storm Water User Fees.  The remaining 
$200,000 in funds from the transfer of Storm Water fees will be used to reimburse the City for 
personnel costs associated with monitoring active construction sites as they relate to Storm Water 
activities. 
                                                       




                                                  130 

 
                                   2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                   PLANNING & ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT

                                      2009/2010    2010/2011    2011/2012    2011/2012    2012/2013     INCREASE
    DESCRIPTIONS                       ACTUAL       ACTUAL      BUDGET       ESTIMATE     BUDGET       (DECREASE)

    PERSONNEL COSTS**
    SALARIES & WAGES                                             1,064,103    1,057,229    1,040,720       (23,383)
    OVERTIME                                                        32,000       32,000       32,000             0
       TOTAL SALARIES & WAGES          1,095,747    1,075,224    1,096,103    1,089,229    1,072,720       (23,383)
    SOCIAL SECURITY                       80,935       78,781       81,404       79,128       79,615        (1,789)
    MEDICAL - DENTAL                     150,237      160,020      171,339      169,158      178,949         7,610
    PENSION PLAN                         123,196      121,665      129,497      123,949      121,433        (8,064)
    LIFE INSURANCE                                                                    0        7,137         7,137
    WORKERS' COMPENSATION                  8,617       26,108       19,491       19,496       16,961        (2,530)
    TOTAL PERSONNEL COSTS              1,458,732    1,461,798    1,497,834    1,480,960    1,476,815       (21,019)

    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
    OFFICE EQUIPMENT                       5,325        8,510        7,500        8,200        8,000           500
                                           5,325        8,510        7,500        8,200        8,000           500


    SUPPLIES
    POSTAGE                                4,880        5,054        6,000        5,030        6,000             0
    OFFICE                                10,617       12,405       12,500       11,500       12,500             0
    NEWSPAPERS-MAGAZINES                     795          998        1,400        1,200        1,200          (200)
    ADVERTISING                           17,893       11,603       19,000       15,000       19,000             0
    ENGINEERING                              122          467        2,000        1,600        2,000             0
    FUEL                                     262                     1,000            0            0        (1,000)
    CLOTHING                               1,237        1,118        1,500        1,225        1,500             0
                                          35,806       31,645       43,400       35,555       42,200        (1,200)

    UTILITY SERVICE
    ELECTRIC                               3,277          831        3,500        3,300        3,500             0
    TELEPHONE                              2,140        2,415        3,500        3,300        3,300          (200)
    CELLULAR TELEPHONE                    12,965       14,833       20,000       16,000       20,000             0
                                          18,382       18,079       27,000       22,600       26,800          (200)

    TRAVEL AND SUBSISTENCE
    MILEAGE REIMBURSEMENT                 48,124       42,663       56,000       49,000       56,000             0
    MEALS DURING MEETINGS                  2,514          938        3,000        2,800        3,000             0
                                          50,638       43,601       59,000       51,800       59,000             0

    CONTRACTUAL SERVICES
    STORM DRAINAGE                        53,658
    SAMPLING AND TESTING                  54,383       39,923       50,000       40,000       50,000             0
    LANDFILL GAS MANAGEMENT                           114,021       40,000       48,000       40,000             0
    FEMA HAZARD MITIGATION                                         684,054            0            0      (684,054)
                                         108,041      153,944      774,054       88,000       90,000      (684,054)

    MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
    ASSOCIATION DUES                       3,131        3,670        6,000        4,000        6,000             0
    SURVEYS & STUDIES                     17,529        2,524       60,000       10,000       40,000       (20,000)
    TRAINING PERSONNEL                     2,598        4,935        8,000        7,390        8,000             0
    COMPUTER SOFTWARE                      1,686          634        3,000        1,200        3,000             0
    OTHER MISCELLANEOUS                    2,040        1,450        2,500        2,300        2,500             0
                                          26,984       13,213       79,500       24,890       59,500       (20,000)

    OPERATING BUDGET                   1,703,908    1,730,790    2,488,288    1,712,005    1,762,315      (725,973)

    ADDITION TO FIXED ASSETS
    NORMAL REPLACEMENT-FURN & EQUIP                                                            5,000
    (7) iPADS FOR PAPERLESS AGENDA                                                             4,200
    (2) LAPTOPS FOR INSPECTORS                                                                 4,000
                                           1,155        5,176        8,500        4,000       13,200         4,700

    TOTAL PLANNING & ENGINEERING       1,705,063    1,735,966    2,496,788    1,716,005    1,775,515      (721,273)  

                                                       131 

 
                                                                   

                                        TRANSPORTATION 

                                      DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

         The Transportation Department budget includes funding for the operation and maintenance of 
traditional roadway elements under the traffic section as well as public transportation services under 
the public transportation section (Rover).   
          
         The Transportation Department is committed to providing adequate transportation facilities 
through the combined effort of maximizing the efficiency of the existing roadway system coupled with 
the construction of new roadways. The Department is additionally committed to providing the 
community with public transportation options through both City operated and contracted public 
transportation services. 
          
         With the purchase of $1,177,924 in new Rover buses in the operating capital, a $52,000 
reduction in the expenses of maintaining the fleet is anticipated.  This offsets the $39,000 of increased 
cost budgeted for fuel.  Additional operating capital of $300,000 from American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds will be utilized to equip the new bus fleet with an Automatic Vehicle 
Location (AVL) system. 
          
         Planning continues on a new Transit station, with preliminary engineering and design being 
funded in the $488,000 operating capital portion of the budget. 
          
                                  




                                                   132 

 
                                          ORGANIZATION CHART 




                                             Transportation



        Public                                   Grant                                  Long Range 
                             Traffic                             Special Projects
    Transportation                             Compliance                                Planning


                                                                                              Major 
                                 Signal 
              Rover                                  Federal            Greenways          Toroughfare 
                              Maintenance
                                                                                               Plan


          Relax and Ride      CCTV System             State



          Para Transit ‐
                              Plans Review
            (MCHRA)


                                 Capital 
                              Improvement 
                                Projects

                                                                                                           

                              IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                                  SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

           Provide transportation service on fixed routes five days per week 
           Plan for future roadways and other transportation facilities as growth determines 

                 STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

           Work with federal and state transportation agencies to obtain planning, construction, 
            operations and maintenance funding 
           Work with Rutherford County and other county jurisdictions to obtain cost sharing for mutually 
            beneficial projects 
           Monitor revenue and expenditures and recommend appropriate adjustments 
                                    
                                                     133 

 
                EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

       Receive and investigate complaints and work to provide resolution of citizen concerns 
       Work with Murfreesboro Police Department in order to identify potential road design solutions 
        for problem areas 
       Achieved one hundred percent staff participation in Service Excellence training 

                                   ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

       Participate in public meetings related to planned roadway projects 
       Conduct transit training and promotion public meetings and events 
 

                                   FY 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

       Rover ridership projected to increase nearly 28% from previous year 2011 ridership of 196,509 
        to estimated 2012 ridership of 251,500 
       Conducted customer appreciation day including free fare day with Rover ridership increase of 
        over 80% of normal ridership 
       Finalized contract execution with TDOT for three roadway projects exceeding 72 million dollars 
        including Bradyville Pike Widening, Thompson Lane Widening, and Cherry Lane Extension (phase 
        III)  
       Signalized three new intersections (Veterans Parkway & SR 99, Greenland Drive & Scottland 
        Drive, Rutherford Boulevard & Gold Valley Drive) 
       The Assistant Transportation Director was named to the statewide board of directors for 
        Tennessee Public Transportation Association (TPTA) 

                                   FY 2013 DEPARTMENT GOALS 

       Purchase and install on‐street public transportation passenger shelters 
       Purchase and install GPS based automatic vehicle location (AVL) technology in Rover buses 
       Begin environmental study, design, and land acquisition for construction of a new transit facility 
        in 2015 
       Expand Rover service area through consolidation/reconfiguration of existing system 
       Purchase new Rover bus replacements 
       Begin update of Major Thoroughfare Plan 
       Begin construction of Stones River Greenway Extension Phase 4 
       Continue roadway construction projects 

                                 PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS 

    1. Maintain public transportation routes within 5 +/‐ minutes of schedule 
 
 


                                                   134 

 
                                   EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

                                                                       Transportation
                             Actual                 Budget                 Budget                Estimated                   Budget
                            FY 2010                 FY 2011               FY 2012                 FY 2012                    FY 2013

Personnel Costs        $             974,970    $        1,036,980     $        1,131,029    $         1,125,604        $         1,203,928
Operating Costs        $          2,086,994     $        2,141,670     $        1,212,742    $            954,059       $            939,766
Capital Expense        $               73,161                 92,987
                                                $                      $           680,226   $                    187   $         2,225,919
Total Transportation   $          3,135,125     $        3,271,637     $        3,023,997    $         2,079,850        $         4,369,613     




                                                                                                                                    

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

                                                        135 

 
                                   HUMAN RESOURCES SUMMARY 

                                       Transportation Department
                                                                Actual    Actual Estimated Proposed
                                                               FY 2010   FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013
Job Description
   Transportation Director                                       1         1         1        1
Public Transportation
   Assistant Transportation Director                             1         1         1        1
   Operations Manager                                            0         1         1        1
   Operations Supervisor                                         1         1         1        1
   Secretary/Receptionist                                        1         1         1        1
   Transit Operator (Full time)                                  7         7         7        7

Traffic
   Traffic Engineer                                              1         1        1         1
   Traffic Signal Technician                                     3         3        3         3
        Full‐Time Positions                                      15        16       16        16

    Transit Operator (Part time)                                 7         7         9        9
       Part‐Time Positions                                       7         7         9        9

Total Transportation Allocation                                  22        23       25        25       
 




                                                 136 

 
                                      2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                      TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT

                                          2009/2010   2010/2011    2011/2012    2011/2012    2012/2013     INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                               ACTUAL      ACTUAL      BUDGET       ESTIMATE     BUDGET       (DECREASE)

PUBLIC TRANSIT EXPENDITURES
PERSONNEL COSTS
SALARIES & WAGES                                                     514,866       514,866     530,572         15,706
DIRECTOR SALARY - 50%                                                 46,270        46,270      95,784         49,514
OVERTIME                                                              10,000         3,700       4,000         (6,000)
   TOTAL SALARIES & WAGES                   476,659     517,739      571,136       564,836     630,356         59,220
SOCIAL SECURITY                              35,025      38,396       40,535        37,840      41,736          1,201
MEDICAL - DENTAL                             77,566      77,864       89,770        94,500      98,397          8,627
PENSION PLAN                                 38,920      41,685       46,649        38,900      35,588        (11,061)
RETIREMENT (401A)                                 0         335            0         4,900       7,204          7,204
LIFE INSURANCE                                    0          59            0           550       2,872          2,872
WORKER'S COMPENSATION                        20,127      17,752       18,185        18,185      13,542         (4,643)
TOTAL PERSONNEL COSTS                       648,297     693,830      766,275       759,711     829,695         63,420

INSURANCE
AUTOMOBILE - ROVER VANS                       3,802            0            0            0        3,705         3,705
AUTOMOBILE - ROVER BUSES                     21,284       16,628       20,554       12,191       13,000        (7,554)
                                             25,086       16,628       20,554       12,191       16,705        (3,849)

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
VEHICLES & MACHINERY- FLEET - ROVER         126,298     178,726      195,175       173,257     142,862        (52,313)
VEHICLES & MACHINERY- ROVER                     505         811        1,000           500       1,000              0
BUS SHELTERS                                                               0           200         500            500
BUILDINGS                                        26         111          500             0           0           (500)
                                            126,829     179,648      196,675       173,957     144,362        (52,313)

SUPPLIES
POSTAGE                                         168         228          350           100         100           (250)
OFFICE                                        2,836       2,194        1,600         1,942       2,000            400
ADVERTISING                                     565       1,710        3,000         2,000       4,000          1,000
EMPLOYEE                                        172          89          200           100         200              0
JANITORIAL                                      789         238          300           415         400            100
BUS SUPPLIES                                    685       1,394          500         1,232       1,300            800
FUEL-ROVER                                   78,413     104,574      131,500       126,064     170,831         39,331
FARE SUPPLIES                                 6,608       7,972        8,000         8,950       9,000          1,000
CLOTHING                                          0       2,912        4,000         2,000       2,000         (2,000)
SAFETY SUPPLIES                                                          100           100         100              0
MISCELLANEOUS SUPPLIES                                                   200           200         200              0
                                             90,236     121,311      149,750       143,103     190,131         40,381

UTILITY SERVICE
ELECTRIC                                      3,523        3,781        4,000        3,700        3,900          (100)
TELEPHONE                                       557          564          600          563          600             0
CELLULAR TELEPHONE                            5,629        5,845        5,500        3,700        4,000        (1,500)
                                              9,709       10,190       10,100        7,963        8,500        (1,600)

TRAVEL AND SUBSISTENCE
MILEAGE REIMBURSEMENT                         1,313        1,638        1,800        1,800        1,800             0
OUT OF TOWN TRAVEL                                0                     1,000            0          500          (500)
                                              1,313        1,638        2,800        1,800        2,300          (500)

CONTRACT SERVICES
RELAX & RIDE (FEDERAL PORTION)              142,685       7,735      177,140       145,000      80,000        (97,140)
RELAX & RIDE -PASS THRU (LOCAL PORTION)                  63,108       12,400        10,150      18,152          5,752
MCHRA                                       132,013     135,659      108,500       108,500     115,000          6,500
                                            274,698     206,502      298,040       263,650     213,152        (84,888)  
                                                       137 

 
                                        2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                        TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT

                                        2009/2010    2010/2011    2011/2012    2011/2012     2012/2013     INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                             ACTUAL       ACTUAL      BUDGET       ESTIMATE      BUDGET       (DECREASE)

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
MARKETING                                  16,305        70,913
PLANNING                                                             97,113         9,323       83,251        (13,862)
SOFTWARE                                       929           0          100             0          100              0
ASSOCIATION DUES                             2,000      12,058       14,058        14,058       14,903            845
TRAINING                                     1,759       1,803        2,000         2,500        3,000          1,000
MPO MATCHING FUNDS - 1/2                     4,306       4,306        4,306         4,306        6,797          2,491
DRUG & ALCOHOL TESTING                           0       1,434        1,000           193            0         (1,000)
TRANSIT - ARRA                           1,321,897     312,767      166,271        84,774            0       (166,271)
OTHER MISCELLANEOUS                          3,560         152        1,000           250          500           (500)
CONSULTANT/PROF SERVICES                                                  0         2,500        1,000          1,000
                                         1,350,756     403,433      285,848       117,904      109,551       (176,297)

PUBLIC TRANSIT OPERATING EXPENDITURES    2,526,924    1,633,180    1,730,042    1,480,279     1,514,396      (215,646)

TRAFFIC EXPENDITURES
PERSONNEL COSTS
SALARIES & WAGES                                                    294,357       296,514      303,173          8,816
LESS: 50% DIRECTOR SALARY - IN ROVER                                (46,270)      (46,270)     (47,892)        (1,622)
OVERTIME                                                                500           500          500              0
ONE-TIME BONUS                                                            0             0            0              0
   TOTAL SALARIES & WAGES                 239,988      244,326      248,587       250,744      255,781          7,194
SOCIAL SECURITY                            17,581       17,946       22,518        21,500       23,193            675
MEDICAL - DENTAL                           38,505       41,521       50,711        50,711       51,003            292
RETIREMENT                                 28,259       28,846       36,639        36,639       36,299           (340)
EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT (401A MATCH)                                                        0            0              0
LIFE INSURANCE                                                                          0        2,136          2,136
WORKER'S COMPENSATION                       2,340       10,511        6,299         6,299        5,821           (478)
TOTAL PERSONNEL COSTS                     326,673      343,150      364,754       365,893      374,233          9,479

INSURANCE
AUTOMOBILE - TRAFFIC                        2,871         1,821           0             0         1,821         1,821
                                            2,871         1,821           0             0         1,821         1,821

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
VEHICLES & MACHINERY-FLEET                  3,686        3,915        5,238         4,950        5,503            265
VEHICLES & MACHINERY                                       257        1,000           200          500           (500)
OFFICE EQUIPMENT                              136          194          350           350          350              0
TRAFFIC SIGNALS                           128,449      176,232      185,000       175,000      185,000              0
STREET LIGHTS                              52,754       17,113       32,000        28,000       32,000              0
                                          185,025      197,711      223,588       208,500      223,353           (235)

SUPPLIES
POSTAGE                                        15            49          200          100           100          (100)
OFFICE                                      1,484         1,443        1,300        1,500         1,300             0
NEWSPAPERS-MAGAZINES                                                     300          200           300             0
ADVERTISING                                 2,271                        500          200           400          (100)
FUEL                                        2,740         4,157        4,650        4,530         5,918         1,268
CLOTHING                                      405           420          250          415           450           200
                                            6,915         6,069        7,200        6,945         8,468         1,268

UTILITY SERVICE
ELECTRIC                                    1,524         1,695        1,600        1,400         1,400          (200)
WATER AND SEWER                               210           209          200          225           225            25
CELLULAR TELEPHONE                          3,762         3,581        4,980        3,500         3,500        (1,480)
                                            5,496         5,485        6,780        5,125         5,125        (1,655)

TRAVEL AND SUBSISTENCE
MILEAGE REIMBURSEMENT                       2,409         2,640        2,400        3,250         3,300          900
                                            2,409         2,640        2,400        3,250         3,300          900      
                                                      138 

 
                                       2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                       TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT

                                       2009/2010     2010/2011    2011/2012    2011/2012    2012/2013     INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                            ACTUAL        ACTUAL      BUDGET       ESTIMATE     BUDGET       (DECREASE)
MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
ASSOCIATION DUES                             1,273       1,076         1,200        1,565        1,200             0
TRAINING PERSONNEL                              20         674         3,000        3,000        4,000         1,000
MPO MATCHING FUNDS - 1/2                     4,306       4,306         4,307        4,307        6,798         2,491
CCTV GRANT EXPENSE - ARRA                              982,267
OTHER MISCELLANEOUS                            52          271           500          250          500             0
SOFTWARE                                                                   0          549          500           500
                                             5,651     988,594         9,007        9,671       12,998         3,991

TRAFFIC OPERATING EXPENDITURES            535,040     1,545,470     613,729       599,384     629,298         15,569

TOTAL TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT
OPERATING BUDGET                         3,061,964    3,178,650    2,343,771    2,079,663    2,143,694      (200,077)

ADDITION TO FIXED ASSETS
NORMAL REPLACEMENT-FURN & EQUIP
  TRAFFIC-INCLUDES BLDG ROOFING                                                                 31,000
  TRANSIT-SEE FUNDING BELOW                                                                  2,194,919
                                           73,161        92,987     680,226           187    2,225,919     1,545,693

TOTAL TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT          3,135,125    3,271,637    3,023,997    2,079,850    4,369,613     1,345,616

ADDITIONAL FIXED ASSET DETAILS                                                 2012/2013
2012/2013                               FEDERAL       STATE        LOCAL        TOTAL
SHELTERS/BENCHES & AMENITIES + LABOR        29,301       3,663        3,662        36,626
TRANSIT FACILITY PE & DESIGN               390,345      48,793       48,793       487,931
MISC. CAPITAL FOR BUSES                     33,950       4,244        4,244        42,438
ITS/GPS - ARRA                             300,000           0            0       300,000
TRANSIT SHELTERS - ARRA                    150,000           0            0       150,000
BUS FLEET REPLACEMENT                      977,676     100,124      100,124     1,177,924
                                         1,881,272     156,824      156,823     2,194,919                                
                                    




                                                      139 

 
                                                                   

                                                STREET 

 

                                      DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The Street Department’s primary functions include the maintenance of streets, sidewalks, curbs, gutters 
and storm drainage systems. They also include fabricating, installing and maintaining inventory of street 
signs. The Street Department also is responsible for winter storm response, mowing of right of ways and 
easements, repairs to street pavement, litter removal and street sweeping.  During the fall months, they 
are responsible for the collection and disposal of leaves.  The Street Department also handles contract 
management of an annual street resurfacing program.  A pavement management system is maintained 
to assure that streets are paved in a manner to gain the maximum life from the surface.  In addition, the 
Street Department is responsible for the issuance of all right of way construction permits. 

The FY 2013 Street Department budget decreased by $258,951.  A new line in the FY 2011‐2012 budget 
for finishing subdivision paving in financially troubled subdivisions in the amount of $428,290 required 
approximately $100,000 to complete and has been removed from the FY 2012‐2013 budget.  The mild 
winter of 2011‐2012 has not required the stockpile of salt to be replenished, saving $66,150.  However, 
the cost of electricity continues to affect the Street Department budget due to overhead street lighting.  
After consulting with Murfreesboro Electric on long range rate estimates, the budget for street lighting 
was increased 3.5% or $85,710 to a total of $1,635,710.  Fuel to operate the Department’s vehicles is 
also expected to cost an additional $20,000 during the next fiscal year. 
                                   




                                                   140 

 
                                         ORGANIZATION CHART 


                                                  Street



                          Storm Sewer                                Contract 
        Streets                                Street Signs                              Rights of way
                          Maintenance                               Management


                                                 Fabrication and 
           Repairs           Storm sewer                               Annual Paving            Mowing
                                                   installation


                                                                           Annual 
         Funding for          Ditches and 
                                                   Maintenance          Concrete and 
        Street Lighting         culverts
                                                                         stormwater


        Street Sweeping                             Inventory
                                                                                                                
 

                             IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                                SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

         Encourage pride in the appearance of Murfreesboro 
         Maintain the usability of all City infrastructure for residents 
         Provide funding for street lighting electrical costs, which accounts for almost half of the total 
          expenditures of the Street Department 
         Implement a 20‐year repaving program for City streets in an effort to maintain a high degree of 
          safety and reliability 

                  STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

         Reduce the cost of replacing costly infrastructure through timely and efficient maintenance 
         Balance the use of contracted help with the need for full time staffing in the provision of 
          services 
         Subsidize our workforce with Rutherford County Correctional inmates to reduce labor costs 

                   EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

                                                     141 

 
       Develop method for examining potholes the day they are reported in an effort to minimize the 
        potential for injuries and property damage 
       Strive to evaluate and respond to all infrastructure complaints either in person or by phone 
        within 24 hours 
       Participate in the first phase of a customer service training for City personnel  

                                   ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

       Utilize the City of Murfreesboro Facebook page to inform the public in regard to service dates 
        for functions performed by the Street Department such as leaf collection, street paving,  and 
        storm drainage projects 
       Respond to calls/notification of navigational issues such as potholes, shrubbery, etc. 
         

                                   FY 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

       Managed the resurfacing of 63 linear miles of street 
       Maintained 593 linear miles of City streets and State Routes 
       Collected 1,835,180 pounds of leaves and yard waste to be converted into mulch 
       Demolished three single family homes on behalf of the Community Development program and 
        three single family homes for Habitat for Humanity 
       Installed or replaced 848 regulatory street marking signs 
       Issued and coordinated the activities associated with the issuance of 180 right of way 
        construction permits 
       Replaced approximately 65% of critical noncompliant street signs 

                                  FY 2013 DEPARTMENT GOALS 

       Continue the replacement of critical non‐compliant signs 
       Completed herbicide research and have initiated spraying cycle in an effort to provide a more 
        effective method of weed control in the right of ways 
       Continue the collection of information necessary for the implementation of a long term 
        sidewalk, curb and gutter maintenance program 
       Strive to continue to respond to citizen concerns within a reasonable time and communicate 
        with those citizens more effectively 
       Continue the improvement of our pavement management system in an effort to insure that all 
        city streets are repaved before major repairs are necessary 
       Include the use of re‐cycle asphalt applications in future paving contracts in an effort to 
        decrease our paving costs and increase the miles of streets paved each year 
       Continue the development of a drainage structure and ditch maintenance schedule to assure 
        that our drainage ways are being maintained on a routine basis in an effort to minimize the 
        effects of flooding 
                                  




                                                  142 

 
                                            PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS 
                                                                                       Actual       Actual       Budget Estimated Proposed
                                                                                      FY 2010      FY 2011       FY 2012 FY 2012 FY 2013
    Number of annual mowings of ROW, easements, City Property                            12                         12      12        12
    Miles of street resurfaced                                                           53            63           70      75        56
    Cubic yards of leaves diverted from landfill                                       6,390         6,588        6,500   6,500     6,500
    Signs installed, replaced or repaired                                              1,028          848         1,305   1000      1000
    Right of Way permits issued                                                         277           180          345     225       225                 
                                                                          

                                                EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

 
                                                                                           Street
                                             Actual               Budget                  Budget                 Estimated                Budget
                                            FY 2010               FY 2011                 FY 2012                 FY 2012                 FY 2013

Personnel Costs                    $          1,547,336      $        1,604,851       $        1,656,834     $         1,641,004     $         1,677,543
Operating Costs                    $          2,302,691      $        2,737,684       $        2,663,542     $         2,460,114     $         2,420,129
Capital Expense                                      3,133
                                   $                         $                2,238   $           110,758    $              75,542   $            102,072
Total Street                       $          3,853,160      $        4,344,773       $        4,431,134     $         4,176,660     $         4,199,744     
                                                                          




                                                                                                                                                 
                                         




                                                                      143 

 
                                   HUMAN RESOURCES SUMMARY 

                                                  

                                         Street Department
                                                              Actual    Actual Estimated Proposed
                                                             FY 2010   FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013
Job Description
   Director                                                    1         1        1         1
   Senior Public Works Inspector                               1         1        1         1
   ROW Inspector/Safety Coordiantor                            1         1        1         1
   Public Works Crew Chief                                     3         3        3         3
   Equipment Operator                                          5         5        5         5
   Light Equipment Operator                                    9         9        9         9
   Sign Technician                                             2         2        2         2
   Refuse/Custodial Crew Supervisor                            2         2        2         2
   Laborer                                                     3         3        3         3
   Administrative Support Specialist                           1         1        1         1
      Full‐Time Positions                                      28        28       28        28

    Street Project Inspector                                   1         1         1        1
       Part‐Time Positions                                     1         1         1        1

Total Street Allocation                                        29        29       29        29       
                                                  
                                




                                               144 

 
                             2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                             STREET DEPARTMENT

                              2009/2010    2010/2011    2011/2012       2011/2012    2012/2013     INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                   ACTUAL       ACTUAL      BUDGET          ESTIMATE     BUDGET       (DECREASE)

PERSONNEL COSTS
SALARIES & WAGES                                         1,082,761       1,082,761    1,109,579       26,818
OVERTIME                                                    40,000          38,987       40,000            0
   TOTAL SALARIES & WAGES      1,087,207    1,103,135    1,122,761       1,121,748    1,149,579       26,818
SOCIAL SECURITY                   78,932       79,530       85,891          81,905       87,943        2,052
MEDICAL - DENTAL                 243,284      264,474      283,938         274,178      280,630       (3,308)
PENSION PLAN                     119,013      122,391      131,591         129,133      126,871       (4,720)
RETIREMENT (401A)                                                                0          900          900
LIFE INSURANCE                                                                   0        7,651        7,651
WORKERS' COMPENSATION             18,900       35,321       32,653          34,040       23,969       (8,684)
TOTAL PERSONNEL COSTS          1,547,336    1,604,851    1,656,834       1,641,004    1,677,543       20,709

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
VEHICLES & MACHINERY-FLEET       180,143      205,189      184,902         220,115      211,647        26,745
VEHICLES & MACHINERY              45,500       48,330       50,000          77,378       60,000        10,000
RADIOS                               164                       500             432          500             0
OFFICE EQUIPMENT                   1,130          983        2,000           1,289        2,000             0
EQUIPMENT RENTALS                  1,171        1,252        2,500             706        2,000          (500)
STREET MARKINGS                                 6,909                                                       0
BUILDINGS                          5,404        5,093        7,000           9,588       24,000        17,000
SUBDIVISION PAVING                            103,650      428,290         100,000            0      (428,290)
                                 233,512      371,406      675,192         409,508      300,147      (375,045)

MATERIAL
RIGHT OF WAY MAINTENANCE          60,635       29,456       50,000          50,000       50,000            0
TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICES           30,732       66,894       30,000          42,809       40,000       10,000
MISCELLANEOUS MATERIAL                                         500              85          500            0
                                  91,367       96,350       80,500          92,894       90,500       10,000

SUPPLIES
POSTAGE                               59           77          100              25          100             0
OFFICE                             2,542        1,966        3,000           2,024        3,000             0
EMPLOYEE                           4,068        3,757        5,000           3,816        4,000        (1,000)
JANITORIAL SUPPLIES                3,046        3,002        4,000           4,935        4,000             0
FUEL                              93,609      111,520      143,500         122,553      164,108        20,608
CHEMICALS                         78,098       27,680       66,150          66,136            0       (66,150)
HAND TOOL & HARDWARE               4,861        4,235        4,500           4,969        5,000           500
CLOTHING                           2,978        3,751        5,500           5,021        5,000          (500)
MISCELLANEOUS SUPPLIES               118           56          500               0          500             0
                                 189,379      156,044      232,250         209,479      185,708       (46,542)

INSURANCE
AUTOMOBILE                        30,455       28,576                                    38,464       38,464
                                  30,455       28,576               0           0        38,464       38,464

UTILITY SERVICE
ELECTRIC                          16,035       13,759       17,000          15,000       15,000       (2,000)
WATER AND SEWER                    8,460        7,896        8,500           8,139        8,500            0
GAS                                5,786        3,803        7,500           3,265        6,000       (1,500)
TELEPHONE                          1,090        1,181        1,500           1,326        1,500            0
CELLULAR PHONE                     5,130        4,754        5,500           3,476        5,000         (500)
STREET LIGHTING                1,561,960    1,724,723    1,550,000       1,635,710    1,635,710       85,710
                               1,598,461    1,756,116    1,590,000       1,666,916    1,671,710       81,710  
 
                                                145 

 
                              2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                              STREET DEPARTMENT

                               2009/2010       2010/2011    2011/2012    2011/2012    2012/2013     INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                    ACTUAL          ACTUAL      BUDGET       ESTIMATE     BUDGET       (DECREASE)
CONTRACTUAL SERVICE
STREET PAVING                                     195,130
STREET MARKINGS                                     5,892
MAINTENANCE OF STATE ROUTES         151,547       123,150       77,000       77,000      125,000        48,000
                                    151,547       324,172       77,000       77,000      125,000        48,000

TRAVEL AND SUBSISTENCE
MILEAGE REIMBURSEMENT                 6,737         3,949        5,000        3,140        5,000             0
                                      6,737         3,949        5,000        3,140        5,000             0

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
ASSOCIATION DUES                        544           276          600          140          600             0
TRAINING PERSONNEL                                               2,000            0        2,000             0
OTHER MISCELLANEOUS                     689           795        1,000        1,037        1,000             0
                                      1,233         1,071        3,600        1,177        3,600             0

OPERATING BUDGET                   3,850,027    4,342,535    4,320,376    4,101,118    4,097,672      (222,704)

ADDITION TO FIXED ASSETS
NORMAL REPLACEMENT-FURN & EQUIP                                                            3,500
(2) HALF TON PICKUP TRUCK                                                                 32,964
HALF TON PICKUP TRUCK/CREW CAB                                                            18,257
SKID LOADER CLAM SHELL ATTACHMENT                                                          5,000
HALF TON SUV                                                                              22,708
THREE QUARTER TON PICKUP TRUCK                                                            19,643
                                      3,133         2,238      110,758       75,542      102,072        (8,686)

TOTAL STREET DEPARTMENT            3,853,160    4,344,773    4,431,134    4,176,660    4,199,744      (231,390)  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                




                                                    146 

 
                                                                   

                                    URBAN ENVIRONMENTAL 

                                      DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The mission of the Murfreesboro Urban Environmental Department is to help improve the health, safety 
and welfare of our Citizens through our proactive arboricultural efforts and to attract new home buyers, 
commercial projects and industrial developments by continuing to improve public corridors through the 
installation and maintenance of aesthetically pleasing landscapes. 

The department is organized into 4 divisions: Administration, Landscape Ordinance Administration, 
Landscape and Urban Forestry and Training & Education. 
        Administration – The Administration Division is responsible for the overall coordination and 
        management of the Urban Environmental Department for the City of Murfreesboro.  This 
        involves the coordination of major initiatives, policies, practices and systems; implementation of 
        and enforcement of City Ordinances and Policies; fiscal management of the departmental 
        budget; and coordination of resources with other City departments. 
        Landscape Administration – The Landscape Administration Division ensures the development 
        and implementation of the City’s Ordinances, related policies, processes and the protection of 
        natural plant communities and for the planting and continued maintenance of installed 
        landscaping.  The division oversees landscape designs from concept through implementation.  
        This division also holds and tracks related installation and maintenance bonds. 
        Landscape and Urban Forestry – A major responsibility of the Landscape and Urban Forestry 
        Division is the maintenance of over 50 City owned properties and City owned trees.  This 
        division maintains over 1,200,000 square feet of turf, 600,000 square feet of plant beds; and 
        almost 400,000 square feet of hardscape area.   
        Training & Education –Training & Education serves a dual purpose in providing educational and 
        instructional assistance to other departments on topics such as chain saw safety while also 
        working to provide educational opportunities to the public through community outreach 
        programs.  Some of these programs are the Community Landscape Awards, the City Tree 
        Appreciation program and speaking engagements for civic organizations and garden clubs. 

 

 



                                                   147 

 
                                           ORGANIZATION CHART 

                                                         Urban 
                                                     Environmental



                                               Urban 
                                           Environmental 
                                            Commission


                       Landscape 
                                            Landscape                              Training and 
                    Maintenance and                                 Civic Plaza 
                                          Ordinance Plans                           Education
                     Urban Forestry


                           City owned 
                                                Plans Review
                           properties



                          Landscaped 
                                                Enforcement
                           Medians




                       Downtown Square
                                                                                                          

                           IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                                SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

       Provide for a greener, more aesthetically pleasing City through standards for landscaping of 
        commercial and industrial developments 
       Maintain the green infrastructure on public land for the enjoyment of all residents  

              STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

       Through strong standards, improve the quality of developments in the community, adding long 
        term value to the tax base 

                EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

       Participate in the first phase of a customer service training for City personnel  

                                         ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

       Implement the Community Landscape Awards in order to give recognition to residents, 
        institutions, and businesses that exceed in the design, installation and maintenance of their 
        landscapes 
                                                             148 

 
        Implement the Tree Appreciation Program to serve as an education and interactive outlet for 
         citizens to learn more about the importance trees play in the environment as well as their 
         planting, maintenance and care 

                                       FY 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Approximately thirty street trees were installed during Phase I of the Historic Downtown Landscape 
Revitalization Project during the fall of 2011.  The ‘Natchez’ Crepe Myrtle and the ‘Bosque’ Elm were 
chosen for their durability and multiple seasons of visual interest.  This project was funded by donations 
to the City’s tree bank utilizing no tax dollars. 

                Established the Community Landscape Awards Program 
                Completed Phase I of the Old Fort Parkway tree replacement project 
                Increased overall Department visibility through public speaking engagements 
                Established a Tree Appreciation Program 

                                       FY 2013 DEPARTMENT GOALS 

                Install Phase II of the Historic Downtown Landscape Revitalization Project 
                Continue to increase overall department visibility through multiple venues such as 
                 ‘Gardening in the City’ (City TV programming), Master Gardner presentations, and other 
                 Civic organization presentation 
                Continue Community Landscape Awards Program 
                Continue Tree Appreciation Program 

                                   PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS 

                                                              Actual Actual Budget Estimated Proposed
                                                             FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2012 FY 2013
Downtown Tree Replacements                                          0       0      15      29      10
Gardening in the City episodes                                      0       0       3       2       2
Community Landscape Awards                                          0       0      10       8      16
Tree Appreciation Program Events                                    0       0       1       1       1

                                    




                                                   149 

 
                                          EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

                                                                           Urban Environmental
                                      Actual                Budget                Budget                    Estimated                 Budget
                                     FY 2010                FY 2011              FY 2012                     FY 2012                  FY 2013

Personnel Costs             $             742,481       $           734,040    $           755,891      $            715,428     $            798,672
Operating Costs             $             165,891       $           181,814    $           193,459      $            180,301     $            204,768
Capital Expense             $                     842                 10,383
                                                        $                      $                2,215                    2,372
                                                                                                        $                                       27,380
                                                                                                                                 $               
Total Urban Environmental   $             909,214       $           926,237    $           951,565      $            898,101     $         1,030,820      
                                                                    
                                                                    




                                                                                                                                              
                                  




                                                                150 

 
                                    HUMAN RESOURCES SUMMARY 

                                       Urban Environmental Department
                                                                   Actual    Actual Estimated Proposed
                                                                  FY 2010   FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013
Job Description
   Director/City Horticulturist                                     1         1         1        1
   Superintendent                                                   1         1         1        1
   Department Coordinator                                                                        1
   Lead Landscaper/Greenskeeper                                     2         2        2         2
   Landscape Specialist/Inspector                                   1         1        1         1
   Landscaper/Greenskeeper                                          6         6        6         6
   Tree Climber                                                     1         1        1         1
   Tree Groundsman                                                  2         2        2         2
   Secretary                                                        1         1        1         0
      Full‐Time Positions                                           15        15       15        15

    Secretary                                                                                    0
       Part‐Time Positions                                          0         0         0        0

Total Urban Environmental Allocation                                15        15       15        15       




                                                    151 

 
                                  2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                  URBAN ENVIRONMENTAL DEPARTMENT

                                  2009/2010   2010/2011   2011/2012   2011/2012   2012/2013    INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                       ACTUAL      ACTUAL     BUDGET      ESTIMATE    BUDGET      (DECREASE)

PERSONNEL COSTS
SALARIES & WAGES                                            499,165     474,505     522,675       23,510
SALARIES                            486,363     475,674     499,165     474,505     522,675       23,510
SOCIAL SECURITY                      34,798      33,787      38,186      33,713      39,985        1,799
MEDICAL - DENTAL                    124,613     142,657     152,215     144,783     165,066       12,851
PENSION PLAN                         55,347      52,448      58,295      52,018      55,585       (2,710)
RETIREMENT (401A)                                   582                   1,633       1,690        1,690
LIFE INSURANCE                                      274                     406       3,626        3,626
WORKERS' COMPENSATION                41,360      28,618       8,030       8,370      10,045        2,015
TOTAL PERSONNEL COSTS               742,481     734,040     755,891     715,428     798,672       42,781

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
VEHICLES & MACHINERY-FLEET           14,774      12,842      11,369       7,677      12,031          662
VEHICLES & MACHINERY                  5,924       6,211       6,500       3,951       6,500            0
OFFICE EQUIPMENT                        516         153         500           0         500            0
EQUIPMENT RENTALS                                             1,000          75       1,000            0
BUILDINGS                             3,528       3,922       3,500       4,363       4,000          500
HARDSCAPE AREAS                                   4,953       5,000       5,000       5,000            0
                                     24,742      28,081      27,869      21,066      29,031        1,162

MATERIAL
AGRICULTURAL                         39,556      38,001      39,300      36,277      39,300            0
OUTSIDE SERVICES - MULCHING          22,848      31,790      35,000      35,000      35,000            0
                                     62,404      69,791      74,300      71,277      74,300            0

SUPPLIES
POSTAGE                                 663         981       1,000         200       1,000            0
OFFICE                                2,022       1,753       2,000         397       1,500         (500)
EMPLOYEE                              1,529       1,991       1,500       1,502       2,250          750
JANITORIAL                            1,008       1,503       1,500       1,706       2,000          500
FUEL                                 18,671      21,148      30,000      23,822      30,000            0
HAND TOOLS & HARDWARE                 3,743       3,310       4,190       4,204       4,190            0
CLOTHING                              5,401       5,339       5,250       7,339       5,250            0
MISCELLANEOUS SUPPLIES                   90                   1,000       1,000       1,000            0
                                     33,127      36,025      46,440      40,170      47,190          750

INSURANCE
AUTOMOBILE                           11,172       8,572           0           0       8,197        8,197
                                     11,172       8,572           0           0       8,197        8,197

UTILITY SERVICE
ELECTRIC                             15,330      18,629      20,000      24,117      22,000        2,000
WATER AND SEWER                      10,902      11,997      14,000      16,486      15,500        1,500
TELEPHONE                             3,367       3,065       3,000       3,185       3,000            0
CELLULAR PHONE                        4,035       4,234       4,300       1,542       2,000       (2,300)
                                     33,634      37,925      41,300      45,330      42,500        1,200

TRAVEL AND SUBSISTENCE
MILEAGE REIMBURSEMENT                                44       1,400           0       1,400            0
                                          0          44       1,400           0       1,400            0

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
ASSOCIATION DUES                                                150           0         150            0
TRAINING PERSONNEL                       25         723       1,000       1,031       1,000            0
OTHER MISCELLANEOUS                     787         653       1,000       1,427       1,000            0
                                        812       1,376       2,150       2,458       2,150            0

OPERATING BUDGET                    908,372     915,854     949,350     895,729   1,003,440       54,090

ADDITION TO FIXED ASSETS
NORMAL REPLACEMENT-FURN & EQUIP                                                       1,000
(1) STRING LINE TRIMMER                                                                 280
(1) CHAINSAW                                                                            360
(1) CREW CAB 4WD TRUCK                                                               22,340
(1) VACUUM BAGGER FOR MOWER                                                           3,400
                                        842      10,383       2,215       2,372      27,380       25,165

TOTAL URBAN ENVIRONMENTAL DEPT.     909,214     926,237     951,565     898,101   1,030,820       79,255     
                                              152 

 
 




                                                                   

                                             CIVIC PLAZA 

 

                                      DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The Civic Plaza is a shared common space between Murfreesboro City Hall and the Linebaugh Public 
Library.  The Plaza is used for a variety of community events including live music, public speakers and 
various civic groups outside functions.  It is heavily landscaped and the home to public art and the icon 
cupola that is used in the City’s logo. The Civic Plaza is maintained by the Urban Environmental 
Department.    
 
Rutherford County owns a portion of the Civic Plaza.  As a result, the cost of maintaining the Plaza is 
divided between the City and Rutherford County on a ratio of 58.5% City and 41.5% County. 
 

                           IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                              SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

       Provides an anchor for cultural activities in the downtown area 
       Supports the Linebaugh Public Library 
     

              STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

       Provide a venue for special events, concerts, weddings and other gatherings in our historic 
        downtown 

                EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

        Maintain the plaza so that it continues to be a beautiful gathering place and one of civic pride 

                                    ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

                                                   153 

 
        Provide a clean, functional and aesthetically pleasing location that serves to draw the 
         community to the downtown area 

                                             EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

                                                                                        Civic Plaza
                                         Actual                 Budget                    Budget                Estimated                    Budget
                                        FY 2010                 FY 2011                  FY 2012                 FY 2012                     FY 2013

Personnel Costs                $               41,469                    54,450
                                                           $                         $              
                                                                                                   45,024   $              44,777                      47,485
                                                                                                                                        $               
Operating Costs                $               13,164                    20,700
                                                           $                         $              
                                                                                                   28,981   $              23,078                      34,834
                                                                                                                                        $               
Capital Expense                $                     893   $                   893                 14,215
                                                                                     $                      $              14,215                      27,590
                                                                                                                                        $               
Total Civic Plaza              $               55,526                    76,043
                                                           $                         $              
                                                                                                   88,220   $              82,070       $            109,909     
                                                                         




                                                                                                                                                     
                                                                         

                                         HUMAN RESOURCES SUMMARY 

                                                               Civic Plaza
                                                                                            Actual           Actual Estimated Proposed
                                                                                           FY 2010          FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013
Job Description
   Lead Landscaper/Greenskeeper                                                                 1               1                   1                   1

Total Civic Plaza Allocation                                                                    1               1                   1                   1        
 
                                     



                                                                    154 

 
                              2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                              CIVIC PLAZA

                                  2009/2010     2010/2011   2011/2012   2011/2012   2012/2013    INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                       ACTUAL        ACTUAL     BUDGET      ESTIMATE    BUDGET      (DECREASE)

PERSONNEL COSTS
SALARIES & WAGES                                               26,587      26,574      27,572           985
   TOTAL SALARIES & WAGES              25,575      26,283      26,587      26,574      27,572           985
SOCIAL SECURITY                         1,756       1,793       2,034       1,801       2,109            75
MEDICAL - DENTAL                       10,830      11,679      12,512      12,512      13,623         1,111
PENSION PLAN                            3,034       3,093       3,319       3,318       3,307           (12)
LIFE INSURANCE                                                                  0         188           188
WORKER'S COMPENSATION                     274      11,602         572         572         686           114
TOTAL PERSONNEL COSTS                  41,469      54,450      45,024      44,777      47,485         2,461

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
VEHICLES & MACHINERY-FLEET              2,093       2,743       1,644       2,686       1,740            96
VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT                    270         992       1,000       1,000       1,000             0
HARDSCAPES                                          3,293      13,000       1,130      13,000             0
FOUNTAIN                                                        1,200       1,200       1,200             0
                                        2,363       7,028      16,844       6,016      16,940            96

MATERIAL
AGRICULTURAL                              263       1,596       1,500       1,500       1,500                0
OUTSIDE SERVICES - MULCHING             2,040       2,890       3,000       3,000       3,000                0
                                        2,303       4,486       4,500       4,500       4,500                0

SUPPLIES
HAND TOOLS & HARDWARE                     986       1,082       1,150       1,150       1,150             0
CLOTHING                                  238         141         250         250         250             0
MISCELLANEOUS SUPPLIES                  3,508         577       1,500       1,500       1,500             0
FUEL                                                            1,500       1,500       1,500             0
JANITORIAL                                                                                300           300
                                        4,732       1,800       4,400       4,400       4,700           300

INSURANCE
AUTOMOBILE                                                                              1,657         1,657
                                                                                        1,657         1,657

UTILITY SERVICE
ELECTRIC                                2,236       2,236       2,237       2,237       2,237             0
WATER                                                                                     800           800
                                        2,236       2,236       2,237       2,237       3,037           800

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
OTHER MISCELLANEOUS                     1,530       5,150       1,000       5,925       4,000         3,000
                                        1,530       5,150       1,000       5,925       4,000         3,000

OPERATING BUDGET                       54,633      75,150      74,005      67,855      82,319         6,657

ADDITION TO FIXED ASSETS
NORMAL REPLACEMENT-FURN & EQUIP                                                           950
(2) BLOWERS                                                                               900
(1) VACUUM BAGGER FOR MOWER                                                             3,400
(1) CREW CAB 4WD TRUCK                                                                 22,340
                                         893          893      14,215      14,215      27,590        13,322

TOTAL CIVIC PLAZA                      55,526      76,043      88,220      82,070     109,909        19,979       




                                                    155 

 
                                                                  

                                         PARKING GARAGE 

 

                                     DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

City Hall, the Civic Plaza and the Linebaugh Public Library all share a two story, below grade parking 
garage.   The garage is maintained by the City Hall Maintenance staff.  The costs of operating and 
maintaining the garage are divided between the City and Rutherford County on a ratio of 68.5% City and 
31.5% County. 

                          IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                              SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

       Supports the Linebaugh Public Library 
       Supports the activities in City Hall 
       Supports all downtown businesses and merchants by providing ample free parking 
       Supports all cultural activities in the downtown area 

              STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

       Maintain the facility using in‐house personnel when appropriate in order to minimize costs 

                EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

       Provide a clean and safe parking for visitors to City Hall, the Library and the Downtown area 

                                   ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

       Continue the maintenance and availability of free parking to visitors of City Hall, the Library 
        and the Downtown area 




                                                   156 

 
                                     EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

                                                                           Parking Garage
                              Actual                   Budget                  Budget                   Estimated                  Budget
                             FY 2010                   FY 2011                FY 2012                    FY 2012                   FY 2013

Personnel Costs        $                      ‐   $                    ‐   $                    ‐   $                     ‐   $                     ‐
Operating Costs        $             110,049      $           109,960      $           110,875      $            114,087      $            116,975
Capital Expense        $                      ‐   $                    ‐   $                    ‐   $                     ‐   $                     ‐
Total Parking Garage   $             110,049      $           109,960      $           110,875      $            114,087      $            116,975       




                                                                                                                                            

                               HUMAN RESOURCES SUMMARY 

None 




                                                           157 

 
                            2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                            PARKING GARAGE

                            2009/2010   2010/2011   2011/2012   2011/2012   2012/2013    INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                 ACTUAL      ACTUAL     BUDGET      ESTIMATE    BUDGET      (DECREASE)

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
SWEEPING                        4,800                   5,400       5,400       5,400            0
                                4,800           0       5,400       5,400       5,400            0

SUPPLIES
LIGHTING                                                  500         250         300         (200)
MISCELLANEOUS SUPPLIES          1,003         173         800         400         600         (200)
                                1,003         173       1,300         650         900         (400)

UTILITY SERVICE
ELECTRIC                       93,393     102,902      98,000     104,472     104,500        6,500
TELEPHONE                         184         184         175         175         175            0
                               93,577     103,086      98,175     104,647     104,675        6,500

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
OTHER MISCELLANEOUS            10,669       6,701       6,000       3,390       6,000            0
                               10,669       6,701       6,000       3,390       6,000            0

TOTAL PARKING GARAGE          110,049     109,960     110,875     114,087     116,975        6,100     




                                            158 

 
                                                                 

                         PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT 

                                     DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The Murfreesboro Parks and Recreation Department provides every citizen of the area with the 
opportunity for safe recreational and cultural activities through a network of parks, recreation centers 
and greenways.   Parks and Recreation acquires, develops, beautifies and maintains over 1,100 acres of 
parks and greenways and operates five comprehensive recreation and cultural facilities that provide 
quality leisure experiences for all Murfreesboro residents. 
 
The operating capital budget for Parks and Recreation includes $4,750,000 to begin construction of 
Phase IV of Stones River Greenway, to complete linkage from the present terminus of the system at New 
Salem Highway to Barfield Crescent Park.  The completion of this approximate 3.2 mile segment would 
provide over 15 miles of continuous greenway path along the Stones River. 
 
The budget also includes funding of $100,000 for the Comprehensive Master Plan, which will guide the 
development of recreation facilities for the next 25 years. 
 

 
                                 




                                                  159 

 
                                            ORGANIZATION CHART 

                                                    Parks and 
                                                    Recreation


                                          Parks and 
                                                              Special Projects 
                                          Recreation 
                                                                Committee
                                         Commission


                                                                            Patterson 
                                                   McKnight and 
        Recreation           Athletics                                     Community            Maintenance
                                                    Sportscom
                                                                             Center



           Cultural Arts     Athletic Facilities        Fitness/Wellness     Fitness/Wellness          Parks



                                McFadden 
              Barfield          Community                  Aquatics               Aquatics           Buildings
                                  Center


            McFadden 
            Community                                                             Library            Grounds
              Center


                                                                                                   Special Event 
            Greenways
                                                                                                     Support
                                                                                                                     
 

 

                           IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                               SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

       To enrich the quality of life in the community by providing high quality facilities and instruction 
        in a diverse range of athletic, recreational and cultural activities 
       Provide citizens and residents of the area safe, accessible and affordable facilities for recreation 
        and cultural activities that contribute to physical and emotional health 
       Demonstrate  Murfreesboro’s  commitment  to  neighborhoods  and  citizens  by  highlighting  the 
        investment in parks, greenways and community centers as focal points of the community 
       Offer  a  wide  range  of  special  events  year‐round  that  involves  all  age  groups  and  multiple 
        interests so every citizen has an opportunity to attend and participate 


                                                           160 

 
              STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

       The investment in parks, greenways and community centers is a major quality of life statement 
        to prospective business and industry 
       Provide opportunities for tourism, tournaments, and special events that produce positive 
        economic impact for the city 
       Generate revenue to offset costs, creating a more sustainable park system 
       Stimulate the local economy through the purchase of equipment, supplies, and services from 
        local vendors and businesses for recreational programs, activities, and projects 

                EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

       Continue application of citywide Service Excellence training, implementing skills learned 
       Obtain post‐program evaluation information from participants and customers 
       Utilize “friends” groups, civic groups, students, partnerships and volunteers to enhance program 
        delivery  

                                   ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

       Foster an environment that allows all City Departments opportunities to engage our community 
        in a park setting through special events, programming, and partnerships 
       Brand Murfreesboro Parks and Recreation Department’s parks, facilities, and programs with an 
        effective marketing campaign utilizing contemporary communication media 
       Develop and conduct a variety of methods to comprehensively assess public input and 
        community needs; make adjustments based upon the data and stated citizens’ needs 
       Increase utilization of social media to include specifically targeted audiences (such as athletic 
        leagues) on Facebook and Twitter  
         

                                   FY 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

       In collaboration with Murfreesboro Water and Sewer Department, completed the stream 
        restoration and demonstration project for storm water management at Old Fort Park 
       In progress with the renovation of Kids’ Castle playground at Old Fort Park, which is partially 
        funded with a grant from Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation 
       Began the process to create the Greenway, Blueways, and Bikeway Master Plan, which will 
        guide the development of these corridors for the next 25 years 
       Final completion of the 10‐year Wetlands Project with the Corps of Engineers is in progress with 
        the completion of the trash screen at Murfree Spring; designs of Oaklands Park are complete 
        with construction projected for completion this year 


                                                  161 

 
       Completed the renovation of the Stones River Greenway bridge and partial restoration of the 
        original trails, 80% of which was funded through a Recreation Trails Grant through Tennessee 
        Department of Environment and Conservation 
       Facilitated over 150 in‐house programs resulting in 181,654 participants.  Facility attendance of 
        Patterson and Sport*Com combined was 402,434 patron visits, and we formed over 100 
        Cooperative Use Agreements in partnership with other organization and agencies 
       Worked in collaboration with Rutherford County Chamber of Commerce in hosting 5th Annual 
        Spring Fling in Murfreesboro, with an estimated economic impact of $3.5 million 
       Hosted the 2011 Region III U. S. Youth Soccer tournament, with an estimated economic impact 
        of $8million; also hosted the Tennessee State Soccer Association (TSSA) boys’ State Cup made 
        up of 84 teams from across the state 
       Hosted USTA State Junior Team Tennis Tournament and received Jr. Team Tennis Tournament 
        of the Year award 
       Hosted 2011 Baseball Players Association (BPA) World Series consisting of 98 teams throughout 
        the Southern Region 
       Awarded the 2011 Outstanding Park to Barfield Crescent Park from the National Softball 
        Association and the Baseball Players Association 
       Served as host to 26 athletic tournaments throughout the city, and accepted $24,000 of in‐kind 
        donations from local leagues 
       Secured the 2013 Southern Athletic Association’s College Championships for tennis 
       Won twelve state awards at the Tennessee Recreation and Parks Association’s Annual 
        Conference, including the President’s Cup; also awarded the Local Government Award for 
        excellence from the Greater Nashville Regional Council, as well as a patriotic Employee award 
        from the office of the Secretary of Defense 
       Begin the yearlong, citywide celebration of our Bicentennial, hosting the kickoff event in 
        October 2011 and continuing with a series of activities and events, with our department serving 
        as key contact for coordination 

                                   FY 2013 DEPARTMENT GOALS 

       Complete the cooperative efforts with the Corps of Engineers for the Wetlands Project, to 
        include final completion of Phase III at Oaklands Park 
       Complete the renovation of Sports*Com and make other improvements at McKnight Park 
       Complete the renovation of McFadden Community Center 
       Make structural repairs to the Leeman House at Cannonsburgh Village, and create a master plan 
        for significant renovation and restoration of the entire village 
       Begin construction of Phase IV of Stones River Greenway to complete linkage to Barfield 
        Crescent Park 
       Acquire land  in the western area of Murfreesboro, and begin the planning phase for a new park 



                                                   162 

 
         Contract for the creation of a Comprehensive Master Plan, which will guide direction and 
          growth to align our department to standards required for national accreditation, grant 
          benchmarks, and professional excellence  
         Increase participation and create more opportunities in Fit for Success, a  wellness program for 
          City, Water and Sewer Department, City School, and Linebaugh Library employees 
         Provide direct and varied opportunities to solicit employee feedback in order to improve 
          services both internally and externally 

                                    PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS 

                                                   Actual          Actual       Budget      Estimated Proposed
                                                  FY 2010         FY 2011       FY 2012      FY 2012   FY 2013
    Acres of parkland per 1,000 residents          11.14            11.2         11.35        11.35     11.93
    Miles of greenway completed                      0               1             0            0         3
    Facility Attendance
                                                     390,127         402,434      405,000     405,000      420,000
    (Sports*Com & PPCC)
    Shelter Rental Revenue                        $48,245.28      $49,890.00   $   50,000   $   50,000   $   52,000 
    Financial Assistance
                                                 $361,800.00  $414,764.75  $415,000  $415,000  $415,000 
    (Sept. 1 – Aug. 31)



                                            EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

                                                          
                                                               Parks and Recreation
                                     Actual          Budget           Budget        Estimated           Budget
                                    FY 2010          FY 2011          FY 2012        FY 2012            FY 2013

Personnel Costs                 $    4,722,586   $    4,855,079   $  5,508,025     $    5,377,131   $    5,729,787
Operating Costs                 $    1,974,535   $    2,151,817   $  2,434,489     $    2,497,558   $    2,563,394
Capital Expense                 $      738,008   $      599,462   $  2,417,410     $    1,170,000   $    4,950,521
Total Parks & Recreation Fund   $    7,435,129   $    7,606,358   $ 10,359,924     $    9,044,689   $   13,243,702      
 
 




                                                       163 

 
            
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

    164 

 
                                   HUMAN RESOURCES SUMMARY 

                                        Parks and Recreation Fund
                                                                Actual    Actual Estimated Proposed
                                                               FY 2010   FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013
Job Description
   Director                                                      1         1          1       1
   Assistant Director                                            0         1          1       1
   Program Coordinator                                           12        12         12      12
   Assistant Program Coordinator                                 8         5          5       6
   Program Grant Coordinator                                     1         1          1       0
   Cultural Arts Coordinator                                     1         1          1       1
   Administrative Assistant                                      1         0          0       0
   Finance/Personnel Supervisor                                  0         1          1       1
   Administrative Support Specialist                             3         3          3       3
   Facility Superintendent                                       3         3          3       3
   Superintendents                                               0         2          2       2
   Technical Support Specialist                                  0         1          1       1
   Facility Maintenance Foreman                                  1         1          1       2
   Crew Leader‐Maintenance                                       1         1          1       0
   Crew Leader                                                   5         5          5       5
   Groundskeeper                                                 14        13         13      12
   Groundskeeper/Maintenance                                     5         5          5       6
   Custodian                                                     7         7          7       7
   Secretary/Receptionist                                        4         4          4       4
   Operations Coordinator                                        3         3          3       3
      Full‐Time Positions                                        70        70         70      70

    Part‐Time Positions (Full‐Time Equivalent)                  242       254         254    254

Total Parks and Recreation Allocation                           312       324         324    324       
                                                                                   




                                                  165 

 
  
                                 2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                 PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT

                                  2009/2010    2010/2011   2011/2012     2011/2012    2012/2013      INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                       ACTUAL       ACTUAL     BUDGET        ESTIMATE     BUDGET        (DECREASE)

EXPENDITURES
PERSONNEL COSTS
SALARIES & WAGES                   2,429,595   2,326,214    2,577,320     2,475,000    2,620,320        43,000
PART TIME EMPLOYEES                1,158,199   1,352,556    1,607,210     1,510,500    1,656,710        49,500
ALLOWANCE FOR VACANCIES - 2%                                 (125,536)                   (85,541)       39,995
MAINTENANCE (ON-CALL OVERTIME)                                  5,980                      5,980             0
   TOTAL NET SALARIES & WAGES      3,587,794   3,678,770    4,064,974     3,985,500    4,197,469       132,495
SOCIAL SECURITY                      266,840     269,472      320,117       295,095      327,193         7,076
MEDICAL - DENTAL                     480,538     528,703      608,370       580,000      637,838        29,468
PENSION PLAN                         283,328     270,420      303,923       290,000      267,625       (36,298)
RETIREMENT (401A)                                    392                      6,000       17,952        17,952
LIFE INSURANCE                                        69                        950       18,207        18,207
WORKER'S COMPENSATION                104,086     107,253      210,641       219,586      263,503        52,862
TOTAL PERSONNEL COSTS              4,722,586   4,855,079    5,508,025     5,377,131    5,729,787       221,762

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
VEHICLES & MACHINERY-FLEET            20,512      30,315      35,272        35,938       37,326          2,054
VEHICLES & MACHINERY                  36,058      47,309      42,105        46,000       42,965            860
OFFICE EQUIPMENT                      13,493      14,041      13,000        16,000       13,000              0
GROUNDS & LAWNS                      183,506     209,974     190,745       220,000      250,785         60,040
EDUCATIONAL ANIMALS                                                                       2,500          2,500
RECREATIONAL EQUIPMENT                11,145       9,404      12,305        11,500       12,305              0
JANITORIAL EQUIPMENT                   1,757         273       1,550           800        1,550              0
BUILDINGS                            200,586     210,935     205,171       230,000      246,317         41,146
SWIMMING POOLS                        41,151      48,100     110,903        97,000      139,251         28,348
                                     508,208     570,351     611,051       657,238      745,999        134,948

SUPPLIES
POSTAGE                                2,309       2,369       2,800         2,700        2,700           (100)
OFFICE SUPPLIES                       18,159      21,673      24,000        24,000       24,000              0
ADVERTISING                           30,744      33,327      37,565        34,000       37,865            300
JANITORIAL                            55,487      48,132      60,000        53,000       56,250         (3,750)
TROPHIES                               8,709       8,227      11,800         9,300       11,565           (235)
FUEL                                  44,352      59,515      67,320        63,636       80,248         12,928
ACTIVITY                              13,212      13,149      18,745        15,000       22,170          3,425
HAND TOOLS & HARDWARE                  4,617       4,413       4,590         4,300        4,565            (25)
CLOTHING                              13,835      16,371      18,250        17,500       19,371          1,121
ADMISSION SUPPLIES                    20,917      28,836      29,000        28,500       29,000              0
RECREATIONAL                          28,040      30,622      34,200        34,200       40,159          5,959
MISCELLANEOUS SUPPLIES                 7,455       6,625       7,425         7,325        7,075           (350)
                                     247,836     273,259     315,695       293,461      334,968         19,273

INSURANCE
GENERAL                               17,535      13,622      17,535        20,562       20,562          3,027
PROPERTY INSURANCE                    10,000      10,000      10,000        10,000       10,000              0
GENERAL LIABILITY                     30,993      30,993      30,993        30,993       30,993              0
AUTOMOBILE                            25,912      22,241           0             0       22,069         22,069
                                      84,440      76,856      58,528        61,555       83,624         25,096       




                                                 166 

 
                                2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT

                                    2009/2010    2010/2011   2011/2012    2011/2012    2012/2013     INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                         ACTUAL       ACTUAL     BUDGET       ESTIMATE     BUDGET       (DECREASE)

UTILITIES
ELECTRIC                               571,030     644,627     610,000       660,000      656,000       46,000
WATER & SEWER                          160,866     150,875     155,000       153,500      158,000        3,000
GAS                                    183,664     150,652     190,000       185,000      188,000       (2,000)
TELEPHONE                               11,630      11,432      13,950        11,200       13,100         (850)
CELLULAR TELEPHONE                      11,798      12,008      14,000         8,000        8,500       (5,500)
INTERNET SERVICE                         3,107       3,119       2,670         3,130        3,205          535
                                       942,095     972,713     985,620     1,020,830    1,026,805       41,185

TRAVEL AND SUBSISTENCE
MILEAGE REIMBURSEMENT                   15,595      18,005      23,000       19,200       20,673         (2,327)
COMMISSION MEETINGS                      1,134       1,622       1,800        1,750        1,800              0
                                        16,729      19,627      24,800       20,950       22,473         (2,327)

RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES
PATTERSON COMMUNITY CENTER                             210         250          240          250              0
PARK MOVIES                              5,693       5,543       6,500        6,000        6,500              0
CULTURAL ACTIVITIES:                    70,163      73,041
  SPECIAL EVENTS                                                62,850       57,000       62,400           (450)
  CONCERTS IN PARKS                                             11,400       10,000       11,500            100
  SENIOR CITIZENS PROGRAMS                                       5,000        4,900        5,000              0
  SUMMER DAY CAMPS                                               3,500        2,500        2,950           (550)
  CHILDREN'S THEATER                                             7,000        7,000        7,000              0
                                        75,856      78,794      96,500       87,640       95,600           (900)

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
ASSOCIATION DUES                         1,690       1,993       2,170        2,249        2,200             30
SURVEYS AND STUDIES                        250                                           100,000        100,000
TRAINING PERSONNEL                       7,246      10,873      11,000       11,000       14,500          3,500
GRANT EXPENDITURES                         380       2,382     200,050      200,050        5,050       (195,000)
COMPUTER SOFTWARE EXPENSE                  302       1,039       2,800        2,785        3,300            500
PURCHASES FOR RESALE                    50,429      76,679      91,200       88,000       91,800            600
SALES TAX                               19,350      26,315      25,000       26,800       26,000          1,000
OTHER MISCELLANEOUS                     19,724      40,936      10,075       25,000       11,075          1,000
                                        99,371     160,217     342,295      355,884      253,925        (88,370)

OPERATING BUDGET                     6,697,121   7,006,896    7,942,514    7,874,689    8,293,181      350,667

ADDITION TO FIXED ASSETS
NORMAL REPLACEMENT-FURN & EQUIP

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE
OFFICE FURNITURE                                                                           5,000
(5) COMPUTERS                                                                              6,000
(2) PRINTERS                                                                                 600
(6) COMPUTER FIBER OPTIC SWITCHES                                                         21,670

CENTRAL MAINTENANCE
60" ZTR MOWER                                                                              9,500
(2) HAND HELD BLOWERS                                                                        560

RICHARD SIEGEL PARK
60" ZTR MOWER                                                                              9,500
HAND HELD BLOWER                                                                             280

BARFIELD CRESCENT PARK
60" ZTR MOWER                                                                              9,500
(4) DUGOUT COVERS                                                                          6,000
WEEDEATER                                                                                    400

                                                   167 

 
                                  2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                  PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT

                                    2009/2010   2010/2011   2011/2012   2011/2012   2012/2013    INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                         ACTUAL      ACTUAL     BUDGET      ESTIMATE    BUDGET      (DECREASE)

GREENWAY TRAIL MAINTENACE
(10) TRASH/RECYCLING CONTAINERS                                                         6,000
(3) BENCHES                                                                             2,700
(2) PICNIC TABLES                                                                       1,600
HAND HELD BLOWER                                                                          280

NORTH SIDE BALL FIELD MAINTENANCE
REEL MOWER                                                                              5,000
BACKPACK BLOWER                                                                           475
PORTABLE FENCING                                                                        2,000

SPORTS*COM
STAIR CLIMBER                                                                           3,000
CHAIRS FOR OUTDOOR POOL                                                                 2,250
WEIGHT ASSISTED DIP & CHIN                                                              4,000
SIT & REACH BOX - WELLNESS                                                                230
ELECTRIC PRESSURE WASHER - AQUATICS                                                       250
(4) SETS BLEACHERS                                                                      7,600

MOVIES UNDER THE STARS
SCREEN                                                                                  1,000

PATTERSON COMMUNITY CENTER
(2) CEILING PROJECTORS                                                                  2,500
(2) VOLLEYBALL STANDS                                                                   1,700
UPGRADE SECURITY CAMERA EQUIPMENT (HARD DRIVE & CAMERA)                                 3,000
(1) TREADMILLS                                                                          5,250
AIRDYNE EXERCISE BICYCLE                                                                1,050
(2) UPRIGHT BICYCLES                                                                    5,500
EYE WASH STATION                                                                          500
MICROPHONES & CABLES                                                                      600
(2) AMPLIFIERS FOR SOUND SYSTEM                                                         2,000
WIRELESS MICROPHONE SYSTEM                                                                500
AMPLIFIER FOR SOUND SYSTEM                                                                500
TWO-WAY RADIOS                                                                            600
(3) DIGITAL TRANSMITTER FOR TELEVISIONS - WELLNESS                                        975
PUSH SWEEPER                                                                              350
(16) CHAIRS FOR AQUATICS AREA                                                           2,400
(4) TABLES FOR AQUATICS AREA                                                            1,200
32" TELEVISION & MOUNT                                                                    500

MCFADDEN COMMUNITY CENTER
BASKETBALL GOAL PADDING                                                                 1,200
(2) SETS OF BLEACHERS                                                                   3,800

CANNONSBURGH
VACUUM                                                                                    200
(3) WINDOW HEAT/AIR UNITS LEEMAN HOUSE                                                  1,800

WILDERNESS STATION
INTERPRETATIVE SIGNS                                                                    4,000
DESKTOP COMPUTER                                                                        1,200

MISCELLANEOUS                                                                           9,000
                                                                                      155,720

NEW EQUIPMENT
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE
VPN NETWORK SWITCH FOR PROGRAMMING OFFICE                                                 500
IPAD                                                                                      850
HD VIDEO CAMERA                                                                           250
                                                  168 

 
                                     2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                     PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT

                                        2009/2010     2010/2011   2011/2012    2011/2012    2012/2013     INCREASE
    DESCRIPTIONS                         ACTUAL        ACTUAL     BUDGET       ESTIMATE     BUDGET       (DECREASE)
    GREENWAY MAINTENANCE
    LANDSCAPE BED REFINER                                                                          600
    (2) FROST FREE WATER FOUNTAINS                                                               6,000
    (10) SMALL DIRECTIONAL SIGNS                                                                 1,500

    NORTH SIDE BALL FIELD MAINTENANCE
    (3) PITCHING MOUND COVERS                                                                     900
    NAIL DRAG                                                                                     400
    WEEDEATER W/ATTACHMENTS                                                                       989

    ROGERS PARK
    SWINGS                                                                                       8,000

    BARFIELD CRESCENT PARK
    JOB SITE TABLE SAW                                                                            600
    PRESS WASH ATTACHMNT (CONCRETE CLEANER)                                                       400
    8' STEP LADDER                                                                                150

    MCFADDEN COMMUNITY CENTER
    PORTABLE SOUND SYSTEM                                                                         300
    PICNIC TABLE                                                                                  250
    TV W/DVD PLAYER                                                                               400
    LAMINATING MACHINE                                                                            200
    FOOSBALL TABLE                                                                                300

    ATHLETICS
    LAPTOP COMPUTER                                                                              1,200

    CANNONSBURGH
    CHRISTMAS LIGHT DISPLAYS                                                                     5,000
    TRAILER                                                                                      1,901
    SOUND SYSTEM                                                                                 1,857
    (10) PICNIC TABLES                                                                           1,090

    PATTERSON COMMUNITY CENTER
    STORAGE RACKS YOUTH GYM                                                                      2,000
    WHIRLWIND LINE LEVEL COMBINER FOR SOUND SYSTEM                                                 109
    (2) RADIAL DIRECTOR BOXES FOR SOUND SYSTEM                                                     280
    IPOD FOR WELLNESS AREA                                                                         200
    EXTERNAL HARD DRIVE                                                                            150
    VIDEO CAMERA                                                                                   200
    PACE CLOCK - AQUATICS                                                                          300

    SPORTS*COM
    ELLIPTICAL MACHINE                                                                           5,000
    ENTRANCE SIGN                                                                                  500
    TELEVISION/DVD COMBO                                                                           350
    WEIGHT RACK                                                                                    350
    PACE CLOCK - AQUATICS                                                                          300
    (2) NOODLE STORAGE RACKS - AQUATICS                                                            300
    HEIGHT MEASUREMENT - WELLNESS                                                                  125
    BOOKSHELF - AQUATICS                                                                           150
    OFFICE CHAIR - AQUATICS                                                                        150

    GENERAL PROGRAMMING
    COMPUTER DOCKING STATION                                                                      400
    PRINTER - RECREATION SUPT.                                                                    300

    FEDERAL GRANTS (REIMBURSEMENTS)
    GREENWAY TRAIL EXTENSION (80%)                                 2,247,274                 4,750,000
                                           738,008      599,462    2,417,410    1,170,000    4,950,521     1,817,948


  TOTAL RECREATION DEPARTMENT             7,435,129   7,606,358   10,359,924    9,044,689   13,243,702     2,168,615    
                                                        169 

 
                                                                    

                                SENIOR CITIZENS DEPARTMENT 

                                       DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

St. Clair Street Senior Center (Senior Center) is a multipurpose, Level 4 senior center as established by 
the Aging Commission for the State of Tennessee.  Multipurpose senior centers are integral to 
neighborhood vitality, aging in place, and intergenerational strengthening of the family system.  Senior 
centers offer life enriching programming, civic engagement, and employment opportunities; and 
connects older adults to vital community services that can help them stay healthy and independent 

Over 3,400 individual seniors visited the St. Clair Street location during Fiscal Year 2011.  Of these, 45% 
are Murfreesboro residents, 52% live in Rutherford County and 3% attend the Center from other 
counties. 
 

As a multipurpose senior center, St. Clair Street Senior Center meets the needs of seniors —mind, body, 
and spirit, through educational programs, health and wellness classes, and socialization.   

Health/wellness opportunities include fitness programs, healthy‐eating/healthy‐living classes, line‐
dancing, clinic visits with the nurse,  Matter of Balance classes, flu shots, community garden, and others.  
Continuing education is also important to seniors.  The Center continues to bring educational classes: 
art, language, crafts, music, drama, and dancing.  The benefits of socialization are almost as important as 
nutrition.  Lack of socialization will diminish quality of life and take years off of the person who lives 
isolated. 
 
Partnerships have been established with Middle Tennessee State University programs, allowing students 
do their internship at the Senior Center in social services, programming, nursing, and others.  The Center 
continues to partner with the medical community – Middle Tennessee Medical Center, physicians and 
other healthcare professionals who bring programs of health education and information to the seniors. 
The United Way continues to fund the “Nurse of Duty” program at no cost to seniors.  The Alzheimer’s 
Association continues to be an excellent partner in reaching the seniors and providing resource material. 
 

                                  




                                                    170 

 
                                       ORGANIZATION CHART 

 
                                             Senior Center

                                     Senior Center 
                                      Commission

       Health and                                           Adult Day               Coordination 
        Wellness                  Programs                    Care                   with other 
                                    Recreation                                        agencies
              Nurse on 
               Duty
                                     Education

                Social 
               Services              Socialization
                                                                                                            

                           IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                              SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

   Enhance the quality of life through prompt, efficient and courteous service to senior adults, their 
    families and caregivers 
   Coordinate services vital to senior adults 
   Awareness programs to guide seniors in making informed decisions and in avoiding social crimes 
    against the elderly 

              STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

   Provide a strong base of support that encourages and maintains independent senior living 
   Connect resources in the community for financial information to seniors 
   Promote community resources for lifestyle and life changes 

                EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

   Caring and compassionate commitment in provision of services to senior adults 
   Participate in service excellence training 
   Provide service to all seniors without bias 
 
 
 


                                                   171 

 
                                          ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

   Open forums at the Senior Center—legislature, health care  
   Monthly contact with 3,700 seniors in the community through the newsletter 
   Media contact through radio, television, newsletter, and the city’s Facebook 
   Outreach opportunities 

                                          FY 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

   Wii Bowling League came in 3rd place in the national competition among seniors 
   One of five Spotlight Awards for senior centers in Tennessee 
   New format for monthly newsletter with new name—The LEAF—Living Every Adventure Fully 
   Senior Center artists display artwork in the Rotunda of City Hall 
   Family Tree Day for Bicentennial of Murfreesboro 

                                          FY 2013 DEPARTMENT GOALS 

   Maintain range of programming service to senior adults in education, health/wellness, and 
    socialization 
   Develop new partnerships for the coordination of services 
   Community Outreach  
   Complete Senior Center Accreditation  
   Rename Senior Center using patron input 

                                     PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS 
               Description                    Actual        Actual        Budget      Estimated    Budget

                                             FY 2010       FY 2011        FY 2012     FY 2012      FY 2013

Education Service Units                          7,417            8,330       7,000        7,000       7,000

Nurse on Duty Service Units                      1,945            2,611       2,500        2,500       2,500

Outreach Service Units                             535            1,184        700           700        700

Physical Fitness Service Units                  11,997           15,440      11,500       11,500      11,500

Recreation Service Units                       100,812           99,229     100,000      100,000     100,000

Visiting Service Units                           1,189             481         500           500        500

Volunteer Hours                                 10,997           12,670      11,000       11,000      11,000

Volunteers                                         542             335         450           400        400

Total Units of Service for all programs        142,000          147,302     150,000      150,000     150,000

Total Unduplicated Participants                  4,529            3,435       4,000        4,000       4,250

 
                                                         172 

 
                                         EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

                                                                  Senior Citizens
                                      Actual          Budget          Budget            Estimated        Budget
                                     FY 2010          FY 2011        FY 2012             FY 2012         FY 2013

Personnel Costs              $          571,276   $     575,435   $     609,160     $      579,433   $      617,505
Operating Costs              $          299,315   $     280,945   $     331,907     $      312,753   $      308,377
Capital Expense              $           10,091   $       4,624   $       8,550     $        2,413   $       20,478
Total Senior Citizens Fund   $          880,682   $     861,004   $     949,617     $      894,599   $      946,360    




                                                                                                                       

                                  




                                                        173 

 
                                  HUMAN RESOURCES SUMMARY 

 
                                            Senior Citizens Fund
                                                                    Actual      Actual Estimated Proposed
                                                                   FY 2010     FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013
Job Description
   Director                                                           1            1           1            1
   Department Coordinator                                             0            1           1            1
   Administrative Assistant                                           1            0           0            0
   Administrative Secretary                                           1            1           1            1
   Program Director                                                   2            2           2            2
   Secretary/Receptionist                                             1            1           1            1
   Care Director                                                      1            1           1            1
   Custodian                                                          2            2           2            2
      Full‐Time Positions                                             9            9           9            9

    Driver                                                            1            1           1            1
    Clerical/After Hours                                              1            1           1            1
    Nurse on Duty                                                     1            1           1            1
    Adult Day Care                                                    4            4           5            5
    Volunteer Coordinator                                                                                   1
    Resource Center                                                   1            1           1            1
       Part‐Time Positions                                            8            8           9            10

Total Senior Citizens Center Allocation                               17          17           18           19         
                                     2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                     SENIOR CITIZENS DEPARTMENT
                                      2009/2010     2010/2011    2011/2012    2011/2012    2012/2013     INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                           ACTUAL        ACTUAL      BUDGET       ESTIMATE     BUDGET       (DECREASE)
EXPENDITURES

PERSONNEL COSTS
SALARIES & WAGES                                                    439,624      394,000      443,672        4,048
   TOTAL SALARIES & WAGES                 414,818      406,708      439,624      394,000      443,672        4,048
SOCIAL SECURITY                            30,695       29,783       33,631       28,500       33,941          310
MEDICAL - DENTAL                           66,091       71,196       73,858       97,971       85,725       11,867
PENSION PLAN                               36,937       36,036       39,564       36,323       34,935       (4,629)
RETIREMENT (401A)                                                                    156          623          623
LIFE INSURANCE                                                                         0        2,202        2,202
WORKERS COMPENSATION                       22,735       31,712       22,483       22,483       16,406       (6,077)
TOTAL PERSONNEL COSTS                     571,276      575,435      609,160      579,433      617,505        8,345

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
VEHICLES & MACHINERY - FLEET                4,435        6,100        3,527        4,158        4,445           918
VEHICLES & MACHINERY                           57          990          500          500          500             0
OFFICE EQUIPMENT                            2,595        3,185        3,500        3,700        3,700           200
RECREATIONAL EQUIPMENT                      1,111          971        1,500        1,500        1,500             0
APPLIANCE REPAIR                               35          351        2,500        2,500        2,500             0
BUILDINGS                                  14,928       14,936       30,500       30,000       20,000       (10,500)
                                           23,161       26,533       42,027       42,358       32,645        (9,382)  



                                                     174 

 
                                       2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                       SENIOR CITIZENS DEPARTMENT

                                        2009/2010    2010/2011     2011/2012       2011/2012    2012/2013     INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                             ACTUAL       ACTUAL       BUDGET          ESTIMATE     BUDGET       (DECREASE)
SUPPLIES
POSTAGE                                     14,109       13,572        20,000          21,000       16,000        (4,000)
OFFICE                                       5,975        5,893         8,500           9,588        8,500             0
ADVERTISING & PRINTING                       9,817        9,219        15,000          12,731       15,000             0
JANITORIAL                                   9,979       11,043        12,000          12,000       13,000         1,000
NURSE                                        3,291        1,695         4,000           4,000        3,000        (1,000)
FUEL                                         2,194        2,586         5,500           5,000        5,000          (500)
ACTIVITY SUPPLIES                           24,258       33,039        30,000          27,000       35,000         5,000
TRIP EXPENSE                               105,120       76,509        50,000          50,000       50,000             0
CLOTHING                                       404          553           650             650        1,763         1,113
ADULT DAY CARE                               7,563        6,751         7,500           7,500        6,500        (1,000)
MISCELLANEOUS SUPPLIES                          48          270         1,000           1,000        1,000             0
                                           182,758      161,130       154,150         150,469      154,763           613

INSURANCE
AUTOMOBILE                                   1,214        1,214                0           0         2,458        2,458
                                             1,214        1,214                0           0         2,458        2,458

UTILITY SERVICE
ELECTRIC                                    35,045       39,918        47,000          47,000       45,500        (1,500)
WATER & SEWER                                4,871        5,072         5,500           5,500        5,500             0
GAS                                          8,948        7,751        16,000          16,000       12,250        (3,750)
TELEPHONE                                    2,510        1,698         1,500           1,346        1,500             0
CELLULAR TELEPHONE                           1,427        1,250         1,500           1,200        1,200          (300)
                                            52,801       55,689        71,500          71,046       65,950        (5,550)

CONTRACTUAL SERVICES
HEALTH SERVICES                              2,400        2,400         2,500           2,500        2,500             0
                                             2,400        2,400         2,500           2,500        2,500             0

TRAVEL AND SUBSISTENCE
MILEAGE REIMBURSEMENT                        1,161           834        1,500           1,200        1,575            75
                                             1,161           834        1,500           1,200        1,575            75

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
ASSOCIATION DUES                               435          650         1,750           1,000        1,200          (550)
COMPUTER SOFTWARE                            1,609        2,841         9,480           9,480        8,286        (1,194)
TRAINING PERSONNEL                             272          807         2,500           2,500        2,000          (500)
INSTRUCTION                                 19,479       20,202        24,000          24,000       27,000         3,000
DESIGNATED CONTRIBUTIONS                     8,270        7,430         3,000           1,200        3,000             0
GRANT EXPENSE                                1,050                     12,500               0            0       (12,500)
OTHER MISCELLANEOUS                          4,705        1,215         7,000           7,000        7,000             0
                                            35,820       33,145        60,230          45,180       48,486       (11,744)

OPERATING BUDGET                           870,591      856,380       941,067         892,186      925,882       (15,185)

ADDITION TO FIXED ASSETS
NORMAL REPLACEMENT - EQUIPMENT                                                                       8,978
COPIER                                                                                              10,000
(1) COMPUTER                                                                                         1,500
                                            10,091        4,624         8,550           2,413       20,478       11,928

TOTAL SENIOR CITIZENS DEPARTMENT           880,682      861,004       949,617         894,599      946,360        (3,257)  


                                    




                                                      175 

 
                                                                    

                             PUBLIC GOLF COURSE DEPARTMENT 

                                      DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The City historically has operated two public golf courses: Old Fort Golf Course and the Veterans 
Administration (VA) Golf Course.  The Old Fort Golf Course is an eighteen‐hole championship course and 
plays host to many local and destination events.  There are several local businesses that participate in 
afternoon golf leagues and along with the Old Fort Men’s Golf Association, Ladies League, and Senior 
League help to make up a solid core of golfers. The VA Golf Course is a nine‐hole facility leased by the 
City from the Federal Government and is an economical walking course that benefits the patients at the 
hospital as well as the community. 
 
Rounds played at Old Fort Golf Club remained similar to last year while rounds at the Veterans Golf 
Course dropped slightly.  The economy continues to have an impact on our citizens and their 
discretionary funds.  The change in the economy has required the City to reevaluate many of the 
practices and standards that are the basis of operations for both golf courses. 
 
Information received by the City of Murfreesboro from the Veterans Administration has made it clear 
that a long term agreement between the two is not coming anytime soon.  With this in mind the VA Golf 
Course will be operated for the upcoming fiscal year as in the past, with a minimal staff and minimal 
outlay of expenses, so that costs to the customer and the City can remain affordable. 
 
Old Fort’s merchandising and concessions operations continue to be a focal point in both examination 
and change to meet the evolving needs and habits of the customer.  Reallocation of time and scheduling 
will be an area of exploration in an attempt to minimize costs in and boost potential revenue growth. 
 
While Old Fort was able to maintain rounds this past year, adding additional rounds will still be a priority 
for 2013 and beyond.  Once again the course was utilized by many of the local high schools and both 
Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU) Men’s and Women’s golf teams.  It is anticipated that this 
trend will continue for 2013. 
 
In operating capital, resealing and repaving of areas of the parking lots and cart paths is budgeted at 
$52,000.  In order to maintain the course in top condition, $17,500 is planned for the purchase of two 
additional fans to circulate air around the greens. 
                                    




                                                    176 

 
                                         ORGANIZATION CHART 


                                               Director of Golf



                                        Golf 
                                     Commission


                                                               Veterans 
                                     Old Fort Golf 
                                                             Administration 
                                        Course
                                                              Golf Course


                                            Pro Shop


                                           Course 
                                        Operations and 
                                         Maintenance                                                      
 
 

                           IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                               SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

       Provide a quality golf recreation facility for all interested residents 
         

              STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

       Continued implementation of the customer loyalty program 
       Expand the number of paid rounds of golf 
       Expand merchandising and concession revenues 

                EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

       Old Fort Golf Course continues to be named among the best golf courses in Middle Tennessee 
       Provide value for golfers via the customer loyalty program, which offers discounts based upon 
        purchases 
       Participate and excel in the service excellence training 

                                                      177 

 
       Provide opportunity to our current and future customers to participate in the “Grow the game” 
        initiatives in upcoming programs 
       We will provide customers a chance to participate in a custom tour “Golf Ball Fitting” from 
        Titleist Golf that is only available at a limited number of golf facilities 

                                    ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

       Promote PGA of America “Grow the Game” initiatives 
       Build a youth short course on the former demolition landfill adjacent to Old Fort Golf Club 
       Expand and grow Junior Programming at Old Fort Golf Club and Veterans Golf Course to include 
        nearby local youth  

                                    FY 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

       Maintained rounds for the FY 20012 
       Improved turf quality on the entire course (one of only a few courses that did not suffer 
        significant turf loss during the year) 
       Value of the experience and quality of the product meet our goals 
       Local High Schools (Blackman, Oakland, Riverdale, and Siegel) utilized the course in matches and 
        preparation for the State Golf Championships 
       Hosted the United States Junior Golf Championship Qualifier for twenty‐five consecutive years, 
        also hosted a two‐day Southeastern Jr. Tour event, and the inaugural MTSU Ladies College 
        Invitational with thirteen colleges from around the mid‐south. 
       New Launch Monitor was utilized to help spur Golf Shop Sales 
       Replaced a fleet of seventy‐five (75) golf cars with new Club Car Precedent golf cars along with 
        eight utility vehicles. 
       Implemented a revenue enhancement of $2.00 on Green Fees  
 

                                    FY 2013 DEPARTMENT GOALS 

       Expand the number of paid rounds of golf through enhanced leagues, tournaments and other 
        measures 
       Continue to provide more value to the golfing public through proper turf maintenance 
       Support the use of the facilities by local school teams 
       Continue to expand merchandising and concession operations as an additional revenue source 
       Research and implement new inventive ways to increase revenues and grow the game of golf 
        for the future 
       Finalize plans for the construction for a short course and learning opportunity on the demolition 
        landfill adjacent to Old Fort Golf Club that will allow usage to all youth at no charge while 
        enhancing a piece of unused property and participating in additional effluent water usage and 
        disposal 
                                 



                                                  178 

 
                                 PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS 

                                                Actual    Actual   Budget    Estimated Proposed
                                               FY 2010   FY 2011   FY 2012    FY 2012   FY 2013
    Paid rounds of golf‐Old Fort                  41,077    42,884    45,000     42,920    43,000
    Paid rounds of golf‐VA                        28,065    23,143     5,000     22,465    23,000
    Concession revenue‐Old Fort                $158,514 $158,944 $175,000 $160,762 $160,000
    Concession revenue‐VA                       $12,317   $10,592   $11,500     $9,883   $10,000
    Merchandise revenue‐Old Fort               $206,762 $213,420 $250,000 $200,000 $225,000
    Merchandise revenue‐VA                       $5,907    $4,579    $5,000     $4,901    $5,000
 

                                      EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

                                                             Old Fort Golf Course
                                  Actual           Budget           Budget        Estimated         Budget
                                 FY 2010           FY 2011         FY 2012         FY 2012          FY 2013

Personnel Costs              $       840,826   $      903,725   $     969,157   $     930,501   $    1,015,959
Operating Costs              $       575,821   $      599,649   $     651,142   $     595,933   $      609,165
Capital Expense              $        15,863   $       10,938   $     277,500   $     283,435   $       92,995
Total Old Fort Golf Course   $     1,432,510   $    1,514,312   $   1,897,799   $   1,809,869   $    1,718,119    
 




                                                                                                                  
                                                        
 




                                                     179 

 
                                                            VA Golf Course
                                Actual          Budget          Budget           Estimated        Budget
                               FY 2010          FY 2011        FY 2012            FY 2012         FY 2013

Personnel Costs        $          244,257   $     254,807   $     250,726    $      241,880   $      251,984
Operating Costs        $           41,696   $      42,034   $      48,251    $       43,990   $       51,801
Capital Expense        $           10,915   $      24,976   $      35,000    $       33,300   $        1,500
Total VA Golf Course   $          296,868   $     321,817   $     333,977    $      319,170   $      305,285    
 




                                                                                                                
                            




                                                  180 

 
                                   HUMAN RESOURCES SUMMARY 

                                       Public Golf Course Fund
                                                              Actual    Actual Estimated Proposed
                                                             FY 2010   FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013
Job Description
   Golf Director                                               1         1        1         1
   Head Golf Professional                                      1         1        1         1
   Shop Manager                                                2         2        2         2
   Golf Facility Supervisor (VA)                               1         1        1         1
   Food Service Manager                                        1         1        1         1
   Department Coordinator                                      1         1        1         1
   Turf Care Manager                                           1         1        1         1
   Turf Care Supervisor                                        1         1        1         1
   Lead Groundskeeper (VA)                                     1         1        1         1
   Groundskeeper/Clerk                                         1         1        0         0
   Equipment Mechanic                                          1         1        1         1
   Irrigation Technician                                       1         1        1         1
   Landscaper/Greenskeeper                                     2         2        2         2
       Full‐Time Positions                                     15        15       14        14

    P/T Golf Shop Personnel                                    19        19       22        25
    P/T Maintenance Personnel                                  15        15       12        13
       Part‐Time Positions                                     34        34       34        38

Total Public Golf Allocation                                   49        49       48        52       




                                                181 

 
                                2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                PUBLIC GOLF COURSE DEPARTMENT

                                 2009/2010     2010/2011 2011/2012    2011/2012 2012/2013        INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                      ACTUAL        ACTUAL   BUDGET       ESTIMATE BUDGET           (DECREASE)

OLD FORT
PERSONNEL COSTS
SALARIES & WAGES                    555,332     566,034    576,583      576,583      579,950          3,367
PART TIME EMPLOYEES                 147,920     161,325    208,032      158,908      217,975          9,943
   TOTAL SALARIES & WAGES           703,252     727,359    784,614      735,491      797,925         13,310
SOCIAL SECURITY                      52,619      55,517     60,023       55,679       61,041          1,018
MEDICAL - DENTAL                     90,454     114,969    123,787      131,866      141,135         17,348
PENSION PLAN                         64,829      66,307     66,506       70,923       68,780          2,274
LIFE INSURANCE                                                                0        3,977          3,977
WORKER'S COMPENSATION                21,091      33,259     18,679       20,369       24,442          5,763
SALARY ALLOTMENT TO V.A. GOLF       (91,419)    (93,686)   (84,452)     (83,827)     (81,341)         3,111
TOTAL PERSONNEL COSTS               840,826     903,725    969,157      930,501    1,015,959         46,801

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
VEHICLES & MACHINERY - FLEET            840         270      1,513        1,485       1,587              74
VEHICLES & MACHINERY                 19,131      25,481     21,000       21,000      21,000               0
OFFICE EQUIPMENT                      4,779       4,998      5,000        5,000       5,000               0
EQUIPMENT RENTAL                      1,180       1,286      1,500        2,900       1,500               0
GROUNDS & LAWNS                       5,770       4,814      5,500        4,000       4,000          (1,500)
BUILDINGS                            13,903       7,171     11,000       11,000      11,000               0
                                     45,603      44,020     45,513       45,385      44,087          (1,426)

MATERIAL
SAND-CEMENT-LUMBER                   10,104       9,587     10,000       10,000      10,000               0
                                     10,104       9,587     10,000       10,000      10,000               0

SUPPLIES
AGRICULTURAL                         77,413      78,807     79,500       79,500      79,500               0
FREIGHT AND POSTAGE                     530         496        700          500         600            (100)
OFFICE                                2,494       2,336      2,750        2,400       2,750               0
NEWSPAPERS & MAGAZINES                                          50            0          50               0
ADVERTISING                           1,200       3,791      6,000        6,000       2,500          (3,500)
EMPLOYEE / COMMISSION                   663         495      1,000          650       1,000               0
JANITORIAL                            5,939       5,731      5,000        6,000       6,000           1,000
FUEL                                 10,103      12,500     18,620       17,000      18,620               0
HAND TOOLS & HARDWARE                 1,416       1,553      1,500        1,500       1,500               0
CLOTHING                              2,690       2,607      3,500        3,500       3,500               0
GOLF SHOP                             4,320       4,636      5,000        4,500       5,000               0
DRIVING RANGE                         3,030       3,327      5,000        5,000       5,000               0
GOLF COURSE                           4,443       4,477      5,000        5,000       5,000               0
LANDSCAPING                           7,742       2,905      6,000        5,000       6,000               0
MISCELLANEOUS SUPPLIES                5,390       6,089      6,000        6,000       6,000               0
                                    127,373     129,750    145,620      142,550     143,020          (2,600)

INSURANCE
GENERAL LIABILITY                       665         665        665          665          665              0
GENERAL                               1,753       1,362      1,753        2,056        2,056            303
AUTOMOBILE                              578       1,747          0            0        1,460          1,460
PROPERTY INSURANCE                    1,000       1,000      1,000        1,000        1,000              0
                                      3,996       4,774      3,418        3,721        5,181          1,763

UTILITY SERVICE
ELECTRIC                             41,588      47,018     55,000       50,000      52,500          (2,500)
WATER & SEWER                         6,794       7,768      7,500        7,500       7,750             250
TELEPHONE                             1,394       1,387      1,500        1,500       1,750             250
                                     49,776      56,173     64,000       59,000      62,000          (2,000)  
                                               182 

 
                                        2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                        PUBLIC GOLF COURSE DEPARTMENT

                                             2009/2010    2010/2011 2011/2012 2011/2012 2012/2013           INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                                  ACTUAL       ACTUAL   BUDGET ESTIMATE BUDGET                 (DECREASE)

TRAVEL AND SUBSISTENCE
MILEAGE REIMBURSEMENT                             1,563      1,648        2,000       1,600       2,000              0
                                                  1,563      1,648        2,000       1,600       2,000              0

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
BANK FEES - CREDIT CARDS                         20,069     21,247       24,000      22,000      24,000              0
GOLF ASSOCIATION                                 12,550     13,340       13,000      14,000      14,000          1,000
ASSOCIATION DUES                                  1,508      1,343        1,600       1,600       1,600              0
SURVEYS & STUDIES                                                         1,500           0       1,500              0
TRAINING PERSONNEL                                 648           503      1,000       1,000       1,000              0
COMPUTER SOFTWARE                                                         1,000           0       1,000              0
PURCHASES FOR RESALE                            236,422    250,911      265,000     225,000     230,000        (35,000)
SALES TAX                                        65,581     65,347       72,491      68,877      68,577         (3,914)
OTHER MISCELLANEOUS                                 628      1,006        1,000       1,200       1,200            200
                                                337,406    353,697      380,591     333,677     342,877        (37,714)

ADDITION TO FIXED ASSETS
NORMAL REPLACEMENT-FURN & EQUIP                                                                   2,500
ICE MAKER                                                                                         5,000
(8) TWO-WAY RADIOS                                                                                2,600
PARK LOT/CART PATHS REPAIR, SEAL, & STRIPE                                                       52,000
(3) REPLACEMENT TELEVISIONS                                                                       2,100
(2) GREENS FANS                                                                                  17,500
ROUGH SPRAYER                                                                                       800
(2) IRRIGATION PROGRAMMABLE RADIOS                                                                1,500
GROOMERS FOR GREENS MOWERS                                                                        3,700
CORE COLLECTOR                                                                                    1,000
DRIVING RANGE GOLF BALL DISPENSER                                                                 4,295
                                                 15,863     10,938      277,500     283,435      92,995       (184,505)

TOTAL OLD FORT EXPENDITURES                   1,432,510 1,514,312      1,897,799   1,809,869   1,718,119      (179,681)

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION
PERSONNEL COSTS
SALARIES & WAGES                                 78,555     79,671       81,012      81,012      81,132            120
PART TIME EMPLOYEES                              39,330     35,834       47,107      39,320      48,750          1,643
   TOTAL SALARIES & WAGES                       117,885    115,505      128,119     120,332     129,882          1,763
SOCIAL SECURITY                                   8,710      8,542        9,801       8,651       9,936            135
MEDICAL - DENTAL                                 14,937     16,130       17,136      17,136      18,465          1,329
PENSION PLAN                                      9,115      9,342        9,987       9,987       9,614           (373)
LIFE INSURANCE                                                                            0         566            566
WORKER'S COMPENSATION                             2,191     11,602        1,231       1,947       2,180            949
SALARY ALLOTMENT FROM OFGC                       91,419     93,686       84,452      83,827      81,341         (3,111)
TOTAL PERSONNEL COSTS                           244,257    254,807      250,726     241,880     251,984          1,258

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
VEHICLES & MACHINERY - FLEET                      1,391      2,186        1,000         198       1,058             58
VEHICLES & MACHINERY                              5,707      5,513        6,000       5,500       6,000              0
EQUIPMENT RENTALS                                                                       120         150            150
BUILDINGS                                         1,267        710        1,500       1,500       3,500          2,000
                                                  8,365      8,409        8,500       7,318      10,708          2,208

MATERIAL
SAND-CEMENT-LUMBER                                1,294      1,350        2,000       2,000       2,000              0
                                                  1,294      1,350        2,000       2,000       2,000              0     
                                                          183 

 
                                                       2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                                       PUBLIC GOLF COURSE DEPARTMENT

                                                         2009/2010       2010/2011 2011/2012           2011/2012 2012/2013               INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                                              ACTUAL          ACTUAL   BUDGET              ESTIMATE BUDGET                  (DECREASE)

SUPPLIES
AGRICULTURAL                                                    4,534            4,643        6,500          6,500            6,500              0
OFFICE                                                            322              200          400            400              400              0
EMPLOYEE / COMMISSION                                                               21          100             32              100              0
JANITORIAL                                                        319              301          500            500              500              0
FUEL                                                            2,800            3,689        4,500          3,500            4,500              0
HAND TOOLS & HARDWARE                                             384              318          350            350              350              0
CLOTHING                                                          225              245          450            450              450              0
GOLF SHOP                                                         830              551          750            800              900            150
GOLF COURSE                                                     1,502              634        1,000          1,000            1,200            200
LANDSCAPING                                                     1,185              875        2,000          1,500            2,000              0
MISCELLANEOUS SUPPLIES                                          1,439            1,109        1,000          1,250            1,250            250
                                                               13,540           12,586       17,550         16,282           18,150            600

INSURANCE
AUTOMOBILE                                                        578                                                           1,226         1,226
                                                                  578               0              0               0            1,226         1,226

UTILITY SERVICE
ELECTRIC                                                        5,734            6,183        6,500           6,000             6,200          (300)
WATER & SEWER                                                     143              235        1,000             250             1,000             0
TELEPHONE                                                         739              763          800             800               900           100
                                                                6,616            7,181        8,300           7,050             8,100          (200)

TRAVEL AND SUBSISTENCE
MILEAGE REIMBURSEMENT                                                             406           500             150              300           (200)
                                                                     0            406           500             150              300           (200)

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
ASSOCIATION DUES                                                  304              304          320            304              320               0
TRAINING PERSONNEL                                                                 218          150            124              200              50
PURCHASES FOR RESALE                                            7,903            8,916        8,000          8,000            8,000               0
SALES TAX                                                       2,876            2,277        2,681          2,412            2,447            (234)
OTHER MISCELLANEOUS                                               220              387          250            350              350             100
                                                               11,303           12,102       11,401         11,190           11,317             (84)

ADDITION TO FIXED ASSETS
NORMAL REPLACEMENT OF EQUIPMENT                                                                                                 1,500
                                                               10,915           24,976       35,000         33,300              1,500       (33,500)

TOTAL VET. ADMIN. EXPENDITURES                               296,868        321,817        333,977         319,170          305,285         (28,692)

TOTAL PUBLIC GOLF COURSE DEPART.                           1,729,378 1,836,129           2,231,777       2,129,039      2,023,404          (208,373)


NOTE: The first column is presented for comparison purposes only as Public Golf was a Special Revenue Fund for that year.                               
                                                                                                                             




                                                                         184 

 
                                                                         

                                     SOLID WASTE DEPARTMENT 

                                         DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The Murfreesboro Solid Waste Department provides the residents and business community of this City 
with  an  environmentally‐safe  and  cost‐effective  integrated  waste  management  system  for  non‐
hazardous solid waste. Above all, the department maintains and exceeds compliance with all Tennessee 
Department  of  Environment  and  Conservation  waste  disposal  regulations.  The  department  provides 
five‐day‐a‐week  service  and  operates  a  convenience  center  for  trash  hauling  and  recycling  on  Main 
Street,  as  well  as  a  composting  facility  on  Florence  Road.  It  also  promotes  and  provides  solutions  to 
household hazardous waste disposal. 
 
The Solid Waste Department is instrumental to the City providing safe and livable neighborhoods by 
quickly reducing garbage and removing yard waste.  The department provides a unified, comprehensive 
solid waste collection and disposal service for approximately 42,000 households and 6,000 businesses, 
with 50‐60,000 cans being serviced weekly.  Solid waste collected at the Main Street convenience center 
is transported by the department to approved recycling centers or for other disposition. 
  
In 1997, the City implemented a program to collect yard waste with a goal of reducing grass, brush and 
leaves from the landfill. In 2011 the Solid Waste Department through its mulching program exceeded 
31,780 tons of yard waste processed through the mulching facility.  Each year the Solid Waste 
Department processes double grind mulch which the department windrows into static piles to make 
black mulch. ; The double grind mulch is given away for free to the residents starting March 1st.  In 2011 
the Solid Waste Department loaded 7,000 cubic yards of the double grind mulch for the residents of 
Murfreesboro. 
 
An aging fleet of collection vehicles and the cost of fuel are major cost increases in the FY 2013 budget 
for Solid Waste.  An increase of $56,475 in projected maintenance expenses for the fleet of vehicles 
represents the lag in delivery of new vehicles purchased through the Capital Improvement Plan.  Logging 
an estimated 417,000 miles for the year creates the need for an additional $129,252 in fuel costs.  
 
 Last budget year, the department picked up approximately 33,577 tons of garbage and 31,780 tons of 
brush.   
 
                                     




                                                        185 

 
                                        ORGANIZATION CHART 


                                         Solid Waste


         Residential          Commercial            Yard Waste          Convenience 
         Collection            Collection            Collection           Center


             Automated                                  Provision of           Recycling 
                                  Rear Loaders
               Trucks                                   free mulch            Containers


            Rear Loaders
                                                                                                 

                           IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                               SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

       Assists in providing safe and livable neighborhoods by quickly reducing garbage and removing 
        yard waste 

              STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

       Provide efficient and cost effective disposal of the City’s solid waste 

                EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

       Provide extraordinary service and follow up to customer issues 
       Participate in the customer service training sessions 

                                      ENGAGING OUR CITIZENS 

       10,000 plus contacts Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 
       Trash collectors for Jazz Fest, Uncle Dave Macon Days, Music on the Square, the Farmer’s 
        Market on the Square, Rally in the Alleys and TSSAA Spring Fling 
       At the City of Murfreesboro’s Convenience Center  on Mondays and Thursdays we average 325 
        plus vehicles’ a day, on Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday 200 visitors a day 
       March 1, 2013 the Solid Waste Department double ground mulch will be available to residents 
        for free                                  


                                                    186 

 
                                       FY 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

       Collected 33,577 tons of residential solid waste 
       Collected 31,780 tons of brush, yard waste aided by the straight line winds on April 27, 2011 
       Collected and disposed all residential waste with a major cost reduction 

                                      FY 2013 DEPARTMENT GOALS 

       Collect and dispose all residential solid waste from the City  
       Collect and dispose of yard waste to maintain the mandated 25% reduction of waste going to a 
        subtitle D landfill 
       A continued focus on safety with employees involved with driving heavy equipment and working 
        around moving equipment 

                                    PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS 

                                                                        Actual   Actual  Budget Estimated Proposed
                                                                       FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2012 FY 2013
Percentage of waste diverted from landfill disposal                      85.97% 94.00% 25.00% 25.00% 25.00%
Number of cans collected per route/per day (automated routes)              1,025   1,025   1,025    1,025     1,025
Number of sercice inquires                                               15.00% 18.50% 17.00% 17.00% 17.00%
 

                                          EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

 
                                                                   Solid Waste
                                     Actual           Budget         Budget             Estimated         Budget
                                    FY 2010           FY 2011        FY 2012             FY 2012          FY 2013

Personnel Costs                 $     2,902,400   $    2,533,691   $    2,454,169   $     2,482,996   $    2,517,342
Operating Costs                 $     2,186,855   $    1,657,736   $    1,751,977   $     1,659,517   $    2,107,100
Capital Expense                 $           -     $          -     $        2,000   $           304   $       59,000
Total Solid Waste Fund          $     5,089,255   $    4,191,427   $    4,208,146   $     4,142,817   $    4,683,442    
                                                            




                                                        187 

 
                                                                                                   
                                                

                                   HUMAN RESOURCE SUMMARY 

 
                                        Solid Waste Fund
                                                            Actual    Actual Estimated Proposed
                                                           FY 2010   FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013
Job Description
   Director                                                  1         1        1         1
   Assistant Director                                        1         1        1         1
   Department Coordinator                                    1         1        1         1
   Administrative Secretary                                  1         1        1         1
   Equipment Operator                                        2         2        2         3
   Driver                                                    42        36       36        32
   Laborer                                                   7         0        0         2
   Convenience Center Attendent                                                 1         1
      Full‐Time Positions                                    55        42       43        42

    Convenience Center Employees                             3         3         3        3
      Part‐Time Positions                                    3         3         3        3

 Total Solid Waste Allocation                                58        45       46        45       
 



                                              188 

 
                             2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                             SOLID WASTE DEPARTMENT

                              2009/2010    2010/2011    2011/2012       2011/2012    2012/2013     INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                   ACTUAL       ACTUAL      BUDGET          ESTIMATE     BUDGET       (DECREASE)

PERSONNEL COSTS
SALARIES & WAGES                                         1,482,510       1,508,190    1,505,054        22,544
OVERTIME                                                    35,000          35,000       35,000             0
   TOTAL SALARIES & WAGES      1,736,395    1,558,287    1,517,510       1,543,190    1,540,054        22,544
SOCIAL SECURITY                  124,376      112,312      116,090         116,090      117,814         1,724
MEDICAL - DENTAL                 474,633      405,038      408,809         411,390      439,889        31,080
PENSION PLAN                     191,191      168,265      178,102         168,500      167,278       (10,824)
RETIREMENT (401A)                                                              155        2,605         2,605
LIFE INSURANCE                                                                  90       10,317        10,317
WORKER'S COMPENSATION            375,805      289,789      233,658         243,581      239,385         5,727
TOTAL PERSONNEL COSTS          2,902,400    2,533,691    2,454,169       2,482,996    2,517,342        63,173

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
VEHICLES & MACHINERY-FLEET       801,622      912,581      969,797         925,689    1,026,272       56,475
VEHICLES & MACHINERY              21,825       20,751       20,000          19,500       20,000            0
RADIOS                                55          766        1,000           1,000        5,000        4,000
OFFICE EQUIPMENT                   2,518        2,925        6,000           4,995        6,000            0
BUILDINGS                          7,611        9,084       12,000          12,000       12,000            0
                                 833,631      946,107    1,008,797         963,184    1,069,272       60,475

SUPPLIES
POSTAGE                              151          168          400             349          400            0
OFFICE                             5,593        3,715        6,000           5,400        6,000            0
ADVERTISING                        2,262        1,060        3,000           1,600        3,000            0
EMPLOYEE                                           31          500              59          500            0
JANITORIAL                        19,473       19,285       31,000          29,875       32,000        1,000
BULK GASOLINE                    306,636      390,720      461,510         435,287      590,762      129,252
HAND TOOLS & HARDWARE              1,022        1,235        4,000           1,600        4,000            0
CLOTHING                           5,521       12,456       16,000          12,575       16,000            0
SAFETY SUPPLIES                    6,415        6,889        7,500           9,387        7,500            0
MISCELLANEOUS SUPPLIES                21          275          500             480          500            0
                                 347,094      435,834      530,410         496,612      660,662      130,252

INSURANCE
AUTOMOBILE                       127,589      114,184               0           0       130,916      130,916
                                 127,589      114,184               0           0       130,916      130,916


UTILITY SERVICE
ELECTRIC                          26,146       28,952       32,000          28,967       32,000             0
WATER AND SEWER                   14,363        8,950       12,500          20,458       21,500         9,000
GAS                                5,659        5,077        8,000           5,369        6,500        (1,500)
TELEPHONE                          2,331        2,285        4,400           2,305        3,300        (1,100)
CELLULAR PHONE                     2,136        1,913        3,000             832        1,000        (2,000)
                                  50,635       47,177       59,900          57,931       64,300         4,400

TRAVEL AND SUBSISTENCE
MILEAGE REIMBURSEMENT              7,005        6,228        7,200           6,997        7,200             0
                                   7,005        6,228        7,200           6,997        7,200             0     




                                                189 

 
                               2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                               SOLID WASTE DEPARTMENT

                                2009/2010       2010/2011       2011/2012    2011/2012    2012/2013     INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                     ACTUAL          ACTUAL         BUDGET       ESTIMATE     BUDGET       (DECREASE)

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
DEBT SERVICE                         800,000
DISPOSAL FEES                          4,995         2,840           4,000        2,859        3,500         (500)
DISPOSAL CARTS                        13,532       102,810         130,000      127,500      165,000       35,000
ASSOCIATION DUES                         271           281           5,720          285          300       (5,420)
TRAINING PERSONNEL                        65            75           3,000        1,500        3,000            0
SALES TAX                                840         1,025             800          659          800            0
OTHER MISCELLANEOUS                    1,198         1,175           2,150        1,990        2,150            0
                                     820,901       108,206         145,670      134,793      174,750       29,080

OPERATING BUDGET                    5,089,255    4,191,427       4,206,146    4,142,513    4,624,442      418,296

ADDITION TO FIXED ASSETS
NORMAL REPLACEMENT - FURN & EQUIP                                                              2,000
SPEAKERS FOR TRAINING ROOM                                                                     2,000
(3) PICK UP TRUCKS                                                                            55,000
                                            0               0        2,000         304        59,000       57,000

TOTAL SOLID WASTE DEPARTMENT        5,089,255    4,191,427       4,208,146    4,142,817    4,683,442      475,296     
 
 




                                                     190 

 
                                                                    

                                        FUEL DEPARTMENT 

                                      DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The Fuel Department was a newly formed department within the General Fund in FY 2012.  The Fuel 
Department was separated from the General & Administrative Department, for the purpose of a 
proposal to accommodate fuel sales for Rutherford County as well as other City departments and 
partners.  Rutherford County was able to secure their own fuel pricing and fueling centers and will not 
be partnering with the City.  This department will be deleted for FY 2013 and the cost of maintaining 
equipment is being moved to the Fleet Service Fund. 

The Fuel Department provides fuel to all of the City departments and funds, including the Water & 
Sewer Department, Electric Department, and City Schools.  In addition, Linebaugh Library and 
Murfreesboro Housing Authority purchase fuel from this department. 

                           IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                              SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

       Provides fuel to all city departments, including Police and Fire on a 24/7 basis 

              STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

       Maintain the facility using in‐house personnel when appropriate in order to minimize costs 
       Purchase fuel on a tax‐exempt basis 

                EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

       Provide all agencies and departments involved with quality customer service and access to fuel 

                                    ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

       Provide  fuel to City and other governmental and non‐profit agencies 



                                                    191 

 
                                                  EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

                                                                                    Fuel
                                             Actual              Budget            Budget           Estimated             Budget
                                            FY 2010              FY 2011           FY 2012           FY 2012              FY 2013

Personnel Costs                        $              -     $              -   $          -     $           -         $             -
Operating Costs                        $              -     $              -   $    2,923,537   $         9,875       $             -
Capital Expense                        $              -     $              -   $          -     $           -         $             -
Total Solid Waste Fund                 $              -     $              -   $    2,923,537   $         9,875       $             -     
                                                                       




                                                                                                                           
                                                                       

                                                  2011 - 2012 BUDGET
                                                  FUEL DEPARTMENT

                                                    2009/2010      2010/2011 2011/2012 2011/2012 2012/2013 INCREASE
                                                     ACTUAL         ACTUAL   BUDGET ESTIMATE BUDGET (DECREASE)


OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
FUEL EQUIPMENT                                                                     10,000       9,875             0           (10,000)

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
FUEL PURCHASES                                                                 2,913,537             0            0        (2,913,537)


TOTAL FUEL DEPARTMENT                                                          2,923,537        9,875             0        (2,923,537)

Fuel Equipment line was moved to Solid Waste Departmer for FY 2012/2013.                                                                  



                                                                   192 

 
                                                                  

                            HEALTH, EDUCATION AND WELFARE 

                                     DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The Health, Education and Welfare budget includes funding for other government agencies, economic 
development, tourism and non‐City agencies that provide services to Murfreesboro residents.  Outside 
agencies must provide services to Murfreesboro and submit funding requests.  Funding for agencies is 
limited to $2,500 in the first year.  These agencies provide a variety of aid and services that are not 
provided by the City, but benefit our residents.   
 
For FY 2013, there is an increase of $56,619 for the Linebaugh and Glanton Public Libraries.  By 
agreement with Rutherford County funding for the Public Library system is divided on a 44% City and 
56% County basis.   
 
By formula, the City allocates a portion of the hotel/motel tax to support the tourism efforts of the 
Chamber of Commerce.  Beyond the $9,000 increase from the growth in hotel/motel tax receipts, an 
additional $25,000 is budgeted for retaining the Tennessee Secondary Schools Athletic  Association 
(TSSAA) spring sports championships here in Murfreesboro.  The “Spring Fling” brings over 5,000 high 
school athletes to Murfreesboro for a week of competition in May. 
 
Fiscal Year 2013 also marks the second of three payments towards Destination Rutherford 2015, a 
public‐private initiative for economic development.  A new initiative led by the Chamber, the United 
Way and Middle Tennessee State University to conduct a community needs assessment has been 
budgeted $15,000. 

                          IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                              SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

       Support many community agencies that offer services aimed at improving the quality of life 

              STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

       Provide an array of services at more affordable costs in many instances than government  
                                                   193 

 
         Support of the Chamber of Commerce and its Economic Development programs, which create 
          and retain jobs and foster investment in the community 
         Funding for Destination Rutherford, a public‐private partnership that has created thousands of 
          jobs in Rutherford County.  This is the first installment for Destination Rutherford 2015 

                  EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

         The focus on tourism programs and activities that are funded to enhance our quality of life 
          and generate sales and hotel motel tax revenues 

                                                EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

                                                                       Health, Education & Welfare
                                             Actual             Budget           Budget          Estimated                           Budget
                                            FY 2010             FY 2011          FY 2012           FY 2012                           FY 2013

Other Government                    $             799,332   $           823,333    $           868,192   $            868,192   $            927,311
Economic Development                $             267,250   $           182,250    $           239,750   $            239,750   $            254,750
Tourism                             $             747,523   $           401,332    $           387,000   $            417,808   $            421,000
Outside Agencies                    $             109,596                 95,470
                                                            $                      $           100,890   $            100,890   $            108,390
Total Health, Education & Welfare   $          1,923,701    $        1,502,385     $        1,595,832    $         1,626,640    $         1,711,451     




                                                                                                                                            

                                             HUMAN RESOURCES SUMMARY 

None   
                                         


                                                                    194 

 
                                       2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                       PUBLIC HEALTH, EDUCATION AND WELFARE

                                        2009/2010    2010/2011      2011/2012   2011/2012    2012/2013 INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                             ACTUAL       ACTUAL        BUDGET      ESTIMATE     BUDGET (DECREASE)

CASH BUDGET PAYMENTS
OTHER GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES
TO STATE FOR LOCAL HEALTH DEPT.             11,000      11,000         11,000      11,000       11,000         0
TENN REHABILITATION CENTER                  41,500      42,000         42,500      42,500       45,000     2,500
LINEBAUGH LIBRARY-MATCH COUNTY             623,531     645,898        688,859     688,859      721,527    32,668
MYRTLE GLANTON LORD LIBRARY                 58,301      59,435         60,833      60,833       84,784    23,951
RUTHERFORD CO. ANIMAL CONTROL               65,000      65,000         65,000      65,000       65,000         0
                                           799,332     823,333        868,192     868,192      927,311    59,119

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE:
  ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DEPT.                97,250      97,250         97,250      97,250       97,250         0
  COMMUNITY NEEDS ASSESSMENT                                                                    15,000    15,000
  MURFREESBORO ECONOMIC DEV.                45,000      22,500         22,500      22,500       22,500         0
  DESTINATION RUTHERFORD                   125,000      62,500        120,000     120,000      120,000         0
                                           267,250     182,250        239,750     239,750      254,750         0

TOURIST ORIENTED
TO PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT         322,170
STONES RIVER TRAIL                          73,292
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE                        219,877     269,148        255,000     260,808      264,000     9,000
RUTHERFORD COUNTY CVB - TSSAA                                               0      25,000       25,000    25,000
CENTER FOR THE ARTS                         25,000      25,000         25,000      25,000       25,000         0
UNCLE DAVE MACON DAYS                        5,000       5,000          5,000       5,000        5,000         0
DISCOVERY HOUSE                             20,000      20,000         20,000      20,000       20,000         0
MAIN STREET                                 37,500      37,500         37,500      37,500       37,500         0
M'BORO YOUTH ORCHESTRA                       7,500       7,500          7,500       7,500        7,500         0
MURFREESBORO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA             10,000      10,000         10,000      10,000       10,000         0
OAKLANDS ASSOCIATION                        15,000      15,000         15,000      15,000       15,000         0
AREA 16 - SPECIAL OLYMPICS                   2,000       2,000          2,000       2,000        2,000         0
BRADLEY ACADEMY HISTORICAL ASSOC             7,684       7,684          7,500       7,500        7,500         0
INTERNATIONAL FOLKLORIC SOCIETY              2,500       2,500          2,500       2,500        2,500         0
                                           747,523     401,332        387,000     417,808      421,000    34,000

OUTSIDE AGENCIES
RUTHERFORD CO. CRIME STOPPERS                5,000       5,000          5,000       5,000        5,000        0
PRIMARY CARE & HOPE CLINIC                  10,000      10,000         10,000      10,000       10,000        0
EXCHANGE CLUB FAMILY CENTER                  6,000       6,000          6,000       6,000        6,000        0
RUTHERFORD CO. RESCUE SQUAD                 15,000
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE PROGRAM                   12,500      12,500         10,000      10,000       10,000        0
MID-CUMBERLAND HUMAN RESOURCE:
   MEALS ON WHEELS PROGRAM                   8,000       8,000         10,000      10,000       10,000         0
LEADERSHIP RUTHERFORD                        1,500       1,500          1,500       1,500        1,500         0
CASA OF RUTHERFORD COUNTY                    5,000       5,000          5,000       5,000        5,000         0
PREGNANCY SUPPORT CENTER                     3,500       3,500          3,500       3,500        3,500         0
BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB                          2,500       2,500          2,500       2,500        2,500         0
CHILD ADVOCACY CENTER                        5,000       5,000          5,000       5,000        5,000         0
CHILD ADVOCACY CENTER - UTILITIES           10,596      11,470         12,390      12,390       12,390         0
MARTIN LUTHER KING SCHOLARSHIP               2,000       2,000          2,000       2,000        2,000         0
SPECIAL KID'S INC.                          10,000      10,000         10,000      10,000       10,000         0
SECOND HARVEST FOOD BANK                     2,000       2,000          2,000       2,000        2,000         0
SEXUAL ASSAULT SERVICE PROGRAM                                          2,500       2,500        2,500         0
GENERATION FOR CREATION, INC.                2,500          2,500       2,500       2,500        2,500         0
READ TO SUCCEED                              4,000          4,000       4,000       4,000        4,000         0
JOURNEYS IN COMMUNITY LIVING                 2,500          2,500       2,500       2,500       10,000     7,500
CITY SCHOOLS FOUNDATION                                                 2,500       2,500        2,500         0
JESSE C. BEESLEY ANIMAL HUMANE FOUND         2,000       2,000          2,000       2,000        2,000         0
                                           109,596      95,470        100,890     100,890      108,390     7,500
TOTAL PUBLIC HEALTH, EDUCATION
AND WELFARE                              1,923,701    1,502,385     1,595,832    1,626,640   1,711,451   100,619    
                                                     195 

 
                                                                   

                                          FUND TRANSFERS 

                                      DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The Fund Transfers budget includes the transfer of funding for other City departments.  These transfers 
were previously budgeted in the Public Health, Safety and Welfare budget. 
 
This budget includes funding for Murfreesboro City Schools ($4.8 million) and debt service ($26.1 
million).   
 
This budget previously provided funding to Parks and Recreation, Solid Waste and Senior Citizens Funds.  
However, with the implementation of GASB 54 in FY 2011, those funds are now included in the General 
Fund. 
 

                                         Fund Transfers  
                                        DRUG FUND        CITY SCHOOLS      
                                          80,000           4,810,103 




                                 DEBT SERVICE       
                                  26,162,698 
                                                                                                
 

                          IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                              SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

       Support various City departments that offer services aimed at improving the quality of life 
                                                 196 

 
                STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

        Provide an array of services at more affordable costs in many instances than government  

                  EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

        Maintain the funding of essential City Funds 

                                      ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

        Provide funding for City Schools and other Funds to enable our citizens to take part in our 
         community 

                                         EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

 
                                                                              Fund Transfers
                                   Actual                 Budget                 Budget                    Estimated                  Budget
                                  FY 2010                 FY 2011                FY 2012                    FY 2012                   FY 2013

Debt Service                         20,534,723
                             $                       $      24,860,379        $      26,162,698               25,362,698
                                                                                                       $                         $       26,139,822
Parks & Recreation           $          5,121,663    $                    ‐   $                    ‐   $                     ‐   $                     ‐
Solid Waste                  $          5,003,726    $                    ‐   $                    ‐   $                     ‐   $                     ‐
City Schools                 $          4,810,103    $        4,810,103       $        4,810,103       $         4,810,103       $         4,810,103
Others                       $             691,062                 95,469
                                                     $                        $              
                                                                                            80,000     $              90,000                    90,000
                                                                                                                                 $               
Total Fund Transfers         $        
                                     36,161,277      $      29,765,951        $      31,052,801        $       
                                                                                                              30,262,801         $       31,039,925         
 




                                                                                                                                               
                                                                  

                                                              197 

 
                                                      

                                HUMAN RESOURCES SUMMARY 

None   
 
                                2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                TRANSFERS

                                 2009/2010    2010/2011    2011/2012    2011/2012    2012/2013     INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                      ACTUAL       ACTUAL      BUDGET       ESTIMATE     BUDGET       (DECREASE)

CASH BUDGET PAYMENTS
CITY FUNDS:
PARKS AND RECREATION FUND         5,121,663
SOLID WASTE FUND                  5,003,726
SENIOR CITIZENS CENTER              474,550
DRUG FUND                           113,427       93,659       80,000       90,000       90,000         10,000
AIRPORT FUND                          1,961        1,810
CITY SCHOOLS                      4,810,103    4,810,103    4,810,103    4,810,103    4,810,103                0
EVERGREEN CEMETERY                  101,124
DEBT SERVICE                     20,534,723   24,860,379   26,162,698   25,362,698   26,139,822        (22,876)
                                 36,161,277   29,765,951   31,052,801   30,262,801   31,039,925        (12,876)  
                             




                                                   198 

 
                                                                    

                                       NON‐DEPARTMENTAL 

 

                                      DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The Non‐Departmental section is used to budget for items that are not related to a particular operating 
budget within the departmental structure of the General Fund.  
 
The Reserve for Uncollected Taxes is set at 2% of the tax levy to allow for taxes that will not be collected 
in the current year, and for those that may never be collected. While the City’s legal department serves 
as its tax attorney, there are some taxes that will never be collected because there is no property to 
attach and sell (personal property taxes for businesses that closed without paying that tax). Additionally, 
there are properties that are in bankruptcy or have protested their assessment and delayed payments 
may be received several years after the initial assessment. 
 
Adjustment and Allowance on Delinquent Taxes is used to allow for tax refunds that may be made for 
property taxes that are paid on time, but later determined by the property assessor to be overvalued. 
Additionally, if a property tax for a delinquent year is adjusted by the assessor before the allowance 
account has been used the adjustment is posted here. 
 
Payment to Schools – The State levies a 15 percent gross receipts tax on wine and spirit sales.  The tax is 
earmarked for education and local government.  The State returns 25 percent of the tax collected from 
businesses in their City limits on wine and sprit sales.  Of the amount received, half is distributed to the 
City and County school systems based on average daily attendance. 
 
Unforeseen Contingencies & Expenses is budgeted to provide for contingencies that may arise in the 
new fiscal year unexpectedly.    
 

                           IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                               SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

       Provides a budgeted allocation to give flexibility in the annual operation of the City 


                                                    199 

 
                STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

         Provides a budgeted allocation to give flexibility in the annual operation of the City 

                  EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

         Provide for contingencies in the budget in case of an event that would not otherwise be funded 
          for 

                                          ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

         Supports the public schools through the transfer of mixed drink taxes  

                                        HUMAN RESOURCES SUMMARY 

None   

                                              EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

                                                                                    Non‐Departmental
                                       Actual                   Budget                   Budget                   Estimated                  Budget
                                      FY 2010                   FY 2011                 FY 2012                    FY 2012                   FY 2013

Personnel Costs                 $                      ‐   $                    ‐    $                    ‐   $                     ‐   $                     ‐
Operating Costs                 $          1,521,410       $        1,397,044        $        1,646,616       $         1,697,591       $         1,722,895
Capital Expense                 $                      ‐   $                    ‐    $                    ‐   $                     ‐   $                     ‐
Total Non‐Departmental          $          1,521,410       $        1,397,044        $        1,646,616       $         1,697,591       $         1,722,895        
 




                                                                                                                                                        
                                                                    200 

 
                                                       
                                                       
                                    2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                    NON-DEPARTMENTAL

                                    2009/2010    2010/2011    2011/2012    2011/2012    2012/2013     INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                         ACTUAL       ACTUAL      BUDGET       ESTIMATE     BUDGET       (DECREASE)

RESERVE FOR UNCOLLECTED TAXES         682,600      694,672      711,866      709,076      714,720         2,854

ADJ AND ALLOW ON DELINQ TAXES          29,063       61,871      100,000      157,340      175,000        75,000

PAYMENT TO SCHOOLS - PART OF
  LIQUOR BY DRINK TAX                 289,157      325,228      334,750      331,175      333,175         (1,575)

UNFORESEEN CONTINGENCIES & EXP        520,590      315,273      500,000      500,000      500,000              0


                                     1,521,410    1,397,044    1,646,616    1,697,591    1,722,895       76,279      
                                 




                                                   201 

 
                                                                     


                                      DEBT SERVICE FUND 

                                       DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The Debt Service Fund receives transfers from the General Fund and Airport Fund to pay principal and 
interest payments on capital projects for police, fire, roads, solid waste, recreation, land acquisition, 
airport improvements, city schools and other similar projects. The pace of growth in Murfreesboro in 
the last fifteen years has created a need for significant investments that has caused debt service levels 
as a percent of budget to exceed levels normally expected in other cities or by the rating agencies. 
Additionally, the 15 year term on all of Murfreesboro’s debt, results in an aggressive repayment of 91 
percent of principal within 10 years. This increases the debt ratios, but lowers interest expense and 
lowers the City’s overall expense. The City maintains a strong fund balance in the General Fund which, 
combined with comprehensive capital improvement plans and debt policies, ensures that City Council 
and management practice proper restraint and discipline when dealing with this higher debt service to 
overall budget ratios.   
 
Principal and interest on City debt is backed by the full faith, credit and taxing power of the City. The City 
was rated AA‐ by Standard and Poor’s and Aa2 by Moody’s Investment Service based on information 
provided to them in 2009. 
 
The City has one fixed rate bond issue outstanding which was issued in FY 2010 to refund five variable 
rate loans. The debt service on the bond issue will be extinguished in the same timeframe as the initial 
loans which were refunded. 
 
Murfreesboro has five outstanding loans issued through the variable rate debt program managed by the 
Tennessee Municipal Bond Fund. These variable rate demand obligations total approximately 56 percent 
of the City’s current outstanding debt. The interest rate for FY 2013 variable rate debt has been set at 
2.5 percent, which is consistent with FY 2012. The actual effective interest rate paid in FY 2012 averaged 
less than 1 percent for these loans. Management understands interest rate fluctuations and is prepared 
to use the fund balance of General Fund if rates rise above the budgeted amount. 
 
There are two capital outlay notes with an outstanding balance of $2,117,350 at July 1, 2012. These 
loans were issued in 2006 and 2007 as taxable fixed rate capital outlay notes for construction of hangars 
at our municipal airport. 
 
In the spring of 2011 and again in December 2012, the City was notified it would be the recipient of a 
loan for $2 million to be used to fund an energy efficiency project in our city schools. This loan is interest 

                                                     202 

 
free and will be received on a reimbursement basis. The school system will reimburse the General Fund 
the principal payments on this loan from savings they expect to experience on their utility bills.  
 
The General Fund debt service also includes principal and interest payments for City school property, 
but these payments will be split out for year‐end reporting purposes. The FY 2013 estimated payments 
related to City schools is approximately $2.96 million.  This is in addition to the $4.8 million fund transfer 
to City schools for operations.  
 
The City’s first new debt issue in nearly three years is scheduled for sale in late 2012 or early 2013.  
Based on the Capital Improvement Plan, this general obligation issue is sized at $47,600,000 and funds a 
variety of projects including the last segment of Veterans Parkway ($9,400,000); the replacement of 
handheld and mobile two‐way radios and the construction of two new towers as the beginning of the 
complete upgrade of radio infrastructure for Public Safety and other departments ($5,250,000); the 
expansion of Hobgood Elementary plus the beginnings of a new elementary school in west 
Murfreesboro ($7,225,000); major renovation to SportsCom/McKnight/Starplex ($4,400,000); 
improvements to Old Fort Park, Patterson Community Center and Parks Administration buildings 
($1,275,000); beginning the search for a new park on the west side of Murfresboro ($720,000) and the 
replacement  of pumpers and a snorkel plus the purchase of two new rescue vehicles by the Fire & 
Rescue Department ($5,200,000). 
 
Currently, plans are to offer the debt as a fixed rate issue, with maturities matching the anticipated life 
of the assets purchased but not exceeding the City’s standard repayment schedule of fifteen years.  
Interest in the amount of $733,333 has been budgeted (approximately 10 months).  However, through 
the variations in annual principal and interest, the total debt service budget is up only $400,189 for the 
fiscal year. 
 
The City budgeted the use of $3 million in the Debt Service Fund Balance for FY 2013 resulting in a 
decrease of Fund Balance by 76.2 percent. 
 

                           IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 
 

                               SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 
       The Debt Service Fund provides financial resources for the capital projects that benefit our 
        neighborhoods 

              STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

       Manage the City’s debt portfolio in a long term manner with lowest total interest costs and 
        diversity of debt instruments as goals 

                EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

       By maintaining the current payment schedule, interest savings should allow for completion of 
        planned projects on a timely basis 
                                                     203 

 
                                    ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

       Maintain transparency as outlined in bond requirements 

                                    FY 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

       Monitored the City’s debt portfolio 

                                   FY 2013 DEPARTMENT GOALS 

       Plan and issue the City’s $47.6 million general obligation debt to support the projects approved 
        by City Council in the Capital Improvement Program  

                                   HUMAN RESOURCES SUMMARY 

None 

                                      EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

                                                             Debt Service Fund
                                   Actual           Actual        Budget          Estimated        Budget
                                  FY 2010          FY 2011        FY 2012         FY 2012         FY 2013

Personnel Costs               $          -     $          -     $        -       $        -     $        -
Operating Costs               $   21,536,256   $   25,433,386   $ 29,451,420     $ 27,271,357   $ 29,851,609
Capital Expense               $          -     $          -     $        -       $        -     $        -
Total Debt Service Fund       $   21,536,256   $   25,433,386   $ 29,451,420     $ 27,271,357   $ 29,851,609  
 
 




                                                                                                      


                                                    204 

 
                                      AMORTIZATION SCHEDULES 

General Long-Term Debt

    Fiscal Year
         Ended                                                                           Total
       June 30,                                                                        Principal
                                                             Principal    Interest    and Interest
          2013    2009 General Obligation Refunding Bonds    7,955,000   1,871,000     9,826,000
          2014    Original Loan Amount $65,855,000           7,800,000   1,473,250     9,273,250
          2015    Interest Rate: 2.00%-5.00%                 3,680,000   1,083,250     4,763,250
          2016    (Includes School Debt)                     3,855,000     899,250     4,754,250
          2017                                               4,030,000     706,500     4,736,500
          2018                                               4,215,000     505,000     4,720,000
          2019                                               4,045,000     294,250     4,339,250
          2020                                               1,840,000       92,000    1,932,000
                                                            37,420,000   6,924,500    44,344,500


          2013    2010 Tennessee Municipal Bond Fund         2,658,000   1,262,554     3,920,554
          2014    Original Loan Amount $47,600,000           2,734,000   1,184,640     3,918,640
          2015    Interest Rate: 2.89%                       2,812,000   1,104,500     3,916,500
          2016                                               2,893,000   1,022,063     3,915,063
          2017                                               2,976,000     937,256     3,913,256
          2018                                               3,062,000     850,007     3,912,007
          2019                                               3,150,000     760,243     3,910,243
          2020                                               3,240,000     667,908     3,907,908
          2021                                               3,333,000     572,928     3,905,928
          2022                                               3,429,000     475,217     3,904,217
          2023                                               3,527,000     374,703     3,901,703
          2024                                               3,629,000     271,299     3,900,299
          2025                                               3,733,000     164,918     3,897,918
          2026                                               3,840,000      55,488     3,895,488
                                                            45,016,000   9,703,724    54,719,724


          2013    2008 Tennessee Municipal Bond Fund         3,998,000   1,219,471     5,217,471
          2014    Original Loan Amount $60,000,000           4,198,000   1,119,104     5,317,104
          2015    Interest Rate: Variable                    3,253,000   1,016,123     4,269,123
          2016    Used 2.5% for Budgeting Purposes           3,416,000     934,458     4,350,458
          2017                                               3,586,000     848,704     4,434,704
          2018                                               3,766,000     758,679     4,524,679
          2019                                               3,954,000     664,138     4,618,138
          2020                                               4,152,000     564,875     4,716,875
          2021                                               4,359,000     460,644     4,819,644
          2022                                               4,577,000     351,215     4,928,215
          2023                                               4,806,000     236,313     5,042,313
          2024                                               5,047,000     115,660     5,162,660
                                                            49,112,000   8,289,384    57,401,384  
                                                    205 

 
    2013   2006 Tennessee Municipal Bond Fund        4,545,000   1,165,079    5,710,079
    2014   Original Loan Amount $68,650,000          4,704,000   1,051,123    5,755,123
    2015   Interest Rate: Variable                   4,869,000     933,179    5,802,179
    2016   Used 2.5% for Budgeting Purposes          5,040,000     811,098    5,851,098
    2017   (Includes School Debt)                    5,216,000     684,731    5,900,731
    2018                                             5,398,000     553,952    5,951,952
    2019                                             5,587,000     418,608    6,005,608
    2020                                             5,783,000     278,525    6,061,525
    2021                                             5,839,907     133,831    5,973,738
                                                    46,981,907   6,030,126   53,012,033


    2013   2006 Tennessee Municipal Bond Fund          309,000     81,006       390,006
    2014   Original Loan Amount $4,640,000             321,000     73,256       394,256
    2015   Interest Rate: Variable                     334,000     65,204       399,204
    2016   Used 2.5% for Budgeting Purposes            347,000     56,827       403,827
    2017                                               361,000     48,123       409,123
    2018                                               375,000     39,069       414,069
    2019                                               391,000     29,660       420,660
    2020                                               406,000     19,854       425,854
    2021                                               422,000      9,671       431,671
                                                     3,266,000    422,670     3,688,670


    2013   2002 Tennessee Municipal Bond Fund         462,000      17,848      479,848
    2014   Original Loan Amount $6,000,000            290,420       6,655      297,075
           Interest Rate: Variable
           Used 2.5% for Budgeting Purposes
                                                      752,420      24,503      776,923


    2013   2001 Tennessee Municipal Bond Fund        2,531,440    219,758     2,751,198
    2014   Original Loan Amount $35,000,000          2,632,440    156,262     2,788,702
    2015   Interest Rate: Variable                   2,737,480     90,232     2,827,712
    2016   Used 2.5% for Budgeting Purposes          1,099,925     25,207     1,125,132
                                                     9,001,285    491,459     9,492,744


    2013   Capital Outlay Note                         150,000     65,392       215,392
    2014   Original Loan Amount $1,900,000             160,000     55,240       215,240
    2015   Interest Rate: 6.55%                        170,000     44,432       214,432
    2016                                               181,000     32,937       213,937
    2017                                               193,000     20,689       213,689
    2018                                               206,000      7,621       213,621
    2019                                                13,350        437        13,787
                                                     1,073,350    226,748     1,300,098  




                                             206 

 
    2013   Capital Outlay Note                             104,000         64,401              168,401
    2014   Original Loan Amount $1,400,000                 110,000         57,454              167,454
    2015   Interest Rate: 6.492%                           118,000         50,054              168,054
    2016                                                   125,000         42,165              167,165
    2017                                                   133,000         33,791              166,791
    2018                                                   142,000         24,864              166,864
    2019                                                   151,000         15,353              166,353
    2020                                                   161,000          5,226              166,226
                                                         1,044,000        293,308            1,337,308


    2013   State of Tennessee School Energy Loan           99,996                              99,996
    2014   Original Loan Amount $1,000,000                 99,996                              99,996
    2015   Interest Rate: 0.0%                             99,996                              99,996
    2016   (Budgeted 9 Payments for First Year -           99,996                              99,996
    2017   Payments Begin When Project is                  99,996                              99,996
    2018   Complete and Approved by the State of TN)       99,996                              99,996
    2019                                                   99,996                              99,996
    2020                                                   99,996                              99,996
    2021                                                   99,996                              99,996
    2022                                                   41,705                              41,705
                                                          941,669                  0          941,669


           Total General Long-Term Debt                194,608,631      32,406,422         227,015,053  
 
             City of Murfreesboro
             Legal Debt Margin Information


            Legal Debt Margin Calculation For Fiscal Year           2012
            Assessed value                                      2,813,193,109
            Debt limit (15% of assessed value)                    421,978,966
            Debt applicable to limit:
                 General obligation bonds                             37,420,000
                 Capital Outlay Notes                                  2,117,350
                 Proposed New Debt                                    44,000,000
                 Tennessee Municipal Bond Fund Loans                 154,129,612
                 New Tennessee Energy Loans‐Schools                    1,000,000
                 Tennessee Energy Loans‐Schools                          941,669
                 Less: Debt Service Fund                              (4,029,850)
                 Net general obligation debt                         235,578,781
            Capital Leases (Schools)                                     269,294
            Total Debt Applicable to Limit                           235,848,075
            Legal debt margin                                        186,130,891



             Debt limit                                              421,978,966

             Total net debt applicable to limit                      235,848,075

             Legal debt margin                                       186,130,891

             Total net debt applicable to the limit
                as a percentage of debt limit                             55.89%        
                                             207 

 
                                        2012 - 2013 BUDGET
                                        DEBT SERVICE FUND

                                                         2011/2012    2011/2012     2012/2013      INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                                             BUDGET       ESTIMATE      BUDGET        (DECREASE)
REVENUES
FROM GENERAL FUND                                        26,162,698    25,362,301   26,139,822       (22,876)
FROM AIRPORT FUND                                           190,725       190,725      241,250        50,525
FROM CITY SCHOOLS                                            74,997        58,331      158,327        83,330
FROM TML LOANS                                               23,000       800,000      312,210       289,210
FROM DEBT SERVICE FUND BALANCE                            3,000,000       860,000    3,000,000             0
TOTAL REVENUE                                            29,451,420    27,271,357   29,851,609       400,189

                                          BALANCE
                                        OUTSTANDING      2011/2012    2011/2012     2012/2013      INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                               7/1/2012      BUDGET       ESTIMATE      BUDGET        (DECREASE)
EXPENDITURES
BONDS TO BE RETIRED
TML REFUNDING   9/30/09 65.855M             37,420,000    6,992,170     6,992,170     6,830,640      (161,530)
TRANSFERS FOR SCHOOL DEBT SERVICE                         1,097,830     1,097,830     1,124,360     1,124,260
                                            37,420,000    8,090,000     8,090,000     7,955,000       962,730

LOANS/NOTES TO BE RETIRED
2001 TML  8/22/01 35.000M                    9,001,285    2,434,310     2,434,310     2,531,440       97,130
2002 TML  5/01/03  6.000M                      752,420      447,000       447,000       462,000       15,000

2006 TML  6/27/06 68.650M                   46,981,907    3,443,750     3,443,750     3,499,102        55,352
TRANSFERS FOR SCHOOL DEBT SERVICE                         1,162,250     1,162,250     1,204,898     1,204,898
                                                          4,606,000     4,606,000     4,704,000     1,260,250

2006 TML   5/30/06  4.640M                   3,266,000      297,000       297,000      321,000         24,000
2008 TML   2/14/08  60.00M                  49,112,000    3,808,000     3,808,000    3,998,000        190,000
2010 TML 11/01/10   47.60M                  45,016,000    2,584,000     2,584,000    2,658,000         74,000
2006 CAPITAL OUTLAY NOTE 1.9M                1,073,350      140,000       140,000      150,000         10,000
2007 CAPITAL OUTLAY NOTE 1.4M                1,044,000       97,000        97,000      104,000          7,000
STATE OF TN - SCHOOLS $1.0M (FY12)             941,669       74,997        58,331       99,996         24,999
STATE OF TN - SCHOOLS $1.0M (FY13)                                                      58,331         58,331
                                           157,188,631   14,488,307    14,471,641   15,086,767      1,760,710

INTEREST ON BONDS
TML REFUNDING (FIXED) 9/30/09 65.855M                     1,905,087     1,905,087     1,555,481      (349,606)
TRANSFERS FOR SCHOOL DEBT SERVICE                           370,413       370,413       315,519       (54,894)
                                                          2,275,500     2,275,500     1,871,000      (404,500)

INTEREST ON LOANS/NOTES
2001 TML (VRDO) 8/22/01 35.000M                            280,818         85,147      219,758        (61,060)
2002 TML (VRDO) 5/01/03  6.000M                             29,054          9,172       17,848        (11,206)

2006 TML (VRDO) 6/27/06 68.650M                             966,533       370,376       850,757      (115,776)
TRANSFERS FOR SCHOOL DEBT SERVICE                           313,569        40,789       314,322           753
                                                          1,280,102       411,165     1,165,079      (115,023)

2006 TML (VRDO)    5/30/06    4.640M                         88,456        28,422        81,006        (7,450)
2008 TML (VRDO)    2/14/08    60.00M                      1,315,067       311,794     1,219,471       (95,596)
2010 TML (FIXED)   11/01/10    47.60M                     1,338,301     1,338,301     1,262,554       (75,747)

2012 TML 00/00/12 44.00M - PROPOSED                                                    627,826       627,826
TRANSFERS FOR SCHOOL DEBT SERVICE                                                      105,507       105,507
                                                                                       733,333       733,333

2006 CAPITAL OUTLAY NOTE 1.9M (FIXED)                        74,890        74,890        65,392       (9,498)
2007 CAPITAL OUTLAY NOTE 1.4M (FIXED)                        70,925        70,925        64,401       (6,524)
                                                          4,477,613     2,329,816     4,828,842      351,229

OTHER MISCELLANEOUS
BANK SERVICE CHARGES                                       120,000         99,400      105,000        (15,000)
OTHER COSTS                                                                 5,000        5,000          5,000
                                                           120,000        104,400      110,000        (10,000)

TOTAL EXPENDITURES                                       29,451,420    27,271,357   29,851,609      2,660,169
                                                  208 

 
  




                                                                    


                                  STATE STREET AID FUND 

                                       DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The State Street Aid Fund includes funding from the State of Tennessee Fuel Tax Allocation to the City.  
This allocation is based on population.     
 
The funding covers expenditures to maintain state streets located within the City limits. Street markings 
make up $180,000 of the budget, storm drainage expenditures make up $140,000, and sidewalks curbs 
and gutters make up an additional $140,000 for FY 2013 budget.   The largest expenditure is $1,860,750 
for repaving of City streets.  The paving amount is adjusted each spring based upon the available funds 
remaining.   
 
The Street Department is responsible for the State Street Aid Fund.  Additionally, the Transportation 
Department and Engineering Department oversee capital projects funded by the State Street Aid Fund.  
 

                                        ORGANIZATION CHART 

The Street Department provides the staffing for the State Street Aid Fund.  
 

                           IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 
 
                               SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 
        Assists in maintaining safe and drivable streets 
        Repairs sidewalks, curbs, gutters and drainage in need of repair 

               STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

        Per capita distribution from State that helps offset the costs of street maintenance 
                                  




                                                    209 

 
                    EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

        Receive and document service requests from the public regarding streets, sidewalks or drainage 
         systems 

                                     ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

        Utilize the social media, CityTV, and the City’s website to inform the public of expected and on‐
         going projects 

                                     FY 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

        Identify and schedule for pavement streets based on condition of the pavement  

                                    FY 2013 DEPARTMENT GOALS 

        Maximize funding from State by following Census results 
        Identify and schedule for pavement streets based on condition of the pavement  

                                   PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS 

                                                        Actual     Actual    Budget    Estimated Proposed
                                                       FY 2010    FY 2011    FY 2012    FY 2012    FY 2013
Funding level from State                              $2,671,320 $2,750,030 $2,693,005 $2,784,520 $2,830,000
 

                                       EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

                                                              State Street Aid Fund
                                    Actual           Actual           Budget           Estimated          Budget
                                   FY 2010          FY 2011           FY 2012          FY 2012           FY 2013

Personnel Costs                $          -     $          -      $          -     $           -     $          -
Operating Costs                $    2,985,300   $    2,757,723    $    2,693,755   $     2,785,270   $    2,830,750
Capital Expense                $          -     $          -      $          -     $           -     $          -
Total State Street Aid Fund    $    2,985,300   $    2,757,723    $    2,693,755   $     2,785,270   $    2,830,750  




                                                     210 

 
                                    
                    

        HUMAN RESOURCES SUMMARY 

None 
 




                  211 

 
                              2012-2013 BUDGET
                              STATE STREET AID FUND

                              2009/2010 2010/2011 2011/2012 2011/2012 2012/2013 INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                   ACTUAL    ACTUAL BUDGET ESTIMATE BUDGET (DECREASE)

REVENUES
STATE FUEL TAX ALLOCATION     2,671,320 2,750,030 2,693,005 2,784,520 2,830,000   136,995
FEDERAL GRANT - ARRA            458,665   116,332
MISCELLANEOUS INCOME                        8,440
INTEREST                            723       778       750       750       750         0
TOTAL REVENUE                 3,130,708 2,875,580 2,693,755 2,785,270 2,830,750   136,995


EXPENDITURES
OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE
TRAFFIC SIGNALS                  70,500    61,362   100,000   100,000   100,000         0
CURBS & GUTTERS                 111,463   191,929   140,000   140,000   140,000         0
SIDEWALKS                       121,010    50,227    50,000    50,000    50,000         0
INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS        50,000    42,808    50,000    50,000    50,000         0
STORM DRAINAGE                   98,895   175,636   140,000   140,000   140,000         0
RIGHTS OF WAY                    64,832    93,066   100,000   100,000   100,000         0
STREET MARKINGS                 154,671   259,354   180,000   180,000   180,000         0
                                671,371   874,382   760,000   760,000   760,000         0

CONTRACTUAL SERVICES
STREET PAVING                 1,597,284 1,633,209 1,725,005 1,815,270 1,860,750   135,745
STREET CONSTRUCTION             138,743              50,000    50,000    50,000         0
                              1,736,027 1,633,209 1,775,005 1,865,270 1,910,750   135,745

UTILITY SERVICE
STREET TRAFFIC LIGHTING          66,675    75,747    78,750    80,000    80,000     1,250
                                 66,675    75,747    78,750    80,000    80,000     1,250

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
ARRA GRANT EXPENSE              458,665   116,332                                       0
SURVEYS & ENGINEERING            52,562    58,053    80,000    80,000    80,000         0
                                511,227   174,385    80,000    80,000    80,000         0

TOTAL STATE STREET AID FUND   2,985,300 2,757,723 2,693,755 2,785,270 2,830,750   136,995  




                                           212 

 
                                                                    
                                                       


                                         AIRPORT FUND 

                                      DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The Murfreesboro Airport (MBT) is a general aviation airport serving Murfreesboro and Middle 
Tennessee.  One of only four small General Aviation Airports in Tennessee that is self‐sufficient, the 
Murfreesboro Municipal Airport is committed to safety and the improvement of its facilities to better 
serve its commercial operators, the business community, local aircraft owners and operators, and 
people from all over the nation that fly into the community to visit friends and family. A recent 
Economic Impact Study documented that 77 jobs are created at the Airport and the economic benefit of 
the Airport for the community is approximately $70 million annually.  The Airport’s largest tenant is the 
Aerospace Department of Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU). MTSU is one of the top schools for 
aviation in the nation.  While the Airport has been operational at its current location since 1952, the City 
became directly involved with the daily management of the Airport on September 1, 1994.  The Airport 
is open 24 hours and day and staffed typically 12 hours a day.  The Airport is staffed every day of the 
year except for Thanksgiving and Christmas Day.   
 
Business at the airfield is presently very good.  All hangars are currently rented and fuel sales have 
increased by over $113,000 from the previous year.  Based on a formula of the Airport Commission and 
based on income from hangar rentals, the debt service on the two capital outlay notes for construction 
of hangars at MBT has increased by $52,000 in this budget.  Additionally, the re‐roofing of two older 
hangars and the purchase of an aircraft tug are included in over $118,000 of operation capital in the 
Airport budget. 
 
The Airport Fund’s decrease in Fund Balance of 14.3 percent is attributed to raises of more than 
$24,000, a decrease in grants by approximately $240,000 and an increase to fixed assets of $117,500.




                                                    213 

 
                                      ORGANIZATION CHART 


                                        Murfreesboro 
                                          Airport


                           Airport 
                         Commission


                                                                         Lease to MTSU 
                                       Hanger and tie 
               Fuel                                                         Aviation 
                                        down rental
                                                                            Program                         

                          IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                              SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

       Maintain safe operations of the airport and good working relationships with supporting 
        agencies, neighbors and customers 
       Adopt an updated Airport Layout Plan that will continue to improve the safety and efficiency of 
        the Airport for the neighbors and customers of the airport 

              STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

       Continue to be an economic asset to the community 
       Continue to improve our service as the “Front Door” of the community for its businesses, 
        industries, and the general aviation flying community 
       Monitor and manage the various revenue sources making adjustments where needed to 
        maximize growth and maintain budget goals 

               EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

       Continue to provide a welcoming and informative Airport Staff who serve as “Ambassadors” of 
        the community to those who are flying to Murfreesboro to conduct business, attend events, 
        tourism, and are just passing through 
       Participate in training and the execution of Service Excellence 

                                                  214 

 
       Continue to be an advocate for the community as well as for all of the various General Aviation 
        customers (businesses and individual aircraft owners and operators) 

                                     ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

       Continuing to provide educational tours to children and adults interested in aviation and the 
        airport 
       Conduct neighborhood meetings and public hearings as they relate to the proposed future 
        improvements to the runway 
       Continue to assist with the local Civil Air Patrol assisting them with their search and rescue and 
        disaster relief missions 
       Improve our ability to serve the business community with services provided by Commercial 
        Operators such as air charter services, top quality aircraft maintenance, and radio and 
        instrument services  

                                     FY 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

       Presented Airport Layout Plan to the Planning Commission and City Council 
       Successfully changed the UNICOM frequency which increased safety by providing a clear 
        frequency for the pilots to communicate on 
       Secured funding for the Airport Asphalt Overlay Project to be completed in 2013 
       Completed clearing of Approach Surface for Runway 36 

                                     FY 2013 DEPARTMENT GOALS 

       Continue to improve our excellent service and be the “Welcome Center” to the many 
        corporations, businesses and individual who fly into Murfreesboro on a daily basis 
       Continue to monitor and make adjustments to maintain sufficient hangar and fuel  revenues to 
        insure the Airport maintains its self‐sufficient financial position 
       Secure necessary approvals and Federal, State, and local funding for funding of annual 
        maintenance and improvements at the airport 
       Complete the resurfacing of the roof on Hangar #2 and #3 

                                 PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS 

                                       Actual     Actual         Budget        Estimated     Proposed
                                     FY 2010     FY 2011          FY 2012       FY 2012      FY 2013
Fuel Sales Revenue                    $99,741    $102,476        $89,619        $99,776     $95,000.00
Gallons of fuel sold                  184,119    191,986         175,000        180,000       189000
Hangar Revenues                      $313,853    $351,950       $334,000       $356,000      $392,000
Hangar Occupancy rate                   80%        90%            85%            92%            93
Number of Based Aircraft                128        132             130            135          138      

                                  



                                                   215 

 
                             EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

                                                       Airport Fund
                          Actual           Actual          Budget           Estimated          Budget
                         FY 2010          FY 2011          FY 2012          FY 2012           FY 2013

Personnel Costs      $      155,287   $      163,219   $      171,218   $       170,233   $      194,953
Operating Costs      $    1,123,041   $    1,133,743   $    1,327,936   $     1,295,373   $    1,235,622
Capital Expense      $          150   $        8,054   $       90,500   $           500   $      118,000
Total Airport Fund   $    1,278,478   $    1,305,016   $    1,589,654   $     1,466,106   $    1,548,575  




                                                                                                   
                                              

                                              

                                              

                                              

                                              

                                              

                                              

                                              

                                              


                                           216 

 
                                    HUMAN RESOURCE SUMMARY 

                                              Airport Fund
                                                               Actual     Actual Estimated Proposed
                                                              FY 2010    FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013
Job Description
   Airport Manager                                                1          1          1          1
      Full‐Time Positions                                         1          1          1          1

    Operations Assistant                                                                           1
    Secretary                                                     1          1          1          1
    Operations Service Specialist                                 1          1          1          1
    Operations Service Personnel                                  3          3          3          3
       Part‐Time Positions                                        5          5          5          6

Total Airport Fund Allocation                                     6          6          6          7

                                    STATE AND FEDERAL FUNDING 

       Currently, there are many changes occurring in the Tennessee Department of Transportation 
        and the Tennessee Aeronautics Division which may impact policies, procedures, funding levels, 
        and even funding availability. 
       The Murfreesboro Airport Commission always works very diligently to secure any State and 
        Federal funds to assist with the cost of maintaining and improving the Murfreesboro Municipal 
        Airport. 

                                    RETIREMENT OF DEBT SERVICE 

       Debt acquired by the Airport is related to two major hangar construction projects which were 
        completed in 1997 and 2007.  The local cost of the airfield asphalt overlay project will also be 
        added to the Airport’s Debt Retirement program. 
       The Airport Commission adjusts the monthly hangar rental rates annually by 3% or based on 
        occupancy rates and current market demands. 
       The retirement of the Airport’s debt service is projected to be completed within a 20 year period 
        from the completion of the last hangar construction project. 




                                                  217 

 
                                 2012-2013 BUDGET
                                 AIRPORT FUND

                                  2009/2010    2010/2011    2011/2012    2011/2012    2012/2013     INCREASE
    DESCRIPTIONS                   ACTUAL       ACTUAL      BUDGET       ESTIMATE     BUDGET       (DECREASE)

    REVENUES
    HANGAR RENTALS                   313,853      351,950      334,000      356,000      392,000        58,000
    OTHER RENTALS                     16,123       26,783       18,000       18,000       18,000             0
    MTSU LEASE                        41,297       42,543       30,906       31,067       31,999         1,093
    TERMINAL BUILDING LEASE           10,122        6,908        8,160        8,208        8,394           234
    STATE MAINTENANCE CONTRACT        13,000                    13,000       13,000       13,000             0
    FEDERAL & STATE GRANTS           179,159       50,448      404,240      129,410      163,625      (240,615)
    FUEL SALES & FLOWAGE FEES        749,190      875,015      741,584      924,000      867,000       125,416
    VENDING MACHINE SALES                758          740          750          756          750             0
    OTHER MISCELLANEOUS                1,065          100                                      0             0
    INTEREST                           1,123        1,295        1,000        1,500        1,200           200
    FROM GENERAL FUND                  1,961        1,810
    FROM FUND BALANCE                                           38,014                    52,607        14,593
    TOTAL REVENUE                  1,327,651    1,357,592    1,589,654    1,481,941    1,548,575       (41,079)

    EXPENDITURES
    PERSONNEL COSTS
    SALARIES & WAGES                                           135,095      134,100      155,056       19,961
       TOTAL SALARIES & WAGES        123,558      129,731      135,095      134,100      155,056       19,961
    SOCIAL SECURITY                    9,265        9,723        9,968        9,968       11,495        1,527
    MEDICAL - DENTAL                  10,062       11,693       12,867       12,867       13,779          912
    PENSION PLAN                       8,293        8,489        9,074        9,074        9,041          (33)
    LIFE INSURANCE                                                                0          513          513
    WORKER'S COMPENSATION              4,109        3,583        4,214        4,224        5,069          855
    TOTAL PERSONNEL COSTS            155,287      163,219      171,218      170,233      194,953       23,735

    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
    MACHINERY & EQUIPMENT             20,949       23,331       20,000       27,000       25,000         5,000
    OFFICE EQUIPMENT                   2,699        2,707        2,600        4,500        2,800           200
    BUILDINGS & GROUNDS               33,362       40,320       65,000       64,500       65,000             0
                                      57,010       66,358       87,600       96,000       92,800         5,200

    SUPPLIES
    POSTAGE                              496          547          520          750          575            55
    OFFICE                             2,435        3,437        2,300        3,500        3,000           700
    ADVERTISING                          224          489        1,000        1,150          800          (200)
    EMPLOYEE                             436          678          450        1,700        1,000           550
    JANITORIAL                         2,007        2,198        2,100        3,000        2,500           400
    FUEL                               1,077        1,234        1,400        1,960        1,800           400
    CLOTHING                                                     1,000          700          700          (300)
                                       6,675        8,583        8,770       12,760       10,375         1,605

    INSURANCE
    PROPERTY INSURANCE                 1,000        1,000        1,000          735          735          (265)
    GENERAL LIABILITY                  7,643        7,493        7,643        7,643        7,650             7
    FIRE                               1,753        1,362        1,753        1,512        1,512          (241)
                                      10,396        9,855       10,396        9,890        9,897          (499)

    UTILITY SERVICE
    ELECTRIC                          28,158       32,489       33,000       30,000       31,000        (2,000)
    WATER & SEWER                      4,319        4,327        4,300        4,500        4,500           200
    GAS                                3,796        3,150        3,800        3,100        3,600          (200)
    TELEPHONE                          1,724        1,751        2,000        1,800        1,800          (200)
    CELLULAR TELEPHONE                   510          548          550          340          400          (150)
    INTERNET SERVICE                     567          611          560          650          600            40
                                      39,074       42,876       44,210       40,390       41,900        (2,310)  

                                                  218 

 
                                                       2012-2013 BUDGET
                                                       AIRPORT FUND

                                                          2009/2010           2010/2011          2011/2012           2011/2012           2012/2013      INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                                               ACTUAL              ACTUAL            BUDGET              ESTIMATE            BUDGET        (DECREASE)

TRAVEL AND SUBSISTENCE
MILEAGE REIMBURSEMENT                                             1,366               1,334              1,370               1,225             1,400             30
OUT OF TOWN TRAVEL                                                                       14              1,000                   0             1,000              0
MEALS DURING MEETINGS                                               638               1,497              1,400               1,300             1,500            100
                                                                  2,004               2,845              3,770               2,525             3,900            130

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
DEBT SERVICE                                                  322,978             190,725             190,725             190,725           241,250           50,525
CREDIT CARD FEES                                                8,539              13,125               8,400              13,937            13,000            4,600
PURCHASES FOR RESALE                                          590,262             702,088             598,965             756,000           702,000          103,035
FUEL REBATES                                                   42,125              36,367              38,000              30,000            36,000           (2,000)
SALES TAX                                                      16,823              20,959              15,000              24,287            21,000            6,000
SURVEYS AND STUDIES                                            21,004              36,903             320,000             117,389            62,000         (258,000)
TRAINING                                                        1,568                 675               1,600                 500             1,000             (600)
HELIPORT                                                        1,961               1,810
OTHER MISCELLANEOUS                                             2,622                 574                 500                 970                500               0
                                                            1,007,882           1,003,226           1,173,190           1,133,808          1,076,750         (96,440)

OPERATING BUDGET                                            1,278,328           1,296,962           1,499,154           1,465,606          1,430,575         (68,579)

ADDITION TO FIXED ASSETS
NORMAL REPLACEMENT - FURN & EQUIP                                                                                                             2,500
TRACTOR MOWER/AIRCRAFT TUG                                                                                                                   15,500
HANGAR #2 AND #3 ROOF RESURFACING                                                                                                           100,000
                                                                    150               8,054             90,500                   500        118,000          27,500

TOTAL AIRPORT FUND                                          1,278,478           1,305,016           1,589,654           1,466,106          1,548,575         (41,079)




ADDITIONAL DETAILS

                                                          AIRPORT          PERCENT OF STATE/FED                      2011/2012            Account
2011 / 2012 BUDGET                                                         ASSISTANCE  FUNDING                        TOTAL            Classification
ENVIRONMENTAL ASESSMENT                                          5,612            90%     80,109                         85,721        Studies & Surveys
AIRPORT LAYOUT PLAN UPDATE                                       1,167            90%     10,501                         11,668        Studies & Surveys
RNWY,TXWY, RAMP OVERLAY DESIGN *                                 8,200            90%     11,800                         20,000        Studies & Surveys
APPROACH CLEARING                                                3,000            90%     27,000                         30,000        Building & Grounds
                                                                17,979                   129,410                        147,389

                                                          AIRPORT      PERCENT OF STATE/FED                          2012/2013            Account
2012 / 2013 BUDGET                                                     ASSISTANCE  FUNDING                            TOTAL            Classification
RNWY, TXWY, RAMP OVERLAY DESIGN (Deposit) *                                   100%    62,000                             62,000        Studies & Surveys
HANGAR ROOF #2 AND #3 RESURFACE                                 10,000         90%    90,000                            100,000        Fixed Assets
TRACTOR MOWER/AIRCRAFT TUG                                       3,875         75%    11,625                             15,500        Fixed Assets
                                                                13,875               163,625                            177,500
*The Airport met its 10% obligation for this project in FY 2012, therefore the balance of the project to be completed in FY 13
will be funded 100% by State/Fed funds.




                                                                                   219 

 
                                                                 


                                          DRUG FUND 

                                     DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The Drug Fund accounts for revenue from drug fines and confiscated property seized by the 
Murfreesboro Police Department.  All management of the Fund’s monies is directed by the Police 
Department.  The fund is used to support additional drug enforcement activities by the Police 
Department and to provide anti‐drug education programs in local schools.  

                          IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                             SAFE AND LIVEABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

       Enforcement activities designed to eradicate illegal drug use in neighborhoods and communities 
        throughout the City 
       Educate young people on the risks involved with drug use 

             STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

       These funds support the Police Department’s efforts to ensure the City remains an excellent 
        location for business and industry 

               EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

       Provide children knowledge and resources to resist drugs  

                                    ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

       Involve the community through outreach programs to at‐risk youth and others 

                                    FY 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

       Provided drug education to youth in public and private schools 
                                 

                                                  220 

 
                                   FY 2013 DEPARTMENT GOALS 

       Provide additional support to law officers involved with the elimination of illegal drug use  
       Provide drug education to 10,000 young people in public and private schools 

                                      EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

                                                                Drug Fund
                                   Actual           Actual          Budget          Estimated         Budget
                                  FY 2010          FY 2011          FY 2012         FY 2012          FY 2013

Personnel Costs               $       65,413   $       69,915   $      90,000   $       90,000   $      90,000
Operating Costs               $      152,012   $      147,577   $     167,242   $       69,465   $     137,475
Capital Expense               $        5,669   $      119,744   $       2,500   $       13,412   $       2,500
Total Drug Fund               $      223,094   $      337,236   $     259,742   $      172,877   $     229,975  

 




                                                                                                          

                                   HUMAN RESOURCES SUMMARY 

None 




                                                    221 

 
                                      2012-2013 BUDGET
                                      DRUG FUND

                                        2009/2010    2010/2011   2011/2012   2011/2012   2012/2013    INCREASE
    DESCRIPTIONS                         ACTUAL       ACTUAL     BUDGET      ESTIMATE    BUDGET      (DECREASE)

    REVENUES
    COURT FINES                            113,428      93,659     100,000      90,000      90,000      (10,000)
    COURT FINES THRU GENERAL FUND          113,427      93,659      80,000      90,000      90,000       10,000
    SEIZURE AWARDS                          74,985      42,325      50,000      45,000      50,000            0
    INTEREST                                   886       1,143       1,200         950       1,000         (200)
    SALE OF FIXED ASSETS & SEIZURES          4,193         639       1,000         500       1,000            0
    UNAUTHORIZED SUBSTANCE TAX               1,257         225           0         175           0            0
    MISCELLANEOUS                            9,824      26,017      27,542           0           0      (27,542)
    TOTAL REVENUE                          318,000     257,667     259,742     226,625     232,000      (27,742)

    EXPENDITURES
    SALARIES
    TRANSFER TO GENERAL FUND:
      OVERTIME / COURT-TIME                 65,413      69,915      90,000      90,000      90,000            0
                                            65,413      69,915      90,000      90,000      90,000            0

    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
    VEHICLES & MACHINERY-FLEET              14,735      15,856      15,117      11,500      15,000         (117)
    VEHICLES & MACHINERY                     9,214       1,387       3,000       2,000       2,000       (1,000)
    RADIOS                                                 970         200         200         200            0
    OFFICE EQUIPMENT                           500         550       1,500       2,300       2,500        1,000
    BUILDINGS                                1,225       1,186       1,500         500       1,500            0
    DRUG DOG                                   567                   1,000           0       1,000            0
                                            26,241      19,949      22,317      16,500      22,200         (117)

    SUPPLIES
    POSTAGE                                     65          47         100          50         100            0
    OFFICE SUPPLIES                            622       1,378       2,500       2,000       2,500            0
    EMPLOYEE                                   181          91         225           0         225            0
    JANITORIAL                                 313         151         500         150         500            0
    CLOTHING                                               869       1,200         500         750         (450)
    OTHER MISC. SUPPLIES                     1,779       1,530       1,500       1,500       1,500            0
                                             2,960       4,066       6,025       4,200       5,575         (450)

    UTILITY SERVICE
    ELECTRIC                                 4,635       4,736       6,000       3,500       4,500       (1,500)
    WATER & SEWER                              941       1,500       1,700       1,200       1,700            0
    GAS                                                  1,584       2,500         150       1,500       (1,000)
    TELEPHONE                                2,953       3,419       3,200       4,600       4,000          800
    CELLULAR TELEPHONES                     14,178      16,492      23,000      12,000      15,000       (8,000)
                                            22,707      27,731      36,400      21,450      26,700       (9,700)

    MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE
    TRAINING PERSONNEL                                              20,000       3,315      10,000      (10,000)
    UNDERCOVER OPERATIONS                   42,000      43,000      80,000      20,000      70,000      (10,000)
    RENT                                    55,200      27,600                       0           0            0
    OTHER MISCELLANEOUS                      2,904      25,231       2,500       4,000       3,000          500
                                           100,104      95,831     102,500      27,315      83,000      (19,500)

    OPERATING BUDGET                       217,425     217,492     257,242     159,465     227,475      (29,767)

    ADDITION TO FIXED ASSETS
    NORMAL REPLACEMENT - FURN & EQUIP                                                        2,500
                                             5,669     119,744       2,500      13,412       2,500            0

    TOTAL DRUG FUND                        223,094     337,236     259,742     172,877     229,975      (29,767)    
                                                       222 

 
                                                                   


                               COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

                                      DEPARTMENT SUMMARY 

The Community Development Department administers the Community Development Block Grant 
(CDBG) program of Federal funds directed in three primary areas; affordable housing, social services, 
improvements and economic development.  Funding is appropriated by Congress through the U. S. 
Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) annually and is calculated on a formula that 
weighs population, income levels and other economic and demographic data.  As a condition of 
participating in the CDBG program, Murfreesboro commits to adopting a five‐year Consolidated Plan 
that strategically addresses the three primary program areas.  The City must also certify annually that it 
affirmatively furthers fair housing and has a current Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice.  
Projects are focused on low‐ and moderate‐income residents.  The Department serves as the City’s 
liaison to the Mayor’s Homeless Task Force and administers the Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) from 
the Tennessee Housing Development Agency (THDA). 
 
The Community Development Fund has seen a decrease of approximately $183,000 in the FY 2013 year 
due to a lack of carryover funds from previous years.  Programs affected by the reduction include the 
Micro Enterprise Loan program ($120,000) and the Housing Rehabilitation program ($81,600). 

                                         ORGANIZATION CHART 




                                                Community 
                                               Development



    Affordable            Housing            Microenterprise          Homeless             Social Service 
     Housing            Rehabilitation         Assistance             prevention          program support




                                                                                                               

                                                   223 

 
                          IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNCIL PRIORITIES 

 

                              SAFE AND LIVABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 

       Use CDBG funds to support and improve living environments, suitable housing and improve the 
        quality of life for low and moderate income Murfreesboro residents 
       Continue implementation of the five‐year Consolidated Plan and the annual Action Plan 
       Utilizing the information from the analysis to fair housing impediments, design and implement 
        programs to improve the range of housing available to all Murfreesboro residents 

              STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC HEALTH 

       By improving low‐ and moderate‐income neighborhoods and through the provision of social 
        support services, aid in maintaining the economic health of all Murfreesboro neighborhoods 
       Provide support to Room in the Inn, Journey Home and other agencies that aid the homeless 
        population 
       Administer the City’s Microenterprise Loan Fund 

               EXCELLENT SERVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CUSTOMER SERVICE 

       Monitor all CDBG projects and sub‐recipients of grant funds for performance goals, timely use of 
        funds and program compliance 
       Participate in the customer service training for City personnel  

                                   ENGAGING OUR COMMUNITY 

       Conduct a minimum of two public hearings in support of CDBG‐funded activities 
       Serve as City liaison on committee developing one‐stop‐shop public service center 
       Adhere to the Citizen Participation Plan 

                                   FY 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

         Exceeded goals for owner‐occupied housing rehabilitation program – Goal‐12/Actual‐18 
     Exceeded goals for assisting first‐time home buyers with down payment and closing costs – 
          Goal‐12/Actual‐16 
     Assisted four microenterprise businesses with low‐interest loans 
     Assisted Habitat for Humanity with acquisition of building lot 
     Provided public service grants to 13 nonprofit agencies 
     Used CDBG funds to assist in rehabilitation of old Samsonite Fire Hall 
     Developed and held public hearings and submitted to HUD the Year Three Action Plan 
 
 


                                                  224 

 
                                                FY 2013 GOALS 

       Complete housing rehabilitation projects for 12 homeowners 
       Assist 12 first‐time home buyers with down payment and closing costs 
       Provide public service grants to 13 non‐profit agencies 
       Assist Habitat for Humanity with acquisition of building lot 
       Provide technical assistance to microenterprise loan portfolio borrowers 
       Maintain a leadership position in the Murfreesboro/Rutherford Co. Continuum of Care 

                                   PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS 

                                                                 Actual  Actual Budget Estimated Proposed
                                                                FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2012 FY 2013

Funds benefiting low or moderate income persons                  100%     100%      100%        100%         100%
Homes involved with downpayment assistance                        25        5        12          15           12
Houses rehabbed with CDBG assistance                               8       12        12          16           12


                                       EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 

                                                         Community Development Fund
                                    Actual             Actual          Budget           Estimated           Budget
                                   FY 2010            FY 2011          FY 2012          FY 2012            FY 2013

Administration                 $       97,580     $      135,319   $      117,600   $       129,401    $     131,229
Operating Costs                $    2,636,922     $    1,409,399   $      911,882   $     1,355,170    $     715,306
Capital Expense                $          -       $          -     $          -     $           -      $         -
Total Community Dev. Fund      $    2,734,502     $    1,544,718   $    1,029,482   $     1,484,571    $     846,535  
 
                                                          




                                                                                                               
                                                       225 

 
                                                

                               HUMAN RESOURCES SUMMARY 

                                  Community Development Fund
                                                         Actual    Actual Estimated Proposed
                                                        FY 2010   FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013
Job Description
   Director                                                1        1         1        1
   Grant Coordinator                                       1        1         1        1
      Full‐Time Positions                                  2        2         2        2

    Secretary                                              1        1         1        1
       Part‐Time Positions                                 1        1         1        1

Total Community Development Fund Allocation                3        3         3        3        




                                              226 

 
                              2012-2013 BUDGET
                              COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FUND

                                  2009/2010    2010/2011    2011/2012    2011/2012     2012/2013     INCREASE
DESCRIPTIONS                       ACTUAL       ACTUAL      BUDGET       ESTIMATE      BUDGET       (DECREASE)

REVENUES
CDBG GRANTS                          975,379      483,311      838,000      997,744       711,535      (126,465)
EMERGENCY SHELTER GRANT              108,884      110,543      111,482      111,482       110,000        (1,482)
HOME GRANT-RESIDENTIAL REHAB                      156,804       60,000      230,372             0       (60,000)
CDBG-R (STIMULUS)                    104,945       64,371            0            0             0             0
MHA ARRA (STIMULUS PASS THRU)         69,949      389,064            0            0             0             0
NEIGHBORHOOD STABILIZATION (NSP    1,421,689      219,793            0      118,973             0             0
PROGRAM INCOME                        35,199      120,832       20,000       26,000        25,000         5,000
TOTAL REVENUE                      2,716,045    1,544,718    1,029,482    1,484,571       846,535      (182,947)

EXPENDITURES
ADMINISTRATION
SALARIES AND WAGES                                              71,703       71,703        74,258        2,555
SOCIAL SECURITY                                                  5,485        5,485         5,681          196
MEDICAL - DENTAL                                                 6,607        6,607         6,958          351
PENSION PLAN                                                     7,090        7,090         7,338          248
LIFE INSURANCE                                                                                886          886
WORKERS' COMPENSATION                                              151          151           183           32
FAIR HOUSING                                                     1,000        1,000         1,000            0
OFFICE SUPPLIES                                                  2,500        2,500         2,500            0
TRAINING & TRAVEL                                                8,000        8,000         8,000            0
TELEPHONE                                                        1,800        1,800         1,800            0
ADVERTISING                                                      1,500        1,500         1,500            0
POSTAGE                                                            750          750           750            0
HMIS-HOMELESS                                                    3,740        4,990         5,000        1,260
OTHER MISCELLANEOUS                                              7,274       36,485        15,376        8,102
LESS: REIMB FROM NSP & ESG                                           0      (18,660)                         0
                                      97,580      135,319      117,600      129,401       131,229       13,629

HOUSING REHAB
SALARIES AND WAGES                                              47,839       45,478        49,367         1,528
SOCIAL SECURITY                                                  3,660        3,660         3,777           117
MEDICAL - DENTAL                                                 4,404        4,404         4,639           235
PENSION PLAN                                                     4,726        4,726         4,892           166
WORKERS' COMPENSATION                                               89           89            67           (22)
CDBG HOUSING PROJECTS                                          265,612      251,000       241,966       (23,646)
HOUSE REHAB PROJECTS                                            60,000      221,187             0       (60,000)
                                      57,327      350,806      386,330      530,544       304,707       (81,623)

AFFORDABLE HOUSING
SALARIES AND WAGES                                              26,893       26,893        27,849          956
SOCIAL SECURITY                                                  2,058        2,058         2,130           72
MEDICAL - DENTAL                                                 6,256        6,256         6,912          656
PENSION PLAN                                                     3,324        3,324         3,440          116
WORKERS' COMPENSATION                                               57           57            58            1
HOUSING ASSISTANCE                                             118,925      134,600       119,485          561
HOUSING ASSISTANCE - NSP                                                    114,807             0
                                     301,321      107,123      157,513      287,995       159,875         2,362

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
MTSU/SBDC MICRO-ENTERPRISE PROJ.                                15,000        7,500        10,000        (5,000)
MICRO-ENTERPRISE LOAN POOL                                      90,000       95,600                     (90,000)
MICRO-ENTERPRISE ACCOUNTING SVC.                                25,000        6,000                     (25,000)
                                       8,526       58,110      130,000      109,100        10,000      (120,000)




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                                 2012-2013 BUDGET
                                 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FUND

                                  2009/2010    2010/2011       2011/2012       2011/2012     2012/2013        INCREASE
DE