Physical Environment by yurtgc548

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									Physical Environment
                Objectives:

•   Successfully create a classroom that will
    compliment your learning style and enhance
    student learning.
•   Identify and apply strategies that will promote
    fast and smooth transitions in the classroom.
•   Apply strategies that will promote parent
    communication, including written and verbal
    communication.
Arranging a classroom seems
simple enough. Assign
students to sit in nice neat
rows that fill up a classroom.
          Right?
Not so fast!!
     Factors that influence the
        “look” of your room:


•   Size and shape of the room
    Factors that influence the
       “look” of your room:
•   Size and shape of the room
•   Age and number of students
   Factors that influence the
     “look” of your room:

• Size and shape of room
• Age and number of students
• Teaching style
   Factors that influence the
     “look” of your room:

• Size and shape of room
• Age and number of students
• Teaching style
• Available furniture
       Factors that influence the
         “look” of your room:


•   Size and shape of room
•   Age and number of students
•   Teaching style
•   Available furniture
•   Special needs of students
  Factors that influence the
     “look” of your room:

• Size and shape of room
• Age and number of students
• Teaching style
• Available furniture
• Special needs of students
• Environmental preferences
 Factors that influence the
    “look” of your room:

• Size and shape of room
• Age and number of students
• Teaching style
• Available furniture
• Special needs of students
• Environmental preferences
• Basic floor plans
     Factors that influence
    the “look” of your room:

• Size and shape of room
• Age and number of students
• Teaching style
• Available furniture
• Special needs of students
• Environmental preferences
• Basic floor plans
• Desk arrangement
Factors that influence the “look”
         of your room:
 • Size and shape of room
 • Age and number of students
 • Teaching style
 • Available furniture
 • Special needs of students
 • Environmental preferences
 • Basic floor plans
 • Desk arrangement
 • Storage
     Factors that influence the
        “look” of your room:
   • Size and shape of room
               having students
Consider number of a small
   • Age and
microwave or refrigerator
   • Teaching style
   • Available furniture
   you cook with your
if • Special needs of students
   • Environmental preferences
students. plans
   • Basic floor
   • Desk arrangement
   • Storage
   • Safety
Transitions
             Transitions

•   Classroom transitions
•   Transitions to and from
    out-of-classroom activities
Parents as Partners
  Parents as Partners

• Positive
• Personalized
• Proactive
• Partnership
    Parents as Partners

• Conferences
  Parents as Partners


• Conferences
• Telephone calls
   Parents as Partners

• Conferences
• Telephone calls
• E-mail
  Parents as Partners

• Conferences
• Telephone calls
• E-mail
• School and teacher news
  letters
     Parents as Partners

• Conferences
• Telephone calls
• E-mail
• School and teacher news
  letters
• Open house
Getting Along with Grownups #1

The parent who … is over zealous at open house.
You carefully go over your notes and prepare the entire
classroom for open house. Everything is in order
because of all of your efforts. You feel great because
you are prepared. The presentation begins. A
mother’s hand goes up and she asks a question about
her son. You politely answer it and move on. A minute
later, her hand goes up again, only to ask yet another
question about her child. Again, you answer it. Pretty
soon, you see her hand go up again, again, and again,
each time with a question that only relates to her son.
What do you do?
           Action Plan #1

Take back control of your open house and
address the concerns of the parent. You may
say something like “I understand your concerns
about your son. However, tonight we are
pressed for time and have much material to
cover. Let’s get together at another time when
we both can talk.” Then resume with your open
house information.
Getting Along With Grownups #2

The parent who … wants to tell you how to teach.
Your student’s mother has scheduled a meeting for
this afternoon, but hasn’t given you any idea what
she wants to talk about. Your student is doing very
well academically and socially, so you don’t have a
clue as to the topic. At the appointed time, mom
enters your classroom, sits down, and proceeds to
tell you that she feels you need to present your class
lessons in a different way and that your curriculum
could be improved.
             Action Plan #2


First, listen to the parent. Remain calm and do not
become defensive, even if it sounds like the parent is
questioning your ability to teach. Explain that you teach
state and county mandated material. Offer to show
teacher editions of the textbooks, grade level
objectives, Sunshine State Standards, and the county
web site. Explain how you teach the material with
direct instruction, small groups, and etc. Review the
homework policy. If these ideas don’t work, ask an
administrator to assist you with handling the parent.
Getting Along With Grownups #3

 The parent who … wants to talk daily. It happens every
 morning. The students have entered the classroom, the
 beginning bell is going to ring any second, and there she is at
 your door! Mrs.Yacker. She is pleasant, but insistent as she
 catches your eye and smilingly demands your attention. “This
 will only take a second” - but of course it never does. The topic
 doesn’t really matter either. It is never urgent. She just wants
 to talk. Meanwhile, the students are in need of your attention.
 You need to begin the day. You give her your attention. By the
 middle of the week, you resent the daily intrusion and realize
 that you have a problem on your hands. What do you do?
           Action Plan #3

Kindly explain to Mrs. Yacker that you would
love to address her needs, but at this time you
need to give your full attention to the class.
Offer to schedule a conference at another time.
Getting Along With Grownups #4

The parent who … never gets involved.
No matter what you send home (newsletter,
personal note, an invitation, request for
something, etc.) the parent never responds,
participates, or gets involved. You are
concerned for the student as well as the
parent. How do you approach the parent
with the concern?
           Action Plan #4

A phone call is necessary. Keep calling until you
speak directly with a parent. Try home, work,
and cell phone numbers. Invite the parent by
asking, “What is a good time for you to come in
to school?” If the parent works, perhaps he/she
could come at their lunch hour or you could
adjust your work hours for that day.
  Getting Along With Grownups #5


The parent who … always brings her kid late. One
of your students is consistently brought late to school.
Not only does she miss the morning drill, but usually at
least 20 minutes of instruction. When she finally does
arrive, the parent’s apology and excuses interrupt the
classroom routine, and you must take time away from
the rest of the class to help get this girl’s morning
started. You realize the parent is having a difficult time
at home. What do you do?
               Action Plan #5

Tell the parent you would like to meet with her to work out
a solution to the problem of her daughter’s chronic
tardiness. At the conference, listen to the parent to find
out the real reason for the lateness. Quite often, there
isn’t any specific thing, except poor time management. If
this is the case, offer suggestions, such as packing
lunches and backpacks the night before, setting the alarm
clock 15 minutes earlier, etc. Kindly share the importance
of students arriving to school on time and how your
morning routine runs. Sometimes when a parent realizes
the impact of her child constantly being late, she will be
happy to make more of an effort.
Which House Do You Live In?

								
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