How to Create a Facebook Page by MikeDriehorst

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									Creating a Facebook Page for Your Business / Organization
In social media – whether you’re in it for personal use or professional gain – the easiest thing to do is to create content. That content can take the form of a blog, an uploaded a picture, a tweet or even a new Facebook Page. Creation is easy. It’s the maintenance that takes an on-going, smart investment of time – especially if you’re a business looking to get some return on your social media investment. Still, if you are new to social media, creation can be scary because it’s so public. I know how you feel because I’ve been there. But, fear not. You can do it. And, 99% of the time, even if you do goof up, you can correct it. So, let me do my little bit to help guide you through the creation of a Facebook Page for your business or organization. If you are in business or even an association, a Page is what you want. A Group serves a different purpose, as does a Profile. (See links under each term for detailed definitions and other information.) For a good post about the difference between Pages and Groups, see this Mashable post. You cannot do anything on Facebook without having an individual Profile. While some people create Profiles for their business or organization, it is clearly against Facebook’s preferences for Profiles (see ―How are Pages different from personal profiles?‖). As a cautionary note, if you create a Profile for your business or organization, and you market too much from it, your account can be closed (especially if a competitor reports you). Before you create a Facebook Page, know this: The person who creates a Facebook Page will forever be linked to that Page. If you’re with an agency creating a Page for a client, and that client goes away or you move on, you will still have administrator rights. The rights for a Page creator cannot be transferred. If you’re on the client side and you ask your agency to create a Facebook Page, it’d be best to create a generic Facebook Profile with a general company email to serve as the Page creator. Then add an agency representative as an administrator. (See Step 3.) Admins have authority to edit and maintain a Page. My four-step process to creating a Facebook Page starts…on the next page.

Mike Driehorst / Diamond Communications Blog: www.MikesPoints.com

©2009 Mike Driehorst / Diamond Communications

+734-347-6587 mike.driehorst@diamond-comms.com

Step 1 After you log into your Facebook Profile, look in the lower left corner of any Facebook page. You should see the image at right: click on the ―Ads and Pages‖ icon. You may not see the icon, especially if your profile is new. If it’s not there, simply find a business with a Page. One way to do this is to conduct a search: Using the search box in the upper right corner (in the same line as your name) seach for ―Facebook Pages,‖ for example.

There, the first result (image below) will be Facebook’s own Page for its Pages. Click on it.

Mike Driehorst / Diamond Communications Blog: www.MikesPoints.com

©2009 Mike Driehorst / Diamond Communications

+734-347-6587 mike.driehorst@diamond-comms.com

After you’ve clicked on it, you’ll see Facebook’s Page for its Fan Pages application. Scroll down. On the left side, click on ―Create a Page for My Business.‖ In your search, you can search for any business that might have a Page.

Mike Driehorst / Diamond Communications Blog: www.MikesPoints.com

©2009 Mike Driehorst / Diamond Communications

+734-347-6587 mike.driehorst@diamond-comms.com

Step 2 Once you’ve clicked on the ―Ads and Pages‖ icon or the ―Create a Page‖ link, you’ll see this – image at right. Click on the ―+ Create Facebook Page‖ button at the bottom right. Once you do that, you’ll see the page below – and you’ll have a three choices:    Local Brand, Product, or Organization Artist, Band, or Public Figure

Under each, you’ll see a range of categories. Pick the category that best describes your business or organization, and then the secondary category from the drop down list. Type the name of your business or organization, and check the box under your business name so that the Page is not immediately published – giving you time to develop initial content. You also may have to type a security code if your Facebook Profile is not yet verified. (It’s a simple process Facebook uses to verify that your Profile is real.)

Mike Driehorst / Diamond Communications Blog: www.MikesPoints.com

©2009 Mike Driehorst / Diamond Communications

+734-347-6587 mike.driehorst@diamond-comms.com

Step 3 Once you’ve created a Page, you’ll see a page like the one at the right – for ―Mike’s Business.‖ Before you build out your Page, click on ―Edit Page,‖ and you’ll see the page below. There, you can set the permissions for who can see the page by age, geography, etc., who can post – just you, or you and fans (recommended) – as well as add applications, add administrators (far right column), and other settings. Go ahead and explore. Remember, there are very few things with Facebook that you cannot undo. So, if you do something and change your mind, just change it.

Mike Driehorst / Diamond Communications Blog: www.MikesPoints.com

©2009 Mike Driehorst / Diamond Communications

+734-347-6587 mike.driehorst@diamond-comms.com

Step 4 Once you set your Page’s Settings, click ―View Page‖ under the Page name at the top to start creating the initial content. See image at right for example areas for content. While you want solid content at first that gives value, your Facebook Page is never ―finished.‖ Get enough content on it to tell your story and make people want to be Fans. After you upload Photos (see steps in upload process below), you can choose one to be your Profile picture. This image will be next to any comment or update you post on the Wall, and elsewhere on the Page. For business, this is often the logo, or other image that is easily associated with your company.

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Mike Driehorst / Diamond Communications Blog: www.MikesPoints.com
©2009 Mike Driehorst / Diamond Communications

+734-347-6587 mike.driehorst@diamond-comms.com

You may want to start a Discussion, as well as include any upcoming Events, Videos or Notes (Facebook’s version of blog posts), etc. Once you have your Facebook Page finished, click ―publish this Page‖ to make it go live.

There are various ways to promote your Page and keep it active – and to grow your fan count and develop a high interaction rate. Remember, social media marketing is not about broadcasting, it is about what I like to call the three Cs:  Connecting: Companies want to seek out customers, prospects and other key influencers. They want mass, numbers, heads — people. Businesses and organizations need to seek out and find common ground – i.e., connect – with their marketplace. Contributing: Connecting ultimately means businesses are contributing value to their audience members’ lives — personal and/or professional, online and/or offline. As contributing is done on a regular basis, a community forms. Communities: The more companies connect with their target audience, and provide valued contributions, communities form around their social media tools and activities. Some bonds will be tight; others will be loose, like those shoppers who buy a product just because they have a coupon.

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AND THEN, with some level of attachment, companies and organizations will see hardcore results via inquiries, sales, customer feedback, referrals, etc. If you want to explore how Facebook and other on-going social media marketing activities can benefit your business or organization – whether small or large – let me know.

Mike Driehorst / Diamond Communications Blog: www.MikesPoints.com

©2009 Mike Driehorst / Diamond Communications

+734-347-6587 mike.driehorst@diamond-comms.com


								
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