Docstoc

apdpip_endterm_report_and_tables00004

Document Sample
apdpip_endterm_report_and_tables00004 Powered By Docstoc
					their counterparts in the control area and across the districts also. In the programme area,
nearly 70% of the SHG leaders visit bank to deposit the amount. This percentage is higher in
Srikakulam and Adilabad too. However, in Anantapur, a higher percentage of members visit
banks on rotation (Table 1.16). In the programme areas and in the districts, a higher percentage
of leaders visit banks for withdrawal of cash. From the data on the distribution of CIF funds,
around 57% of the SHGs received CIF in the programme areas as against 54% in the control
areas. It is in Adilabad district that around 73% of the SHGs received CIF followed by
Anantapur (61%) and Srikakulam (39%) (Table 1.16). For 93% of the programme participants
as against 90% in the control area in Srikakulam, bank loans are distributed equally. In the
newly formed groups, a higher percentage of leaders visit bank to deposit remittances, and also
withdraw cash in the programme area as a whole as against control area. This is true across the
districts (Table 1.17).

As far as the average annual income and expenditure are concerned, it is more both in the
programme areas and the newly formed SHGs as against the control and the old groups. In
programme areas, it is Rs. 1878 vs. Rs. 94 in the programme areas, while, it is Rs. 2766 in the
new groups as against Rs. 1124 in the old groups. Across the districts, average annual income
is low in Adilabad both in the programme and newly formed groups as against the other two
districts. However, the average annual expenditure is high than the average annual income in
this districting (Rs. 179.65 vs. Rs. 79.79). The average annual income is high in Anantapur
(Rs. 5024 in program areas and Rs. 6682 in newly formed groups) and expenditure is less both
in program area and in the newly formed groups as compared to the average annual income. In
Srikakulam district, in the program area, average annual expenditure is high than the income
(Rs. 263.58 vs. Rs. 177.29) (Table 1.18). Taking into consideration the percentage of SHGs
with surplus income it is around 13% in the program area as a whole. This holds well across
the districts also (Table 1.19).

The case of frequency of conflicts over attendance shows that there around 25% of the SHGs
reported conflicts in the program area as a whole and in the newly formed groups. Similar
trends are observed in frequency of savings related conflicts, fines related conflicts, leadership
related, loans related, repayment related and CIF related conflicts (Table 1.20). With respect to
the resolving of conflicts, by and large, a high percentage of the various conflicts are resolved
internally (Table 1.21).

The percentage of SHGs reporting attrition of members is low in the program area vis-à-vis
control area (33% in the program area as against 36.36% in the control area). Similar is the


                                                9
case with the newly formed groups when compared to the old groups. This is particularly true
across the districts (Table 1.22 and 1.23). Looking at the reasons for members leaving SHGs
the higher percentage of attrition of members from SHGs is due to moving away from the
village or due to the reason that they are no longer interested in the program area as a whole.
This is true across the districts also (Table 1.24). With respect to distribution of members
leaving SHGs by poverty status and social groups in the newly formed groups, from the data, it
is clearly evident that around 34% of the poor households leave SHG in the newly formed
groups as a whole and this is high in Srikakulam (58%) and Anantapur (40%). However, in
Adilabad, around 83% of the not poor left the newly formed SHGs. Among the social
categories, by and large, a higher percentage of BCs left the self-help groups (57% on the
whole, 77% in Srikakulam, 54% in Anantapur and 46% in Adilabad) (Table 1.24).

Taking into consideration, the total savings and bank balances of SHGs, both have increased
over FUS-I in the newly formed groups and program area as a whole. The total savings
increased by Rs. 4353 in the program area and by Rs. 2638 in the newly formed groups over
FUS-I. Across the districts, Anantapur had the highest increase (by Rs. 5942) followed by
Srikakulam (Rs. 5565) and Adilabad (Rs. 1086) in the program area. In the newly formed
groups, the highest increase in total savings is observed in Anantapur (Rs. 7190) followed by
Srikakulam (Rs. 6122) and Adilabad (Rs. 2638) (Table 1.25). With regard to distribution of
SHGs by access to bank loans in the last three years, in the program area as whole, around 30%
of the SHGs has accessed two loans as against 22% in the control area, while in the case of
newly formed groups, around 34% of the SHGs accessed three or more loans as against 29% of
the old groups. Across the districts, in the programme areas of Srikakulam and Anantapur, the
percentage of SHGs accessing two loans and three or more loans is high as against the control
area (Table 1.26), while in Adilabad around 26% of the SHGs accessed two loans as against
20% in the control area. In the newly formed groups, across the districts, around 38% access
one loan as against 27% of the old group, 41% in Anantapur access three or more loans as
against 27% of the old groups (Table 1.26). Looking at the source through which the SHGs
obtain loan, in the program areas and the newly formed groups, higher percentage of SHGs
obtain loans from bank (Table 1.27 and 1.29). The case of repayment of internal loans shows
that the percentage of amount repaid has declined from FUS-I to FUS-II both in the
programme and the control areas which are a cause of concern to the project (Table 1.30). This
is also true across the districts.




                                              10
The data on percentage distribution of members accessing different schemes shows that a
higher percentage of members access RCL, FSL, death and disability insurance now,
irrespective of the economic category (Table 1.34).

1.2 Performance of Village Organizations (VOs) and Mandal Samakhyas (MSs)

Around 62% of the VOs have own building in the program area as against 58% in the control
area in FUS-II and 90% of the VOs are registered as against 88% in the control area and nearly
4% of the VOs file IT returns as against none in the control area. Across the districts, around
45% of the VOs have own building in the program area as against none in the control area in
Anantapur. (Table 1.35). Across the districts, in Adilabad around 63% of the VOs conduct
meetings once in a year in the program areas as against 50% in the control area (1.36). The
percentage distribution of VOs by the frequency of EC meetings shows that in Srikakulam and
Anantapur the frequency of EC meetings conducted every month is more in the program areas
as against the control areas (Table 1.37). 52% of the VOs held monthly meetings in the
program area, while it is 58% in Adilabad, 46% in Anantapur and 57% in Srikakulam (Table
1.39). Percentage of VOs which submitted masanivedikas stood at 87% in the program area in
2006 while it is 83% in Srikakulam, 91% in Anantapur and 50% in Adilabad (Table 1.45).
Higher percentage of VOs has the rule that repayment should be made in meetings in the
program area as a whole and also across the districts (Table 1.46). Similarly a large percentage
of the VOs implement this rule (Table 1.46). In the districts, in Srikakulam and Adilabad, the
average annual income of the VOs is more than the average annual expenditure (Table 1.47).

Out of the registered 13 MSs in Srikakulam and Anantapur, critical rating is done for 7 in
Srikakulam and 2 in Anantapur. By and large, a high percentage of MSc conduct EC meeting
once a month and the average attendance is also high. Similarly, a large percentage of MSs
work with a trained book keeper with the percentage being highest in Srikakulam followed by
Anantapur and Adilabad. A large number of households benefited out of the implementation of
pension distribution by the MSs (Table 1.48). With respect to the performance of MSs on
social issues a large percentage of the MSs have been successful in resolving issues such as
child labor, unsociability and they have also been successful in accessing the government
program and improving the educational institutions and primary health care centres (Table
1.48). MSs have also taken action with respect to Anganwadis and gram pantheist (Table 1.48).
Around 62% of the MSs in Anantapur report surplus income, followed by Adilabad (56%) and
Srikakulam (54%). (Table 1.50).




                                              11

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:0
posted:3/13/2013
language:English
pages:3