ANTHROPOLOGY by mifei

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									COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

BIOLOGY 3530/5530. Marine Biology of Hawaii/ (4). The Hawaiian Islands are the remotest inlands in the world, separated from the nearest major landmass by more than 2,000 miles of open ocean. As a result of this isolation, the Islands possess a unique fauna and flora found nowhere else in the world. Because islands are ideal systems in which to study the processes of speciation, adaptive radiation, coevolution, and extinction, the Hawaiian Islands represent one of the world‟s outstanding models of insular biogeography. In addition, Hawai‟i is the only state in the United States that contains true tropical rainforest. The marine systems on four islands (Oahu, Kauai, BIG Island, and Maui) will be examined and compared. Individuals must know how to swim as we will be snorkeling various sites around the islands. 3531/5531. Conservation Issues of Vietnam and Southeast Asia/(3)(Study Abroad) This course will familiarize the student with the basic conservation issues in modern Vietnam and surrounding areas through a review of geography, biogeography, and human history of the region, identification of conservation priorities within the region, and an examination of methods used to achieve these priorities within the social and economic structure of a developing country. Students will be expected to participate in a lecture segment at ASU, develop a presentation on a selected issue to be presented in Vietnam, and submit a journal and a final paper highlighting both the trip and one strategy of dealing with a particular conservation goal in the region. 3532/5532. Biogeography of Vietnam and Southeast Asia/(3)(Study Abroad) This course will familiarize the student with the diverse array of plants and animals in modern Vietnam and surrounding areas through a review of principles of biogeography, major issues shaping the flora and fauna of the region, and overview of diversity of selected taxonomic groups, identification of conservation priorities for maintaining biodiversity within the region, and an examination of methods used to achieve these priorities within the social and economic structure of a developing country.

3546/. On the Origin of the Origin: A Systematic Analysis of Evolutionary Theory and On the Origin of Species/(1).(Study Abroad) A series of eight 1.5 hr lectures given over the second half of spring semester in which we will discuss Darwin‟s life up to the writing of On the Origin of Species. We will also read

On the Origin of Species and discuss its implications. The purpose of this course is to prepare the students for the field trip course. 3547/.On the Origin of the Origin: A field Course in Darwin’s England/(4).(Study Abroad) During this two-week field trip to England, students will visit Darwin‟s birthplace, various filed sites important to his development as a naturalist, the universities he attended, and also important locations in his adult life, such as the Museum of Natural History, Kew Gardens, and Down House. Students will read Darwin‟s biography and autobiography, as well as portions of On the Origin of Species and Voyage of the Beagle. Prior to the field trip, students will attend lectures on the theory of evolution, the writing of the Origin, and the important historical events that helped shape Darwin‟s development as a naturalist. COMPUTER SCIENCE 3533./ Design of Algorithms/ (3). This course will address time and space complexity of algorithms; techniques for design of correct and efficient sequential algorithms; NP-compete algorithms; parallel algorithms; distributed algorithms; and genetic algorithms. Problem domains include combinatorial algorithms, geometric algorithms, numerical algorithms, algebraic algorithms, and graph algorithms. Prerequisite: CS 3460, Data Structures FOREIGN LANGUAGES & LITERATURE

FOREIGN LANGUAGE 1530. Conversational Irish/(3)(Study Abroad). Students without previous knowledge of the language will learn elementary conversational patterns from qualified instructors. The course is designed to allow students to acquire elementary speaking skills in the Irish language. Can be used for elective credit only. 5530. Technology in the Foreign Language Classroom/(3) FL 5530 incorporates both practical and theoretical perspectives on instructional technologies in the foreign language classroom. Through analysis of recent investigations into the effectiveness of current technologies in language learning, participants will gain an understanding of how these technologies can be used in and outside the classroom to the advantage of students as well as instructors. The course will

also discuss facilitating collaborative and communicative learning using instructional technologies. RUSSIAN 3545. Russia Today/(3).(Study Abroad) This course is aimed at giving the basic outline of key concepts and problems of Russian culture in historical perspective from the state‟s inception to the 20 th century. Russia Today includes discussion and lectures on Russian history, modern politics and ancient Russian culture. SPANISH 3530. Art in Spain/(3) (Study Abroad) This course is an overview of Art in Spain from prehistoric times to the present. The purpose of the class is to acquaint students with Spanish works of art and to elaborate a theory of what makes art in general. 3531. Spain Today/(3)(Study Abroad) This is a study of the main events and ideas of the history and culture of Spain in the twentieth century. This course is designed to acquaint students with the recent history of Spain, with its politics, societal trends, economy and culture. Since this course is taught in Spain as part of the University Summer Program, a considerable amount of information will be derived from the physical monuments, museums, palaces, streets and squares, newspapers, and marketplaces. The particular events will be considered as reflections of a peculiar Spanish history and as contributions as well as to the formation of the new attitude of today‟s Spaniard in private and in public.

3546. Ancient and Modern Chinese Culture/(3). This course is a study of the philosophy, religions, language, art, meditation, martial arts, politics, history, and other elements that form the basis of the Chinese world-view.

GEOGRAPHY & PLANNING

3140/5530. Mountain Geography/(3).(Study Abroad)

This course explores the physical and human dimensions of mountain environments. Specific topics include: global changes in mountain environments, mountain meteorology, mountain hazards, glacial processes, mountain people and cultures, health and health care, human adaptation of mountains, and sustainable mountain development. Case studies are drawn from mountain regions around the world, especially the Appalachians, Andes, and Himalayas, with regional emphasis varying by the instructor. (Note: for Summer 1, 2009, the course will focus on and be taught in the Andes of Ecuador.) 3531/5531. Climate and Tropical Glaciers/(3). This course will examine recent trends in the extent, altitudinal range, and mass balance of glaciers in the central and northern Andes. A primary focus of the course will be the connections that exist between the climatic driving forces and glacier dynamics in the region. GEOLOGY

3530. Paleontology Field and Museum Methods in the Triassic/(2). This course combines paleontological field and museum work to investigate topics related to the origin of dinosaurs during the Triassic. Trip involves multiple nights camping in the field collecting geological and paleontological data followed by time at a major natural history museum preparing fossils and archiving data. Specific techniques covered will include field orientation using GPS and topographic maps, rock identification, stratigraphic description and mapping, paleontological reconnaissance and fossil collection. Physically demanding with exposure to high temperatures and altitude, with other extreme weather events possible. Prerequisite: GLY 1101 & 2250 or permission of instructor. GLY 2745 preferred.

GOVERNMENT & JUSTICE STUDIES 3535. “Washington at Work”/(3). This course is designed to combine an academic view of the actors and institutions in our nation‟s capitol with a hands-on exploration of Washington, D.C. Washington at Work is a 3 hour credit course in the Department of Political Science and Criminal Justice and will include both classroom teaching and readings, an examination, a term paper and a journal of the students‟ experiences in Washington, D.C. 5535. “Washington at Work”/(3).

This course examines the crossroads between politics and academic research through a combination of classroom instruction, independent research and meetings with private and public officials in Washington, D.C. The class begins with a review of research on Washington politics, followed by a week in our nation‟s capitol, where students will meet with several political actors (Members of Congress, Executive and Legislative Staff, Lobbyists and members of the Washington media) in order to conduct interviews and research on topics related to the course. Requirements for the course will include classroom instruction, required readings, a 15-20 page research project and an exam. HISTORY

3530. Nationalism in South Asia/(3). Nationalism in South Asia provided the basis for the anti-colonial movements which brought political independence and nationhood to India and Sri Lanka and the formation of the new nation of Pakistan, while post-colonial nationalism has continued to play a role in state formation. This course examines the role which nationalism has played in the formation of political development of the nations and states of South Asia. It examines nationalist forces in anti-colonial struggles, in post-colonial state formation and in contemporary political developments. It will be of relevance to students with an interest in political developments in Asia, with particular reference to forms of nationalism and nation-building. 3531. The Nazi Holocaust/(3).(Study Abroad) In this course students will examine the nature and meaning of the Nazi Holocaust. Class discussions will focus on the changing position of Jews in European society; the character of traditional racial anti-Semitism in Europe; the role of anti-Semitism in the rise of Hitler and the Nazis; the nature of the Third Reich and its racial policies; the implementation of the Final Solution; the experience of the ghettoes, camps, death, and survival; collaboration and resistance in the Holocaust; and the meaning of the Holocaust for us today. The students will visit places in Germany, France, and Austria where the Holocaust took place. 3532. Film and The Holocaust/(3).(Study Abroad) This course will trace the major stages of the Nazi Holocaust through film. It will examine anti-Semitism prior to 1933; the evolution of Nazi policy after 1933; the program of mass murder during World War II; Jewish responses to the Holocaust; the behavior of bystanders, such as the Catholic Church, anti-Nazi Europeans and the US Government; and the role of rescuers such as Oskar Schindler. Visits will be made to sites in Europe covered in the documentary and feature films. The goal of this course is to provide a visual and

documentary underpinning to the analysis of the Holocaust, and to develop viewing skills that will enable participants to analyze and evaluate films about the Holocaust more effectively. 3533. History and Archaeology of Daily Life in Early Ireland/(3).(Study Abroad) Students will research a specific place in Irish history, one with both primary historical records and archaeological excavation reports available. They will learn to analyze and evaluate primary sources, and to use information from a site report to balance the claims made in their primary sources. They will learn the strengths and weaknesses of both types of sources, and see how looking at different kinds of records can give a historian a more complete picture of the past than by only using one type of source. We will visit each site and it will be the students‟ job to teach each other about the history and sources for the history of that site. Some will be currently under excavation, so we will meet with local historians and archaeologists whenever possible. 3535. Germany in Europe from the Middle Ages to Reunification/(3).(Study Abroad) This course is to be taught in Trier, Germany. The class will examine German politics, culture, and environment from the Middle-Ages to Reunification. 3549. Germany’s Place in a Changing World/(3).(Study Abroad) This is an interdisciplinary course, which introduces students to the historical, economic, cultural, linguistic, sociological, and educational issues facing Germany today. Each participating professor will teach a specific theme in his field of experience and area that relates to Germany. Students will discuss these themes in different modes of inquiry necessary for a comprehensive and interdisciplinary understanding of the topic at hand and will write a research paper in the academic area the credit will be awarded. 5206. Readings Seminar in American History/(3). In 1988, historian Gordon S. Wood wrote, “Until very recently the period from the American Revolution to the election of Andrew Jackson (1828) was the most neglected if not the most despised period of American history.” Yet this period would seem to be the most critical in understanding why America developed like it has. How can we explain that great irony? During the semester we will take on the question posed by Wood as well as read some of the most recent works on the period analyzing the author‟s arguments, style, sources and content. 5406. Environmental History of Africa/(3). This course will examine the interplay between African people and their natural surroundings in the last 300 years. The course is a reading exercise and will involve rapid reading of excellent textbooks written by the best authors in the field of environmental

studies and a critical review of selected documentary films. The course will be organized thematically and examine issues that have plagued Africa in recent years such as environmental degradation, deforestation, desertification fuel crisis, food insecurity and population explosion. POLITICAL SCIENCE 3530. Popular Culture and the 1 st Amendment/(3). This course will focus on the free speech guarantees of the 1 st Amendment and corresponding efforts to limit expression that is perceived as socially harmful. Particular attention will be paid to areas of popular culture that consistently provoke demands for censorship. For example, the photos of Robert Mapplethorpe, pop and rap music and a number of films will be discussed in an effort to both understand the role of the 1 st Amendment and the problematic natue of expression in contemporary American society. 3535. “Washington at Work”/(3). This course is designed to combine an academic view of the actors and institutions in our nation‟s capitol with a hands-on exploration of Washington, D.C. Washington at Work is a 3 credit hour course in the Department of Political Science and Criminal Justice and will include both classroom teaching and readings, an examination, a term paper and a journal of the students‟ experiences in Washington, D.C. 5535. “Washington at Work”/(3). This course examines the crossroads between politics and academic research through a combination of classroom instruction, independent research and meetings with private and public officials in Washington, D.C. The class begins with a review of research on Washington politics, followed by a week in our nation‟s capitol, where students will meet with several political actors (members of Congress, Executive and Legislative staff, lobbyists and members of the Washington media) in order to conduct interviews and research on topics related to the course. Requirements for the course will include classroom instruction, required readings, a 15-20 page research project and an exam.

PHILOSOPHY & RELIGION Religion 3530. Chinese Culture of Yesteryear/(3).(Study Abroad)

This course introduces students to traditional Chinese religion, history, and culture as it exists in conversation with the modern world, and their interactions both past and present. The site that we will visit will provide historical background, cultural context, and physical reality to the experiential, problem-based course focus. Students will work to demonstrate their ability to think critically and analytically about Chinese religion, history, and culture and their ability to successfully engage with and interpret ancient and modern Chinese ideas and material culture that we encounter. This course is integrated with REL 3531 China in the World Today. 3531. China in the World Today/(3).(Study Abroad) This course has the major goal of introducing students to modern Chinese religion, history, and culture. Students will work to demonstrate their abilities to think critically and analytically about Chinese religion, history, and culture – and their integration – both past and present, and their successful engagement with interpreting ancient and modern Chinese ideas and material culture that we encounter. We expect our students to gain an initial understanding of the global impact of Chinese process – how the society works internally and interacts with the external world. This course is integrated with REL 3530 Chinese Culture of Yesteryear. SOCIOLOGY 3549. Germany’s Place in a Changing World/(3).(Study Abroad) This is an interdisciplinary course, which introduces students to the historical, economic, cultural, linguistic, sociological, and educational issues facing Germany today. Each participating professor will teach a specific theme in his field of experience and area that relates to Germany. Students will discuss these themes in different modes of inquiry necessary for a comprehensive and interdisciplinary understanding of the topic at hand and will write a research paper in the academic area the credit will be awarded. 4560 Race and Minority Relations. (3). (Study Abroad) This course examines the historical and current processes of intergroup relations, including racial, ethnic, and cultural issues; the bases of conflict, accommodation, and assimilation; the nature and consequences of prejudice and discrimination; and the evaluation of proposals for reduction or elimination of prejudice and discrimination. While in Germany, this course will also evaluate race and ethnic relations within the European perspective, specifically tackling issues of colonialism, genocide, and immigration. 3564. Social Problems in an African Society/(3)/(Study Abroad) This course will explore current and historical social problems facing Ghana and its region of Africa.

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS
BUSINESS 3545. International Entrepreneurship in Spain/(3).(Study Abroad) This short course will take place at the University of Alicante in Alicante, Spain. Appalachian State University students will be matched with Spanish and other European students to work on business plans together. The course will include lectures on entrepreneurship, business plan development and international business, a significant group project, company visits, and sightseeing in the coastal area of the Costa Blanca (Southern Spain). COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 3536. Visual Web Design/(3). This course will provide students with the opportunity to obtain computer skills, knowledge, and abilities in the use of Web Page Design through lecture, lab assignments and practical applications. HTML, Dreamweaver, Photoshop, and Flash will be the software utilized during the class. 3537 E-commerce Systems/(3). This course will provide students with the opportunity to discuss the nature of online actions and sales, buyer and seller rights both domestic and internationally and the design of online business (selling) strategies and dynamics. The goal of the class is to conduct research and experiments to understand the buyer and seller interactions of online auctions and how technology is used.

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
CURRICULUM & INSTRUCTION

3538. Adolescent Sexuality and Family Life Education/(3) This course covers reproductive anatomy/physiology, puberty, body image, sexual identity/orientation, families, love, dating, marriage, divorce, parenting, values, decision making, resources, abstinence, intimate sexual behavior, contraception, HIV/AIDS and STD‟s, sexual abuse, gender roles, influence of media, influence of drugs and alcohol on sexual risk taking, and teaching methods with training in effective curricula. Graduate credit requires an additional assignment.

3539. Community Development in Adolescent Sexuality/Risk Reduction/(3). This course will include status of teen sexual behavior and risk taking, adolescent pregnancy and other consequences, socio-cultural factors, needs assessment, program planning, public school and public health, social, media, and legislative advocacy. Graduate credit requires an additional assignment. 3540. Integrating Multimedia and Technology into Teaching and Training/(3). This course is designed to increase the knowledge of integrating multimedia and technology into teaching and training of adult learners through the use of evidence-based practices and research. 5540. Integrating Multimedia and Technology into Teaching and Training/(3).

This course is designed to increase the knowledge of integrating multimedia and technology into teaching and training of adult learners through the use of evidence-based practices and research. Students enrolled in this course are required to prepare and submit a training plan by course end. COMMUNICATION DISORDERS

5531. Professional Ethics/(3) This course provides a theoretical overview of the clinical principles and guidelines in communication disorders. Ethical considerations relative to best practice in a variety of clinical settings will be highlighted using a case study approach. Assigned readings and discussion of current research will emphasize 1) scope of practice, professional competencies, professional organizations, ethics, and liability; 2) employment issues including workforce issues and support personnel; 3) working with special populations; 4) health care legislation, education policy, and service delivery; 5) policies, procedures, leadership skills, communication skills, culturally and linguistically diverse populations, the supervisory process, and conflict management. 5542. Pediatric Dysphagia/(1). This course will discuss the speech and swallowing disorders that are commonly associated with various childhood conditions, including cleft palate and other craniofacial anomalies, cerebral palsy, Down Syndrome, and developmental apraxia of speech. 5543. Artificial Airways/(1).

This course will provide detailed information about the impact of artificial airways on speech and swallowing function, modifications to assessment methods to address the presence of artificial airways, and management strategies that maximize communication effectiveness and swallowing safety.

5544. EBD Sensorimotor Interventions/(1). This course will discuss the theoretical foundations and empirical evidence for sensorimotor treatments. This course will describe the nature of sensorimotor impairments associated with speech and swallowing disorders (ASHA III – C). We will discuss the theoretical foundations for sensorimotor treatments, including the unique responses of the oropharyngeal musculature to these treatments (ASHA III –D). There will also be a discussion of the level of evidence available to support the use of sensorimotor treatments for improving speech and swallowing function(ASHA III – F).

5547. Cleft Palate/(1). This course will discuss the speech and swallowing disorders that are commonly associated with various childhood conditions, including cleft palate and other craniofacial anomalies, cerebral palsy, Down Syndrome, and developmental apraxia of speech.

COLLEGE OF FINE AND APPLIED ARTS

DANCE 3280. Yoga As Somatic Practice/(2) This course will examine the basic principles o the physical practice of yoga known as Hatha Yoga. The course will explore the practice of asanas (sustained postures) and vinyasas (swquences of postures connected to breath), pranayama (breathing exercises) and pratyahara, (meditation practices). Students will also be introducted to the philosophy and history of Hatha yoga.

HEALTH, LEISURE AND EXERCISE SCIENCE Recreation Management 3243. Cruise Line Industry/(3)

This program is designed to acquaint students with the process of operating a cruise ship with multiple international destinations (Bahamas, St. Thomas and St. Maarten). The course will take place on Freedom of the Seas, one of the largest ships in the industry. Freedom-class ships offer more services than most cruise ships and Royal Caribbean is considered to be one of the market leaders in terms of service quality. Topics to be covered include: Who Cruises and Why, The Anatomy of a Cruise Ship, The Cruise Experience, Who‟s Who in Cruising, The Pre, and Post, and Off-Ship Cruise Experience, The Geography of Cruising, Profiling the Lines, Selling Cruises, and Cruise Marketing. 3244. Coastal Tourism/(3) This is a field course designed to acquaint students firsthand with the many aspects of the coastal tourism product along the southern coastline of the United States. We will visit a number of sites and settings that play a role in tourism development and delivery. 3545. Russia/(3) Students in this program will have the opportunity to increase cultural understanding and international exchange, to gain practical experience in understanding youth development practices, to stimulate thoughtful reflection and service-learning in conjunction with practical experience, to gain Russian language skills and appreciation through immersion, to learn about social welfare systems in the post-soviet era, and to provide technical assistance to Russian summer camps. THEATRE AND DANCE

2005. Page and Stage/(3) In this class, students will learn techniques for analyzing and interpreting written dramatic texts and theatrical performances. They will analyze and interpret plays of different styles from various historical periods, with particular attention to the unique characteristics of drama as a medium for telling stories. 3548. Film & Digital Video Workshop/(3) This workshop will introduce students to the experience of film and video production. Students will explore the realm of Independent Narrative Filmmaking using 16mm and 35mm film equipment. The class will be conducted by industry professionals. 3640. Solo and Group Performance/(3) The program will focus on developing performance and teaching skills with practical applications in a Jamaican school. We will also be learning about the Jamaican and

Caribbean cultures while staying at a family owned and operated guesthouse. See VIJON for more information at http://www.italjamaica.com/1VIJON.htm.

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE CENTER FOR APPALACHIAN STUDIES 2410. Appalachian: An Introduction/(3).(Study Abroad) This course explores the Appalachian region from a cross-disciplinary perspective, with readings on Appalachia drawn primarily from the humanities. Both historical and contemporary issues are examined, focusing upon national and international as well as local and regional context. This course provides an introduction to the Bachelor of Art degree in Appalachian Studies and to the undergraduate minor in Appalachian Studies. Students who take AS 2410 cannot take AS 2411 for credit. (WRITING; MULTICULTURAL; CROSS DISCIPLINARY) (CORE: HUMANTIES) 4900. Internship/(6). (Study Abroad) This course focuses on the political, cultural and economic transformation of Welsh society in historical and anthropological contexts. Course includes ethnographic study of rural community changes and renewal, internship with local organizations, oral history interviews with community elders, scholarly and tourism-based presentation on Welsh history and culture, participation in social and cultural events, and observing political activity associated with the National Assembly for Welsh. Program dates May 26-June 24, 2009. Program cost without tuition $2346.00 (airfare not included) 5110. Postindustrial Wales/(6).(Study Abroad) This course focuses on the political, cultural and economic transformation of Welsh society in historical and anthropological contexts. Course includes ethnographic study of rural community changes and renewal, internship with local organizations, oral history interviews with community elders, scholarly and tourism-based presentation on Welsh history and culture, participation in social and cultural events, and observing political activity associated with the National Assembly for Welsh. Program dates May 26-June 24, 2009. Program cost without tuition $2346.00 (airfare not included)

GLOBAL STUDIES PROGRAM 2000. Contemporary Global Issues/(3).

This course examines a selection of global issues from a variety of perspectives and disciplines. Students will be exposed to the complexities of these issues which are the result of the confluence of historical, geographical, economic, cultural, and political factors; emphasis will be placed on how different societies view global issues, as well as how different perspectives can alter one‟s understanding of them. (MULTICULTURAL; CROSS-DISCIPLINARY).

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES PROGRAM 2530. New Zealand/(3).(Study Abroad). Students will spend three weeks on an expeditionary learning adventure on the South Island of New Zealand. Components of the expedition include: an overnight Marae stay examining Maori traditions and culture; four days sea kayaking in Abel Tasman National Park; an eight day backcountry traverse of the Tasman Mountains in Kahurangi National Park including trekking, exploring rugged peaks, and wilderness whitewater rafting; an overnight farm stay with rural New Zealand family farmers; and learning opportunities from large cities to small villages including Christchurch, Nelson, Karamea, and Maruia Springs. During this expedition, students will be introduced to: the skills, judgment, and organization needed to successfully implement a multi-week international expedition; the complex historical and contemporary issues surrounding Maori and European cultures and their influences on one another; and the environmental and cultural sensitivity issues related to this type of travel experience. We will also have guest lectures by CPIT faculty on a variety of topics pertaining to New Zealand. 3261. Sustainability, Religion, & Spirituality/(3). Since Lynn White‟s groundbreaking article in 1967, debate has raged among scholars, activists, and members of religious communities about the role(s) of religion and of specific religions in fostering unsustainability and in achieving sustainability. As part of this debate, some have proposed the existence and importance of a spirituality unconnected with historical or new religions as a key component of moving toward sustainability. This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to these questions both in their historical and contemporary forms. 3300. Seminar I: Theory on Film/(3) This course will offer an introduction to contemporary poststructuralist theory through film. The principle texts for the class will be feature-length documentary films on some major theorists including Derrida, Lacan, Butler and Zizek. Along the way, we will be reading and writing reviews of the films and discussing the ways in which these theories have been translated into the medium of film. We will read some theory too. In addition to writing and talking about these films, you will also produce and present your own You Tube video of theory on film.

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

2400. Principles of Sustainable Development/(3) This course is the foundation course for students interested in pursuing a major or minor in Sustainable Development. The course will introduce students to the concepts and history of „development,‟ the origins of concerns about „sustainability,‟ and the marriage of these two ideas in the contested notion of „sustainable development‟ (SD). From that basis, the course will then examine the understanding and use of SD principles in and from various disciplinary and multi/interdisciplinary perspectives. SD 2400. (CROSSDISCIPLINARY) 3300. Agroforestry & Farm Forestry System/(4).(Study Abroad). Agroforestry has been defined by the World Agroforestry Center (20000) as “A dynamic, ecologically based management practice that integrates trees and other tall woody plants in the agricultural landscape to diversify production for increased social, economic and environmental benefits.” This course will focus on the principles, complexity and diversity of agrogorestry systems to enhance land productivity and sustainability and discuss the social and economic benefits of such systems for farmers, communities and society. Emphasis will be on agroforestry systems for the humid tropical zone of Eastern Madagascar, in particular on soil and soil conservation aspects of agroforestry, plant interactions, and the spatial (above and below ground) and temporal arrangements of components. 3530. Natural Resource and Environmental Issues in the Humid Zone of Madagascar/(3).(Study Abroad) Madagascar is recognized internationally as a critical reservoir of biodiversity; home to many unique, endemic species of plants and animals found nowhere else on earth. Due to population growth and development, the humid tropical zone of Madagascar is undergoing rapid social and environmental changes, including extensive deforestation, habitat loss, and loss of biodiversity in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. In this course we will study the complex forces driving the pressures on natural resources across a transect from sea-level to the high mountains plateau of Eastern Madagascar. Through field visits to national parks, special reserves, protected areas, community managed forest, ecotourism sites, and sustainable agriculture projects, among others, we will examine the ecological, economic, political and social viability of different strategies for managing and conserving these forests used by various government agencies and national/international conservation organizations

4200. Ecologically-Based Pest Management/(4).

Applied principles of ecologically-based integrated pest management in agricultural, landscape and other environments, cultural, biological, mechanical/physical, preventive, and organically approved chemical control methods will be featured, with an emphasis on practical ecosystem-based strategies that feature biologically-based controls as the cornerstone of ecological pest management. Lecture three hours, laboratory two hours.


								
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