Working Near our Loads by TPenney

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									Working Near our Loads
            Risks/Hazards may arise as a result of:
The nature and type of services performed the
  location of the work materials, chemicals or
equipment used the time of the work proximity
   to the public or other contractors the work
                  environment.
Vehicular incidents don’t just happen when the vehicle is running:
• “As you approach the vehicle, take a look around. Make sure it’s
  secure. Don’t get under, in front of or behind a truck or piece of
  heavy equipment if there’s any chance at all that it could move.”
• “As you approach the vehicle, take a look around. Make sure it’s
  secure. Don’t get under, in front of or behind a truck or piece of
  heavy equipment if there’s any chance at all that it could move.” “A
  load can shift while in transit, so use caution when you open cargo
  doors or release tie-downs. Open only one side of a van trailer and
  stand behind the other latched door. This will give you some
  protection from any falling cargo.”
• Be aware of the condition of the vehicle. Now would be a better time
  to notice a defect than when you’re miles down the road or in the
  middle of a critical operation.
• Make sure that there are no loose objects that could hit you if you
  start or stop abruptly.
Take the Trucker Stance
       on Safety
1. As you approach the vehicle cab,
eyeball the footholds. Dirt or grease
could cause you to slip and fall.
2. Enter the cab with one foot on the
ground, one on the truck’s foothold
and one hand on the handhold.
3. Exit by climbing out backward, as if
you were using a ladder. Never jump
out of the cab.”
“Do a little personal inventory. Are you
fit to operate a heavy truck or piece
heavy equipment? If you’re too
fatigued, hung over, distracted or
preoccupied to perform safely, you’re
putting yourself as well as others at
risk”.

								
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