Ap French Review by DynamiteKegs

VIEWS: 1,682 PAGES: 13

									                                AP FRENCH LANGUAGE


COURSE OVERVIEW

In this course, students are trained to become proficient in the four language skills 
(listening, speaking, reading, and writing) at a level commensurate with that of a third 
year college course.  The fifth skill, culture, is treated as an integral part of the other four 
skills. 

With rare exceptions (when a brief explanation or clarification is required in English), 
this course is conducted entirely in French.  

COURSE TEXTS AND MATERIALS

    •   The Ultimate French Review and Practice, by David M. Stillman & Ronni L. 
        Gordon.  Passport Books: NTC/Comtemporary Publishing Group, 1999.
    •   Moments Littéraires:  Anthologie pour cours intermédiare, by Bette G. Hirsch & 
        Chantal P. Thompson.  D.C. Heath and Company, 1998.
    •   Le Petit Nicolas, Sempé et Goscinny, Editions Denoel, 1960.
    •   L’Express (magazine) : www.lexpress.fr., and photocopied from paper version.
    •   Le Petit Prince, Antoine de Saint­Exupéry, Editions Gallimard 1946, 1987 (Folio 
        Junior Edition Spéciale).
    •   AP French :  Preparing for the Language Exam, Second Edition, Richard Ladd 
        & Colette Girard.  Prentice Hall/Scott Foresman Addison Wesley, 1998.
    •   Champs­Elysées, Audio CD, Transcription booklet, Study supplement (with 
        another CD of audio exercises) :   three­month subscription 2006­2007 : Série 
        No. 23, numéros 6, 7 & 8.
    •   Le Petit Nicolas, CD Audio, Gallimard Jeunesse (Textes Lus), 3/04.
    •   Le Petit Prince, CD Audio, Gallimard Jeunesse (Textes Lus), 4/06.
    •   Le Petit Prince, DVD (2003), Spectacle Musical, d’après l’œuvre d’Antoine de 
        Saint­Exupéry.  Musique, Richard Cocciante; Paroles, Elizabeth Anais; Acteurs, 
        Daniel Lavoie, Jeff.
    •   TV5 (excerpted news and other shows taped at home and viewed in class).
    •   www.tv5.org
                      
    •    
        www.radiofrance.fr/reportage/dossier/stexupery/prince.php   
    •   www.saint­exupery.org
                                
    •    
        http://www.richmond.edu/~jpaulsen/petitprince/conseilprof.html   
    •   http://www.richmond.edu/~jpaulsen/petitprince/petitprince.html
                                                                        
    •    
        www.paroles.net  (song lyrics)
    •   www.rfi.fr
                  
    •    
        www.bonjourdefrance.com    
    •   CD recordings of songs
    •   Released AP Exams (from apcentral and full versions from 1993, 1998, and 
        2003).

COURSE PLANNER


Week 1: Fall Semester begins
  • Overview of course and AP Exam
  • Present tense (regular & irregular verbs), Ultimate (Chaps. 1, 2, 8 [Reflexive 
      verbs]); Use of  depuis + present.
  • L’alphabet

Week 2
  • Negation ; Interrogative ; Imperative, Ultimate (Chaps. 3, 4, 5).
  • La phonétique : Review rules of liaison, silent letters, etc.
  • AP Practice : Speaking : Introduce speaking portion of AP Exam,
      discuss strategies, practice.
  • “La cigale et la fourmi,” La Fontaine (Moments Littéraires, pp. 69­72).
  • Discuss writing techniques, outlining, and strategies for writing essay, practice 
      exercises.
  • Essay

Week 3
  • Imparfait & Passé Composé, Ultimate (Chaps. 6 & 7).
  • La phonétique
  • AP Practice : Listening : Introduce listening portion of AP Exam, discuss 
      strategies, practice.
  • “Le Loup et l’agneau,” La Fontaine (Moments Littéraires, pp. 72­74).
  • TV5 telecast
  • Oral Presentation

Week 4
  • Object Pronouns, Ultimate (Chap. 18).
  • AP Listening exchanges (Ladd).
  • AP Speaking practice: Picture sequence
   •   “Ode à Cassandre,” Ronsard (Moments Littéraires, pp. 49­51).
   •   Essay

Week 5
  • Future Tense ; “If” clause (1st type), Ultimate (Chap. 9).
  • AP Listening exchanges (Ladd).
  • AP Speaking practice: Picture sequence.
  • Champs­Elysées (Série 23, No. 7), “250ème anniversaire de la naissance de 
      Lafayette.”
  • “Heureux qui, comme Ulysse, a fait un beau voyage,” du Bellay (Moments  
      Littéraires, pp. 46­49).

Week 6
  • Conditional ; “If clause” (conditional­imparfait), Ultimate (Chap. 9).
  • AP Listening exchanges (Ladd).
  • AP Speaking practice : Picture sequence.
  • « Le temps a laissé son manteau… » Charles d’Orléans (Moments Littéraires, pp.
      33­34).
  • End­of­Marking period testing : Reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar, 
      listening ; AP Speaking practice test (picture sequence).

Week 7
  • Past conditional; pluperfect; “If ”clauses; future perfect, Ultimate (Chap. 10).
  • AP Listening exchanges (Ladd).
  • AP Speaking practice: Questions type 2 & 3.
  • Champs­Elysées (Série 23, no. 7), “Ce que cache le sourire de la Joconde.”
  • Essay
   
Week 8
  • Passé simple, Ultimate (Chap. 11).
  • AP Listening exchanges (Ladd).
  • AP Speaking practice : Questions type 2 & 3.
  • Le Petit Nicolas, “Le Bouillon,” (pp. 22­29) ; CD audio



Week 9
  • Present participles; Uses of the infinitive, Ultimate (Chap. 12).
  • AP Listening exchanges (Ladd).
   •   AP Speaking practice: Questions type 2 & 3.
   •   TV5 telecast
   •   Essay

Week 10
  • Relative clauses, Ultimate (Chap. 23).
  • AP Listening exchanges (Ladd)
  • AP Speaking practice: Questions type 2 & 3.
  • Le Petit Nicolas, « Rex, » (pp. 48­55) ; CD audio
  • Oral Presentation 

Week 11
  • Relative clauses (Cont’d.), Ultimate (Chap. 23).
  • AP Listening exchanges (Ladd).
  • AP Speaking practice: Questions type 2 & 3.
  • « Ces nouveaux animaux de compagnie », par Marine Batiste, L’Express du 
      09/08/2001, www.lexpress.fr.
  • Essay

Week 12
  • The present subjunctive, Ultimate (Chap. 24).
  • AP Listening exchanges (Ladd).
  • AP Speaking practice : Questions type 2 & 3
  • End­of­marking period testing : Reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar, listening; 
      AP Speaking practice test (Quest. Type 2 or 3).

Week 13
  • The past subjunctive; literary subjunctives, Ultimate (Chap. 25).
  • AP Listening dialogues (Ladd).
  • AP Speaking practice: Compare/Contrast (Question type 4).
  • Le Petit Nicolas,  « Je fume, » (pp. 94­102) ; CD audio
  • Essay 

Week 14
  • The subjunctive (Cont’d.), Ultimate (Chap. 26).
  • AP Verb fill­in practice: Discuss strategy and practice.
  • AP Listening dialogues (Ladd).
  • AP Speaking practice: Compare/Contrast (Question type 4).
   •   “Marilyse, l’anticlope,” par Elise Doàn, L’Express du 20/4/2006, p. 45.
   •   TV5 telecast
   •   Oral Presentation

Week 15
  • Stressed pronouns; subject­verb agreement; Possessive and demonstrative 
      adjectives and pronouns; Interrogative adjectives and pronouns, Ultimate, Chaps. 
      14­16.
  • AP Verb fill­ins.
  • AP Listening dialogues (Ladd).
  • AP Speaking practice: Compare/Contrast (Question type 4).
  • Champs­Elysées (Série 23, no. 7), « Evelyne Pagès rencontre Françoise 
      Montenay, présidente de Chanel et du comité Colbert. »

Week 16
  • Passive voice and substitutes for the passive, Ultimate (Chap. 27).
  • AP Verb fill­ins.
  • AP Listening dialogues (Ladd).
  • AP Speaking practice: Compare/Contrast (Question type 4).
  • Essay

Week 17
  • Adjectives; comparative and superlative, Ultimate (Chap. 17).
  • AP Verb fill­ins.
  • AP Listening dialogues (Ladd).
  • AP Speaking practice: Compare/Contrast (Question type 4).
  • Le Petit Nicolas, “Les carnets,” (pp. 73­79) ; audio CD

Week 18
  • Adverbs, Ultimate (Chap. 20).
  • AP Verb fill­ins.
  • AP Listening dialogues (Ladd).
  • AP Speaking practice: Compare/Contrast (Question type 4).
  • Speaking assessment: AP Question type 4 (counted as part of final exam).
  • Semester review for final exam (fall semester).

Weeks 19
   •   Final Exam (fall semester): Reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar, listening, 
       speaking.

Week 20
  • School­wide standardized testing

Week 21: Spring semester begins
  • Prepositions; prepositions with geographical names, Ultimate (Chap. 22)
  • Review final exam from fall semester
  • AP Verb fill­ins.
  • AP Function­word fill­ins.  Discuss strategies, practice.
  • AP Listening: Released exams.
  • AP Speaking practice: Question type 5.
  • AP Reading Comp.: Released exam samples.  Discuss strategies, practice.
  • “Discrets petits frères,” par Natacha Czerwinski, L’Express du 20/4/06, p. 45.

Week 22
  • Negatives and indefinites, Ultimate (Chap. 21).
  • AP Verb fill­ins.
  • AP Function­word fill­ins.
  • AP Listening: Released exams.
  • AP Speaking practice: Question type 5.
  • AP Reading Comps: Released exam practice.
  • TV5 telecast
  • “Service civique, belle utopie?”  par Gilbert Charles, L’Express du 9/2/2006, p. 
      38.
  • Essay

Week 23
  • Nouns : gender, number, articles ; uses of articles, Ultimate (Chap. 13).
  • AP Verb fill­ins.
  • AP Function­word fill­ins.
  • AP Listening: Released exams.
  • AP Speaking practice: Question type 5.
  • AP Reading Comps: Released exam practice.
  • Champs­Elysées (Série 23, no. 6), « Les bistrots à Paris. »
  • Oral Presentation
Week 24
  • Discours direct vs. discours indirect (handouts)
  • AP Verb fill­ins.
  • AP Function­word fill­ins.
  • AP Speaking practice: Question type 5.
  • AP Listening: Released exams.
  • AP Reading Comps: Released exam practice.
  • “Le Pont Mirabeau,” Guillaume Apollinaire (Moments Littéraires, pp. 173­175).
  • Champs­Elysées (série 23, no. 6), “Exposition des photos de Robert Doisneau.”
  • Essay

Week 25
  • Numbers; time; dates, Ultimate (Chap. 19).
  • AP Verb fill­ins.
  • AP Function­word fill­ins.
  • AP Speaking: Question type 5
  • AP Listening: Released exam practice.
  • AP Reading Comps: Released exam practice.
  • « Mon Oncle Jules, » Guy de Maupassant (Moments Littéraires, 144­153).

Week 26
  • AP Verb fill­ins.
  • AP Function­word fill­ins.
  • AP Listening: Released exam practice.
  • AP Reading Comps: Released exam practice.
  • End­of­marking period testing: Reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar, listening;
      AP Speaking test: Question type 5.

Week 27
  • Important idioms and proverbs, Ultimate (Chap. 28).
  • AP Verb fill­ins.
  • AP Function­word fill­ins.
  • AP Listening: Released exam practice.
  • AP Reading Comps: Released exam practice.
  • AP Speaking practice: all question types.
  • TV5 telecast
  • Essay
Week 28
  • AP Verb fill­ins.
  • AP Function­word fill­ins.
  • AP Listening: Released exam practice.
  • AP Reading Comps: Released exam practice.
  • AP Speaking practice: all question types.
  • Champs­Elysées (Série 23, no. 6), « Cyril Lignac, chef cuisinier. »
  • Oral Presentation

Week 29
  • Simulated AP exam: Full­length released AP French Language Exam, given over 
      the course of several class periods.
  • Review and analyze exam results.

Week 30
  • AP Verb fill­ins.
  • AP Function­word fill­ins.
  • AP Listening: Released exam practice.
  • AP Reading Comp. practice.
  • AP Speaking practice: all question types.
  • Le Petit Prince, Saint­Exupéry (Chaps. 1 & 2).
  • Le Petit Prince (audio CD & DVD musical, excerpts).

Week 31
  • AP Verb fill­ins.
  • AP Function­word fill­ins.
  • AP Listening: Released exam practice.
  • AP Reading Comp. practice.
  • AP Speaking practice: all questions types.
  • Le Petit Prince, Saint­Exupéry (Chaps. 3, 4, 5).
  • Le Petit Prince (audio CD & DVD musical, excerpts).
  • Essay

Week 32
  • End­of­marking period Test: Based on Le Petit Prince
  • Le Petit Prince, Saint­Exupéry (Chaps. 6­9).
  • Le Petit Prince (audio CD & DVD musical, excerpts).
Week 33
  • AP Exam
  • Le Petit Prince, Saint­Exupéry (Chaps. 10­13).
  • Le Petit Prince (audio CD & DVD musical, excerpts).

Week 34
  • Le Petit Prince, Saint­Exupéry (Chaps. 14­16).
  • Le Petit Prince (audio CD & DVD musical, excerpts).

Week 35
  • Le Petit Prince, Saint­Exupéry (Chaps. 17­20).
  • Le Petit Prince (audio CD & DVD musical, excerpts).
  • Essay
 
Week 36
  • Le Petit Prince, Saint­Exupéry (Chaps. 21­23).
  • Le Petit Prince (audio CD & DVD musical, excerpts).

Week 37
  • Le Petit Prince, Saint­Exupéry (Chaps. 25­27).
  • Le Petit Prince (audio CD & DVD musical, excerpts).

Week 38
  • Final Exam presentations (culture project).
  • Review

Week 39
  • Final exam week (school­wide).
  • Final exam: Reading, writing, vocabulary, grammar, listening.

Week 40
  • School­wide standardized testing.

COURSE ACTIVITIES AND ASSIGNMENTS


Listening and Speaking
 All class discussion (teacher­students; student­student) is conducted in 
  French.
 The alphabet is reviewed so that we can spell words out in French, as needed.
 Rules of pronunciation are reviewed.  Important features such as the use of the 
  liaison and the rules of silent letters are stressed.
 Weekly listening activities from at least one of the following:  Champs­
  Elysées, TV5 (taped newscast or other show, or online viewing from the 
  computer room of tv5.org), Ladd practice AP Listening, Released  AP Exam 
  listening exercises, audio CD versions of texts being read in class, DVD of Le  
  Petit Prince (spectacle musical), songs.  Listening activities are accompanied 
  by vocabulary lists, answers to comprehension questions are elicited, 
  summaries, reaction and commentary are given by students. Some definitions 
  of vocabulary words are supplied by the teacher to begin an assignment, then 
  students are required to look up the rest of the words, giving definitions in 
  English and in French.  Once students have looked up words at home, 
  definitions are reviewed in class, giving definitions in French (and sometimes 
  English to check comprehension) and discussing related words (root words, 
  faux amis, etc.). Comprehension questions, summary and student commentary 
  are usually done first in groups or in pair work, then shared with the entire 
  class. (This work is done orally as well as in writing.)  Some of the listening is 
  also based on a written text assigned to students.  In this case, students will 
  listen to the piece, at least once without reading, and at least one more time 
  while reading along with the text.  
 Oral readings of all texts are also done.  The teacher reads aloud, followed by 
  some brief choral repetition, students practice reading aloud with a partner, 
  and individual students are called upon to read aloud.  After students have 
  listened to an audio CD of a reading, they will sometimes read aloud with the 
  speaker to try to follow the natural inflection and to keep pace with the native 
  speaker.
 Approximately once a week, impromptu oral tasks, such as debates, role­play 
  skits, round table discussion, simulated news casts, and interviews are 
  performed.  Topics are taken from reading and listening assignments.
 Individual oral presentations (3­4 minutes, once per marking period, 
  approximately once every six weeks) related to topics studied in class are 
  given.  Examples of types of speeches are: how­to; persuasive; descriptive; 
  news report, and personal narrative.
 Dictées are given as whole paragraphs, or as incompleted paragraphs for 
  students to fill in the missing words.  
        Memorization and dramatic interpretation of poems (at least one during the 
         year).
        AP Listening, from Ladd as well as from released AP exams (weekly 
         practice).
        AP Speaking, mainly from released AP exams (weekly practice, using hand­
         held recorders).  Students are also tested at the end of each marking period 
         (every six weeks) using one AP question.

Reading and Writing
       Approximately one reading assignment per week: a poem, short story, 
         newspaper or magazine article, transcript to Champs­Elysées, portion of a 
         novel (Le Petit Prince).  
       For each reading, the procedure corresponds to that mentioned above in the 
         “Listening and Speaking” section. Students are required to look up vocabulary 
         (from handouts), giving definitions in English as well as in French (most of 
         the students use the dictionary on  www.tv5.org), answer comprehension 
         questions, and write summaries and commentaries.  Readings are usually 
         begun in class, with a portion of each text assigned as new reading and/or 
         review for homework, along with the corresponding answers to questions, 
         summaries, etc., written out.
       Weekly grammar review of one major topic.
       Study of linking and transitional terms (handouts).
       Study, analysis, and practice of various types of discourse (expository, 
         narrative, descriptive, persuasive) to be used in writing an essay.
       Analysis of the AP essay question prompts.
       Study of outline preparation.
       Essays (AP­style) are written in class approximately once every two weeks 
         and are to be approximately 250 words in length.  They address a variety of 
         topics gleaned from class readings discussion, as well as from released AP 
         exams. 
       AP Reading passages of released AP Exams and from Ladd are first practiced 
         in class (and are timed) so that students can learn strategies to better 
         comprehend the text and the questions. Once they are comfortable with this 
         portion of the test, passages are assigned as homework.   The reading passages 
         are given at first at least one per week, beginning in the spring semester, and 
         later on more are assigned as the exam approaches.
       Function­word fill­in practice from assigned readings, where students are 
         given a paragraph with function words left out.  This is done almost from the 
         beginning of the fall semester, once every week or two.
        AP Function­word fill­in practice from released exams, beginning in the 
         spring semester (at least one per week, more as the exam approaches).
        Verb fill­in practice from assigned readings, where students are given a 
         paragraph with verbs left out.  This is done almost from the beginning of the 
         fall semester, once every week or two.
        AP Verb fill­in practice from released exams and from Ladd (beginning in the 
         middle of the fall semester, at least one per week, more as the exam 
         approaches).

ASSESSMENTS
      Nightly homework assignments based on readings or grammar.  All 
       homework must by typed.
      Weekly quizzes (at least one per week) covering an aspect of one of that 
       week’s topics (grammar, vocabulary, a reading comprehension question, a 
       paragraph, a dictée, etc.).  The quizzes may be teacher­generated, or may be 
       taken from released AP exams.  
      Weekly impromptu oral tasks (debates, round table, role­play, interview,  etc.) 
       count as a quiz.
      One oral presentation (3­4 minutes) per marking period (once every six 
       weeks).  This counts as an exam.
      A timed essay  is written in class approximately once every two weeks.  Each 
       essay counts as one exam.  Essays are scored out of 100, and are evaluated for 
       content, organization, range and appropriateness of vocabulary, and 
       grammatical accuracy (based on the AP rubric).  Each essay is also given an 
       estimated AP score (9­point scaled score) to help students gauge their 
       readiness for the AP exam.
      End­of­marking period tests (every six weeks) include one AP­style speaking 
       question (counting as a large quiz worth 50 points); multiple choice reading 
       comprehension questions based on class readings; listening comprehension 
       questions (multiple choice or short answer) from listening assignments 
       (Champs­Elysées, TV5, etc.), or from AP released exams; grammar fill­ins, 
       vocabulary (multiple choice or short­answer); a short writing portion (short 
       answers or a paragraph).
      Final Exam (fall semester): similar to end­of­marking period exam.
      Final Exam (spring semester): 50% is similar to certain portions of the end­of­
       marking period exams; the other 50% is a final oral presentation, based on a 
       culture project researched individually by students.
 Simulated AP Exam: Listening, reading, function word fill­in, verb fill­in 
  portions count as quizzes; Speaking and Essay count as exams.
 Report grades are calculated as follows: Exams (including essays) and 
  quizzes: 60%; Class Participation: 20%; Homework: 20%.

								
To top