THE KUNG FU SYSTEM

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THE KUNG FU SYSTEM Powered By Docstoc
					                    Kung Fu System
                         What is Kung Fu

      Kung Fu is a learned skill that was handed down by
generations of masters who wanted to ensure the survival of
  their art. Kung means ”worK” and fu means ”man”, together
   they refer to a discipline that requires time, effort, and
 dedication to reach a high level of skill. Kung Fu generally
meant good workmanship, a architect or even a chef. What the
  west refers to as Kung Fu, among Chinese the proper word is
   “wu shu”(manderin), “mo shu” (Cantonese). Wǔshù literally
  means "martial art". It is formed from the two words 武術: 武
    (wǔ), meaning, "martial" or "military", and 術 (shù), which
translates into "discipline", "skill" or "method." Since it took an
     enormous amount of time to master Wu Shu, it became
 commonplace in certain Chinese Provinces to refer to such an
expert as one who obtained a high level of Kung Fu or master.
In the past Kung Fu was considered as a sexist tradition, even
  women were top masters and warriors. It was an everyday
 life and death matter to be able to protect oneself or ones
                              family.

Basics

 Basics (基本功) are a vital part of the training, as a student
 cannot progress to the more advanced stages without them;
      without strong and flexible muscles including the
  management of the concept of "chi" (breath, or energy) and
  proper body mechanics, many movements of Chinese martial
  arts are simply impossible to perform correctly.    Basics
                                                      [37][38]



 training may involve a series of simple movements that are
  performed repeatedly over a short interval; examples of
    these basics training include stretching, stance work,
  rudimentary conditioning, meditation and basic kicking and
                    punching techniques.

In many Chinese martial arts, meditation is considered to be an
important component of basic training. Meditation can be used
  to develop focus, mental clarity and can act as a basis for
                        qigong training.

Forms

  Forms or taolu (Chinese: 套路; pinyin: tào lù) in Chinese are
  series of predetermined movements combined so they can be
     practiced as one linear set of movements. Forms were
 originally intended to preserve the lineage of a particular
  style branch, and were often taught to advanced students
who were selected to preserve the art's lineage. Forms were
     designed to contain both literal, representative and
exercise-oriented forms of applicable techniques which would
    be extracted, tested and trained by students through
                     sparring sessions. [44]




  Today, many consider forms to be one of the most important
 practices in Chinese martial arts. Traditionally, they played
   a smaller role in training combat application, and were
     eclipsed by sparring, drilling and conditioning. Forms
 gradually build up a practitioner's flexibility, internal and
external strength, speed and stamina, and teach balance and
coordination. Many styles contain forms using a wide range of
   weapons of various length and type, utilizing one or two
 hands. There are also styles which focus on a certain type of
  weapon. Forms are meant to be both practical, usable, and
applicable as well as promoting flow, meditation, flexibility,
  balance and coordination. Teachers are often heard to say
"train your form as if you were sparring and spar as if it were
                            a form."
There are two general types of forms in Chinese martial arts.
Most common are "solo forms" which are performed by a single
     student. There are also "sparring" forms, which are
   choreographed fighting sets performed by two or more
   people. Sparring forms were designed both to acquaint
   beginning fighters with basic measures and concepts of
 combat, and to serve as performance pieces for the school.
 Sparring forms which utilize weapons are especially useful
  for teaching students the extension, range and technique
                required to manage a weapon.



                   NAME OF THE KUNG FU STYLE

 The 5 Petal Plum Blossom Fist Kung Fu Rotating Hand System

                      NAME OF THE SYSTEM

                  The Rotating Hand System



                    NAME OF THE FIRST FORMS

          Plum blossom set #1- chi development form

             Plum blossom set #2- double fist set

             Plum blossom set #3- iron palm set

    Plum blossom set #4- kicks and stance switching form

 Plum blossom set #5- 5 element form and free style drilling

                    Small tiger set form



                  NAMES OF THE ADVANCED FORMS
                      The small plum fist

                        Closing the gap

                       Poison needle fist


                         MEANING OF SIFU

 From Cantonese 師傅 and 師父 sifu, the first meaning master,
the second meaning "my master", both also conveying the sense
                      of father teacher

                        MEANING OF BOWING

An inclination of the head, or a bending of the body, in token of
reverence, respect, civility, or submission; an obeisance; as, a
bow of deep humility. To bend or incline, as the head or body, in
token of respect, gratitude, assent, homage, or condescension.
                      MEANING OF HAND SALUTE

               The Salute: A Gesture of Respect
Martial artists commonly salute when they greet each other.
This is a custom that is an intrinsic part of traditional Chinese
Kung Fu. It is a mutual show of respect for each other's skill,
    knowledge and abilities. In addition, the salute has a
  practical application. Martial artists were always very
 cautious in the old days; handshakes were considered either
  too threatening or an invitation for an attack. Warriors
would try to avoid contact with unscrupulous people, leery of
 surprise attacks. Many Chin Na (joint breaking) techniques
                   begin from a handshake.


  The KUNG FU salute is a distinctly Chinese-style movement.
 Take one step forward with the left foot. The right hand is
clenched in a fist. The left thumb is bent and the four fingers
are stacked and straight. The palm of the left hand is placed
over the fist. Both fist and palm are about 4 to 6 inches from
   the chest, with both elbows bent and the arms forming a
  circle. The hands are held at chest height. The posture is
  erect and the eyes are focused on the person who is being
  saluted. The head is held upright and a slight bow is made
from the shoulders as the hands are slightly extended, still
  pressed together. When your salute is acknowledged, you
 should move your hands back to your sides as you step back
          with your left foot and stand up straight.
*One is to salute when they greet and take leave of their Sifu. This shows
their respect for his or her teachings. They salute their instructors for
the same reason. They are expected to salute when they enter and exit
the Kwoon to show respect for the sacrifices that their teachers made
for the art. Also, they should salute their equals to show that you will
 work together to hone each other's skills. One should always salute
               their teacher before he or she salutes them.




                            THE MEANING OF QI GONG



  Qigong (or ch'i kung) is an internal Chinese meditative practice which
    often uses slow graceful movements and controlled breathing
 techniques to promote the circulation of qi within the human body, and
                 enhance a practitioner's overall health




                             What is Qigong?
 Qigong is an ancient Chinese health care system that integrates physical postures,
                     breathing techniques and focused intention.


The word Qigong (Chi Kung) is made up of two Chinese words. Qi is
 pronounced chee and is usually translated to mean the life
  force or vital-energy that flows through all things in the
                           universe.

          The second word, Gong, pronounced gung, means
 accomplishment, or skill that is cultivated through steady
    practice. Together, Qigong (Chi Kung) means cultivating
   energy, it is a system practiced for health maintenance,
                    healing and increasing vitality.
                       WHAT IS MEDITATION

 Meditation is a mental discipline by which the practitioner
attempts to get beyond the reflexive, "thinking" mind into a
 deeper state of relaxation or awareness. Meditation is a
 component of many religions, and has been practiced since
 antiquity. It is also practiced outside religious traditions.
 Different meditative disciplines encompass a wide range of
 spiritual or psychophysical practices that may emphasize
   different goals—from achievement of a higher state of
     consciousness, to greater focus, creativity or self-
awareness, or simply a more relaxed and peaceful frame of
                              mind.




  Meditation can be practiced while walking or doing simple
    repetitive tasks. Walking meditation helps break down
 habitual automatic mental categories, "thus regaining the
primary nature of perceptions and events, focusing attention
    on the process while disregarding its purpose or final
outcome." In a form of meditation using visualization, such as
         [5]



 Chinese Qi Gong, the practitioner concentrates on flows of
   energy (Qi) in the body, starting in the abdomen and then
     circulating through the body, until dispersed. Some
                                                   [5]



meditative traditions, such as yoga or tantra, are common to
                       several religions.   [6]
                         WHAT IS QI(CHI)

                           Use of qi

  The concept of qì or ch'i (氣/气) is encountered in a number of
    Chinese martial arts. Qi is variously defined as an inner
 energy or "life force" that is said to animate living beings; as
   a term for proper skeletal alignment and efficient use of
  musculature (sometimes also known as fa jin or jin); or as a
 shorthand for concepts that the martial arts student might
not yet be ready to understand in full. These meanings are not
              necessarily mutually exclusive.   [note 2]




    One's qi can be improved and strengthened through the
 regular practice of various physical and mental exercises
known as qigong. Though qigong is not a martial art itself, it
   is often incorporated in Chinese martial arts and, thus,
 practiced as an integral part to strengthen one's internal
                           abilities.

There are many ideas regarding the control of one's qi energy
 to such an extent that it can be used for healing oneself or
  others: the goal of medical qigong. Some styles believe in
   focusing qi into a single point when attacking and aim at
 specific areas of the human body. Such techniques are known
      as dim mak and have principles that are similar to
                         acupressure.  [61]




                     WHAT IS MARTIAL MORALITY

                Martial arts and morality

  Traditional Chinese schools of martial arts, such as the
 famed Shaolin monks, often dealt with the study of martial
 arts not just as a means of self-defense or mental training,
but as a system of ethics.     Wude (武 德) can be translated as
                              [60][36]



"martial morality" and is constructed from the words "wu" (武),
which means martial, and "de" (德), which means morality. Wude
(武德) deals with two aspects; "morality of deed" and "morality
of mind". Morality of deed concerns social relations; morality
 of mind is meant to cultivate the inner harmony between the
    emotional mind (Xin, 心) and the wisdom mind (Hui, 慧). The
  ultimate goal is reaching no extremity (Wuji, 無 極) (closely
 related to the Taoist concept of wu wei), where both wisdom
          and emotions are in harmony with each other.

                          THE WARRIOR CODE

             LOVE, HONOR, RESPECT, LOYALTY, SACRIFICE

   This Chinese character is "wu" (it's "bu" in Japanese, with the same
meaning) which means warrior spirit or military, and it closely identified
                       with Kung Fu (Gong Fu).

    But there is more to the warrior spirit than engaging in
 battle. There are aspects that provide both inner and outer
 dimensions to the overall human spirit that would otherwise
   leave us incomplete. While our just longing for peace and
 harmony might prompt us to reject anything associated with
                 war, we do so only at our peril.
      Medieval chivalry represented a turning point in our
concept of the warrior, at least in Western culture. Although
    warriors were always valued as protectors of society,
 chivalry added new dimensions of responsibility and civility.
  The warrior tradition became more civilized, although the
 final goal was never really achieved during those difficult
                              times.
   Why is this important? Because the warrior spirit provides a
   number of qualities that are extremely valuable to our
  overall humanity. Today's sensibilities might not recognize
  this at first, so repulsed we are with war and killing and
 brutality. This is understandable. Warlike tendencies have
always been a curse on humanity. The warrior spirit, however,
                     is something different.
               What do I mean by warrior spirit?

              It is an intensity of life, filled with energy and a
                          readiness to act when needed.
           A desire to perfect oneself for the benefit of others.
              An inner determination to protect one's family,
                         neighborhood, nation and world.
           Fairness, and the sanity to do what is right and good.
                        Doing one's best in everything.
                             Being true to oneself.
                          Honesty. Loyalty. Integrity.
            Willingness to stand up for what is right, even when
                             everyone is against you.
                        Idealism coupled with realism.


    The ultimate goal of KUNG FU, however, is not the mastery
            of sparring or forms; but the improvement of a person
            along three levels; the mind, the body, and the spirit.
        practitioner will work for a many years attempting to
        attain the body of a warrior, the mind of a scholar, and
                                the spirit of a monk.

                BELOW ARE THE EIGHT VIRTUES OF THE SHAOLIN WARRIOR

                compassion                             respect
                 courage                            self discipline
                  honor                               strength
                 patience                              wisdom
                         Philosophy
There are three parts to every person: Body, Mind and Spirit.
These three parts exist on separate planes: Physical, Mental
                        and Spiritual.
 Three archetypes exemplify the perfection of each level :
                   *The Body of a Warrior
                    *The Mind of a Scholar
               *The Spirit of a Priest, or Monk
   The goal of KUNG FU is to unite the three archetypes in
                  harmony within a person.
     A major emphasis of the art is conflict resolution.
The school teaches one to resolve conflict by raising it to a
higher plane - moving from violence at the physical level, to
    rational argument at the mental level, to unity and
           understanding at the spiritual level.
  One reason KUNG FU is taught in groups (called Circles) is
because the skills needed for conflict resolution are better
                      taught in groups.
    There are several fundamental principles, or maxims
           associated with the School of Kung Fu:
              #The Understanding of Weapons:
 #*There are no dangerous weapons, only dangerous people.
              #The Understanding of Discipline:
     #*Discipline is the training which makes punishment
                        unnecessary.
                      #The Honor Code:
     #*A Student of Kung Fu will not lie, cheat, or steal.
#**Those who do participate in such behavior will be asked to
                      leave the school.
                    EXPECTATIONS AND REQUIREMENTS
          KUNG FU has no specific doctrinal or religious
       requirements; the School only insists that there be
    something you believe in that is greater than yourself, a
       code of conduct is maintain & martial morality, and
                 proper attire or uniform worn.


                            Rank Structure

         There are five different classes of people in The
      Rotating Hand System. Guests, Novices, Students, Clan
     Leaders, Disciples, and Instructors. The Guests are just
         that -- honored guests treated with respect and
      courtesy. The School encourages interested people to
     come for a while as a guest before making a decision or
          commitment to continue. Guests are invited and
       encouraged to participate in a variety of drills and
           exercises but all activities are voluntary.

    Guests who show a proficiency in the basic techniques, and
     who display a respect for the traditions and culture of
      the school, can request to test for the rank of Novice.
       The Novice, with a white sash, immediately becomes a
     fundamental building block of the school -- helping host
          new guests and reinforcing those fundamental
      techniques through repeated practice and instruction.


Members of a Circle train, work, progress and test together.
    Students are expected to display a greater sense of
 responsibility and duty to themselves, their Circle, Novices
                            and their Sifu.
Students may be proposed by their Circle for participation in
      a ceremony in which they promise to undertake the
preservation of the art by becoming a teacher. The student, if
accepted, takes the title of Disciple works under the direction
   and close supervision of an Instructor. At the end of this
period and at the discretion of the Instructor responsible the
           title of full Instructor may be awarded.


Whereas many martial arts, such as Karate and Tae Kwon Do,
  use colored belts to show rank Kung Fu uses wide colored
sashes. The sash is tied around the waist with the knot at the
                     point of the left hip.



                      Color: Rank: Title:


                        *No Sash: Guest
            *White Sash: Novice (Beginner Student)
        *Junior Clan Leader Sash: 師弟 shī dì, 師妹 shī mèi
      *Senior Clan Leader Sash: 師兄 shī xiōng, 師姐 shī jiě
              *Red Sash: (Intermediate Student)
               *Black Sash: 師兄 Disciple (Sihing)
               *Black Sash: Assitant Instructor
                *Black Sash: Senior Instructor
          *Black Sash: Master Instructor 師父 (Sifu)

            *Black Sash: Grandmaster 師公 shī gōng
                               CLOSING NOTES FROM SIFU




Time is the path to perfection in martial arts. Once motivation
    and self-discipline have set in, a learner has to spend a
    considerable amount of time putting mind and body into
practice. A truly inspired learner does not have the privilege
   to waste time, stay idle or indulge in fruitless activities.
  Everything done by him/her should reflect real motivation
                       and self-discipline.



It should be noted that long ago these philosophical fighting
   principles were reserved solely for the masters, and not
taught to students of the art. The point behind this was that,
although there are many varied sets and advanced forms, the
     entire KUNG FU system involves the combination of the
  philosophic principles and the style's powerful movements.




Altogether, the system has 123 hands movements, 15 stances, and 13
                                 kicks, used in all possible combinations.


Plum blossom set #1- chi development form

Plum blossom set #2- double fist set

Plum blossom set #3- iron palm set

Plum blossom set #4- kicks and stance switching form

Plum blossom set #5- 5 element form and free style drilling




Small tiger form



                                                   The philosophies

                                              The nature of the character

                                Rotating hand switching analysis & combinations




                                       The 4 chi building blocks(the 4 treasures)

                                                        C
                                                      1.Chi Kung

                                                       M
                                                     2.Meditation

                                                        N
                                                      3.Nutrition

                                                          S
                                                        4.Sleep



                                               The 4 methods of attack

                                              R
                                            1.React-explosion, sharp reflex

                                    C
                                  2.Closing the gap-closing in on the opponent

                                         p
                                       3.penetrate-internal and external power

                                       S
                                     4.Shut down-attacking vital pressure points
                                         The 5 elements of training

                                      Wood-strong bones and muscles

                                          Fire-no order, versatility

                                        Earth-rooted(strong stances)

                               Metal-Penetrating power, fajing(internal power)

                                 Water-fluidity(constant flow in movement)



                                       The 8 methods used in combat

                 V
               1.Versatility                                                       E
                                                                                 5.Efficiency

                S
              2.Surrounding                                                        E
                                                                                 6.Emptiness

                 D
               3.Deception                                                         E
                                                                                 7.Explosion

                  C
                4.Control                                                          D
                                                                                 8.Disruption

 The 8 methods used in combat are the principles applied in order to effectively control and overcome a
                                           confrontation.

                                 Versatility - the art of knowing many forms

                      Surrounding - the art of attacking from all angle, directions

                                        Deception - the art of trickery

                          Control - the art of manipulation through joint locks

                         Efficiency - the art of reacting with as little movements

                                 Emptiness - the art of controlling the mind

                         Explosion - the art of explosive reactions through fajing

                                      Disruption - the art of confusion

The 5 pedal plum blossom fist kung fu rotating hand system training format
 Toughening exercises                       Double pole fighting                     Stance switching(dragon
                                                                                             posture)
 Three forearms drills                      Cinder block circling
                                                                                        Pivoting posture
 Swinging sand bags                            Circle walking
                                                                                         Springing legs
   Brick hard chi kung           The 6 stepping patterns    Moving small mountain chi
                                                                     kung
     Tri pole dummy                 Rotating dummy
                                                           The 14 chi kung body building
   The stepping patterns      Wing Chun spring arm dummy             exercises

   Flapping bird wings           Praying Mantis dummy             The 3 branches

  Grasping willow palms               Man dummy

     Corner fighting                 Small plum fist

  14 chi kung(soft, hard,           Closing the gap
      combination)
                                   Poison needle fist

            THE 5 PEDAL PLUM BLOSSOM FIST KUNG FU ROTATING HAND SYSTEM

                                 STEPPING PATTERN




THE STEPPING PATTERN IN THE SYSTEM IS USED TO REACT QUICKLY TO AN ATTACK, AND THE
               COMBINATION IS INTENDED TO CONFUSE THE ATTACKER.
                        Below are the Eight Virtues of the Shaolin Warrior

                                            Compassion
                                              Courage
                                               Honor
                                              Patience
                                              Respect
                                           Self Discipline
                                              Strength

                                               Wisdom

                                        “Sir Gee Dorr Kung Fu”.




[edit] Family Lineage Titles or Terms

 As normally                Cantonese        Mandarin
                Simp. Trad.                                                Meaning(s)
seen in English               (Yale            (Pinyin
                char. char.                                                 (in English)
(from Cantonese)             transcription) transcription)



Sidai              师弟 師弟 si1 dai6           shī dì           junior male classmate



Simui              师妹 師妹 si1 mui6           shī mèi          junior female classmate



Sihing             师兄 師兄 si1 hing1          shī xiōng        senior male classmate



Sije               师姐 師姐 si1 je2            shī jiě          senior female classmate
Sifu                师父 師父 si1 fu6               shī fù         master



Sisuk               师叔 師叔 si1 suk1              shī shū        master's junior male or female classmate



Sibak               师伯 師伯 si1 baak3             shī bó         master's senior male or female classmate



Sigung              师公 師公 si1 gung1             shī gōng       master's master



Sijo                师祖 師祖 si1 jou2              shī zǔ         master's master's master




The ultimate goal of Shen Lung, however, is not the mastery of sparring or forms; but the improvement
of a person along three levels; the mind, the body, and the spirit. A Shen Lung practitioner will work for
a many years attempting to attain the body of a warrior, the mind of a scholar, and the spirit of a monk.

                                                  Philosophy

                        There are three parts to every person: Body, Mind and Spirit.
                 These three parts exist on separate planes: Physical, Mental and Spiritual.
                          Three archetypes exemplify the perfection of each level :
                                          *The Body of a Warrior
                                           *The Mind of a Scholar
                                       *The Spirit of a Priest, or Monk
      The goal of Shen Lung Kung Fu is to unite the three archetypes in harmony within a person.
                              A major emphasis of the art is conflict resolution.
 The school teaches one to resolve conflict by raising it to a higher plane - moving from violence at the
physical level, to rational argument at the mental level, to unity and understanding at the spiritual level.

       One reason Shen Lung is taught in groups (called Circles) is because the skills needed for conflict
                                  resolution are better taught in groups.

 There are several fundamental principles, or maxims associated with the School of Shen Lung Kung Fu:
                                   #The Understanding of Weapons:
                    #*There are no dangerous weapons, only dangerous people.
                                   #The Understanding of Discipline:
                 #*Discipline is the training which makes punishment unnecessary.
                                           #The Honor Code:
                    #*A Student of Shen Lung Kung Fu will not lie, cheat, or steal.
            #**Those who do participate in such behavior will be asked to leave the school.

                                   Expectations and Requirements
Shen Lung Kung Fu has no specific doctrinal or religious requirements; the School only insists that there
                     be something you believe in that is greater than yourself.

                                           They also ask that:
                                *One be tolerant of the beliefs of others.
                                 *One respects their seniors in the art.
                 *One is to be respectful of martial arts other than Shen Lung Kung Fu.

                                               Rank Structure
     There are five different classes of people in Shen Lung. Guests, Novices, Students, Disciples and
  Instructors. The Guests are just that -- honored guests treated with respect and courtesy. The School
encourages interested people to come for a while as a guest before making a decision or commitment to
   continue. Guests are invited and encouraged to participate in a variety of drills and exercises but all
                                           activities are voluntary.

Guests who show a proficiency in the basic techniques, and who display a respect for the traditions and
    culture of the school, can request to test for the rank of Novice. The Novice, with a white sash,
   immediately becomes a fundamental building block of the school -- helping host new guests and
         reinforcing those fundamental techniques through repeated practice and instruction.

 The rank of Novice in Shen Lung Kung Fu is well-earned and those with white sashes may have been
                                     studying for a year or more.
Novices who join a Circle and perform their service as hosts to guests are eventually eligible to test for
                                            Student rank.
Members of a Circle train, work, progress and test together. Students are expected to display a greater
         sense of responsibility and duty to themselves, their Circle, Novices and their Sifu.

   Students may be proposed by their Circle for participation in a ceremony in which they promise to
undertake the preservation of the art by becoming a teacher. The student, if accepted, takes the title of
Disciple works under the direction and close supervision of an Instructor. At the end of this period and at
          the discretion of the Instructor responsible the title of full Instructor may be awarded.

Whereas many martial arts, such as Karate and Tae Kwon Do, use colored belts to show rank Shen Lung
Kung Fu uses wide colored sashes. The sash is tied around the waist with the knot at the point of the left
                                                  hip.

                                            Color: Rank: Title:
                                             *No Sash: Guest
                                          *White Sash: Novice
                              *Orange Sash: Student of the Spiritual Forms
                               *Yellow Sash: Student of the Mental Forms
                               *Green Sash: Student of the Physical Forms
                                       *Blue Sash: Disciple (Sihing)
                           *Black Sash: Instructor of the Physical Forms (Sifu)
                         *Silver Sash: Instructor of the Mental Forms (Master)
                       *Gold Sash: Instructor of the Spiritual Forms (Grandmaster)

                                      The Salute: A Gesture of Respect
 Martial artists commonly salute when they greet each other. This is a custom that is an intrinsic part of
traditional Chinese Kung Fu. It is a mutual show of respect for each other's skill, knowledge and abilities.
  In addition, the salute has a practical application. Martial artists were always very cautious in the old
days; handshakes were considered either too threatening or an invitation for an attack. Warriors would
 try to avoid contact with unscrupulous people, leery of surprise attacks. Many Chin Na (joint breaking)
                                    techniques begin from a handshake.

The Shen Lung salute is a distinctly Chinese-style movement. Take one step forward with the left foot.
The right hand is clenched in a fist. The left thumb is bent and the four fingers are stacked and straight.
 The palm of the left hand is placed over the fist. Both fist and palm are about 4 to 6 inches from the
 chest, with both elbows bent and the arms forming a circle. The hands are held at chest height. The
posture is erect and the eyes are focused on the person who is being saluted. The head is held upright
and a slight bow is made from the shoulders as the hands are slightly extended, still pressed together.
 When your salute is acknowledged, you should move your hands back to your sides as you step back
                                with your left foot and stand up straight.

 There are many common explanations of the meaning or symbolism of the salute. One is that the fist
shows martial ability and the open hand covers the fist to show civility. The left hand thumb is bent out
 of humility. Chinese people will point to themselves with their thumb instead of their index finger, as
   westerners do. A straightened thumb (like a thumbs-up) means "I'm number one!" to the Chinese.
Therefore, the bent thumb means that you do not claim superiority. Proper martial arts etiquette would
  expect for you to be humble, even if you are a champion. The four fingers symbolize uniting Kung Fu
                               across the four seas (or compass points).

Perhaps the oldest explanation is the Hung Gar story of the rebellion against the Ching Dynasty, in which
 the salute was a symbol of the secret society that formed the rebellion. The fist was the earth and the
    open hand the crescent moon, both of which were objects on the flag of the rebellion. The most
   common explanation is the Yin / Yang symbolism of the fist being the hard way and the open hand
                                      representing the soft way.

  *One is to salute when they greet and take leave of their Sifu. This shows their respect for his or her
  teachings. They salute their instructors for the same reason. They are expected to salute when they
 enter and exit the Kwoon to show respect for the sacrifices that their teachers made for the art. Also,
  they should salute their equals to show that you will work together to hone each other's skills. One
                    should always salute their teacher before he or she salutes them.

This Chinese character is "wu" (it's "bu" in Japanese, with the same meaning)
which means warrior spirit or military, and it closely identified with Kung Fu
(Gong Fu).

But there is more to the warrior spirit than engaging in battle. There are aspects that provide both inner
and outer dimensions to the overall human spirit that would otherwise leave us incomplete. While our just
longing for peace and harmony might prompt us to reject anything associated with war, we do so only at
our peril.
   Medieval chivalry represented a turning point in our concept of the warrior, at least in Western culture.
Although warriors were always valued as protectors of society, chivalry added new dimensions of
responsibility and civility. The warrior tradition became more civilized, although the final goal was never
really achieved during those difficult times.
   Why is this important? Because the warrior spirit provides a number of qualities that are extremely
valuable to our overall humanity. Today's sensibilities might not recognize this at first, so repulsed we are
with war and killing and brutality. This is understandable. Warlike tendencies have always been a curse
on humanity. The warrior spirit, however, is something different.
   What do I mean by warrior spirit?

       It is an intensity of life, filled with energy and a readiness to act when needed.
       A desire to perfect oneself for the benefit of others.
       An inner determination to protect one's family, neighborhood, nation and world.
       Fairness, and the sanity to do what is right and good.
       Doing one's best in everything.
       Being true to oneself.
       Honesty. Loyalty. Integrity.
       Willingness to stand up for what is right, even when everyone is against you.
       Idealism coupled with realism.
       A sense of duty greater than one's selfish needs.

While these attributes do contribute to the mindset of a good soldier, they are valuable qualities that
everyone can benefit from. Indeed, we are less for the want of them.
    Perhaps the Chinese illustrate this best in their symbol of tai chi, or the Grand Ultimate. We've all
seen it. A circle divided by an "S" shaped curve, one side black, the other white, with small circles of the
opposite colors on each side. It is also known as yin/yang. Yin, the dark side, representing female
qualities, and yang, the light side, representing the masculine. In our Western minds, we tend to look at
this symbol as representing two opposite energies, but it is more than that. It is a balance of two energies
as one, each containing qualities of the other. A predominance of yin or a predominance of yang throws
everything off balance.
    Discarding the warrior spirit in the name of peace throws the human spirit out of balance as well. The
good and even profound qualities of the warrior spirit need to be redirected from war for their true value to
be understood and appreciated.
    And this is what Chivalry-Now is all about. We recognize the intrinsic value of well-directed masculine
ideals to the overall balance of human energies. They can add tremendously to the peace movement by
completing its scope of reference. In fact, it transforms a potential opponent into a powerful ally.
   Contending against the warrior spirit is self-defeating. It produces contention, which is the opposite of
peace.
   Ignoring the warrior spirit limits the potential of the peace movement, for it continues the imbalance
caused by separation.
   Embracing the warrior spirit, and channeling it in positive directions, restores the balance of life. It
completes the all-inclusive circle of our best intent.

The warrior spirit does not have to be identified with war. No one hates war as much as the soldier who
 has to live it. A proper soldier is not given to a sadistic instinct to maim or kill. Their instincts come from
  loyalty, love of neighbor and country, a desire to protect and safeguard. These are positive, spiritual
qualities that touch upon every aspect of a person's life. Jesus recognized this when he said "No greater
                             love is this, that a man sacrifice his life for another."
      There are exceptions, of course. There are heartless killers who use violence to the most terrible
extremes. They represent the warrior spirit gone completely bad, energies misdirected in a manner that
                              kills the warrior spirit and replaces it with insanity.

Here I found the warrior tradition at its finest: men and women who were highly trained, committed to their
 purpose, and working cooperatively for the greater good. Courtesy was everywhere, at all times. To me,
     they best exemplified the warrior spirit, although they had nothing to do with killing or with war.

 Train hard, protect your honor, respect your teacher, help those in need, uplift your self awareness and
                          inner warriorship, honor your family, embrace sacrifice.

                    The martial morality ( code of the warrior) the warrior code of honor

Meditation can be practiced while walking or doing simple repetitive tasks. Walking meditation
helps break down habitual automatic mental categories, "thus regaining the primary nature of
perceptions and events, focusing attention on the process while disregarding its purpose or final
outcome."[5] In a form of meditation using visualization, such as Chinese Qi Gong, the
practitioner concentrates on flows of energy (Qi) in the body, starting in the abdomen and then
circulating through the body, until dispersed.[5] Some meditative traditions, such as yoga or
tantra, are common to several religions.[6]

Meditation is a mental discipline by which the practitioner attempts to get beyond the reflexive,
"thinking" mind into a deeper state of relaxation or awareness. Meditation is a component of
many religions, and has been practiced since antiquity. It is also practiced outside religious
traditions. Different meditative disciplines encompass a wide range of spiritual or
psychophysical practices that may emphasize different goals—from achievement of a higher
state of consciousness, to greater focus, creativity or self-awareness, or simply a more relaxed
and peaceful frame of mind.

Wǔshù literally means "martial art". It is formed from the two words 武術: 武 (wǔ), meaning,
"martial" or "military", and 術 (shù), which translates into "discipline", "skill" or "method."
Basics

Basics (基本功) are a vital part of the training, as a student cannot progress to the more advanced
stages without them; without strong and flexible muscles including the management of the
concept of "chi" (breath, or energy) and proper body mechanics, many movements of Chinese
martial arts are simply impossible to perform correctly.[37][38] Basics training may involve a series
of simple movements that are performed repeatedly over a short interval; examples of these
basics training include stretching, stance work, rudimentary conditioning, meditation and basic
kicking and punching techniques.

In many Chinese martial arts, meditation is considered to be an important component of basic
training. Meditation can be used to develop focus, mental clarity and can act as a basis for
qigong training

Forms

Forms or taolu (Chinese: 套路; pinyin: tào lù) in Chinese are series of predetermined
movements combined so they can be practiced as one linear set of movements. Forms were
originally intended to preserve the lineage of a particular style branch, and were often taught to
advanced students who were selected to preserve the art's lineage. Forms were designed to
contain both literal, representative and exercise-oriented forms of applicable techniques which
would be extracted, tested and trained by students through sparring sessions.[44]

Today, many consider forms to be one of the most important practices in Chinese martial arts.
Traditionally, they played a smaller role in training combat application, and were eclipsed by
sparring, drilling and conditioning. Forms gradually build up a practitioner's flexibility, internal
and external strength, speed and stamina, and teach balance and coordination. Many styles
contain forms using a wide range of weapons of various length and type, utilizing one or two
hands. There are also styles which focus on a certain type of weapon. Forms are meant to be both
practical, usable, and applicable as well as promoting flow, meditation, flexibility, balance and
coordination. Teachers are often heard to say "train your form as if you were sparring and spar as
if it were a form."

There are two general types of forms in Chinese martial arts. Most common are "solo forms"
which are performed by a single student. There are also "sparring" forms, which are
choreographed fighting sets performed by two or more people. Sparring forms were designed
both to acquaint beginning fighters with basic measures and concepts of combat, and to serve as
performance pieces for the school. Sparring forms which utilize weapons are especially useful
for teaching students the extension, range and technique required to manage a weapon.

                             Martial arts and morality
Traditional Chinese schools of martial arts, such as the famed Shaolin monks, often dealt with
the study of martial arts not just as a means of self-defense or mental training, but as a system of
ethics.[60][36] Wude (武 德) can be translated as "martial morality" and is constructed from the
words "wu" (武), which means martial, and "de" (德), which means morality. Wude (武德) deals
with two aspects; "morality of deed" and "morality of mind". Morality of deed concerns social
relations; morality of mind is meant to cultivate the inner harmony between the emotional mind
(Xin, 心) and the wisdom mind (Hui, 慧). The ultimate goal is reaching no extremity (Wuji, 無
極) (closely related to the Taoist concept of wu wei), where both wisdom and emotions are in
harmony with each other.

                                           Use of qi
Main article: Qigong

The concept of qì or ch'i (氣/气) is encountered in a number of Chinese martial arts. Qi is
variously defined as an inner energy or "life force" that is said to animate living beings; as a term
for proper skeletal alignment and efficient use of musculature (sometimes also known as fa jin or
jin); or as a shorthand for concepts that the martial arts student might not yet be ready to
understand in full. These meanings are not necessarily mutually exclusive.[note 2]

One's qi can be improved and strengthened through the regular practice of various physical and
mental exercises known as qigong. Though qigong is not a martial art itself, it is often
incorporated in Chinese martial arts and, thus, practiced as an integral part to strengthen one's
internal abilities.

There are many ideas regarding the control of one's qi energy to such an extent that it can be
used for healing oneself or others: the goal of medical qigong. Some styles believe in focusing qi
into a single point when attacking and aim at specific areas of the human body. Such techniques
are known as dim mak and have principles that are similar to acupressure.[61]

Brief History:

The practice, philosophy, and concept of Kung Fu can be traced back to ancient Chinese texts
such as Zhuang Zi, Dao De Jing, and Sun Zi Bing Fa (Art of War written by Sun Zi), all written
between 1111-255 BC. These texts contain passages related to the practice, propagation, and
principles of Chinese martial arts, or Kung Fu as it is known today.

One theory regarding the first written history of Kung Fu suggests that the Yellow Emperor, who
reigned from 2698 BC, wrote the first treatise on Chinese martial arts. Others give credit to
Taoist monks for introducing an art form that resemble modern Tai Chi around 500 BC. Then in
39-92 AD, Pan Ku included "Six Chapters of Hand Fighting" in his discourse on the history of
the Han dynasty (Han Shu). As the popularity of martial arts progressed, a physician named Hua
T’uo also wrote his own treatise entitled, “Five Animals Play" in 220 AD.

In Kung Fu, discipline is complementary to motivation. Discipline puts motivation into deed and
action. A learner has to make an effort into what he has been motivated for, and self-discipline
helps him get started and guides him to achieve that goal. Therefore, without discipline,
motivation is just a dormant state of mind.
Time is the path to perfection in martial arts. Once motivation and self-discipline have set in, a
learner has to spend a considerable amount of time putting mind and body into practice. A truly
inspired learner does not have the privilege to waste time, stay idle or indulge in fruitless
activities. Everything done by him/her should reflect real motivation and self-discipline.

In general, white crane kung fu is classified as an "external" system, in contrast to many others
that come under the dual heading of "internal" as well as "external." According to instructor
Kingston Ku: Though the idea of chi, or internal power, is not disbelieved in this system, it is not
fostered or promoted. Rather, in white crane, it is the concept of 'natural power' that is cultivated
and made the most of. The reason for this is that natural power, which is external in nature, is
highly practical. Also, it doesn't require years to develop like the internal type. The upheld belief
is that by performing the techniques repeatedly, the power exerted will be analogous to that of
internal power that, at present, has a reputation of being impenetrable and superior.

It should be noted that long ago these philosophical fighting principles were reserved solely for
the masters, and not taught to students of the art. The point behind this was that, although there
are many varied sets and advanced forms, the entire white crane system involves the
combination of the four philosophic principles and the style's six basic powerful movements




[edit] Wing Chun

 As normally
                                  Cantonese      Mandarin
seen in English Simp.    Trad.                                                    Meaning(s)
                                     (Yale         (Pinyin
    (from       char.    char.                                                     (in English)
                                 transcription) transcription)
  Cantonese)


                                      2
Wing            咏       詠        Wing           yǒng             song; poem


                                          1
Chun            春                Cheun          chūn
                        (as                                      spring (time); gay; joyful; youthful; love;
                       simp.)                                   lust; life


                       (as
Kuen               拳              kyun4          quán           fist
                       simp.)



[edit] Forms

   As normally                                  Cantonese          Mandarin
                       Simp.        Trad.                                                  Meaning(s)
  seen in English                                  (Yale            (Pinyin
                       char.        char.                                                      (in English)
  (from Cantonese)                             transcription)    transcription)



Siu Lim Tao            小念头       小念頭         siu2 lim6 tau4     xiǎo niàn tou       little idea



Chum Kiu               寻桥        尋橋          cham4 kiu4         xún qiáo            seeking the bridge



Biu Jee                镖指        鏢指          biu1 ji2           biāo zhǐ            darting fingers



Muk Yan Jong           木人桩       木人樁         muk6 yan4 jong1 mù rén zhuāng wooden dummy



Luk Dim Boon Gwun 六点半棍 六點半棍                                     liù diǎn bàn gùn six and a half point pole



Bat Jam Dao            八斩刀       八斬刀                            bā zhǎn dāo         eight slashing knives



[edit] Family Lineage Titles or Terms

 As normally                Cantonese           Mandarin
                Simp. Trad.                                                   Meaning(s)
seen in English               (Yale               (Pinyin
                char. char.                                                     (in English)
(from Cantonese)                transcription) transcription)
Sidai              师弟 師弟 si1 dai6            shī dì         junior male classmate



Simui              师妹 師妹 si1 mui6            shī mèi        junior female classmate



Sihing             师兄 師兄 si1 hing1           shī xiōng      senior male classmate



Sije               师姐 師姐 si1 je2             shī jiě        senior female classmate



Sifu               师父 師父 si1 fu6             shī fù         master



Sisuk              师叔 師叔 si1 suk1            shī shū        master's junior male or female classmate



Sibak              师伯 師伯 si1 baak3           shī bó         master's senior male or female classmate



Sigung             师公 師公 si1 gung1           shī gōng       master's master



Sijo               师祖 師祖 si1 jou2            shī zǔ         master's master's master



[edit] Limb names

 As normally                       Cantonese      Mandarin
                Simp.    Trad.                                  Meaning(s)
seen in English                       (Yale         (Pinyin
                char.    char.                                  (in English)
(from Cantonese)                  transcription) transcription)



sao                手    (as simp.) sau2          shǒu           hand



kuen               拳    (as simp.) kyun4         quán           fist
gerk               脚     腳        geuk3          jiǎo             foot; leg



[edit] 18 hand technique names
[edit] Limb position names

 As normally                       Cantonese      Mandarin
                Simp.     Trad.                                     Meaning(s)
seen in English                       (Yale         (Pinyin
                char.     char.                                      (in English)
(from Cantonese)                  transcription) transcription)



bong sau           膀手 (as simp.) bong2 sau2      bǎng shǒu        wing arm



fook sau           伏手 (as simp.) fuk6 sau2       fú shǒu          controlling hand



man sau            问手 問手          man6 sau2      wèn shǒu         seeking hand



wu sau             护手 護手          wu6 sau2       hù shǒu          protecting hand



tan sau            摊手 攤手          taan1 sau2     tān shǒu         dispersing hand



kau sau            扣手 扣手          kau1 sau2      kòu shǒu         detaining hand


[edit] Limb movement names

 As normally                       Cantonese      Mandarin
                Simp.     Trad.                                    Meaning(s)
seen in English                       (Yale         (Pinyin
                char.     char.                                     (in English)
(from Cantonese)                  transcription) transcription)



jam sau            沉手 (as simp.) cham4 sau2      chén shǒu        sinking hand
gaun sau           耕手 (as simp.) gang1 sau2       gēng shǒu     cultivating arm



jut sau            窒手 (as simp.) jat6 sau2        zhì shǒu      choking hand



huen sau           圈手 (as simp.) huen4 sau2       quán shǒu     circling hand



lap sau            拉手 (as simp.) laap6 sau2       lā shǒu       pulling hand



pak sau            拍手 (as simp.) paak3 sau2       pāi shǒu      slapping hand



tok sau            托手 (as simp.) tok3 sau2        tuō shǒu      lifting hand



lan sau            拦手 攔手            laan4 sau2    lán shǒu      barring arm



tie sau            提手 (as simp.) tai4 sau2        tí shǒu       uplifting hand



jip sau            接手 (as simp.) jip3 sau2        jiē shǒu      receiving hand



gum sau            揿手 撳手                          qìn shǒu      pressing hand



biu sau            镖手 鏢手            biu1 sau2     biāo shǒu     darting hand



[edit] Drills

 As normally                            Cantonese           Mandarin
                   Simp.    Trad.                                              Meaning(s)
seen in English                            (Yale           (Pinyin
                   char.    char.                                               (in English)
(from Cantonese)                       transcription)   transcription)
dan chi sau   单黐手 單黐手 daan1 chi1 sau2 dān chī shǒu       single sticky hand



luk sau       双黐手 雙黐手 seong1 chi1 sau2 shuāng chī shǒu double sticky hands



chi gerk      黐脚     (as simp.) chi1 geuk3   chī jiǎo    sticky feet

				
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