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					Course Syllabus Conceptual Physics
Spring 2004

Instructor: Phone: E-mail

Rachel S. Peak (985) 892-2540 ext. 347 rpeak@ssacad.com

Room: 282 Office Hours: Monday and Tuesday Second Lunch (or by appointment)

TEXT AND REQUIRED MATERIALS: Conceptual Physics Text * * Bring to class daily 3 Ring Binder with Dividers * Loose-Leaf Paper * Pencils * Protractor / Ruler * Graph Paper 8 1/2 x 11 Manila Folder Stapler * Hole Punch* Spiral Bound Note-cards* DESCRIPTION: Conceptual Physics presents to the student a solid foundation in physics. Knowledge of basic algebra is required. GOALS:  The student will explore basic physical laws that govern our world. Students will be assessed on physical laws through homework, quizzes, tests, lab reports and projects.  The student will develop conceptual thinking and problem solving skills. Conceptual thinking skills will be assessed through homework, quizzes, tests, lab reports and projects.  The student will apply her knowledge of physics in her own environment. Application of knowledge will be assessed through lab reports, tests and projects.  The student will apply processes in scientific research to her own life. Students will be assessed on scientific research through projects.

Course Syllabus (cont.)
CRITICAL QUESTIONS: Unit 1: Math Review Why is the metric system important? How are graphs used to communicate information? Unit 2: Linear Motion How do distance and displacement, speed and velocity differ? How are they the same? How are Distance-Time graphs and Velocity-Time graphs used to communicate information? How can velocity, time, distance and acceleration be used to solve problems? Does horizontal motion affect vertical motion? How are two-dimensional motion problems solved? How are vectors used to aid in problem solving? What are the four types of force and where are these types seen in the physical world? How do Newton’s Laws of Motion describe what we observe in the physical world? How do we include consideration of the force of friction in problem solving? How do momentum, work and energy relate? How is the study of momentum and impact important in car wrecks? How do simple machines help us do work? How do we solve circular motion problems? How is center of gravity important in the physical world? How do we solve rotating motion problems? What are the various types of waves and in what physical applications are they seen? How does wave theory explain the light we see and the sound we hear? What are the other light and sound ranges that we cannot see or hear and how are they used?

Unit 3: Projectile Motion

Unit 4: Newton’s Laws

Unit 5: Momentum, and Energy

Unit 6: Circular Motion and Rotational Mechanics

Unit 7: Waves, Light and Sound

REQUIREMENTS: To successfully complete this course, the student must attend class, pay attention and take notes during lectures, participate in laboratory experiments, complete projects and other research activities outside of class. Students must check Edline (www.edline.net) daily for updates on homework, projects, quizzes and tests.

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Course Syllabus (cont.)
RESOURCES: Help sessions will be held on Mondays and Tuesdays at second lunch. Students may also make an appointment with me at another convenient time. The text also offers an informative and interactive web site: http:\\www.cpsurf.com. EVALUATION: Students will be graded on the following: quizzes, lab reports, homework, tests, projects and participation. Quizzes may or may not be announced. There will be at least one quiz per unit covered. Quizzes cannot be made up. If a student misses a quiz, she should take another version of the quiz during Test Make-Up Session, Thursdays from 3:25 to 4:30. Quizzes are meant as a participation grade; if the student faithfully attends class and pays attention, the quiz should not prove difficult. If a student is absent the day before a quiz, she is still responsible for taking the quiz with the rest of her class. Be sure to call classmates when you are absent from class to get notes and assignments. Lab Reports are due at the beginning of class the day following an experiment and should be typed unless otherwise instructed. Students turning their lab reports in late will have 10% of the report grade per day late deducted from their participation grade. Any report turned in after the beginning of class is considered one day late. Students should only use a 12-point type for reports. Reports will include the following:  Cover Page – Lab title, lab number, student name, partners’ names, class period and date.  Purpose – Describe what the student explored, verified, measured, investigated, etc.  Method – Describe the procedures used to obtain data.  Data – Record observations and measurements, include all applicable data tables  Calculations – Show all calculations and required graphs  Conclusion – Summarize results of experiment, state conclusions made and answer any questions.  Be sure to staple original data collected at the end of the report. Should a student be absent on lab day, it is her responsibility to schedule a make up within two days after her return to school. The report is due at the beginning of class the day after she completes the lab. Should a student be absent on the report due date, it is her responsibility to turn the report in to me by 7:45 a.m. on the day she returns to school. Homework may or may not be collected as assigned in class. The intent of homework is to reinforce concepts discussed in class. I expect students to work on homework incrementally as we cover related topics, not to put off homework until the last minute. When a student is absent, it is her responsibility to obtain Homework, continued notes and assignments given on day(s) missed. Homework is to be turned in at the beginning of class on the due date. Students turning in late homework will have 10% of the homework grade per day late deducted form their participation grade. Any work
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Course Syllabus (cont.)
turned in after the beginning of class is considered one day late. Tests will be based on lecture notes, homework problems, labs and the text. Tests will cover announced units. I will announce the time allotted for the test and tests will be collected at the end of the allotted time. Any talking while tests are out is considered cheating. Before the test, all purses, backpacks, etc. must be in the front of the room and students seated and quiet before tests are handed out. If a student is absent on a test day, she must take the test at the following Test Make-Up Session, held every Thursday in the cafeteria from 3:25 – 4:30 p.m. If a student does not show up for the make-up day, she will lose the privilege of making up the test. If a student has missed several days of classes and has several tests to make-up, she should see her counselor to work out a schedule to make-up tests. Projects will be announced throughout the course of the semester. Project guidelines will be given upon assignment. Make ups and late credit will be discussed with each project. Participation grades will be assessed at the end of each term. Students begin with 50 participation points at the beginning of each term. Points will be deducted from this grade fro things such as, but not limited to, lack of class participation, lack of group participation and for late work.

Grades will be computed by total points accumulated for the following assignments: homework, classwork, quizzes, lab reports, tests, projects and participation. TENTATIVE SCHEDULE: Weeks 1 - 2 Unit 1: Intro. & Math Review Weeks 3 - 5 Unit 2: Ch. 2, Linear Motion Weeks 6 - 7 Unit 3: Ch. 3, Projectile Motion Weeks 8 - 9 Unit 4: Ch. 4-6, Newton’s Laws Week 10 Review and Midterm Weeks 11 - 12 Unit 5: Ch. 7-8, Momentum and Energy Weeks 13 - 15 Unit 6: Ch. 9-11, Circular Motion, Center of Gravity, Rotation Mechanics Weeks 16 - 17 Unit 7: Ch. 25-30, Vibrations and Waves, Sound, Light, Color, Reflection/Refraction, Lenses and Mirrors Week 18 Review and Final Exams EXPECTATIONS: Academically I expect all students to perform to their best levels. I expect students to take an active role in their learning. Active learning includes nightly studying, class and group participation and seeking help when it is needed. While physics is a challenging subject, students who work hard should have no trouble passing the course. Due to the nature of the course, there will be a great deal of group work. I expect equal participation from all members of a group. Please recall the academic policies of this

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Course Syllabus (cont.)
school. Turning in any assignment that comes from the work of another is cheating and will be dealt with promptly. Behaviorally I expect all students to act as Christian ladies at all times. Students must be respectful of others and their belongings. Respect can be demonstrated by not talking while others are talking, paying attention during lecture, treating texts, school property and laboratory equipment with care. Students show respect to the instructor by focusing only on the course while in the classroom. Discussions about other courses or activities, such as parties or dates, should be saved for later. Any materials that do not have purpose in this course can and will be confiscated and returned at the end of the year. Do not work on any other course work, write notes or apply make-up, perfume, lotion, etc. during class. Be sure to take care of any restroom stops before coming to class. Once entering class, take out course materials and be ready to begin class when the bell rings. Consequences for inappropriate behavior can consist of warnings, being held after class, a conference with parents and/or a reduction in Dove Points. If a student has utilized instructional time in an inappropriate manner or has missed an important academic opportunity, she may be required to do extra academic assignments in order to make up for the lost instructional time.

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Course Syllabus (cont.) Conceptual Physics Syllabus Verification
I have read and understand the content of the syllabus for Conceptual Physics. I am aware of the consequences of my behavior and the policies regarding late and make-up work. Key information in the syllabus:  Help sessions are on Mondays and Tuesdays, a second lunch, or by appointment.  Students should check Edline daily for schedule updates.  Quizzes may or may not be announced. Please refer to syllabus regarding absences.  Lab reports are due at the beginning of class the day following an experiment and should be typed unless otherwise instructed.  Homework may or may not be collected as assigned in class.  Lab reports and homework are due at the beginning of class on the due date. Late work will result in a 10% penalty per day late to be reflected on the student’s participation grade. Any work turned in after the beginning of class is considered one day late. When a student is absent, it is her responsibility to obtain notes and assignments given on day(s) missed.  Tests must be made up at the next following Thursday Make-Up Session.  Projects will be announced throughout the course of the semester.  Grading is based on quizzes, homework, classwork, quizzes, lab reports, tests, projects and participation.  Academic and Behavior expectations and consequences have been reviewed.

_____________________________ Parent Signature Date

_____________________________ Student Signature Date

Parents: Your Edline account log-in code was given to your daughter. Make sure she gives it to you. She will also show you how to log-on to Edline to check her progress in all of her classes. This class will be using Edline extensively for homework and project due dates as well as quiz and test schedules. You may use Edline to check for upcoming events and may also check your daughter’s current grade in this class. All email correspondence to me should go through Edline.

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