Immigration And Citizenship Usa

Document Sample
Immigration And Citizenship Usa Powered By Docstoc
					                                 Comparative Politics IV: 
                               Immigration and Citizenship 

                                           POL 492Y1 
                                           Spring 2005 



Meetings: Mondays 2:00­4:00 p.m. 
                                                                    Instructor: Thomas Faist 
                                                          E­mail: thomas.faist@utoronto.ca 
                                                                          Tel. 416­946­8967 
                                         Office: Munk Centre for International Studies, N219 
                                  Office Hours: Mondays 1:00­2:00 p.m. and by appointment 



COURSE OUTLINE 

Items marked with an asterisk (*) are required readings all students should read. Other items 
are recommended readings and may be helpful for writing research papers. 



WEEK ONE 1/10 
Theoretical Perspectives on Citizenship 

* Jean L. Cohen, 1999: “Changing Paradigms of Citizenship and the Exclusiveness of the 
Demos”, International Sociology, 14, 3: 245­268 
­ Will Kymlicka and Wayne Norman, 1994: “Return of the Citizen: A Survey of Recent Work 
on Citizenship Theory”, Ethics, 104: 352­381 
­ Michael Walzer, 1989: „Citizenship“, in Terence Ball et al. (eds.), Political Innovation and 
Conceptual Changes, New York: Cambridge University Press, 211­219 
­ T.H. Marshall, 1965 (1949): “Citizenship and Social Class” in Class, Citizenship and Social 
Development. New York: Anchor, Chapter IV 
­ Judith N. Shklar, 1993: “Obligation, Loyalty, Exile”, Political Theory 21, 2: 181­197 



WEEK TWO 1/17 
Citizenship Rules and Immigrant Integration 

* Patrick Weil, 2001: “Access to Citizenship: A Comparison of Twenty­Five Nationality 
Laws”, in T. Alexander Aleinikoff and Douglas Klusmeyer (eds.), Citizenship Today. Global 
Perspectives and Practices. Washington, D.C.: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 
17­35 
* Richard Alba, 2005: “Bright vs. Blurred Boundaries: Second­generation Assimilation and 
Exclusion in France, Germany, and the United States”, Ethnic and Racial Studies 28, 1: 20­ 
49
                                                1 
* Rainer Bauböck, 1994 : The Integration of Immigrants, Strasbourg: Council of Europe, 
Chapter 1 
(http://www.coe.int/T/E/Social%5FCohesion/Migration/Documentation/Publications_and_re 
ports/Reports_and_proceedings/1994_Cdmg(94)25E.asp#TopOfPage) 
­ Adrian Favell, 2001: “Integration Policy and Integration Research in Europe: A Review and 
Critique”, in Citizenship Today. Global Perspectives and Practices. Washington, D.C.: 
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 349­399 


WEEK THREE 1/24 
Citizenship in ‘Classical’ Countries of Immigration 

* Gianni Zappalà and Stephen Castles, 2000: “Citizenship and Immigration in Australia”, in 
T. Alexander Aleinikoff and Douglas Klusmeyer (eds.), From Migrants to Citizens: 
Membership in a Changing World. Washington, DC: Carnegie Endowment for International 
Peace, 32­81 
* Donald Galloway, 2000: “The Dilemmas of Canadian Citizenship Law”, in T. Alexander 
Aleinikoff and Douglas Klusmeyer (eds.), From Migrants to Citizens: Membership in a 
Changing World. Washington, DC: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 82­118 
* T. Alexander Aleinikoff, 2000: “Between Principles and Politics: U.S. Citizenship Law”, in 
T. Alexander Aleinikoff and Douglas Klusmeyer (eds.), From Migrants to Citizens: 
Membership in a Changing World. Washington, DC: Carnegie Endowment for International 
Peace, 119­172 



WEEK FOUR 1/31 
Ethnic Citizenship? Israel and Japan 

* Ayelet Shachar, 2000: “Citizenship and Membership in the Israeli Polity”, in T. Alexander 
Aleinikoff and Douglas Klusmeyer (eds.), From Migrants to Citizens: Membership in a 
Changing World. Washington, DC: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 386­433 
* Chikako Kashiwazaki, “Citizenship in Japan: Legal Practice and Contemporary 
Development”, in T. Alexander Aleinikoff and Douglas Klusmeyer (eds.), From Migrants to 
Citizens: Membership in a Changing World. Washington, DC: Carnegie Endowment for 
International Peace, 434­471 



WEEK FIVE 2/7 
From Ethnic to Civil Citizenship? Germany in Comparative Perspective 

* Rogers W. Brubaker, 1990: “Immigration, Citizenship, and the Nation­State in France and 
Germany: A Comparative Historical Analysis”, International Sociology 5, 4: 397­407 
* Thomas Faist, Jürgen Gerdes, Beate Rieple, 2004: “The Politics of Citizenship Law and 
Dual Nationality in Germany” (conference paper)




                                              2 
WEEK SIX 2/21 
Citizenship quo vadis (1): Multiculturalism 

* Keith Banting and Will Kymlicka, 2004: “Do Multiculturalism Policies Erode the Welfare 
State?” (conference paper) 



WEEK SEVEN 2/28 
Citizenship quo vadis (2): Postnational Citizenship 

* Linda Bosniak, 2001: “Denationalizing Citizenship”, in T. Alexander Aleinikoff and 
Douglas Klusmeyer (eds.), From Migrants to Citizens: Membership in a Changing World. 
Washington, DC: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 237­252 
­ Ayelet Shachar, 2003: “Children of a Lesser State: Sustaining Global Inequality Through 
Citizenship Laws”, New York University, School of Law, Jean Monnet Working Paper 2/03 



WEEK EIGHT 3/7 
Transnational Citizenship: Mexican Migrants in the USA 

* Paul Johnston, 2001: “The Emergence of Transnational Citizenship among Mexican 
Immigrants in California”, in T. Alexander Aleinikoff and Douglas Klusmeyer (eds.), 
Citizenship Today: Global Perspectives and Practices. Washington, DC: Carnegie 
Endowment for International Peace, 253­277 
­ Manuel Beccera Ramírez, 2000: “Nationality in Mexico”, in T. Alexander Aleinikoff and 
Douglas Klusmeyer (eds.), From Migrants to Citizens: Membership in a Changing World. 
Washington, DC: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 312­341 
­ David Fitzgerald, 2004: “Beyond ‘Transnationalism’: Mexican Hometown Politics at an 
American Labour Union”, Ethnic and Racial Studies 27, 2: 228­247 
­ on Asia: Robyn M. Rodriguez, 2002: “Migrant Heroes: Nationalism, Citizenship and the 
Politics of Filipino Migrant Labor”, Citizenship Studies 6, 3: 341­356 
­ on Eastern Europe: Pal Nyiri, 2003: “Chinese Migration to Eastern Europe”, International 
Migration 41, 3: 239­265 



WEEK NINE 3/14 
Dual Citizenship: Institutions and Discourses in Europe 

* Thomas Faist, Jürgen Gerdes, Beate Rieple, 2004: “Dual Citizenship as a Path­Dependent 
Process”, International Migration Review 38, 3: 913­944 
* Thomas Faist, “The Boundaries of Dual Citizenship” and “The Reconfiguration of 
Citizenship” (work in progress, the texts will be e­mailed one week before the meeting)




                                               3 
CONFERENCE ON DUAL CITIZENSHIP: RIGHTS AND SECURITY (Munk Centre for 
International Studies, Campbell Room,  March 17­19, register with Edith Klein) 



WEEK TEN 3/21 
Supranational Citizenship: The European Union (EU) 

*  Marco Martiniello, 2000: “Citizenship in the European Union”, in  T. Alexander Aleinikoff 
and Douglas Klusmeyer (eds.), From Migrants to Citizens: Membership in a Changing 
World. Washington, DC: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 342­380 
­ Thomas Faist, 2001: “Social Citizenship in the European Union: Nested Membership”, 
Journal of Common Market Studies 39, 1: 39­60 



WEEK ELEVEN 3/28 
Citizenship, Political Transformations and National Minorities 

* Jonathan Klaaren, 2000: “Post­Apartheid Citizenship in South Africa”, in in T. Alexander 
Aleinikoff and Douglas Klusmeyer (eds.), From Migrants to Citizens: Membership in a 
Changing World. Washington, DC: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 221­251 
* Lowell W. Barrington, 2000: “Understanding Citizenship Policy in the Baltic States”, in T. 
Alexander Aleinikoff and Douglas Klusmeyer (eds.), From Migrants to Citizens: 
Membership in a Changing World. Washington, DC: Carnegie Endowment for International 
Peace, 253­301 
­ Graham C. Smith, 1999: Transnational Politics and the Politics of the Russian Diaspora, 
Ethnic and Racial Studies 22, 3: 500­523 
­ Richard Siddle, 2003: “The Limits to Citizenship in Japan: Multiculturalism, Indigenous 
Rights and the Ainu”, Citizenship Studies 7, 4: 447­462 




WEEK TWELVE 4/4 
Towards Global Citizenship? 

­ Richard Falk, 2000: “The Decline of Citizenship in an Era of Globalization”, Citizenship 
Studies 4, 1: 5­17 
­ Brett Bowden, 2003: “The Perils of Global Citizenship”, Citizenship Studies 7, 3: 349­362 
­ Michael Muetzelfeldt and Gary Smith, 2002: “Civil Society and Global Governance: The 
Possibilities for Global Citizenship”, Citizenship Studies 6, 1: 55­75




                                              4 
                      Seminar Presentation – Feedback against Assessment Criteria 



Student Name: 


Preparation 
Well prepared                                                                Lack of preparation 
Well organised                                                               Poorly organised 
Structure 
Clear Structure                                                              Unclear structure 
Logical Structure                                                            Illogical structure 
Coherent Structure                                                           Incoherent structure 
Content 
Relevancy                                                                    Irrelevant content 
In­depth                                                                     Content too shallow 
Analysis                                                                     Content lacks analysis 
Evidence 
Evidence pertinent                                                           Evidence irrelevant 
Evidence                                                                     Evidence weak 
Illuminating 
Conclusion 
Conclusion                                                                   Conclusion lacks focus 
Focused 
Conclusion                                                                   Conclusion 
thought­provoking                                                            unimaginative 
Presentation 
Lively                                                                       Presentation boring 
Presentation 
Good visual aids                                                             Poor visual aids 
Co­operation 
Where relevant,                                        No evidence of co­ 
Good Teamwork                                          Teamwork
                        Excellent ……………………………….……….…Poor 

Provisional Grade: 

Advice: How this Seminar Presentation could be improved: 



Date: 
Signature: 




                                                  5 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:41
posted:11/3/2009
language:English
pages:5