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20120426 ROFRTT Item 02c Draft Transmission Project ... - MISO

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									            Transmission Projects

               Not Subject to a

        Federal Right-of-First-Refusal




Proposed Project Implementation Qualifications

                     for

        Incumbent and Non-incumbent

           Transmission Developers




              Draft White Paper

                   April 2012




                      1
1. Definitions

   Applicable Authority. The entity assigned to review and approve qualifications for
   Transmission Developers to own, operate and maintain transmission facilities not subject to a
   Federal right-of-first-refusal. This entity could be a state regulatory commission, MISO or
   another entity.

   New Substation. An entire Terminating Substation proposed within a specific transmission
   project that does not exist prior to implementation of that transmission project. New
   Substations do not include expansions to existing substations where substation expansions
   include i) expanding or upgrading facilities within the substation footprint, ii) expanding the
   substation footprint within the current site boundaries or iii) procuring additional land
   adjacent to or near the existing substation site and expanding the substation footprint into or
   adding substation facilities on the additional land.

   State. A state or commonwealth within the United States or a province within Canada that
   contains transmission facilities turned over to the functional control of the Midwest
   Independent Transmission System Operator.

   Tapped Substation. A distribution substation serving load that is tapped off of a
   Transmission Circuit but is not considered a terminal of the Transmission Circuit and does
   not include circuit breakers to isolate the Transmission Circuit when a short-circuit fault
   occurs on the Transmission Circuit.

   Terminating Substation. A substation located at one of the terminals of a Transmission
   Circuit that contains one or more circuit breakers to automatically isolate the Transmission
   Circuit when a short-circuit fault occurs on the Transmission Circuit.

   Transmission Circuit. A high voltage DC or three-phase AC electrical circuit located
   external to a substation and installed between two or more substations for the purpose of
   transporting electrical energy between the substations.

   Transmission Line. One or more Transmission Circuits, or portions thereof, supported by
   common structures if overhead or installed in common duct banks if underground.

   Transmission Developer. A pre-qualified i) incumbent Transmission Owner or ii) non-
   incumbent developer of transmission projects and subsequent owner of the associated
   transmission facilities for any transmission facilities not subject to a Federal right-of-first-
   refusal that are within the MISO footprint that have been turned over to the functional control
   of MISO. Hereinafter generally referred to as the “entity”.


                                                2
2. Introduction

This white paper outlines proposed project implementation qualifications for entities that plan to
implement, own, operate and maintain transmission not subject to a Federal right-of-first-refusal.
Project implementation consists of route and site evaluation, regulatory and permitting activities,
engineering and surveying, material procurement, construction and final commissioning. The
project implementation qualifications proposed in this white paper do not alter the obligations of
incumbent Transmission Owners for transmission projects and transmission facilities that will
remain subject to a right-of-first-refusal (i.e, as to which such right need not be eliminated),
including i) existing transmission facilities; ii) transmission facilities approved for construction
in an MTEP planning cycle prior to the first MTEP planning cycle where the right-of-first-
refusal will be implemented to the extent applicable; and iii) implementation of future
transmission projects that will continue to be subject to a right-of-first-refusal.

The project implementation requirements represented by the qualifications proposed in this white
paper apply to entities after bid award and before the transmission facilities are placed in service.
Operations and maintenance requirements applicable to entities after they transmission facilities
are placed in service and proposed bid requirements applicable to entities prior to bid award are
discussed in separate white papers. This white paper introduces independent qualifications for i)
implementation of Transmission Line projects and ii) implementation of New Substation
projects. Implementation of a Transmission Line project requires compliance with i) above.
Implementation of a New Substation project requires compliance with ii) above. Implementation
of a transmission project consisting of both Transmission Lines and New Substations requires
compliance with both i) and ii) above.

All project implementation qualifications will be applied on a State by State basis, and it is
possible that a specific entity could be qualified in one State and not be qualified in another
State, or the level of qualification (i.e., ability to implement New Substation vs. Transmission
Line vs. combined projects) could vary from State to State as well.

The remainder of this white paper is organized into the following sections:

          Transmission Line Project Implementation Qualifications
          New Substation Project Implementation Qualifications

The proposed point of demarcation between “Transmission Line facilities” and “substation
facilities” (including New Substations) is assumed to be a vertical plane located between i) the
property boundary of the tract of land owned or leased by the substation owner that contains the
substation and ii) the substation footprint (the ground grid footprint or fence if the ground grid
does not extend beyond the fence). Provisions will be needed to adjust the point of demarcation
when future substation expansions requiring additional land and/or an expanded footprint are
developed.
                                                 3
3. Transmission Line Project Implementation Qualifications

Transmission Line project implementation qualifications are organized as follows: i)
Transmission Line project management, ii) Transmission Line routing, iii) Transmission Line
engineering, iv) Transmission Line material procurement, v) Transmission Line construction and
vi) Transmission Line commissioning. These qualifications are discussed below:

   3.1. Transmission Line Project Management

   It is important that approved Transmission Line projects be implemented in a manner that
   ensures quality facilities, cost effectiveness and timeliness. Therefore, all Transmission Line
   projects should have a project manager employed by the Entity to oversee all aspects of the
   Transmission Line project until it is placed in service. The name and contact information of
   the project manager should be forwarded to MISO within two weeks of selection and will
   serve as the contact point for MISO once the project has been approved by the MISO Board
   of Directors. Quarterly (??) status updates must be forwarded to MISO throughout the
   project implementation, including updates on any potential risks that could impact regulatory
   approval or in-service date.

   3.2. Transmission Line Routing

   Typically, the first step in developing a Transmission Line project once it has been approved
   by MISO is to evaluate potential Transmission Line routes. To mitigate the risk of regulatory
   delay, due diligence must be performed to ensure all regulatory requirements regarding route
   evaluation are satisfied (e.g., public outreach requirements, alternative route evaluation
   requirements, data collection requirements, etc.). Furthermore, legal research must be
   performed to ensure all potential permits and regulatory requirements from other agencies
   with jurisdiction or approval authority over the final route are considered when evaluating
   alternative routes. In addition to regulatory requirements, the routing process must also
   consider financial and technical constraints of the project as well. Modifications that result
   in alternative terminal locations or extended line length could adversely impact both the cost
   of the project and the ultimate performance or benefits of the project. For example, adding
   30 miles of length to a Transmission Line will not only increase the cost of the project, but it
   will also increase the impedance and forced outage rate of the Transmission Circuit facilities.
   Finally, any routing study should endeavor to use existing transmission corridors when cost
   and performance is not significantly impacted as this substantially reduces regulatory risk.
   Exploring potential use of existing corridors should begin in the planning and project
   proposal phase prior to project approval by the MISO Board of Directors and must continue
   through the regulatory process.


                                                4
The entity must employ personnel or use contractors with experience in transmission route
evaluation and/or transmission regulatory support to perform route evaluation studies and
public workshops. The entity must develop a Transmission Line route evaluation policy for
each State approved by the Applicable Authority including a listing of required tasks,
description of standard procedures and a listing of resources to be utilized. Resources may
consist of entity personnel or contractors. Contractors should have ten (??) years experience
performing transmission route evaluation studies, public workshops and/or Transmission
Line regulatory tasks. The route evaluation policy should address applicable state laws,
regulatory requirements of state regulatory commissions, applicable requirements of other
entities with jurisdiction or approval authority over the final route, financial and technical
constraints and use of existing corridors when possible.

3.3. Transmission Line Engineering

Transmission Line engineering includes all design, calculations, specifications development,
material selection, preparation of construction drawings and surveying required to construct a
Transmission Line in a manner that is safe, cost effective and satisfies operational, reliability,
regulatory and performance requirements. There are two important stages of engineering in
the implementation of a Transmission Line project: preliminary engineering and detailed
engineering.

Preliminary engineering is performed after a project has been approved by the MISO Board
of Directors and awarded to an entity, but prior to submitting an application for regulatory
approval. Preliminary engineering is required to provide the information required in an
application for regulatory approval by state regulatory commissions. In the preliminary
engineering phase, each alternative route submitted with the regulatory application is studied
and an attempt is made to determine a very accurate estimate of the total line mileage and the
number of structures required by structure type (i.e., tangent, running angle, double-deadend,
angle dead-end, etc.) for each route studied. In addition, the structure design options (steel
lattice, steel H-frame, wood H-frame, steel pole, wood pole, etc.) used for various segments
of the Transmission Line and the conductor size and type should be finalized at this point as
well for each alternative route. Preliminary engineering must be sufficient to provide all
information and prepare all documents required in the application for regulatory approval,
including updated cost estimates for each alternative route option.

All entities must have a documented engineering process in place to perform preliminary
engineering. Preliminary engineering may be performed by in-house personnel or an outside
engineering firm. Outside engineering firms must be licensed in the States where the
Transmission Line project is proposed.


                                              5
Detailed engineering and surveying is necessary after regulatory approval and final route
selection to provide the documents necessary to order materials, construct the Transmission
Line and ensure the Transmission Line will meet all applicable reliability standards,
regulatory requirements, performance requirements and applicable codes including, but not
limited to, the National Electric Safety Code. The entity may establish engineering and
construction standards ahead of time (e.g., standard structure designs, etc.) that can assist in
performing detailed engineering and design in a more efficient and cost effective manner. At
a minimum, final transmission engineering must include i) structure design or selection of
structures from standard designs if an overhead transmission line, ii) duct bank, manhole and
vault design or selection of standard designs if an underground transmission line, iii) sag-
tension calculations if an overhead transmission line, iv) cable pulling calculations if an
underground transmission line, v) preparation of plan-profile drawings, vi) guying
calculations if applicable, vii) final positive and zero sequence impedance calculations
including shunt susceptance calculations viii) final thermal rating calculations and ix) any
additional calculations necessary to ensure compliance with all applicable standards and
codes.

The detailed engineering package must include, at a minimum, i) results of sag-tension
calculations for overhead Transmission Line sections, ii) results of cable pulling calculations
for underground Transmission Line sections, iii) results of all thermal rating, impedance and
susceptance calculations iv) detailed plan-profile drawings, v) a bill of material (including
required material specifications when appropriate), vi) detailed drawings for foundations,
structures, poles, attachment details, guying details and grounding details for overhead
Transmission Lines, vii) detailed drawings of duct banks, vaults, man-holes, cable splices
and terminations and conduit schedules and assemblies for underground Transmission Lines,
viii) right-of-way cross section elevation drawings keyed to the plan-profile drawings and
showing conductor and shield wire spacing and distances between structure centerlines
(necessary for zero sequence mutual impedance calculations for short-circuit studies) and ix)
a statement by the supervising engineer(s) that all applicable codes and regulations related to
the engineering and design of the Transmission Line have been satisfied, including but not
limited to, applicable local and State codes and the National Electric Safety Code.

After the detailed engineering package is completed and prior to commencement of
construction, a surveyor will be required to stake the right-of-way and locate and stake all
structure foundations, pole locations and, if applicable, guy anchor locations. The surveyor
may be an in-house employee or contractor, but if a contractor, must meet all applicable state
licensing requirements for surveyors for the State where the surveying is to be performed.

From time to time, field changes may be proposed to certain aspects of a Transmission Line
design due to unforeseen circumstances. The supervising engineer must approve all field
changes and all calculations and drawings must be updated prior to approval. Once the

                                             6
project is completed, it will be necessary to update the i) plan-profile drawings and ii) right-
of-way cross section drawings to as-built drawings and maintain and update these records for
as long as the Transmission Line remains in service.

All entities that plan to implement transmission projects not subject to a Federal right-of-
first-refusal should have a documented engineering process in place to perform detailed
engineering. Detailed engineering may be performed by in-house personnel or an outside
engineering firm. Outside engineering firms must be licensed in the States where the
Transmission Line project is proposed. In addition, if outside engineering firms are used, the
entity must employ at least one full-time engineer with three or more years experience
performing Transmission Line engineering and design to act as a liaison with the outside
engineering firm as necessary until the Transmission Line is placed in service. This
engineering liaison could be the project manager but does not have to be the project manager.

3.4. Transmission Line Material Procurement

Upon completion of detailed engineering, material procurement can begin. Entities must
have a documented Transmission Line material procurement policy in place that uses a
bidding process to obtain materials. The entity may use an outside material procurement
contractor or perform this function with in-house personnel. The policy must list qualified
suppliers of various materials and the qualification criteria and process used to qualify these
suppliers. Requests for proposal for materials must include the required material
specifications developed in the detailed engineering process or, when applicable, the entity’s
applicable construction standards. The material bidding process should consider cost, lead
time, material quality and reputation of each supplier.

3.5. Transmission Line Construction

Upon completion of detailed engineering, procurement of materials and receipt of all
required permits, Transmission Line construction may begin. Entities must have a
documented Transmission Line construction policy in place that outlines policies,
procedures, methods, techniques and practices for safely and cost effectively constructing
quality Transmission Lines in accordance with the engineered design. The Transmission
Line construction policy must also list approved tools and equipment for use in Transmission
Line construction including vehicles, heavy equipment, hoisting and stringing equipment,
live line tools, conventional tools, rubber goods and other tools and equipment required for
Transmission Line construction.

Entities may use in-house personnel, contractors or a combination of both to perform
construction tasks. Entities may hire a general contractor or may serve as the general
contractor and hire subcontractors and/or use in-house personnel as needed. Contractors

                                             7
   must have access to tools and equipment approved for use in construction by the entity’s
   Transmission Line construction policy. In addition, contractors must follow approved
   construction policies, procedures, methods, techniques and practices outlined in the entity’s
   Transmission Line construction policy. All contractors must be licensed, insured and bonded
   in the State where work is to be performed. All general contractors or their predecessor firms
   must have a minimum of ten (??) years experience constructing Transmission Line and/or
   distribution facilities. The entity must maintain at least one employee on the construction
   site at all times to act as a liaison between the contractors and the entity. This employee must
   have five years experience in transmission line construction and must be able to read and
   interpret construction drawings and specifications.

   3.6. Transmission Line Commissioning

   Entities must have a documented policy for commissioning Transmission Line projects prior
   to placing the Transmission Line facilities in-service for the first time. Commissioning
   ensures the Transmission Line is complete, built as designed and that any necessary permits
   to energize and operate the Transmission Line have been secured. The commissioning policy
   should also have typical procedures for energizing the Transmission Line for the first time,
   including procedures to coordinate with other entities that may own and operate the
   Terminating Substations, other sections of the Transmission Circuit and, when applicable,
   Tapped Substations.

4. New Substation Project Implementation Qualifications

New Substation project implementation qualifications are organized as follows: i) New
Substation project management, ii) New Substation engineering, iii) New Substation material
procurement, v) New Substation construction and vi) New Substation commissioning. These
qualifications are discussed below:

   4.1. New Substation Project Management

   It is important that approved New Substation projects be implemented in a manner that
   ensures quality substation facilities, cost effectiveness and timeliness. Therefore, all New
   Substation projects should have a project manager employed by the entity to oversee all
   aspects of the New Substation project until it is placed in service. The name and contact
   information of the project manager should be forwarded to MISO within two weeks of
   selection and will serve as the contact point for MISO once the project has been approved by
   the MISO Board of Directors. The New Substation project plan may be integrated with other
   New Substation and Transmission Line project plans and placed under a single project
   manager if the associated facilities are part of one large transmission project involving


                                                8
multiple facilities. Quarterly (??) status updates must be forwarded to MISO, including
updates on any potential risks that could impact regulatory approval or in-service date.

4.2. New Substation Engineering

New Substation engineering includes all design, calculations, specifications development,
material selection, preparation of construction drawings and surveying required to construct a
substation in a manner that is safe, cost effective and satisfies operational, reliability,
regulatory and performance requirements. There are two important stages of engineering in
the implementation of a New Substation project: preliminary engineering and detailed
engineering.

Preliminary engineering is performed after a project has been approved by the MISO Board
of Directors and awarded to the entity but prior to submitting an application for regulatory
approval. Preliminary engineering is necessary to provide the information required in an
application for regulatory approval by state regulatory commissions. In the preliminary
engineering phase, each alternative New Substation site that is submitted with the regulatory
application package must be analyzed in detail and an attempt is made to determine a very
accurate cost estimate by i) establishing a detailed one-line diagram and listing all major and
minor equipment items and estimated material quantities and ii) reviewing each site in detail
to establish an estimated purchase price for property and property development costs where
property development costs include clearing, grading, drainage, landscaping and other
required site improvements. Preliminary engineering must be sufficient to provide all
information and prepare all documents required in the application for regulatory approval,
including updated cost estimates for each alternative site.

All entities that plan to implement New Substation projects not subject to a Federal right-of-
first-refusal must have a documented engineering process in place to perform preliminary
engineering. Preliminary engineering may be performed by in-house personnel or an outside
engineering firm. Outside engineering firms should be licensed in the State where the New
Substation project is proposed.

Detailed engineering and surveying is necessary after regulatory approval and final site
selection to provide the documents necessary to order materials, construct the substation and
ensure the substation will meet all applicable reliability standards, regulatory requirements,
performance requirements and applicable codes including, but not limited to, the National
Electric Safety Code. The entity may establish engineering and construction standards ahead
of time (e.g., standard substation structure designs, standard substation bay designs, standard
protective relay schemes, etc.) that can assist in performing detailed engineering and design
in a more efficient and cost effective manner. New Substation design must be based on good
utility practice including development of an operationally sound substation one-line diagram,

                                             9
layout and associated protection and control schemes as well as space to accommodate
required maintenance including the installation and replacement of major equipment when
necessary and space for heavy equipment and vehicles required for routine maintenance.
Detailed design of protective relay schemes should be coordinated with owners of adjacent
Terminating Substations to ensure protective relay schemes and associated
telecommunications facilities are designed to function properly together, including an
assessment of impacts of the New Substation on remote backup protection capabilities
required at existing adjacent Terminating Substations.

At a minimum, detailed engineering for New Substations must include all design, material
selection, equipment and material specification, supporting calculations and preparation of
construction drawings to facilitate material procurement, facilitate construction and ensure
compliance with all applicable standards and codes. The detailed engineering package must
include, at a minimum, i) detailed one-line diagrams, ii) relay functional diagrams, iii)
general arrangement plans iv) foundation plan, v) ground grid drawings, vi) conduit and
cable trough plan, vii) detailed drawings of foundations, structures, bays, connection details,
attachment details, conduit details, bus details, oil retention basins and other necessary details
viii) conduit and control wire schedules, ix) detailed drawings of control house structure, x)
elementary diagrams of all protective relay schemes, metering and control circuits, xi) wiring
diagrams of all protective relay, metering and control panels and schemes, xii) results of all
supporting calculations including structural calculations, ground grid calculations, bus span
and deflection calculations, breaker duty calculations, seismic calculations and any other
calculations required to design the substation, xiii) detailed specifications for all major
equipment, minor equipment and substation materials, including detailed specification
documents for power transformers and power circuit breakers, xiv) drawings for all site
improvements including grading, drainage, roads and other site improvements, xv) a bill of
material and xvi) a statement by the supervising engineer(s) that all applicable codes and
regulations related to the engineering and design of the substation have been satisfied,
including but not limited to, applicable local and State codes and the National Electric Safety
Code.

After the detailed engineering package is completed and prior to commencement of
construction, a surveyor will be required to stake the substation property and locate and stake
all structure foundations, control house foundations, major equipment foundations, fence
locations, oil retention basins, roads and other site improvements. The surveyor may be an
in-house employee or contractor, but if a contractor, must meet all applicable State licensing
requirements for surveyors for the State where the surveying is to be performed.

From time to time, field changes may be proposed to certain aspects of a substation design
due to unforeseen circumstances. The supervising engineer must approve all field changes


                                             10
and all calculations and drawings must be updated prior to approval. Once the project is
completed, it will be necessary to update the i) one-line diagram, ii) general arrangement
plan, iii) control house drawings, iv) relay functional diagram, v) protective relay, metering
and control elementary diagrams and vi) protective relay, metering and control wiring
diagrams to as-built drawings and maintain these records as long as the substation remains in
service.

All entities that plan to develop New Substation projects not subject to a Federal right-of-
first-refusal must have a documented engineering process in place to perform detailed
engineering. Detailed engineering may be performed by in-house personnel or an outside
engineering firm. Outside engineering firms must be licensed in the State where the New
Substation project is proposed. In addition, the entity must employ at least one full-time
engineer with three or more years experience performing substation engineering and design
and one full time engineer with three or more years experience performing substation
protective relay, metering and control design to act as a liaison with the outside engineering
firm as necessary until the substation is placed in service. The same individual can serve
both engineering liaison functions if so qualified.

4.3. New Substation Material Procurement

Upon completion of detailed engineering, material procurement can begin. Entities must
have a documented substation material procurement policy in place that uses a bidding
process to obtain materials. For substation materials, the entity may use an outside material
procurement contractor or perform the function with in-house personnel. For critical and/or
specialized equipment items such as power transformers, phase angle regulators, circuit
breakers and protective relay units, the entity should bid these items separately or may use
sole source suppliers if called for by the design. Requests for proposals for these critical and
specialized equipment items should be prepared by in-house or consulting engineers with
knowledge and experience regarding this type of equipment, and the request for proposal
should include a very detailed specification of the design, performance requirements and
accessories required for these items.

The substation material procurement policy should list qualified suppliers of various
materials and equipment items and the qualification criteria and process used to qualify the
suppliers. Requests for proposal for materials must include the required material
specifications developed in the detailed engineering process. The material bidding process
should consider cost, lead time, material quality and reputation of each supplier.

4.4. New Substation Construction




                                             11
After completion of detailed engineering, procurement of materials and receipt of all required
permits, substation construction may begin. Entities must have a documented New
Substation construction policy in place that outlines policies, procedures, methods,
techniques and practices for safely and cost effectively constructing quality substations in
accordance with the engineered design. The New Substation construction policy must also
list approved tools and equipment for use in substation construction including vehicles,
heavy equipment, testing equipment, live line tools, conventional tools, rubber goods and
other tools and equipment required for substation construction. Entities may use in-house
personnel, contractors or a combination of both to perform substation construction tasks.
Transmission Developers may hire a general contractor or may serve as the general
contractor and hire subcontractors and/or use in-house personnel as needed. Contractors
must have access to tools and equipment approved for use in construction by the entity’s
New Substation construction policy.

In addition, contractors must follow approved construction policies, procedures, methods,
techniques and practices outlined in the entity’s New Substation construction policy. All
contractors must be licensed, insured and bonded in the State where work is to be performed.
All general contractors or their predecessor firms must have a minimum of ten (??) years
experience constructing transmission and/or distribution substations. The entity must
maintain at least one employee on the construction site at all times to act as a liaison between
the contractors and the entity. This employee must have five years experience in substation
construction and must be able to read and interpret construction drawings and specifications.
In addition, the entity must have a qualified protective relaying technician or engineer on site
to supervise all protective relay and control wiring activities. This individual must also
supervise panel wiring or, if panel wiring is performed off site, should verify all wiring for
each relay and control panel once installed.

4.5. New Substation Commissioning Criterion

Entities must have a documented policy for commissioning New Substations prior to placing
the substation in-service for the first time. Commissioning ensures the substation is
complete, built as designed, functions as designed and that major equipment items meet
requirements for being placed in service. Commissioning also ensures that any necessary
permits to energize and operate the substation have been secured. The commissioning policy
should have procedures for i) acceptance testing of major equipment, ii) calibrating,
programming and/or applying setpoints to protective relay, metering, control and
telecommunications equipment, iii) functionally testing control systems and schemes
including protective relay schemes and iv) energizing the substation for the first time,
including procedures to coordinate with other transmission owners that own the
Transmission Circuits terminating at the substation, generation owners that own generating


                                             12
units connecting to the substation and substation owners that own the other Terminating
Substations (if different than the entity) and, when applicable, Tapped Substations associated
with each Transmission Circuit that terminates at the substation.

For major equipment commissioning such as power transformers, phase angle regulators,
voltage regulators, load tap changers, power circuit breakers, and other major equipment, the
commissioning policy should specify procedures for checking out and testing these
equipment items prior to placing them in service. Acceptance testing is important not only to
ensure the major equipment is functioning properly and not defective, but also to establish a
baseline for future testing conducted as part of a preventative maintenance program.
Acceptance testing includes, but is not necessarily limited to, insulation power factor testing,
transformer turns ratio testing, circuit breaker time and travel analysis, transformer oil
testing, protective relay testing including full functional testing of the entire protective relay
scheme and contact resistance measurements on switchgear. The entity should have detailed
test plans for various types of major equipment (including pass/fail criteria) included in the
New Substation commissioning policy.

For metering, control and telecommunications equipment such as instrument transformers,
protective relays, meters, remote terminal units, tap changer controls, transformer cooling
controls, equipment heater controls, control switches, lockout relays and telecommunications
equipment, it is necessary to initially calibrate and program the equipment including
application of setpoints. All programming parameters including setpoints for protective relay
schemes should be determined and specified by qualified protection, metering and control
engineers and should be based on design specifications and detailed short-circuit fault study
analysis. Qualified engineers or technicians should be used to apply setpoints and other
programming parameter values, and a separate technician or engineer should be used to
verify the settings and other programmed parameters. Finally, detailed functional tests
should be performed to ensure correct operations of protective relay schemes (including
breaker tripping), metering, telemetry (including remote operation of control switches), load
tap changer controls and transformer cooling controls. The entity should have detailed
procedures for applying settings and functionally testing control, metering and
telecommunications equipment included in the New Substation commissioning policy
including pass/fail criteria and troubleshooting procedures.

Prior to energizing a New Substation for the first time, an overall inspection should be
performed to ensure the station is complete and built as designed. In addition, phasing
should be checked and verified visually throughout the entire substation prior to energizing
equipment or facilities, and checked with a phasing meter when appropriate during the
process to energize the New Substation for the first time.



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