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Emergency Preparedness Policeis and Procedures Guide

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					Emergency Preparedness Policies and Procedures Resource Guide




                     [1]                                        7/08
        DeKalb County Advanced Practice Center




Emergency Preparedness Policies and Procedures:
   A Resource Tool for Local Public Health Departments




                                                                        Prepared for

                                                    DeKalb County Board of Health
                                                       Division of Internal Services
                                                          445 Winn Way, Suite 398
                                                               Decatur, GA 30030


                                                                         Prepared by
                                   Public Health Foundation Enterprises, Inc. (PHFE)
                                                        Consulting Services Division
                                              13200 Crossroads Parkway North #135
                                                         City of Industry, CA 91746




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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS



This Resource Guide represents a collaborative effort between the Dekalb County Advanced Practice Center
in Decatur, Georgia and Public Health Foundation Enterprises (PHFE). The Guide contains policies and
procedures gleaned from a number of health- and emergency- related agencies across the U.S. We would
especially like to acknowledge and personally thank Public Health – Seattle and King County, Oakland County
(Michigan) Health Division, and the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) together with
the Center for Risk Communication (N.Y, N.Y.) for their well-written, useful, and organized policies and
emergency-focused documents. We relied heavily upon some of their materials for Chapters 1, 5, and 9.

In addition, we gratefully acknowledge the following health/public health departments who provided us with
significant resources contributing to the policy and procedure templates that constitute this Emergency
Preparedness Policies and Procedures Resource Guide:

Arizona Department of Administration

American Red Cross

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials together with the Center for Risk Communication

Department of the Army: U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventative Medicine

Environmental Protection Agency

Government Accounting Office

Louisiana State Department of Administration

Michigan Department of State Police

National Aeronautics and Space Administration

National Institute for Chemical Studies

New Jersey Office of Emergency Management

Ohio Department of Health

Pan American Health Organization

Public Health Foundation

SANS Institute

States of South Carolina, and Wisconsin

South Dakota Department of Health

Umatilla CSEPP Community, Joint Information System/Center

U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine, Health Risk Communication Program



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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services:
        Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
        Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
                Coordinating Center for Infectious Diseases
                National Center for Environmental Health
        Health Resources and Services Administration
        Occupational Health and Safety Administration
        Pandemicflu.gov

U.S. Department of Labor

Utah Department of Health

Local Health Departments:

Berkshire County (Massachusetts) Board of Health

Coconino County (Arizona) Health Department

Dekalb County (Georgia) Advance Practice Center

Galveston County (Texas) Health District

Huron County (Michigan) Health Department

Kittitas County (Washington) Health Department

Long Beach (California) Department of Health and Human Services

Montgomery County (Maryland) Department of Health and Human Services

Oakland County (Michigan) Health Division

Orange County (North Carolina) Emergency Services

Palm Beach County (Florida) Health Department

Pierce County (Washington) Office of Emergency Management

Pima County (Arizona) Board of Supervisors

Pinellas County (Florida) Health Department

San Francisco City/County Department of Public Health

Santa Cruz County (Arizona)

Public Health – Seattle and King County (Washington)




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                                          Emergency Preparedness Policies and Procedures Resource Guide




TABLE OF CONTENTS

Acknowledgements .......................................................................................................................................................3

Introduction .................................................................................................................................................................13

How To Use This Manual .............................................................................................................................................14

Chapter 1.0:               DECLARATION AND ACTIVATION OF AN EMERGENCY ....................................................................15

   Chapter Summary ....................................................................................................................................................15

   Chapter Acronyms ...................................................................................................................................................15

   Policy and Procedures: Declaration and Activation of an Emergency .....................................................................16

       Declaration of an Emergency...............................................................................................................................16

       Activating A Public Health Emergency .................................................................................................................19

Chapter 2.0:               HUMAN RESOURCES .......................................................................................................................23

   Chapter Summary ....................................................................................................................................................23

   Chapter Acronyms ...................................................................................................................................................24

   Policy and Procedures: Human Resources ..............................................................................................................25

       Duty to Report to Work during a Disaster and/or Emergency ............................................................................25

       Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) ...........................................................................................................................27

       Emergency Overtime Compensation and FLSA ...................................................................................................29

       Child and Elder Care during an Emergency..........................................................................................................34

       Sick Leave during an Emergency ..........................................................................................................................37

       Travel Reimbursement during an Emergency .....................................................................................................39

       Inclement Weather Staffing Policy ......................................................................................................................50

       Alternative Work Schedules ................................................................................................................................52

       Special Duty Assignments ....................................................................................................................................54

       Return to Work Authorization .............................................................................................................................57

       Labor Relations-Emergency Administration ........................................................................................................59



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     Rescission of Leave and Time Off ........................................................................................................................62

  Templates: Human Resources .................................................................................................................................64

     Emergency Call-In Responsibility .........................................................................................................................64

     Special Duty Assignment Email/Memo/Fax .........................................................................................................65

     Special Duty Request and Extension Form ..........................................................................................................66

     Assignment to Alternative Schedule Email/Memo/Fax .......................................................................................69

     Alternative Work Schedule Agreement ...............................................................................................................70

     Rescission of Vacation and Comp Time off Email/Memo/Fax .............................................................................71

  Additional Resources: Human Resources ................................................................................................................72

     Human Resource Policies and Pandemic Planning Workplace Questions ...........................................................72

Chapter 3.0:            VOLUNTEER SERVICES AND CREDENTIALING ..................................................................................75

  Chapter Summary ....................................................................................................................................................75

  Chapter Acronyms ...................................................................................................................................................75

  Policy and Procedures: Volunteer Services and Credentialing ................................................................................76

     Credentialing Procedures during an Emergency .................................................................................................76

     Volunteer Notification and Alerting ....................................................................................................................78

     Contingent Workforce .........................................................................................................................................80

  Templates: Volunteer Services and Credentialing ...................................................................................................84

     Volunteer Services Waiver and Release ..............................................................................................................84

     Contingent Workforce .........................................................................................................................................85

  Additional Resources: Volunteer Services and Credentialing ..................................................................................86

     Volunteer Staffing and ESAR-VHP........................................................................................................................86

Chapter 4.0:            CONTRACTS AND PROCUREMENT ..................................................................................................88

  Chapter Summary ....................................................................................................................................................88

  Chapter Acronyms ...................................................................................................................................................88




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  Policy and Procedures: Contracts and Procurement ...............................................................................................89

     Request for a New Contract during an Emergency .............................................................................................89

     Routine Service Delivery during an Emergency ...................................................................................................93

     Procurement during a Usual Emergency .............................................................................................................96

     Procurement during a Catastrophic Emergency ..................................................................................................99

Chapter 5.0:             INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ......................................................................................................101

  Chapter Summary ..................................................................................................................................................101

  Chapter Acronyms .................................................................................................................................................101

  Policies and Procedures: Information Technology ................................................................................................102

     Data Collection at Points of Dispensing .............................................................................................................102

     Maintaining Confidentiality of Emergency Surveillance Data ...........................................................................106

     HIPAA Privacy during an Emergency..................................................................................................................109

     Electronic Document Storage ............................................................................................................................111

     Telecommuting during Response to an Emergent Event ..................................................................................115

     Remote Access to Agency Network ...................................................................................................................121

     Portable Emergency Systems and Equipment ...................................................................................................125

  Templates: Information Technology......................................................................................................................128

     Sample Assignment to Telecommute Email/Memo/Fax ...................................................................................128

     Telecommuting Form ........................................................................................................................................129

     Telecommuting Agreement ...............................................................................................................................131

Chapter 6.0:            MEDIA RELATIONS AND COMMUNICATION .................................................................................132

  Chapter Summary ..................................................................................................................................................132

  Chapter Acronyms .................................................................................................................................................132

  Policy and Procedures: Media Relations and Communication .............................................................................133

     Filming/Photography of Clients and Facilities ...................................................................................................133




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     Media Policy ......................................................................................................................................................135

     Public Information Officer (PIO) ........................................................................................................................137

     Emergency Public Information (EPI) ..................................................................................................................141

     Providing for the ESL Community during an Emergency ...................................................................................146

     Emergency Alert System (EAS) ..........................................................................................................................148

     Media Access/Security .......................................................................................................................................152

  Additional Resources: Media Relations and Communication................................................................................154

     Emergency Public Information (EPI) Release Priorities .....................................................................................154

     Information Management Cycle at the Joint Information Center .....................................................................156

     Communication and Consistent Messaging ......................................................................................................157

     Risk Communication Challenges Posed by BT and Emerging Infectious Diseases .............................................163

     Risk Communication Rules ................................................................................................................................163

     Risk Communication Theories ...........................................................................................................................164

     Working with the Media and Interview Tips .....................................................................................................166

     Involving the Community...................................................................................................................................168

     Public Meetings .................................................................................................................................................169

     Methods of Communication ..............................................................................................................................172

     CDC Bioterrorism Guidance: Communication ...................................................................................................174

Chapter 7.0:            SECURITY .......................................................................................................................................176

  Chapter Summary ..................................................................................................................................................176

  Chapter Acronyms .................................................................................................................................................176

  Policies and Procedures: Security ..........................................................................................................................177

     Physical Access to Facilities during an Emergency ............................................................................................177

     Reporting Serious or Unusual Incidents ............................................................................................................180

     Handling Suspicious Mail ...................................................................................................................................186




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     Facility Security and Safety/Theft Reporting .....................................................................................................189

     Building Closure .................................................................................................................................................193

  Templates: Security ...............................................................................................................................................195

     Bomb Threat Phone Call Checklist .....................................................................................................................195

Chapter 8.0:            CONTINUITY OF OPERATIONS .......................................................................................................196

  Chapter Summary ..................................................................................................................................................196

  Chapter Acronyms .................................................................................................................................................196

  Policy and Procedures: Continuity of Operations ..................................................................................................197

     COOP Activation, Notification, and Termination Procedures ............................................................................197

     Clarifying Essential Functions ............................................................................................................................199

     Planning Contingency Staffing ...........................................................................................................................201

     Establish Delegation of Authority and Leadership Succession ..........................................................................203

     Designating Mission-Critical Personnel and Delegating Authority ....................................................................205

     Emergency Operations Personnel Essential and Non-Essential Staff ................................................................209

     Alternate Site Plan Development ......................................................................................................................215

     Protecting Vital Agency Records ........................................................................................................................217

     Department Emergency Pager Use....................................................................................................................219

     COOP Personnel Issues ......................................................................................................................................221

     Reduction in Force Policy...................................................................................................................................223

     Closure of Schools and Daycare Facilities ..........................................................................................................226

  Templates: Continuity of Operations ....................................................................................................................228

     Public Health Emergency Roles List ...................................................................................................................228

     Agency Essential Function and Staff Alternate Contacts ...................................................................................229

     Worksheet: Continuity of Operations Plan: Lead Staff, Training, and Contact Information .............................230

     Worksheet: Essential Tasks, Workforce, Supplies, and Records .......................................................................232




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     Worksheet: Essential Functions by Incident Command and Staff Positions .....................................................233

     Worksheet: Limitations on Delegation of Authority during a Declared Emergency .........................................239

     Worksheets: Emergency Payroll Plans and Personnel Issues ............................................................................240

     Worksheet: Developing an Alternate Site Plan Template/Checklist .................................................................243

     Worksheet: Alternate Site Supplies and Resources...........................................................................................244

     Worksheet: Vital Records ..................................................................................................................................245

  Templates: Continuity of Operations, Isolation and Quarantine ..........................................................................247

     Emergency Detention Order ..............................................................................................................................247

     Voluntary Public Health Isolation Request (non-TB) .........................................................................................249

     Worker Health and Safety Guidelines: Essential Staff Planning Sheet ..............................................................250

  Additional Resources: Continuity of Operations ...................................................................................................251

     Pre-Planning Agency Checklist: Critical Personnel, Succession Planning, and Business Continuity ..................251

Chapter 9.0:            EMERGENCY FACILITY ...................................................................................................................253

  Chapter Summary ..................................................................................................................................................253

  Chapter Acronyms .................................................................................................................................................253

  Policy and Procedures: Emergency Facility ...........................................................................................................254

     Evacuation/Shelter in Place ...............................................................................................................................254

     Personal Safety Kits ...........................................................................................................................................257

     Emergency Public Health Drills and Exercises ...................................................................................................259

     Telecommunications Failure during an Emergency ...........................................................................................261

     Power Failure during an Emergency ..................................................................................................................263

     Water Source Loss during an Emergency ..........................................................................................................265

  Templates: Emergency Facility ..............................................................................................................................268

     Power Outage ....................................................................................................................................................268

  Additional Resources: Emergency Facility .............................................................................................................269




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     Safety Equipment/Go Bags ................................................................................................................................269

Chapter 10.0:           BEHAVIORAL HEALTH AND CRITICAL INCIDENT STRESS MANAGEMENT (CISM) ..........................273

  Chapter Summary ..................................................................................................................................................273

  Chapter Acronyms .................................................................................................................................................274

  Policy and Procedures: Behavioral Health .............................................................................................................275

     Behavioral Health Command and Management ...............................................................................................275

     Target Populations in Behavioral Health ...........................................................................................................277

     Behavioral Health Response Activities ..............................................................................................................284

     Employee Assistance Program Policy ................................................................................................................289

  Policy and Procedures: Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM)....................................................................290

     Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) Teams ..........................................................................................290

     Critical Incident Stress Mangement (CISM) Team Activation ............................................................................295

     Debriefing the Debriefers ..................................................................................................................................298

  Templates: Behavioral Health and CISM ...............................................................................................................302

     CISM Team: Application for Membership .........................................................................................................302

     CISM Team: Activation Request Form ...............................................................................................................306

     CISM Team: Debriefing Team Report ................................................................................................................308

  Additional Resources: Behavioral Health and CISM ..............................................................................................309

     CISM Team: Introductory Remarks for Defusings .............................................................................................309

     Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM): The Core Components ...............................................................311

     CISM Team: Coordinator Follow-up Questions .................................................................................................312

     Additional Resource: Behavioral Health in Emergencies Bibliography..............................................................313

Appendix A:             Methodology and Results .............................................................................................................315

Appendix B:             Glossary .........................................................................................................................................316

Appendix C:             Specific Citations/References .......................................................................................................321




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INTRODUCTION



This Emergency Preparedness Policies and Procedures Resource Guide has been created for health
agencies across the United States. The Guide is the result of a joint effort of Public Health Foundation
Enterprises (PHFE) and the Advanced Practice Center at DeKalb County Board of Health in Decatur, GA.
DeKalb County is funded as one of the nation’s Advanced Practice Centers for public health as
designated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Association of City
and County Health Officials (NACCHO). NACCHO is tasked with creating emergency preparedness tools
for public health organizations throughout the country, and is the organization that funded this Project.

The goal was to create a “Best Practices Resource Guide” to help public health agencies develop and
implement special policies and procedures during an emergency. Examples of the policies and
procedures included in the Guide include: human resources/personnel issues (e.g., duty to report to
work in an emergency, Fair Labor Standards Act, sick leave, overtime, credentialing of volunteers,
employee assistance), Continuity of Operations Plans (COOP), security, multiple uses of facilities in an
emergency, (“Emergency Facility”), procurement and purchasing, media relations and communication,
information technology, telecommuting, flexible scheduling, alternate worksites and other policies and
procedures that may be needed during an emergency.

The policies themselves do not contain names of specific public health agencies. We have acknowledged
the agencies whose policies we relied on most heavily in the Acknowledgements section as well as in
Chapter Resources. We provide this Guide in hopes that it helps ensure that all public health agencies
have the tools they need to more effectively and efficiently respond to emergencies.




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                          Emergency Preparedness Policies and Procedures Resource Guide




HOW TO USE THIS MANUAL



This manual is drafted such that the policy and procedures templates can be edited by health
departments and re-used. It is meant to compliment department operational plans. This manual does
not limit department authority to make operational decisions as to essential or needed functions.

The following assumptions were made in drafting this manual:

       State Governors have not waived state legislation dealing with personnel issues;
       Unions will be informed in advance of potential personnel administration changes; and
       Essential functions will be staffed first and other functions will be staffed secondarily.

This manual provides staffing strategies, tools, advice and directives that departments should follow in
the event of an emergency. Of note, many human resources processes may be simplified and the
administration of collective bargaining provisions narrowed in order to meet exigent staffing needs. The
effect of the provisions of this manual confer no new privilege, right of appeal, right of position, transfer,
demotion, promotion nor reinstatement for any employee, contract worker or volunteer. This manual
does not constitute an express or implied contract. It provides general guidance that cannot form the
basis of a private right of action. We hope health departments and other organizations across the
country find it a useful tool for emergency preparedness.




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                         Emergency Preparedness Policies and Procedures Resource Guide




CHAPTER 1.0: DECLARATION AND ACTIVATION OF AN EMERGENCY

CHAPTER SUMMARY

Agencies are charged with maintaining standard protocols for the declaration and activation of a state of
emergency at the local, state, and federal levels. This includes Declaration of the Emergency itself,
Recommendation of Requests for Assistance and actual Requests for Assistance. The policies in this
Chapter clarify agency authority and activities regarding emergency and disaster situations. The Chapter
is additionally intended to assure that agencies will be adequately prepared to cope with emergencies
resulting from a direct threat to public health and to set forth steps for requesting assistance from the
jurisdiction, state, or federal sources.

Activating an Emergency involves procedures for establishing the Emergency Operations Center,
activating the Incident Command System (ICS), activating the Continuity of Operations Plan (COOP), and
determining additional steps to respond to an emergency when the agency Director deems that agency
resources and personnel in their primary, everyday roles are insufficient to respond adequately to the
emergent health event. If this is the case, a number of resources and personnel must be activated,
temporarily reassigned, or deployed for response efforts. Appropriate lines of succession need to be
followed. These general policy statements shall guide emergency response and recovery actions.



CHAPTER ACRONYMS

COOP            Continuity of Operations Plan

EOC             Emergency Operations Center

ICS             Incident Command System




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POLICY AND PROCEDURES: DECLARATION AND ACTIVATION OF AN EMERGENCY


DECLARATION OF AN EMERGENCY




                  <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

               POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                Origination Date

          Declaration of an Emergency                               Page No.



1.0   Policy

      It is the policy of <Your Agency> to maintain the standard protocol for succession in declaring a
      state of emergency at the local, state, and federal levels. <Your Agency> will activate the
      procedures for requesting a State of Emergency through the <Jurisdictional Authority (i.e.
      Board of Health)> only when the <Your Agency> Director deems that <Your Agency> resources
      and personnel are insufficient to respond adequately to the emergent health event. Appropriate
      lines of succession will be followed.

      Requests for assistance in response to a public health emergency must be initiated by the
      <Jurisdictional Authority (i.e. Board of Health)>. The Public Health Officer for <Your Agency>
      may only recommend that the <Jurisdictional Authority (i.e. Board of Health)> request
      assistance, and is not authorized to do so directly. A state of public health emergency for a city
      may be declared by the Mayor, thereby requesting county or state assistance with emergency
      response efforts. A state of public health emergency for the county may be declared by the
      County Commission, thereby requesting state assistance with response efforts to the
      emergency. Only the Governor of the state may declare a statewide or multi-jurisdictional state
      of emergency, if he/she finds an imminent threat or occurrence of a health condition or illness
      that poses substantial risk of significant numbers of human fatalities or incidents of permanent
      or long-term disability. The Governor may, at his/her discretion, declare a state of public health
      emergency by virtue of an executive order with no obligation to consult the public health
      authority at the state or local levels. Only the Governor may request federal assistance for a
      public health emergency within the state.

      These general policy statements shall guide emergency response and recovery actions.

          1. The <Your Agency> will take an all-hazards approach to emergency planning and
             preparedness whenever practical.


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          2. Essential services will be maintained as long as possible.
          3. <Your Agency> personnel will foster cooperative efforts with disaster relief agencies,
              volunteer organizations, and the private sector during mitigation and jurisdiction
              preparedness activities, with the added benefit of fostering prompt and effective
              cooperation during response and recovery activities.
          4. <Your Agency> will use all available local and mutual aid resources prior to requesting
              additional assistance from the <Jurisdictional Authority> or other outside sources.
          5. Assistance from the <Jurisdictional Authority> or other outside sources (beyond mutual
              aid) will be requested through the jurisdiction’s emergency declaration process.
          6. <Your Agency> resources shall first be allocated to incidents within the jurisdiction
              limits, second to mutual aid responders that may have an impact upon the public’s
              health within the jurisdiction, third to other mutual aid responders, and fourth to other
              requestors.
          7. <Your Agency> departments shall activate their staff in support of this Plan and their
              respective Department procedures, as necessary or as directed to support the
              emergency.
          8. On-scene incident management, Emergency Operations Center (EOC) staff, and <Your
              Agency> departments shall provide situation and resource status reports to the EOC
              Director, as requested.
          9. Access to emergency services shall not be denied on the grounds of race, color, national
              origin, gender, sexual orientation, age, physical or mental abilities, marital status, or
              religious or political affiliation.
          10. The Incident Commander will make decisions based upon the best information available
              at the time. A formal evaluation will follow the incident to capture constructive
              criticism/lessons learned and to identify any necessary policy or procedural changes.
          11. The on-scene Incident Commander, EOC Director, or any member of the Emergency
              Management Group, has the authority to activate the Emergency Alert System or
              Community Notification System, when activation criteria are met.

2.0   Purpose

      The purpose of this policy is to set out and clarify the authority of <Your Agency> and its officers
      and employees with regard to emergency and disaster situations. It is intended to grant as
      broad a power as permitted by statutory and constitutional authority. It is additionally intended
      to assure that <Your Agency> will be adequately prepared to cope with emergencies resulting
      from a direct threat to public health and to set forth steps for requesting assistance from the
      jurisdiction, state, or federal sources.

3.0   Persons Affected

      <Your Agency> Director, Delegates of <Your Agency> Director, Department Directors, Board of
      Health members, and other high-level officials responsible for ensuring the emergency
      capacities of <Your Agency>.

4.0   Definitions



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5.0    Responsibilities

       Authorized personnel who are responsible for requesting assistance from the county and/or
       state in response to a public health emergency.

       Preplanning:
       Departments must predetermine officers authorized to determine the need for requesting
       assistance from the county or state as well as officers authorized to request assistance through
       the <Jurisdictional Authority (i.e. Board of Health)>.

6.0    Procedures/Process Guidelines

       1.      Recommendation of Request for Assistance. The Public Health Officer for <Your
               Agency> shall formally recommend that the <Jurisdictional Authority (i.e. Board of
               Health)> request assistance from the County Commission.

       2.      Request for Assistance. Upon review and under their discretion, policies, and protocols,
               the <Jurisdictional Authority (i.e. Board of Health)> shall formally request assistance
               from the County Commission.

       3.      Declaration of Emergency. The County Commission shall, after reviewing all pertinent
               information and at their discretion, declare a state of emergency for the county, and, if
               deemed necessary, request assistance from the state. Such a request will be sent
               directly to the Office of the Governor.


7.0    References/Additional Resources:

8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #        Change                                                   Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Agency Director of Policies>




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ACTIVATING A PUBLIC HEALTH EMERGENCY




                  <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

               POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                Origination Date

      Activating A Public Health Emergency                          Page No.



1.0   Policy

      It is the policy of <Your Agency> to maintain the standard protocol for succession in activating a
      public health emergency. <Your Agency> will activate the procedures for establishing the
      Emergency Operations Center, activating the Incident Command System (ICS), activating the
      Continuity of Operations Plan (COOP), and determining additional steps to respond to an
      emergency only when the <Your Agency> Director deems that <Your Agency> resources and
      personnel in their primary, everyday roles are insufficient to respond adequately to the
      emergent health event, and therefore a number of resources and personnel must be activated,
      temporarily reassigned, or deployed for response efforts. Appropriate lines of succession will be
      followed.

      These general policy statements shall guide emergency response and recovery actions.

          1. The <Your Agency> will take an all-hazards approach to emergency planning and
             preparedness whenever practical.
          2. Essential services will be maintained as long as possible.
          3. <Your Agency> personnel will foster cooperative efforts with disaster relief agencies,
             volunteer organizations, and the private sector during mitigation and jurisdiction
             preparedness activities, with the added benefit of fostering prompt and effective
             cooperation during response and recovery activities.
          4. <Your Agency> will use all available local and mutual aid resources prior to requesting
             additional assistance from <Jurisdictional Authority> or other outside sources.
          5. Assistance from <Jurisdictional Authority> or other outside sources (beyond mutual aid)
             will be requested through the jurisdiction’s emergency declaration process.
          6. <Your Agency> resources shall first be allocated to incidents within the jurisdiction
             limits, second to mutual aid responders that may have an impact upon the public’s
             health within the jurisdiction, third to other mutual aid responders, and fourth to other
             requestors.



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          7. <Your Agency> departments shall activate their staff in support of this Plan and their
              respective Department procedures, as necessary or as directed to support the
              emergency.
          8. On-scene incident management, Emergency Operations Center (EOC) staff, and <Your
              Agency> departments shall provide situation and resource status reports to the EOC
              Director, as requested.
          9. Access to emergency services shall not be denied on the grounds of race, color, national
              origin, gender, sexual orientation, age, physical or mental abilities, marital status, or
              religious or political affiliation.
          10. The Incident Commander will make decisions based upon the best information available
              at the time. A formal evaluation will follow the incident to capture constructive
              criticism/lessons learned and to identify any necessary policy or procedural changes.
          11. The on-scene Incident Commander, EOC Director, or any member of the Emergency
              Management Group, has the authority to activate the Emergency Alert System or
              Community Notification System, when activation criteria are met.

2.0   Purpose

      The purpose of this policy is to set out and clarify the authority of <Your Agency> and its officers
      and employees with regard to emergency and disaster situations. It is intended to grant as
      broad a power as permitted by statutory and constitutional authority. It is additionally intended
      to assure that <Your Agency> will be adequately prepared to cope with emergencies resulting
      from a direct threat to public health and to set forth steps for activating a full response to a
      public health emergency.

3.0   Persons Affected

      <Your Agency> Director, Delegates of <Your Agency> Director, Department Directors, Director
      of Emergency Response, Incident Command System officers, other public health personnel
      responsible for initiating protocols for emergency response in <Your Agency>.

4.0   Definitions

      COOP – Continuity of Operations Plan – provides a framework for ensuring the survival of vital
      government operations following a catastrophic event.

      EOC – Emergency Operations Center – A facility that serves as a central location for the
      coordination and control of all emergency response and preparedness efforts.

      ICS – Incident Command System – a system of handling field response activities in emergencies.
      It provides essential management using these aspects: common terminology, modular
      organization, integrated communications, a unified command structure, consolidated action
      plans, manageable span-of-control, pre-designed incident facilities and comprehensive resource
      management.



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5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning

      Authorized personnel who are responsible for requesting assistance from the county and/or
      state in response to a public health emergency.

      1. Departments must predetermine officers authorized to serve as Incident Commander;
      2. Departments must predetermine personnel trained and qualified to serve as officials in a
         response to a public health emergency;
      3. Departments must ensure proper training (including ICS) for personnel designated as
         response personnel
      4. Departments must predetermine a plan for continuity of operations.
      5. Departments must predetermine protocol for activating and staffing the Emergency
         Operations Center.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines

      1.     Activating Response Efforts. The Public Health Officer for <Your Agency> shall declare
             that a public health emergency has occurred, and that response efforts are needed
             beyond the day-to-day operations of <Your Agency>.

      2.     Activating ICS/Appointment of Incident Commander. The Public Health Officer shall
             appoint an Incident Commander to oversee response efforts, thereby providing the
             authority for activation of the ICS to the Incident Commander. Unless otherwise
             determined by the Public Health Officer, the Incident Commander shall be the highest
             ranking official on-site at the time of activation.

      3.     Organizational Structure. The Incident Commander shall establish an appropriate
             organizational structure to ensure appropriate public health response to the event.

      4.     Additional Response Assessment. The Incident Commander, in consultation from the
             Public Health Officer and other ICS officers or subject-matter experts designated by the
             Incident Commander, shall determine the level of need for additional response efforts
             at the EOC or (if EOC has not been activated) the response site.

      5.     Activation of EOC. The Public Health Officer, in consultation from the Incident
             Commander and other designated public health officials, shall direct the Incident
             Commander to activate the EOC. Such activation shall be followed by an official
             announcement to all <Your Agency> employees.

      6.     Assignment of Response Personnel. The Public Health Officer shall direct Center and/or
             Division Directors to temporarily assign response personnel according to pre-established
             procedures and responsibilities.

      7.     Activation of COOP. The Public Health Officer shall determine, based on consultation
             from Center, Division, and/or Department Directors, the need for activation of the
             COOP. If it is determined that the COOP must be activated, the Public Health Officer


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               shall recommend activation of the COOP to the Board of Health. Only the Board of
               Health shall be authorized to activate the COOP.

       8.      Additional Assistance. The Public Health Officer shall determine if additional assistance
               is needed, based on consultation from the Incident Commander and other high-level
               officials within the <Your Agency>. Requests for assistance shall commence according
               to policies, procedures, and protocols which are pre-determined.

7.0    References/Additional Resources:

8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #        Change                                                 Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Agency Director of Policies>




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CHAPTER 2.0: HUMAN RESOURCES

CHAPTER SUMMARY

Public Health provides public health, prevention, and direct clinical care services for many U.S. residents.
A large-scale or severe local or regional emergency has immediate potential to disrupt these essential
community services, including governmental and business human resource-related functions. An
emergency may result in high absentee rates, including sick employees, employees who are caring for
sick family members and employees who do not come to work from fear of becoming ill. In addition,
there may be a significant need for social distancing (a reduction of the number of persons concentrated
in the workplace), necessitating that employees complete production but do not report to the
workplace. Mass prophylaxis/vaccination programs always represent some level of inherent risk. We
saw this in the national smallpox vaccination program. In some areas of the country, nursing unions and
other groups debated the ability of government to provide for those experiencing severe side effects.
Emergency staffing and backfill of existing positions will be of primary concern in order to provide
essential services and other services to the public. In the event that essential services are adequately
staffed, non-essential services may be staffed, to the extent possible.

Ultimately, these issues are Human Resource concerns, necessitating pre-planning and alternative
strategies. This Human Resources Chapter is drafted such that it can be used immediately by local and
state health departments, and perhaps other groups. It is meant to compliment department
operational plans. It does not limit departmental authority to make operational decisions regarding
essential or needed functions. The following assumptions were made in drafting this Chapter:

        State Governors have not waived state legislation dealing with personnel issues;
        Unions will be informed in advance of potential personnel administration changes; and
        Essential functions will be staffed first and other functions will be staffed secondarily.



DISCLAIMER: This Chapter provides staffing strategies, tools, advice and directives that departments should follow in the event
of an emergency. Of note, many human resources processes may be simplified and the administration of collective bargaining
provisions narrowed in order to meet exigent staffing needs. Many government health employees are represented by various
labor unions. In the event that an emergency is proclaimed, the temporary suspension of certain collective bargaining
agreement provisions may be necessary. The effect of the provisions of this Chapter confer no new privilege, right of appeal,
right of position, transfer, demotion, promotion nor reinstatement for any employee, contract worker or volunteer. This
Chapter does not constitute an express or implied contract. It provides general guidance that cannot form the basis of a private
right of action.




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CHAPTER ACRONYMS

ADA:      Americans with Disabilities Act

CAO:      Corporate Administrative Officer

CPR:      Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation

EEOC:     Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

FLSA:     Fair Labor Standards Act

FMLA:     Family Medical Leave Act

FTE:      Full-Time Employee

HR:       Human Resources

HRD:      Human Resources Division

MLE:      Making Life Easier

OPM:      Office of Personnel Management

OSHA:     Occupational Health and Safety Act

SARS:     Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

SDM:      Special Duties Manager




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POLICY AND PROCEDURES: HUMAN RESOURCES


DUTY TO REPORT TO WORK DURING A DISASTER AND/OR EMERGENCY




                      <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

              POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                     Origination Date

      Duty to Report to Work During a Disaster
                 and/or Emergency                                       Page No.



1.0     Policy
        In order to carry out these responsibilities, it is the policy of the <Your Agency> that all
        employees report to work as required by the <Your Agency> Emergency Response Plan. Under
        these circumstances, the following procedures will be followed:

2.0     Purpose
        This policy establishes guidelines for basic logistics if employees are required to report to work
        in the event of an emergency. The <Your Agency> is responsible for protecting the health and
        safety of the public during times of disaster or emergency.

3.0     Persons Affected
        All employees

4.0     Definitions

5.0     Responsibilities/Preplanning
        1. The agency should make every effort to provide assistance to employees and their families
           to facilitate this work reporting requirement.
        2. The agency should maintain emergency contact lists for key employee family members.
        3. The agency should pre-plan for appropriate emergency shelter locations for both employees
           as well as employee family members.
        4. Employee families need to have a plan in place for childcare during emergencies.
        5. Employees should create family emergency kits.

6.0     Procedures/Process Guidelines

        Where and When to Report



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       Employees will report for work in accordance with the procedures of the <Your Agency>
       staffing plan for functions that are needed during an emergency/disaster. Employees will be
       informed in advance of where and when to report.

       Employees are expected to make every effort possible to get to the assigned work site. If the
       employee is unable to get to the assigned job site due to road closures, the employee should
       report to the nearest fire station.

       Employees who are unable to report must contact their supervisor as soon as possible.

       Family Needs

       If an employee is at home at the time of the emergency, their first responsibility is to care for
       themselves and their family’s immediate needs, and then report to work. If an employee is at
       work at the time of the emergency, the <Your Agency> will make every effort to
       establish contact with the employee’s family to determine status and assist where possible.

       Emergency Shelter

       Should it be necessary for an employee to report to work and they have no place for their family
       to stay, the employee may bring their family with them. The <Your Agency> will make every
       effort to assist in locating appropriate shelter. The employee must, however, provide the
       necessary food, clothing, and other supplies (e.g., medications, diapers, formula, and small toys)
       that they will need. If the employee has no other child care options, child care will be provided.

       Compensation

       Employees will be paid in accordance with <Your Agency> Policy #__________________.

7.0    References

8.0    Revisions

       Date         Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT (FLSA)




                  <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

            POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                   Origination Date



         Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)                            Page No.



1.0   Policy
      The policy of the <Your Agency> is to ensure:
      1. Compliance with all aspects of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).
      2. All overtime must be authorized by the appropriate Officer Supervisor or Branch Division
          Director before submitted to the <Your Agency> Director for final approval. Emergency
          situations in which prior approval is not possible will be reviewed on a case by case basis.
          Overtime should only be implemented when absolutely necessary (refer to overtime
          procedures). When this Policy is enacted, the following Procedures shall be initiated:
2.0   Purpose
      This policy provides administrative compliance by <Your Agency> with the Fair Labor Standards
      Act (FLSA) as established by the State of <Name of State>. For purposes of FLSA, the State of
      <Name of State> is considered a single employer. The provisions of FLSA include guidance for
      establishing work periods, payment of minimum wages, hours of work, overtime compensation
      and required record keeping.
3.0   Persons Affected
              All Non-exempt employees
              May also affect exempt employees in certain situations (see Compensation for exempt
               employees below).
              Human Resources
4.0   Definitions

      The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) is federal law that was established by the US Congress in
      1938 and has been amended several times since then, most recently August 23, 2004. It is
      enforced by the US Department of Labor. The FLSA defines the federal minimum wage,
      employee time recordkeeping requirements, and jobs required to receive overtime
      compensation after 40 hours have been worked in a workweek. The <Your Agency> administers
      overtime compensation in compliance with the FLSA and <Name of State> state law.
      Non-exempt status means positions that are covered by the provisions of FLSA.
      Exempt status means positions that are not covered by the provisions of FLSA because their
      work assignments fall into one of the following categories:
       Executive


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        Professional
        Administrative
       FLSA Work period is a fixed period of seven (7) consecutive calendar days. It does not need to
       coincide with the calendar week and may begin on any day and at any time.
       Overtime occurs when a non-exempt employee actually works more than 40 hours in a work
       period.
       Compensatory Time is the time and a half time received by the non-exempt employee for the
       amount of overtime worked.
       Compensation for non-exempt employees If an employee is non-exempt (covered by FLSA)
       then the time they physically work over 40 hours in a work week is calculated as 1.5 time for
       compensation purposes. If they work overtime but 40 hours or less during the work week (an
       example would be they work additional time during a week with a holiday) they receive straight
       time (hour for hour).
       Compensation for exempt employees Under certain emergency or disaster conditions, exempt
       employees may be required to work extended hours due to the nature of the emergency.
       Although exempt employees are not normally eligible for overtime compensation, in such
       situations they may be authorized for overtime compensation at the discretion of the <Your
       Agency> Director.
5.0    Responsibilities/Preplanning

       1. Managers and Supervisors: responsible for ensuring conformance with the <Your Agency>
          administrative compliance process with FLSA by all employees within their unit; and for
          ensuring that all employees of their unit are informed regarding the FLSA process.
       2. Human Resources: responsible for designating the FLSA status of individual positions.
6.0    Procedures/Process Guidelines

       1. Managers and Supervisors are responsible for monitoring arrival and departure times of
          non- exempt status employees to ensure accurate records are maintained and to minimize
          overtime worked.

       2. Non-Exempt status employees are strongly recommended not to occupy their work stations
          before their scheduled work day begins, during meal periods, and after their scheduled
          work day ends.

7.0    References
       Wage and Hour provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) of 1938 as amended.
8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section



Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>


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EMERGENCY OVERTIME COMPENSATION AND FLSA




                  <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

               POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                Origination Date



 Emergency Overtime Compensation and FLSA                           Page No.



1.0   Policy

      During an emergency<Your Agency> employees may be called upon to work more hours than
      one’s individual job normally requires. This may include overtime (more than 40 hours per
      week).

      Employees may be required to perform their normal duties or they may be required to perform
      work specific to the event (i.e. working at an emergency triage or treatment center). All
      employees who are required to work shall be paid their regular rate of pay for all hours worked
      unless those hours result in overtime; in which, the employee will receive overtime
      compensation based upon the Fair Labor Standards Act (FSLA) guidelines and their exempt or
      non-exempt status. FSLA guidelines allow for overtime compensation for employees in two
      ways: overtime pay or compensatory time off.

      Designations of exempt or non-exempt status are made by the <Name of State> Department of
      Human Resources and the <Your Agency> Human Resources Department, based on the criteria
      established by the Fair Labor Standards Act. Such designations are made on an individual basis
      and are based on the actual work responsibilities assigned to each employee.

      All overtime must be authorized in advance by the appropriate Office Supervisor or Branch
      Division Director before being submitted to the <Your Agency> Director or his/her designee(s)
      for final approval. Emergency situations in which prior approval is not possible will be reviewed
      on a case by case basis. Overtime should only be implemented when absolutely necessary.

2.0   Purpose

      This policy establishes guidelines for the compensation of exempt and non-exempt employees
      during an emergency.

3.0   Persons Affected
            All Non-exempt employees



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             May also affect exempt employees in certain situations (see Compensation for exempt
              employees below).
             Human Resources

4.0   Definitions

      The Fair Labor Standards Act (FSLA) is a federal law that was established by the US Congress in
      1938 and has been amended several times since then, most recently August 23, 2004. It is
      enforced by the US Department of Labor. The FLSA defines the federal minimum wage,
      employee time recordkeeping requirements, and jobs required to receive overtime
      compensation after 40 hours have been worked in a workweek. The <Your Agency>
      administers overtime compensation in compliance with the FLSA and <Name of State> state
      law.

      Overtime – Overtime is work in excess of 40 hours in a work period. Overtime of less than 15
      minutes may not be ordered or approved. It may be recorded and compensated in units of 15
      minutes. When the amount of overtime worked in any day is not evenly divisible by 15, the
      excess time is dropped.

      Compensatory Time – Time off from work instead of being paid additional monies.

      Non-Exempt Employees – Employees who are covered by the Wage and Hour provisions of FLSA
      are considered to be FLSA non-exempt employees. Non-exempt employees are also covered by
      the overtime provisions of the FLSA and must record each hour worked on the time record. If
      the employee works more than 40 hours in one workweek, the employee is paid a rate of time
      and one-half for time worked beyond the 40 hours. Overtime will be granted as compensatory
      time or, in unique situations, employees will receive overtime pay.

      Exempt Employees – Employees who are not covered by the Wage and Hour provisions of FLSA
      are considered to be FLSA exempt employees. Exempt employees are not covered by the
      overtime provisions of the FLSA and are paid an agreed amount for the whole job, regardless of
      the amount of time or effort required to complete the work. Exempt employees do not record
      hours of work on the time record and are not eligible for overtime compensation except in
      unusual circumstances and at the discretion of the <Your Agency> Director. Exempt employees
      typically include supervisory, professional, and administrative personnel.

      Work Period – The standard FLSA work period is a fixed period of seven (7) consecutive calendar
      days. It does not need to coincide with the calendar week and may begin on any day and at any
      time. Employees in the same <Your Agency> organizational unit may have different work
      periods.

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning

      1. Employees who do not know whether their status is exempt or non-exempt should ask their
         immediate supervisors.




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      2. A work period must be established in writing for every employee (both exempt and non-
         exempt) and must be on file in an accessible location.

         a. The work period must define the time of day and day of the week when the employee’s
            work period begins and ends. (Example: Friday at 12:01 a.m. to 12:00 midnight the
            following Friday).

      3. Exempt employees are required to have a defined work period in the event that they
         assume non-exempt duties for a period of time, which may make them eligible for FLSA
         overtime compensation.

      4. An established work period may be changed if the change is intended to be permanent and
         not for the purpose of avoiding the accrual of FLSA overtime.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines

      1. Compensation for non-exempt employees

         a. If an employee is non-exempt (covered by FLSA) then the time they physically work over
            40 hours in a work week is calculated as 1.5 time for compensation purposes.

         b. If they work overtime but 40 hours or less during the work week (an example would be
            they work additional time during a week with a holiday) then they receive straight time
            (hour for hour).

      2. Compensation for exempt employees

         a. Under certain emergency or disaster conditions, exempt employees may be required to
            work extended hours due to the nature of the emergency.

         b. Although exempt employees are not normally eligible for overtime compensation, in
            such situations they may be authorized for overtime compensation at the discretion of
            the <Your Agency> Director.

         c. The compensation for exempt employees will be straight compensatory time (for 8
            hours overtime time worked, 8 hours of compensatory time will be granted).

         d. Compensation to exempt employees working overtime during an emergency shall not
            affect their exempt status.

         e. Compensation of emergency response overtime to exempt employees is discretionary
            and compensation for one emergency operation shall not create a precedent for future
            operations.

      3. Time Worked

         a. Time worked includes all time employees are required to be on duty at prescribed work
            places, and all time during which employees are required or permitted to work.



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         b. Non-exempt employees must be compensated for all time which supervisors know or
            have reason to know is being worked, not simply the time which non-exempt employees
            have been required or asked to work.

         c. Supervisors are not to ignore work which non-exempt employees do on their own time.
            Non-exempt employees are required to report all time worked.

         d. Hours worked includes only hours actually worked and does not include other hours
            paid but not worked i.e. sick pay, vacation pay, holiday, etc. within a pay period.

      4. Reporting Overtime

         a. The amount of overtime worked must be reported to <Agency Department> for
            processing payment.
         b. Records of time worked must be maintained by the <Your Agency> organizational unit.
         c. All authorized overtime must be accurately recorded on a form and must have the
            employee’s supervisor’s sign-off initials.
                  i. The starting and stopping times must be reported.
                 ii. Compensation for overtime will be included in the employee's regular paycheck
                     or be given as compensatory time off as outlined within this policy.
         d. The accrual and usage of FLSA compensatory time must be reported through the system
            in the manner that other leave is accrued and used.
         e. Non-exempt employees may accrue up to a maximum of 240 hours of FLSA
            compensatory time (160 overtime hours worked x 12 = 240 hours of compensatory
            time).
         f. Non-exempt employees must receive overtime payment for FLSA compensatory time
            accrued in excess of 160 hours.

      5. Compensatory Time Use and Payment

         a. Employees must use compensatory time within _____ days following the pay period in
            which the overtime is worked, or by a date designated by the <Your Agency> Director.
                  i. Every effort to provide an opportunity to take the time off within the time limit
                     must be made.
                 ii. Absences taken as compensatory time are shown on the Time and Attendance
                     Report in accordance with the <HR Attendance Manual Name>.
                iii. Compensatory time will be cancelled if not used by the designated date.
         b. Compensatory time is lost when employees leave the <Your Agency>. Employees are
            not entitled to be paid for the lost time.
         c. Supervisors must require employees to take compensatory time in lieu of annual leave.
            Employees may request compensatory time in lieu of sick leave or personal leave.
         d. Monetary payment of overtime to employees will be made only in unique or critical
            circumstances and must have prior approval from the <Your Agency> Director.
         e. Overtime payments are calculated on an hourly rate by adding the employee’s annual
            salary and dividing the sum by 2,080 hours.

7.0   References

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       To review the complete Fair Labor Standards Act, visit http://www.dol.gov/esa/whd/flsa/

8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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CHILD AND ELDER CARE DURING AN EMERGENCY




                     <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

              POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                    Origination Date

      Child and Elder Care During an Emergency
                                                                       Page No.

1.0     Policy
        It is the responsibility of the employee to have child and elder care services in place that would
        serve during an emergency. However, sometimes extenuating circumstances may exist where
        the employee must report to work, but planned child and elder care is not available. Under
        these circumstances, the following procedures will be followed to provide “temporary child and
        elder care”:

2.0     Purpose

        As a special emergency preparedness activity, the Temporary Child Care disaster function team
        works with the partners listed below to make them aware of conditions under which temporary
        child care may be allowed and encouraged:
        1. Existing licensed child care providers are temporarily or permanently unable to continue
            providing services (i.e., overall supply of child care in the community is no longer sufficient,
            as determined through the needs assessment/other sources);
        2. Key Emergency Personnel with young children need child care to be able to report for duty.
        3. Key Emergency Personnel are more likely to report for duty if they are assured of a safe
            place for their children/Elder(s).

        <Insert Your Agency Partners List>

3.0     Persons Affected
        Key Emergency Personnel

4.0     Definitions
        Definition of “temporary child care and elder” for the purposes of this policy: organized
        supervision of unrelated children that may ordinarily be subject to child or elder care licensure,
        but due to the severity of a disaster, may be allowed to operate without a license for a limited
        amount of time. Temporary child or elder care arrangements would be allowed to protect the
        health and safety of children, as well as promote key emergency personnel efforts to aid in
        disaster relief.



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5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning
      1. <Your Agency> must devise a contingency plan for where the children or elders of key
         emergency personnel will stay when a safe and accessible care setting is not available to
         them during an emergency.
               a. Designate a safe room in <Your Agency> building where care can be focused.
      2. Designate employees without designation for other public health emergency tasks who will
         be able to care for children and elders.
               a. These employees should be current in Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR).
               b. These employees shall not have other duties assigned to them.
               c. <Your Agency> may choose to recruit trained child care staff and screen volunteers
                    who would assist staff during an emergency.
      3. Have necessary equipment available to appropriately care for children and elders.
               a. Different developmental levels of toys
               b. Blankets
               c. Sleeping mats or cots
      4. If it is not feasible to house children or elders at the agency site, alternative care sites should
         be determined and whether funds could be made available to help local partners finance
         temporary care arrangements.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines
      At <Your Agency Director>’s request, the Disaster Management Team decides whether
      temporary child care arrangements are needed to supplement existing capacity or make child
      care more easily accessible to workers required to report to work due to the disaster or assisting
      with the relief effort. If temporary child care arrangements are needed, the following
      procedures will be followed:

      1. Using information on worker family needs the determination is made as to what kind of
         temporary child care arrangements may be allowed and encouraged. Examples might
         include:
         a. Ad hoc childcare arrangements set up at such locations as utility offices, police
              departments, or hospitals for the children of these employees who must work during or
              just after disasters, when licensed childcare facilities may still be closed.
         b. Childcare in emergency shelters if shelters are expected to be open for an extended
              amount of time (e.g., longer than a week).
         c. Care offered at temporary housing sites if no existing childcare providers in the area can
              accommodate extra demand (or if transportation obstacles prevent access).
         d. Ad hoc childcare arrangements set up through Head Start, 4-H, or other partners.
         e. Use of childcare arrangements that are license-exempt and would not normally serve
              children receiving subsidy services.
      2. If alternative sites are not available, the agency contingency plan for on-site child and elder
         care will take effect.
         a. A survey of ages of children and elder care needs will be taken. The younger the
              children or more infirm the elders, the smaller the ratio of caretaker to child and/or
              elder should be.



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           b. Designated child/elder care workers will set up the designated room to accommodate
              the ages and needs of the children and elders.
           c. Workers must sign their children/elder(s) in and out whenever they intend to remove
              their wards from care. It is advisable to ask for a suitable list of substitutes for who will
              be responsible for picking up the children/elder(s), as well as require identification for
              pick-up.
           d. Workers are responsible for the food, formula, medications, and small comfort items
              that their children/elder(s) require.
           e. Keep as much as a schedule as possible to assure children that they are safe.
           f. Temporary childcare providers may be approved for a period of up to four months
              (depending on local and State regulations).

7.0    References
       http://ncchildcare.dhhs.state.nc.us/pdf_forms/dcddis.pdf
       http://www.childcareresourcesinc.org/employers/emergency.aspx

8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #    Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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SICK LEAVE DURING AN EMERGENCY




                    <YOUR AGENCY>                                   Policy No.

            POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                   Origination Date

        Sick Leave During an Emergency
                                                                    Page No.


1.0   Policy
      In the case of an emergency all employees who are assigned to activities related to the
      emergency, who are absent due to illness, should be required to provide satisfactory medical
      documentation prior to being granted sick leave. Lack of medical documentation will result in a
      loss of pay.

2.0   Purpose
      Employee illness may occur during an emergency, necessitating the absence of key emergency
      personnel.

3.0   Persons Affected
      Key Emergency Personnel

4.0   Definitions

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines
      1. As standard operating procedure <Your Agency> will notify all employees in writing that in
         public health emergency situations, all employees assigned to activities relating to the
         emergency are required to provide medical documentation for approval of any sick leave
         taken.
      2. Social Distancing Measures: Employees may be asked to follow social distancing measures.
         The time span of different disease scenarios may affect emergency workforce policy. Three
         potential scenarios of disease are: acute influenza, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome
         (SARS), and pandemic influenza.
             a. Acute Influenza
                     i.  2-5 day incubation period
                    ii.  Affected agencies may close for 1-3 days due to acute outbreaks
             b. SARS
                     i.  8-10 day incubation period


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                     ii.Longer incubation period allowing more time to implement social distancing
                        measures.
                   iii. At least 10 days after resolution of a fever or 10 days after potential
                        exposure.
               c. Pandemic Influenza
                     i. 2-5 day incubation period
                    ii. Short incubation period; able to spread more rapidly through communities.
                   iii. Roughly 6-12 weeks for the first wave of the epidemic; varies based on
                        outbreak specifics.

7.0    References
       Public Health Emergencies, School Closures, and Workforce Absenteeism: Tools for
       Stakeholders: http://nciph.sph.unc.edu/law/ud_070706.htm

8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #      Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT DURING AN EMERGENCY




                  <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

            POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                   Origination Date

        Travel Reimbursement During an
                   Emergency                                        Page No.



1.0   Policy
      It is the policy of <Your Agency> to ensure that all appropriate travel reimbursements for meals,
      lodging, transportation, and miscellaneous expenses, as well as mileage reimbursement are
      made in compliance with <Your State Regulatory Agency>. The following procedures will be
      followed:

2.0   Purpose
      This Policy provides administrative guidelines for <Your Agency> to ensure that resources are
      available for reimbursement of expenses associated with travel and mileage associated with an
      emergency response.

3.0   Persons Affected
      Key Emergency Personnel

4.0   Definitions
      Travel expense is used in this policy to mean meals, lodging, transportation and miscellaneous
      expenses.
      Commercial transportation means any entity that offers transportation of people or goods to
      the public for pay.
      Miscellaneous travel expense means necessary and reasonable expense incurred while traveling
      on official business, excluding meals, lodging, or transportation costs.
      County and Municipal Excise Tax means the local taxes charged by hotels/motels for lodging.
      This tax is separate from the state sales tax.
      Employee Travel Expense Statement means the accounting document used to reimburse a
      <Your Agency>employee for travel expenses incurred while on official business.
      Federal per diem rate means the maximum reimbursements allowed to federal employees who
      are on travel status. The available rates only include locations within continental United States.
      The federal per diem rate is used for out-of-state travel expenses.




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      High Cost Area means any area within <Your State>within which meal expenses may be
      reimbursed at a higher amount than the limits that otherwise apply to travel within <Your
      State>.
      Lodging means a hotel, motel, inn, apartment or similar entity that furnished lodging to the
      public for pay.
      Meal expense means the cost of a meal including applicable taxes and tip.
      Travel advance means any payment to an employee for travel expenses that will be incurred for
      a scheduled future trip.
      Travel advance authorization form means the form used to document approval of cash advances
      and to document receipt of the cash advance by the employee.
      Travel exception means written authorization for travel reimbursement of expenses generally
      not allowable under the <Your Agency>employee meetings and travel policy.

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning
      1. <Your Agency Authority> is responsible for communicating and administering the provisions
         of this policy to employees and approving all travel advances and travel expense reports. It
         is the responsibility of the Managers and Supervisor to ensure all travel expense reports are
         accounted for within thirty (30) working days from the date of return. However, during an
         emergency, extenuating circumstances may necessitate a longer period of time to file
         appropriate paperwork.
      2. <Your Agency Authority> is responsible for communicating and administering the provisions
         of this policy to <Your Agency Board> and processing all travel advances and expense
         reports.
      3. Travel should be related to the activities of the disaster designation/detail in which the
         employee or organizational unit is engaged.
      4. All in-state travel must be approved by the appropriate designated emergency manager
         and/or supervisor and the <Your Agency Authority>, who will certify that funds have been
         budgeted for this purpose.
      5. All out-of-state travel for regular <Your Agency> employees must be approved by the
         appropriate designated emergency manager and/or supervisor, and <Your Agency
         Authority>, who will certify that funds have been budgeted for this purpose. All travel must
         be approved prior to leaving for the out-of-state trip.
      6. All out-of-state travel for district employees must be approved by the appropriate
         designated emergency manager and/or supervisor, <Your Agency Authority>, who will
         certify that funds have been budgeted for that purpose.
      7. All requests for approval must be coordinated through the Emergency Operation Center.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines
         1. Meal Reimbursements
             Employees traveling overnight may be reimbursed for the actual cost of meals, within
             the maximum limits established in this policy. Limits are based on the end of day that
             an employee is officially on travel status. The following limits apply to meal
             reimbursements for all employees traveling within most areas of <Your State>:




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 Number of Meals Allowed                  Meals Allowed              Daily Maximum Allowable Expense
                                                                                   (1)

     3 meals per day                  Breakfast/lunch/dinner                       $XX.XX


     2 meals per day                      Breakfast/lunch                          $XX.XX


                                         Breakfast/dinner                          $XX.XX


                                           Lunch/dinner                            $XX.XX


      1 meal per day                         Breakfast                             $ XX.XX


                                              Lunch                                $ XX.XX


                                              Dinner                               $XX.XX




(1)Taxes and tips are allowable expenses; however, they should be included in the total expense
for the meal.
*Generally, employees who travel overnight should not be reimbursed for three full meals on
the day of departure or return, provided an expense was incurred.




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            a. In some areas of <Your State>, employees may experience high costs that cause
               the employee to exceed general meal limits. In recognition of this fact, certain
               areas, as defined in the definitions, have been designated “high cost areas.”
               When working and spending the night in lodging in the designated high cost
               areas, the following meal limits apply:


 Number of Meals Allowed                 Meals Allowed              Daily Maximum Allowable Expense
                                                                                  (1)

     3 meals per day                 Breakfast/lunch/dinner                       $XX.XX


     2 meals per day                     Breakfast/lunch                          $XX.XX


                                        Breakfast/dinner                          $XX.XX


                                          Lunch/dinner                            $XX.XX


     1 meal per day                         Breakfast                             $ XX.XX


                                             Lunch                                $ XX.XX


                                             Dinner                               $XX.XX


(1) Taxes and tips are allowable expenses; however, they should be included in the total expense
for the meal.

            b. Employees are considered traveling in high cost areas of <Your State> when
               their official responsibilities must be performed at a location in a high cost area.
               Employees who are not both working and spending the night in lodging in a
               designated high cost area are subject to the general meal limits.
            c. Employees are considered traveling outside <Your State>when their official
               responsibilities must be performed at an out-of-state location. Employees who
               are working in <Your State> but spending the night in lodging in another state
               are not traveling outside of <Your State>.
            d. Employees traveling outside <Your State> should make every effort to remain
               within the meal limits prescribed in these travel regulations. However,
               employees may be required to travel to some high cost areas that cause the
               employee to exceed the authorized meal expenses. Employees who experience
               this situation should refer to the federal per diem rates to determine an
               appropriate meal limit.
            e. Employees who are required to travel for their job and do not stay overnight
               may be reimbursed for certain meal expenses under the following situations:


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                  i.     Employees acting as an official representative for their department may
                         be reimbursed for meals that are an integral part of a scheduled, official
                         meeting. Reimbursement is only authorized, however, if the meeting is
                         with persons outside the employee’s department and if the meeting
                         continues during the meal. If the meal is provided, employees cannot
                         be reimbursed for meal expenses if they leave the premises of the
                         meeting site.
                   ii.   Employees may be reimbursed for a noon meal not associated with
                         overnight lodging if the meal is a scheduled part of an intra-
                         departmental meeting of training session. (i.e., the meeting or training
                         session continues during lunch and the employees do not leave the
                         premises of the meeting site).
                  iii.   Employees may be reimbursed for noon meals that are part of a
                         required registration fee.
                  iv.    Employees who take annual leave while on travel status may not be
                         reimbursed for meal expenses incurred during the period of leave.
           f.   All meal expenses must be itemized on the employee travel expenses
                statement, indicating the date, location and actual cost of each meal. Taxes and
                tips are also reimbursable; however, they should be included in the total meal
                cost subject to the authorized limits. Meal receipts are not required. However,
                expenses that exceed the authorized general meal limits due to travel in high
                cost areas or out-of-state should be explained on the expense statement.

2. Lodging Expenses
          a. Employees who travel more than 30 miles (and outside the county) from their
                home office, residence or headquarters may be reimbursed for lodging
                expenses associated with overnight travel.
           b.   Employees will be reimbursed for actual lodging expenses, provided the
                expenses are reasonable.
           c.   Employees traveling overnight are responsible for ensuring the most reasonable
                lodging rates are obtained. To accomplish this, employees should:
                    i.   Make reservations in advance, when practical;
                   ii.   Utilize minimum rate accommodations;
                  iii.   Avoid the “deluxe” hotels and motels; and
                  iv. Obtain corporate/government rates, whenever possible.
           d.   Employees traveling out-of-state should refer to the federal per diem rates to
                identify high cost areas of the United States, and to determine whether high
                expenses are justified. The rates published by the federal government,
                however, should only be used as a guide. Lodging expenses associated with
                travel to high cost areas should be approved by the designated emergency
                manager prior to the trip.
           e.   Employees who stay at a hotel/motel that is holding a scheduled meeting or
                seminar may incur lodging expenses that exceed the rates generally considered
                reasonable. The higher cost may be justified to avoid excessive transportation


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               costs between a lower cost hotel/motel and the location of the meeting.
               Lodging expenses associated with travel to high cost areas should be approved
               by the department manager prior to the trip.
            f. When employees on travel status share a room, reimbursement will be
               calculated, if practical, on a prorated share of the total cost. When an employee
               is accompanied by someone who is not an employee on travel status, the
               employee is entitled to reimbursement at a single room rate.
            g. By law, hotels/motels must collect sales tax/use tax. They must also collect the
               MARTA Tax, and a variety of local sales and use taxes. The local sales and use
               taxes include: the local option sales tax, the special purpose local option sales
               tax, the sales tax for educational purposes and the homestead option sales and
               use tax. In most situations, state or local government employees are required
               to pay the taxes noted above. The law specifies, however, that any additional
               excise tax that is charged on lodging is not to be collected from state or local
               government employees traveling on official business.
            h. Employees should review hotel/motel receipts to ensure that taxes have been
               applied correctly to their lodging expenses in accordance with the state tax laws
               and regulations. Employees should attempt to resolve any problems with the
               billing prior to check-out.
            i. Daily lodging expenses, including applicable taxes, must be itemized on the
               employee’s travel expense statement. Employees requesting reimbursement
               for lodging expenses are required to submit receipts with their expense
               statement. In addition, any expenses that exceed the maximum reasonable
               rates established should be explained on the travel statement. Individuals
               responsible for approving travel expenses should review these explanations to
               determine whether the higher costs are justified and allowable.
            j. Employees who take annual leave while on travel status may not be reimbursed
               for lodging expenses incurred during the period of leave.

3. Travel Expenses
   a. Employees may be reimbursed for miles traveled in a vehicle that is personally owned
       by the employee. The mileage reimbursement is set by the <Your Agency>and the
       state, as applicable. The actual reimbursement is calculated by multiplying the number
       of miles traveled by the authorized mileage rate.
   b. Employees may be reimbursed for the mileage incurred from the point of departure to
       the travel destination. During the scheduled work hours, the point of departure will be
       either the employee’s residence or headquarters, whichever is closer to the destination
       point. During weekends and holidays, employees required to work outside their normal
       work schedule will be reimbursed for actual miles incurred.
   c. During the normal work schedule, employees are not entitled to mileage
       reimbursement for:
                   i.   travel between their place of residence and their official headquarters;
                        or
                  ii.   personal mileage incurred while on travel status.



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d. Employees will also be reimbursed for parking and toll charges while on official travel.
     While there are no maximum limits for parking, employees are encouraged to utilize
     low-cost, long-term parking to minimize the cost.
e.   All requests for reimbursement of mileage, parking and toll charges must be
     documented on the employee travel expense statement. Employees are expected to
     obtain receipts for these expenses. If it is not possible to obtain a receipt, then a
     written explanation should be included on the expense statement.
f.   Employees traveling by personal vehicle and requesting reimbursement must record the
     actual odometer readings on the expense statement. Personal mileage is then excluded
     to determine the actual miles. Employees should claim mileage based on the most
     direct route from the point of departure to the destination. Deviations from the direct
     route (i.e., due to field visits, picking up passengers, etc.) should be explained on the
     travel expense statement.
g.   Employees who share a personal vehicle with another employee and do not claim
     reimbursement for mileage should indicate the name of the person they rode with and
     the dates of the trips on the travel expense statement.
h.   Travel by rented or public transportation must be approved by the department manager
     prior to the date of travel. When considering a request, the employee should consider
     the distance to be traveled, the travel time and the cost.
i.   Employees should utilize the most cost effective and efficient mode of transportation,
     as approved by the designated emergency manager. Employees, who choose to travel
     by personal vehicle when air travel is more cost effective, will be reimbursed for the cost
     of the lowest available airfare to the specified destination.
j.   Employees who require air travel may submit their travel request to the designated
     emergency manager. They will utilize the statewide contract, as well as local travel
     agencies, when making travel arrangements for the purpose of securing the lowest
     available airfare. The statewide contract will establish the maximum allowable
     reimbursement for airline tickets.
k.   In general, it is <Your Agency>’s policy that employees traveling by commercial air
     carrier travel in the most cost-effective manner and utilize the lowest possible coach
     fares. Employees traveling by commercial air carrier will not be reimbursed for the
     portion of non-coach (first class, business class, etc.) airfare that exceeds the cost of the
     lowest, available fare on the same flight, unless:
         i.   There is no other space available on the needed flight; or
        ii.   A licensed medical practitioner certifies that because of a person’s mental or
              physical condition, specific air travel arrangements are required. It is the
              responsibility of the department to obtain necessary medical certifications for
              any employee that requires special air travel arrangements due to a medical
              condition. The department should obtain information specifying the expected
              length of time such condition would have an impact on travel needs. The
              department will maintain such information in a manner that would enable the
              auditors to readily determine who is subject to these special travel provisions.




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       d. Employees may, at any time, use personal frequent flyer miles or similar programs
            to upgrade to non-coach travel. In addition, nothing in this policy shall preclude an
            employee from personally paying for an upgrade to non-coach travel.
       e.   Occasions may arise when airlines overbook, change, delay, or cancel flights,
            thereby imposing travel inconveniences on their passengers. In these instances,
            airlines often offer the impacted passengers indemnification for these
            inconveniences. Examples of indemnification that may be offered by an airline
            include vouchers for meals or lodging, upgrades to non-coach travel and credits
            toward future flight costs. Employees are authorized to accept such indemnification
            if the travel inconvenience was imposed by the airline and there is no additional
            cost to <Your Agency>.
       f.   The use of a commercially leased vehicle will be left to the discretion of the
            department manager responsible for authorizing travel.
       g.   Employees may be reimbursed for the actual cost of rail transportation, provided
            the appropriate personnel authorized the travel expense in advance. Employees
            requiring the use of rail transportation may obtain their tickets through Internal
            Services, Purchasing.
       h.   Employees may be reimbursed for necessary costs of transportation by bus, taxi, or
            airport vans for the following situations:
                 i.  Between the individual’s departure point and the common carrier’s
                     departure point;
                ii.  Between the common carrier’s arrival point and the common carrier’s
                     departure point;
               iii.  Between the lodging and meeting places, if at different locations.
       i.   It is expected that airport vans will be utilized when available, when arrival or
            departure is during daylight hours, and when they are the lowest cost alternative.
       j.   Employees may be reimbursed for expenses associated with baggage handling
            services when an expense is actually incurred in moving luggage into or out of
            lodging places, common carriers and/or airports, and when such expense was
            necessary. Employees should not be reimbursed for such expenses if they choose to
            use baggage handling services as a convenience to them.
       k.   All travel by rented or public transportation must be recorded on the employee’s
            travel expense report. Employees requesting reimbursement must submit receipts
            for travel by commercial air carrier or railroad and for the cost of commercially
            leased vehicles. Receipts are required for travel by taxi and airport vans. All
            transportation expenses should be itemized on the employee travel expense
            statement.

4. Miscellaneous Travel Expenses
       a. Employees may be reimbursed for expenses incurred for work related telephone
          and facsimile messages. Employees must document these claims on the travel
          expense statement and indicate the location from which each call was made, the
          person contacted and the reason for the communication. Personal calls made while




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          on travel status are not reimbursable. Receipts/invoices should accompany the
          travel expense report.
       b. Expenses for stationery, supplies or duplicating services may be reimbursed,
          provided that the expense is directly associated with a work related project and the
          cost is reasonable. In addition, work related postage expenses may be reimbursed.
          Employees requesting reimbursement for these expenses must document actual
          expenses on the travel statement and explain the purpose for these expenses.
          Receipts/invoices should accompany the travel expense statement.
       c. Registration fees required for participation in workshops, seminars or conferences
          that an employee is directed and/or authorized to attend will be allowed when
          supported by a paid receipt or a copy of the check showing payment. Any part of a
          registration fee applicable to meals will be reported as a meal expense, and not as a
          registration fee, if the costs can be separately identified. Employees are encouraged
          to submit required registration fees to the <Finance Department> for payment prior
          to the conference.
       d. The following expenses are not reimbursable unless specific legal authority has been
          established:
              i.   Laundry
             ii.   Tipping for hotel concierge or maid services
            iii.   Valet services for parking, when self-parking options are available
            iv.    Theater
             v.    Entertainment
            vi.    Alcoholic beverages

5. Travel Advances
       a.  In general, each agency is authorized to set specific policies and procedures
          regarding travel advances, provided the policies and procedures do not conflict with
          any regulations.
       b. The purpose of travel advances is to minimize the financial burden on employees
          while traveling on behalf of <Your Agency> Funds may be advanced for anticipated
          subsistence (meals and lodging), as well as for mileage and other transportation
          costs which are reimbursable under these travel regulations.
       c. The designated emergency manager is required to specifically authorize each cash
          advance made to an employee. The Travel Expense Report should be signed by the
          designated emergency manager. This request should be prepared and submitted at
          the earliest practical time. If unsure of the timeliness of the cash advance request,
          consult Accounts Payable, which is subject to review and possible denial.
       d. Each employee receiving a cash advance shall sign and date the travel authorization
          form acknowledging receipt of funds. All employees are fully responsible for funds
          advanced to them and shall account for funds in accordance with the <Your
          Agency> policies. Employees are liable for any advanced funds that are lost or
          stolen.




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         Neither state law nor these regulations, however, in any way relieve the department
         manager from the responsibility of accounting for all funds expended for travel
         purposes.
      e. When the actual travel expenditures reported on the travel expense statement
         exceed the amount of the cash advance, the employee shall be reimbursed for the
         additional travel costs incurred within the established travel guidelines.
      f. Cash advances for specific trips shall be recovered under the following
         circumstances:
             i.  When the actual travel expenditures reported on the travel expense
                 statement are less than the amount of the cash advance, the employee shall
                 reimburse the agency for the difference. This reimbursement shall be made
                 at the same time that the travel expense statement is submitted;
            ii.  In the event of cancellation or indefinite postponement of authorized travel,
                 any cash advances which were made shall be refunded immediately; and
           iii.  Outstanding travel advances shall be recovered from terminating
                 employees. Each department shall establish procedures to notify Human
                 Resources regarding terminating employee’s outstanding cash advances.

6. Reimbursement Procedures
      a. Employees requesting reimbursement for travel expenses are required to submit
            their claim to authorized personnel on the employee travel expense statement. A
            copy of the travel expense report is attached.
      b. Requests for reimbursement should include the following information:
          i.    Itemized expenses for authorized meals, lodging, mileage, transportation, and
                miscellaneous expenses;
         ii.    Explanation of any expenses which exceed the established limits or any unusual
                expenses;
        iii.    Explanation of the purpose of the trip; and
        iv.     Description of the type(s) of transportation used.
      c. Employees are required to sign their travel expense statement, attesting that the
            information presented on the form is accurate. Employees who provide false
            information are subject to criminal penalty.
      d. Employees are also required to submit receipts for the following expenses:
          i.    Lodging
         ii.    Airline or Railroad Fares
        iii.    Rental of Motor Vehicles
        iv.     Supplies, and
         v.     Registration Fees, if applicable
      e. Receipts for parking, toll ways, taxi or airport vans, and communication expenses
            are required. However, if receipts are not available, employees are required to
            include an explanation of the expense on the travel expense statement. Receipts
            for meals are not required.

7. Compensatory Time



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           a. Compensatory time awarded for personal hours spent traveling should be granted
              according to established <Your Agency> policy.

       8. Responsibility
          a. <Your Agency Authority> is responsible for examining and approving claims for
              reimbursement under these travel regulations. Claims should be reviewed to ensure
              that they are reasonable, accurate and only cover expenses incurred by the employee.
          b. Claims that exceed the established limits should be reviewed closely to ensure that the
              explanations are sufficient to justify the higher expense. Employees should not assume
              that all travel expenses that exceed the authorized limits and are explained on the travel
              expense statement will be automatically approved.
7.0    References

8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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INCLEMENT WEATHER STAFFING POLICY




                    <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

            POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                     Origination Date

         Personnel- Inclement Weather
                                                                      Page No.

1.0   Policy
      This Policy provides procedures for agency staffing in severe/inclement weather. The Agency
      Executive will determine the staffing levels needed during inclement weather. In a
      severe/inclement weather event, the following procedures will be followed:

2.0   Purpose
      Because government offices cannot close completely and must continue to provide emergency
      services, coordinate government responses to disasters, and care for citizens who are entrusted
      to our institutions, essential employees will always be expected to deliver services. Essential
      employees are those employees requested by management to work during a period of
      inclement weather.

3.0   Persons Affected
      All Employees

4.0   Definitions

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning

      1. <Your Agency> should maintain current employee emergency contact lists.
      2. <Your Agency> should ensure employees know which local radio station(s) will broadcast
         inclement weather facility closures.
              a. Schools are accustomed to these procedures but other agencies may not be as
                   familiar with implementing these procedures.
      3. Employees should maintain family emergency plans, kits, and contact information.
      4. In cases where the <Your Agency> does not control the building in which a <Your Agency>
         office is located, <Your Agency> managers should work with the building owners or lessors
         to establish a procedure which ensures <Your Agency> employees access to offices in order
         to remain open at least for communicating with the public and handling administrative
         duties.



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6.0    Procedures/Process Guidelines

       1. The <Agency Executive Title> will determine the staffing levels needed during inclement
          weather.
       2. If inclement weather threatens or occurs, employees who do not report to, or remain at,
          their work site may be absent with the prior approval of their supervisor.
       3. In cases where the <Your Agency> does not control the building in which a <Your Agency>
          office is located, <Your Agency> managers should work with the building owners or lessors
          to establish a procedure which ensures <Your Agency> employees access to offices in order
          to remain open at least for communicating with the public and handling administrative
          duties.
       4. Employees who do not work due to inclement weather may request approval to:
               a. Adjust their work week;
               b. Take annual leave; or
               c. Take leave without pay.
       5. This policy is effective even if no employee can reach the work site.
       6. This policy does not mean employees should take undue risks during inclement weather.
               a. Employees who believe they cannot safely reach the worksite or travel home at the
                    end of the scheduled workday should make arrangements with their supervisor to
                    be absent from work.
       7. If no employee can reach the work site, the office supervisor shall notify the <Your Agency>
          office.
               a. The <Agency Executive Title> must approve the closing of any office, and is
                    responsible for assuring that local radio stations announce that <Your Agency>
                    offices are not currently staffed.
               b. Employees who are unsure if the worksite is open must contact their supervisor
                    prior to the start of their shift.
               c. The <Your Agency> will continuously re-evaluate weather conditions during the day
                    so the office can conduct business as soon as possible.
               d. The <Agency Executive Title> will determine whether <Your Agency> offices will be
                    staffed and will notify local radio stations.
7.0    References
8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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ALTERNATIVE WORK SCHEDULES




                      <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

               POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                    Origination Date

              Alternative Work Schedules
                                                                        Page No.


1.0     Policy
        The administration of alternative work schedules will be modified during a proclaimed
        emergency to enhance social distancing, business continuity or other response goals using the
        following procedures:

2.0     Purpose
        Normal and alternative schedules may be changed with 24 hour notice or minimal notice.

3.0     Persons Affected
        Key Emergency personnel

4.0     Definitions

5.0     Responsibilities/Preplanning
        <Your Agency> shall review their normal business hours and work schedules to determine if
        they can be modified and staffed with personnel on alternative schedules.

6.0     Procedures/Process Guidelines
        1. In addition to regular full-time employees, regular part-time and temporary employees may
           work alternative schedules.1
        2. Departments shall review their normal business hours and work schedules to determine if
           they can be modified in a manner that best promotes social distancing, business continuity
           or other response goals during an emergency.
        3. Departments will identify first responder functions, essential functions and non-essential
           functions that may be staffed with personnel on alternative schedules.


1
  Please note that an alternative work schedule for a part-time employee simply means a change in the scheduled
workweek and does not mean that the part-time Full-Time Employee (FTE) may be increased. However, the part-
time employee may be worked beyond their normal part-time hours on a very limited exigent basis.


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        4. If feasible, supervisors should first ask for employees to volunteer to work hours other than
            their usual schedule. Where certain work schedules cannot be staffed with volunteers,
            department management may direct staff to work the schedules necessary.
        5. Regular work schedules may be changed by a supervisor subject to a 24 hour cancellation
            notice, when possible, upon the proclamation of an emergency. If less than a 24 hour notice
            is necessary, department management may make such changes.2
        6. Alternative work schedules may be changed by a supervisor subject to a 24 hour
            cancellation notice upon the declaration of an emergency, when possible. If less than a 24
            hour notice is necessary, department management may make such changes.
        7. Departments are encouraged to work with staff to minimize the impacts of decisions
            affecting schedule changes. Rest and meal period requirements continue no matter what
            type of work schedule is assigned. Overtime is probable and should be expected.
        8. Alternative work schedules may be processed via email, fax or telephone. Approved
            schedules shall also be formally documented. Such documentation should occur within one
            week of the start of an alternative schedule or as soon as practicable thereafter. A
            supervisor may document the change via email, memorandum, fax or Alternative Schedule
            Agreement form.
        9. If an employee makes a request for an alternative work schedule and the request is denied,
            no written explanation of why the request has been denied is required during the
            proclaimed emergency.
        10. Management may assign an employee back to their regular schedule as appropriate.
                 a. If an employee is assigned back to his or her regular schedule during an emergency,
                    the assignment is subject to a 24 hour cancellation notice, when possible; if less
                    than a 24 hour notice is necessary, department management may make such
                    changes as necessary.
                 b. If an employee is assigned back to his or her regular schedule after the emergency is
                    declared over, the assignment is subject to notification periods contained in
                    applicable collective bargaining agreements.
7.0     References
8.0     Revisions

        Date          Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




2
 Many collective bargaining agreements provide for a specific notification period. During an emergency, the
notification period may not be practicable to apply and enforce.


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SPECIAL DUTY ASSIGNMENTS




                    <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

               POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                  Origination Date

               Special Duty Assignments
                                                                      Page No.

1.0   Policy

      This Administration of Special Duty Policy must be in accordance with Agency Codes and
      Personnel Guidelines. Completion of a Special Duty Request and Extension form is currently
      required for all special duty assignments involving higher pay. If this Policy comes into effect,
      the following procedures will be initiated:

2.0   Purpose

      A special duty assignment may be needed when higher-level duties and responsibilities comprise
      the majority of an employee’s work performed.

3.0   Persons Affected

      Employees for whom higher-level duties and responsibilities temporarily comprise the majority
      of work performed.

4.0   Definitions

      A special duty assignment is defined as a temporary assignment of an employee to an existing
      higher-level classification when the higher-level duties and responsibilities comprise the
      majority of the work performed. Special duty pay is not available for assignment to other units
      or other duties unless that assignment also encompasses duties of a higher classification.

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning

      Departments should identify areas where special duty assignments are expected to occur.

      Collective bargaining agreement provisions dealing with special duty assignments and
      notification periods may be suspended.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines



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1. An expedited process, including email notification, should be used to document the
   assignment, instead of forms routed for signature.

2. Only in the event that an employee is assigned to higher level duties will they be paid
   special duty.

        a. Special duty pay is not appropriate where an employee is simply assigned different
           duties which are not higher level duties or where an employee is simply assigned to
           work in a different work unit if the work performed there are not higher level
           duties.

3. Employees may be assigned to perform duties of an equal or lower classification, without
   reduction in base pay.

4. Should an emergency be declared, assignments to special duty involving higher pay will
   continue to be made prospectively but approvals and notification to the employee may be
   made prior to the commencement of the assignment either via e-mail or using the Special
   Duty form.

        a. If the email process is used, then routing the special duty form will not be required.

        b. An assignment to special duty may be made via e-mail, memorandum or fax only for
           the duration of the proclaimed emergency.

        c. Where an email, memorandum or fax is used:

                 i. For an initial request of 6 months or less, the email originates with the
                    employee’s supervisor, manager or the division director and is emailed to
                    the <Department’s Human Resources Manger> or his or her designee, who
                    may approve or deny the request by simply replying to the email.

                ii. For the first extension request of 7-12 months, the email originates with the
                    employee’s supervisor or manager and is emailed to the <Human Resources
                    Division Director> or his or her designee, who may approve or deny the
                    request by simply replying to the email.

               iii. For the second extension request of 13-18 months, the email originates
                    with the employee’s supervisor or manager and is emailed to the <Agency
                    Administrative Officer>, who may approve or deny the request by simply
                    replying to the email.

               iv. For the third and final extension request of 18-24 months, the email
                   originates with the employee’s supervisor or manager and is emailed to the
                   <Agency Administrative Officer>, who may approve or deny the request by
                   simply replying to the email.




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7.0    References

       The Special Duty Form and a sample email/ memorandum/fax are attached in the Templates at
              the end of this Chapter.

8.0    Revisions


       Date         Rev. #   Change                                                     Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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RETURN TO WORK AUTHORIZATION




                         <YOUR AGENCY>                                    Policy No.

                    POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                 Origination Date

               Return to Work Authorization
                                                                          Page No.


1.0        Policy

           In the event <Your Agency Executive> declares an emergency, the following procedures will be
           in effect for the duration of the emergency:


2.0        Purpose
           Employees may be returning to duties outside of their typical jurisdiction.

3.0        Persons Affected
           Key Emergency Personnel

4.0        Definitions

5.0        Responsibilities/Preplanning
           Managerial and HR practitioner training on symptoms of the public health outbreak

6.0        Procedures/Process Guidelines
           Returning from Leave: In the event that an employee is ready to return to work from a leave
           (paid, unpaid, or military) the following procedures shall apply:
           1. The employee who is ready to return from leave shall contact his/her supervisor (or a
               person acting in his/her capacity) for instructions on when and where the employee should
               return for assignment, provided an assignment is available prior to the day that the
               employee proposes to return. Contact shall be made in the manner deemed appropriate by
               the work unit.
           2. The supervisor shall inform the employee as to whether or not the employee’s return to
               work is authorized.3 If it is authorized, the employee should be informed of his/her work
               location (or whether the employee will be assigned to work from a remote location or
               telecommute), work schedule and shift, and specific work assignments, if different from the
               employee’s regular assignment.

3
    Of note, if the employee returns to work and appears ill, the supervisor may send the employee back home.


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       3. In administering this section, medical certifications may not be required.
       4. After the emergency, the requirements for the employee to provide a medical
          release/return to work verification form from a health care professional will be restored,
          unless otherwise notified by the employee’s supervisor.


7.0    References

8.0    Revisions

       Date         Rev.

                    No.        Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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LABOR RELATIONS-EMERGENCY ADMINISTRATION




                       <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

               POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                     Origination Date

      Labor Relations- Emergency Administration
                                                                         Page No.


1.0      Policy
         In the event that an emergency is proclaimed by a local or state Executive, the emergency may
         necessitate the suspension of certain collective bargaining agreement provisions in order to
         staff and administer the functions of a department, division and/or work unit. Provisions should
         be suspended only when narrowly tailored for the emergency situation. Provisions suspended
         may include but are not limited to those which deal with:
           Scheduling
           Notification procedures
           Assignment of work

         To the extent possible, compensation provisions will not be suspended but may be streamlined
         in order to administer payroll in a timely manner.

         In the event an emergency is proclaimed the following procedures will be followed in the
         administration of collective bargaining:


2.0      Purpose
         An emergency may necessitate the suspension of certain collective bargaining agreement
         provisions in order to staff and administer the functions of a department, division and/or work
         unit.

3.0      Persons Affected
         All Employees

4.0      Definitions

5.0      Responsibilities/Preplanning
         Suspension of certain collective bargaining agreement provisions must be carefully analyzed and
         communicated to employees and union representatives prior to and during an emergency.
         Departments will do this with the assistance of Human Resources Division Labor Relations.
         Create a local Labor Relations staff (Manager and Negotiators) contact list.


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6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines

      Guiding Principles

              1.     Should an emergency be proclaimed, emergency administration of collective
                     bargaining agreements may be invoked where:

                     a. The local or state Executive has proclaimed a temporary emergency;

                     b. The emergency threatens to impair agency operations;

                     c. The need to address the threat results in an unavoidable suspension of
                             certain collective bargaining agreement provisions;

                     d. Suspension of collective bargaining agreement provisions is narrowly tailored
                             as necessary to provide services during an emergency; and

                     e. Suspension of collective bargaining agreement provisions is limited to the
                             duration of the emergency.

              2.     The provisions of the respective collective bargaining agreement that are
                     temporarily suspended due to the emergency should be those that:

                     a. Ensure that functions of the unit can be staffed safely;

                     b. Have the least disruptive effect on bargaining unit employees; and

                     c. Have the least disruptive effect on non-bargaining unit employees.

              3.     Managers and supervisors should follow the provisions of collective bargaining
                     agreements to the extent possible, without causing too much difficulty in
                     administering a work unit during the emergency.

              4.     Managers and supervisors should provide as much notice to employees as
                     possible, given the circumstances, of any change affecting employees.

              5.     In the event that an emergency is proclaimed, managers and supervisors should
                     refer to a list of local Labor Negotiators who will be available to assist in using
                     these guidelines.

      Communicate to employees that certain provisions of their respective collective bargaining
      agreement have been suspended. For instance, the emergency may result in high absentee
      rates resulting in the loss of the necessary number of employees to perform the identified
      functions of the work unit. The employee absentee rate may reach a point where, in order to
      perform the functions of the work unit, it is necessary to use employees outside of the
      bargaining unit to perform the work.

              Some other examples are:


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               1.      Previously approved vacation, compensatory time, leave of absences (other
                       than for sick or family leave purposes) may be rescinded with minimal notice.
               2.      Employees may be required to report for work with minimal notice.
               3.      Employees’ work schedules and/or hours of work may change with minimal
                       notice.
               4.      Employees may be required to telecommute with minimal notice.
               5.      Employees may be assigned overtime with minimal notice.
               6.      Employees may be assigned special duty with minimal notice.
               7.      Employees may be assigned to other work units with minimal notice.

       Pay and Break Periods
              1. Compensation will be paid in accord with the respective collective bargaining
                  agreements or personnel policies, as appropriate, for all work performed.
              2. Rest and Meal Periods will be administered in accordance with the employees’
                  labor agreement, Personnel Guidelines and state law. Should exigent circumstances
                  exist where rest and/or meal periods cannot be taken, employees will be paid for
                  any missed rest and/or meal period.

       Contract Negotiations and Administration

               During the period of the emergency, the agency may temporarily suspend collective
               bargaining negotiations, grievance processing and labor-management committee
               meetings. Labor representatives should contact the Labor Negotiator for their
               respective collective bargaining agreement if she or he has questions or concerns about
               these guidelines or how they are being applied.


7.0    References

8.0    Revisions

       Date         Rev. #   Change                                                     Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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RESCISSION OF LEAVE AND TIME OFF




                           <YOUR AGENCY>                                               Policy No.

                   POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                               Origination Date

       Rescission of Approved Executive Leave,
      Vacation Leave & Compensatory Time Off                                           Page No.



1.0       Policy
          During an emergency, the ability to rescind previously approved vacation leave and
          compensatory time off currently exists in the event of business need.4 When rescission is
          required the following procedures will be followed:
2.0       Purpose
          Because an emergency may cause significant staffing shortages, previously approved executive leave,
          vacation leave and compensatory time off may be rescinded in order to provide staffing coverage for
          agency services.
3.0       Persons Affected
          All <Your Agency> Employees
4.0       Definitions
5.0       Responsibilities/Preplanning
          Managers and supervisors should keep an updated calendar of all approved time off and
          provide access of that calendar to those in their line of succession.
6.0       Procedures/Process Guidelines
          1. Executive leave, vacation and/or compensatory time off should only be rescinded where the
               supervisor is unable to adequately staff a work unit or project.
          2. Executive leave, vacation and/or compensatory time off should be rescinded as soon as the
               supervisor believes that a potential staffing shortage will require that the employee report
               to work.
          3. Prior to rescinding previously approved vacation leave or compensatory time off, the
               supervisor should attempt to staff the unit or project through other available means (i.e.,
               seek available staff to volunteer for the work or staff with other available employees or
               contract workers).




4
 Rescissions may not be made where the approved leave is a necessary extension of sick leave to be used in conjunction with Agency Family
Medical Leave.




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       4. Rescission of an employee’s leave which is already in progress shall be reasonably based
          upon the employee’s ability to report to work.
               For example, it would be reasonable to require that an employee who is on vacation at home
               report to work but unreasonable to require that an employee who is on vacation out of the
               country report to work.
       5. When rescinding vacation and/or compensatory time off, the supervisor shall have actual
          contact with the employee to ensure that the employee received the directive to report to
          duty. Rescission should be made in writing, if possible.
               For example, an email exchange between the employee and the supervisor or a letter from the
               supervisor to the employee in which the employee acknowledges receipt is acceptable contact; a
               message left on an employee’s home telephone message recorder is not an acceptable contact,
               unless the message was left and employee returned the call acknowledging the directive.
       6. Employees eligible for vacation leave may accrue up to sixty days vacation leave, pro-rated
          to reflect their normally scheduled work day. However, should the need for an employee to
          work during an emergency result in the employee going beyond the maximum accrual
          amount, the appointing authority may submit a recommendation to the <Human Resources
          Division Director> that the employee be allowed to carryover vacation leave.
       7. While employees who have accrued compensatory time off have a right to use it within a
          reasonable time of their request, such may not be the case in the event of an emergency,
          where an employee’s absence would disrupt <Your Agency> business operations. Should
          rescission of compensatory time off due to a proclaimed emergency occur, the appointing
          authority may submit a recommendation to the <Human Resources Division Director> that
          the employee be allowed to carryover accrued compensatory time. Compensatory hours
          that have been carried over shall be used within the first quarter of the new calendar year.

          Should, at year end, an employee have accrued compensatory time that is not carried over,
          it will be paid to the employee.
       8. Executive leave cannot be carried over or cashed out—it must be used in the calendar year
          that it is granted or it is forfeited.
7.0    References
8.0    Revisions


       Date        Rev. #    Change                                                     Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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TEMPLATES: HUMAN RESOURCES



EMERGENCY CALL-IN RESPONSIBILITY



                                                                                          <AGENCY SEAL HERE>




                                EMERGENCY CALL-IN RESPONSIBILITY


The <Your Agency> is one of the key Departments to be mobilized in the event of an emergency. As an
employee of the <Your Agency>, you can be called to work in the event of an emergency, irrespective of
the time of day or the day of the week. You have an obligation to be prepared for such an event if it
becomes necessary.

In the event of the emergency, it is unlikely that all employees will be called in at once. Depending on
the extent of the disruption, some of you may not be called in at all. But it is important that you
understand that this is a job expectation and must be prepared to respond, if called.




Name (print)                                                 Date




Signature




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SPECIAL DUTY ASSIGNMENT EMAIL/MEMO/FAX



                              SPECIAL DUTY ASSIGNMENT EMAIL/MEMO/FAX
From: <Appointing Authority>

Sent:    Date

To:      <Special Duties Manager (SDM)/Human Resources Director (HRD) Director/Corporate
         Administrative Officer (CAO)>

Subject: Assignment to Special Duty during an Emergency

Please be advised that effective <date> and continuing until approximately <date> I am requesting
approval to assign <employee’s name> to special duty as a <classification> at <range/step>. This is the
<initial/first extension/second extension/third extension> request. <Employee’s name> is currently
serving as a <base classification>.

During the assignment, <he/she> will be responsible for <general statement of duties> for
<100%/intermittent> of the time assigned.

Via a copy of your reply approving this assignment, <employee’s name> has been advised that this
assignment will not confer any new privilege, right of appeal, right of position, transfer, demotion,
promotion or reinstatement; that this assignment may be revoked at any time; and that, during the
duration of this assignment <employee’s name>, the will be paid at the rate of <pay rate equating to
step one of the higher class of 5% above the base class> which reflects the higher level duties
<employee’s name> will be performing. At the conclusion of the assignment, <employee’s name> pay
will revert to its usual rate.

Thank you for considering this request.

cc: department or division director

   Department Human Resources Service Delivery Manager

   Department payroll staff

cc: employee after approval email is received




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  SPECIAL DUTY REQUEST AND EXTENSIO N FORM



  <AGENCY                                 SPECIAL DUTY REQUEST AND EXTENSION FORM
  SEAL HERE>
                       The Supervisor making the request completes this form and forwards to the Service Delivery
                                     Manager or the appropriate Human Resources Representative.

  Use this form when requesting a special duty assignment. Reclassification: This form is not to be used in lieu of
  request for reclassification nor pending reclassification.
   All special duty requests and/or extensions must have advanced written approval before the employee begins the
  assignment. Extensions are to be requested prior to the end of the special duty assignment. No retroactive pay
  for a special duty assignment is allowed.
  PLEASE NOTE: Union contract provisions and practices governing special duty and lead worker pay will continue
  to apply. If you have any questions as to whether these special duty changes can be made to a particular
  bargaining unit, please contact your Labor Relations representative.

  Employee Name:

  Requesting Department:                                                                  Division:

  Requesting Division Manager or Designee Signature:                                      Request Date:


Select one appropriate Action:


   Action


    Work is within a higher-level classification/pay range. Special duty tasks comprise a majority of the work performed AND
duties do not justify a permanent reclassification. This may be a short backfill (vacation/sick leave) or project-related.


    Assign as a Lead Worker. Limited supervisory authority exists AND duties do not justify permanent reclassification. (Applicable
to represented employees whose contract includes lead worker provision)

    Backfill a vacancy due to one of the following reasons (check applicable box):
         Vacant Position
         Medical Disability, as required for reasonable accommodation under the State or Federal law,
         Military Duty, or
         Project where higher level of work has a definite termination date
     Backfill is for
    Employee name:           Position number:




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Select one appropriate Duration:

NOTE: Assignments or extensions are prospective. No retroactive compensation will be awarded, unless specified by
bargaining agreement.


Assignment/Extension Dates                Duration (limted to 6 month increments)                  Approval Level Required

                                              Initial request – 6 months or less                   HR Service Delivery Manager
Start (mm/dd/yy):
                                               st
                                              1 Extension – 7 to 12 months                         HRD Division Director

                                               nd
                                              2 Extension – 13 to 18 months                        Agency Administrative Officer
End (mm/dd/yy):                                rd
                                              3 Extension – 19 to 24 month (Overall max.)          Agency Administrative Officer


 This Special Duty Assignment is:

     100% Full-time

     Intermittent – Employee is required to submit timecard for all actual hours worked while performing higher-level duties

                                         Please note: boxes will expand as necessary

 Specific Duties and Responsibilities:                     Extension Justification:

                      To be completed by the Supervisor and verified by Department HR or Payroll staff

 Payroll ID Number                        Base - Current Class Code                Base - Current Classification Title



 Base -Current          Special Duty      Special Duty Class Code                  Special Duty Classification Title
 Union                  Union



 Base ~ Current Plan/Range/Step           Base Hourly Rate                         Current FLSA status

        /        /                        $   /hr                                      Non-Exempt (OT eligible)            Exempt

 Special Duty Plan/Range/Step             Special Duty Hourly Rate                 Special Duty FLSA status

        /    /                            $   /hr                                      Non-Exempt (OT eligible)            Exempt

                                          Increase %
 Special Duty Low Org/Cost Center
 #                                        Increase Amt. $

 Additional Comments



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Approval Signatures

       Denied                             Approved                      Denied                               Approved

       Approved, as amended                                             Approved, as amended

_____________________________________                              __________________________________

HR Service Delivery Manager                    Date                HRD Division Director                       Date


       Denied                             Approved                      Denied                               Approved

       Approved, as amended                                             Approved, as amended

______________________________________                             ________________________

Agency Administrative Officer                    Date                                         Date


Employee Acceptance and Agreement
Employee agrees the following terms and conditions were met prior to acceptance of the special duty assignment:
   Written notification for the special duty assignment (this form) has been provided by the Supervisor.
    Notification listed the specific duties that will be performed and the duration of the assignment.
    Notification informed employee the assignment will not confer on him/her any privilege, right of appeal,
       or right of position, transfer, demotion, promotion, or reinstatement to the higher level classification.
    The special duty assignment may be revoked at any time at the discretion of the appointing authority.

By signing, the employee agrees not to perform duties nor receive any pay for the special duty assignment prior to receiving
written required approvals.

      Accept
      Decline

Employee Name (print) __________________________________________________                   Date ____________

Employee Signature __________________________________________________________Date ____________

cc:        HRD Compensation Management Services
           Employee




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ASSIGNMENT TO ALTERNATIVE SCHEDULE EMAIL/MEMO/FAX

                      ASSIGNMENT TO ALTERNATIVE SCHEDULE EMAIL/MEMO/FAX
From:             Appointing Authority

Sent:             Date

To:               <employee’s name>

Subject:          Alternative Work Schedule during an Emergency

Please be advised that effective <date> and continuing until approximately <date> I am assigning you to
an alternative schedule on the following days and times:

Fixed Flex          Compressed 4/40          Compressed 9/80           Compressed Other ________

                                        Work Schedule (Two Week Period)

         Week One                     Mon    Tue        Wed        Thu         Fri          Sat   Sun

         Start Time

         Stop Time

         Length of Lunch Break

         Total Hours Worked

         Week Two                     Mon    Tue        Wed        Thu         Fri          Sat   Sun

         Start Time

         Stop Time

         Length of Lunch Break



Your meal break is from ___a.m. to ___ p.m. each day and be sure to take your rest breaks.

(For overtime eligible employees: You may also be required to work overtime.)

Thank you for your assistance during this difficult time.

cc: department or division director

   Department Human Resources Service Delivery Manager




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ALTERNATIVE WORK SCHEDULE AGREEMENT

Non-represented/Non-union            Represented/Union Local ____________________________

For represented employees, alternative work schedules may be covered by a collective bargaining agreement. If
that is the case, the provisions of the collective bargaining agreement prevail.

FLSA exempt (salaried)                    Non-exempt (hourly)

The Fair Labor Standards Act prohibits non-exempt employees from working any schedule with more than 40
hours in a single week (depending on conditions of employment) unless overtime is paid. However, the FLSA does
allow the employer to define “week” as something other than the standard Sunday through Saturday, will allows
us to accommodate 9/80 (or similar) schedule requests.
ALTERNATIVE WORK SCHEDULE REQUESTED:

 Fixed Flex          Compressed 4/40        Compressed 9/80         Compressed Other _________

Holiday pay may be pro-rated.

                                           Work Schedule (Two Week Period)

        Week One                    Mon      Tue         Wed        Thu         Fri          Sat   Sun

        Start Time

        Stop Time

        Length of Lunch Break

        Total Hours Worked

        Week Two                    Mon      Tue         Wed        Thu         Fri          Sat   Sun

        Start Time

        Stop Time

        Length of Lunch Break

Approval:

By signing below, we agree that the alternative work schedule complies with agency policies and procedures,
personnel guidelines, union contract provisions, and FLSA and state regulations.

Date Schedule Implemented: ______________ Date agreement expires/must be reviewed: ____________

Employee Signature: ____________________________________________                  Date signed: ___________

Supervisor Signature: ____________________________________________                Date signed: ___________

HR Manager Signature: __________________________________________                  Date signed: ___________




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RESCISSION OF VACATION AND COMP TIME OFF EMAIL/MEMO/FAX

                  RESCISSION OF VACATION AND COMP TIME OFF EMAIL/MEMO/FAX
From:             Appointing Authority

Sent:             Date

To:               <employee’s name>

Subject:          Rescission of Previously Approved (Vacation/Compensatory Time Off)

Please be advised that the ____________emergency has caused staffing shortages <your agency> wide.
Unfortunately, this means that I must rescind my prior approval of your <date of vacation leave and
compensatory time off> in order to provide staffing coverage for <name of work unit>.

However, please note that:

[The following is only for employees whose approved vacation is being rescinded:]

         Employees eligible for vacation leave may accrue up to sixty days vacation leave, pro-rated to
          reflect their normally scheduled work day. However, should rescission of your vacation leave due
          to a declared emergency result in your leave going beyond the maximum accrual amount, either
          myself or the department director may submit a recommendation to the <Human Resources
          Division Director> that you be allowed to carryover vacation leave, per Personnel Guideline
          Section _______.

[The following is only for hourly employees whose approved compensatory time off is being rescinded:]

         As an employee who can accrue compensatory time off, you normally have a right to use it
          within a reasonable time of your request. However, such is not the case in the event of an
          emergency, where your absence may disrupt <Your Agency> business operations. Because your
          previously approved compensatory time off is being rescinded, upon your request the
          department director may recommend to the Human Resources Division, the carryover of
          accrued compensatory time to the next calendar year. If that occurs, you must use those hours
          within the first quarter of the new calendar year.
         Should you have accrued compensatory time at year end that is not carried over, it will be paid
          out to you.

Thank you for your understanding and your assistance during this difficult time.

cc: department or division director

   Department Human Resources Service Delivery Manager

   Department payroll staff




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ADDITIONAL RESOURCES: HUMAN RESOURCES


HUMAN RESOURCE POLICIES AND PANDEMIC PLANNING WORKPLACE QUESTIONS

Human Resource Policies and Pandemic Planning Workplace Questions From:
http://www.pandemicflu.gov/faq/workplace_questions/human_resource_policies/index.html
        [Note: This website provides very helpful and specific answers to HR emergency- policy type questions.
        Below is a list of the overall topics included, followed by some of the more relevant Questions and
        Answers. The questions relate to an influenza pandemic, but they are useful for any health emergency.]

As an overall matter, employers should be guided in their relationship with their employees not only by
federal employment law, but by their own employee handbooks, manuals, and contracts (including
bargaining agreements), and by any applicable state or local laws.

Not all of the employment laws referenced apply to all employers or all employees, particularly state
and local government agencies. For information on whether a particular employer or employee
is covered by a law, please use the links provided for more detailed information. This information is not
intended for federal agencies or federal employees -- they should contact the U.S. Office of Personnel
Management (OPM) for guidance.

During an influenza pandemic, can a healthy employee refuse to come to work, travel, or perform
other job duties because of a belief that by doing so, he or she would be at an increased risk of
catching pandemic influenza?

The circumstances under which employees have a right to refuse to work are very limited. Refusing to
do a job because of potentially unsafe workplace conditions is not ordinarily an employee right under
the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSH Act). (A union contract or state law may, however, provide
for such rights.) Employees may refuse an assignment only if: (1) they reasonably believe that doing the
work would put them in serious and immediate danger; (2) they have asked their employer to fix the
hazard; (3) there is no time to call the Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health
Administration (OSHA); and (4) there is no other way to do the job safely. Employees are not protected
for simply walking off the job.

An employer can impose disciplinary action for refusing to work. However, employees do have the right
to refuse to do a job if they believe in good faith that they are exposed to an imminent danger. "Good
faith" means that even if an imminent danger is not found to exist, the worker had reasonable grounds
to believe that it did exist.

In addition, employers should be aware that an employee’s inability to attend work or perform certain
duties could be related to a disability. In this instance, the employer may need to consider the
implications of its actions under the Americans with Disabilities Act1 (ADA) before proceeding. For
example, if an employee with a disability could safely perform the essential functions of the job with a
reasonable accommodation (e.g., telework, changes in shift times), then an employer would need to
provide the accommodation, in lieu of termination, unless it would pose an undue hardship. (See the
U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s (EEOC) Enforcement Guidance: Reasonable

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Accommodation and Undue Hardship under the Americans with Disabilities Act for additional
information.)

We would encourage employers to prepare a plan of action specific to your workplace. As a practical
matter, employers will likely want to be flexible regarding attendance during a pandemic. It would also
be prudent to notify employees and, if applicable, their bargaining unit representatives about decisions
made at the earliest feasible time.
1
 The EEOC enforces Title I of the ADA. The ADA’s provisions in regards to disability-related inquiries, medical
examinations, and confidentiality apply to all applicants and employees of covered employers, regardless of
whether those individuals have disabilities, as defined by the ADA. By contrast, other ADA requirements apply
only if an applicant or an employee is an individual with a disability under the ADA. It cannot be definitively
established in advance, however, whether a future pandemic influenza would rise to the level of a disability under
the ADA. Therefore, this answer provides guidance for employers that would comport with the ADA even if a
future pandemic illness was found to be an ADA disability.



Note: As an overall matter, employers should be guided in their relationship with their employees not only by
federal employment law, but by their own employee handbooks, manuals, and contracts (including bargaining
agreements), and by any applicable state or local laws.
Not all of the employment laws referenced apply to all employers or all employees, particularly state and local
government agencies. For information on whether a particular employer or employee is covered by a law,
please use the links provided for more detailed information. This information is not intended for federal agencies
or federal employees -- they should contact the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) for guidance.

If individuals volunteer to a private, not-for-profit organization, are they entitled to compensation?

Individuals who volunteer their services in an emergency relief capacity to private not-for-profit
organizations for civic, religious or humanitarian objectives, without contemplation or receipt of
compensation, are not considered employees due compensation under the Fair Labor Standards Act
(FLSA). However, employees of such organizations may not volunteer to perform on an uncompensated
basis the same services they are employed to perform.

Where employers are requested to furnish their services, including their employees, in emergency
circumstances under Federal, state or local general police powers, the employer’s employees will be
considered employees of the government while rendering such services. No hours spent on the disaster
relief services are counted as hours worked for the employer under the FLSA.



Note: As an overall matter, employers should be guided in their relationship with their employees not only by
federal employment law, but by their own employee handbooks, manuals, and contracts (including bargaining
agreements), and by any applicable state or local laws.

Not all of the employment laws referenced apply to all employers or all employees, particularly state and local
government agencies. For information on whether a particular employer or employee is covered by a law,



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please use the links provided for more detailed information. This information is not intended for federal agencies
or federal employees -- they should contact the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) for guidance.

Can an employee be required to perform work outside of the employee's job description?

Yes. The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) does not limit the types of work employees age 18 and older
may be required to perform. However, there are restrictions on what work employees under the age of
18 can do. This is true whether or not the work asked of the employee is listed in the employee's job
description.

As part of your pre-pandemic planning, you may want to consult your human resource specialists if you
expect to assign employees work outside of their job description during an influenza pandemic. You
may also wish to consult bargaining unit representatives if you have a union contract.



Note: As an overall matter, employers should be guided in their relationship with their employees not only by
federal employment law, but by their own employee handbooks, manuals, and contracts (including bargaining
agreements), and by any applicable state or local laws.
Not all of the employment laws referenced apply to all employers or all employees, particularly state and local
government agencies. For information on whether a particular employer or employee is covered by a law,
please use the links provided for more detailed information. This information is not intended for federal agencies
or federal employees -- they should contact the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) for guidance.

Will workers qualify for unemployment if an influenza pandemic hits and their employer has to shut
down operations?

Only the state agency responsible for administering the unemployment insurance (UI) programs in the
state can make eligibility determinations. In general, if a worker is laid off due to a shut down caused by
an influenza pandemic, the worker would be eligible for UI benefits if the worker meets all other
program requirements. For example, the worker must be able to work and available for suitable work.

More information is available by calling the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration at 1-
866-4-USA-DOL (1-866-487-2365).



Note: As an overall matter, employers should be guided in their relationship with their employees not only by
federal employment law, but by their own employee handbooks, manuals, and contracts (including bargaining
agreements), and by any applicable state or local laws.
Not all of the employment laws referenced apply to all employers or all employees, particularly state and local
government agencies. For information on whether a particular employer or employee is covered by a law,
please use the links provided for more detailed information. This information is not intended for federal agencies
or federal employees -- they should contact the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) for guidance.




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CHAPTER 3.0: VOLUNTEER SERVICES AND CREDENTIALING

CHAPTER SUMMARY


During an emergency, departments may wish to utilize the services of volunteers. Generally, volunteers
are individuals who perform hours of service for the agency for civic, charitable or humanitarian
reasons. Departments should first attempt to utilize <Your Agency> employees to perform needed
work and then look to volunteers. Departments should identify areas where volunteers might be
utilized in advance and identify the type of skills that volunteers will need to be useful in that area.
Departments should then compile a list of possible volunteers.
Volunteers and similar staff may need to be credentialed before performing certain services. In general,
facilities are responsible pre-event to credential their own staff/volunteers and provide appropriate ID
badges. Credentialing is difficult to perform in an emergency situation, and may be impossible. If
necessary, during an incident, credentialing may take place at the staging area of the local jurisdiction
involved in the incident as defined by that local jurisdiction.

In addition, an agency may need to hire/rehire workers. These “contingent” workers usually fall into one
of three general categories: contract workers, short-term temporary workers, and term-limited
temporary. Wage laws/rules and benefits vary for these types of workers.



CHAPTER ACRONYMS

ACS:            Acute Care Setting
AHRQ:           Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
BRO:            Benefits and Retirement Operation
BT:             Bio-Terrorism
CW:             Contact Worker
DHHS:           Department of Health and Human Services
ESAR-VHP:       Emergency Systems for Advance Registration of Volunteer Health Professionals
MCE:            Mass Casualty Event
PDQ:            Position Description Questionnaire
PEW:            Position Eligibility Worksheet
STT:            Short-Term Temporary
TLT:            Term-Limited Temporary




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POLICY AND PROCEDURES: VOLUNTEER SERVICES AND CREDENTIALING



CREDENTIALING PROCEDURES DURING AN EMERGENCY




                    <YOUR AGENCY>                                    Policy No.

            POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                    Origination Date

      Credentialing Procedures During an
                  Emergency                                          Page No.



1.0   Policy
      It is imperative to provide a uniform and consistent method of credentialing volunteers and
      workers during a disaster, the following procedures will be followed for credentialing:

2.0   Purpose
      During an emergency, the credentialing process must be uniform and communication and
      directions must be clear.

3.0   Persons Affected
      Key Emergency Personnel

4.0   Definitions

5.0   Responsibilities
      Facilities are responsible pre-event to credential their own staff/volunteers and provide
      appropriate ID badges. Departments should pre-plan potential credentialing mechanisms.
      During an incident, credentialing will take place at the staging area of the local jurisdiction
      involved in the incident as defined by that local jurisdiction

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines
      1. Primary Credentialing System:
          <Your Agency> has initiated an online volunteer registry that will pre-credential volunteers
         prior to an event. This system is called <Name of Your Agency’s Volunteer Registry>. Local
         health department emergency preparedness coordinators and regional BT coordinators may
         have administrative access to this system to utilize registered, pre-credentialed volunteers.
         The <Name of Your Agency’s Volunteer Registry> Volunteer Registry can be accessed at
         <www.          Name of Your Agency’s Registry website>


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       2. Secondary Credentialing System:
                a. Non-registered volunteers should be asked to report to a specified staging area for
                    certified/licensed healthcare volunteers. This location should be disclosed to
                    volunteers through public service announcements, TV, radio, website access, and
                    through communications to request mutual aid. Volunteers should be asked during
                    these announcements to bring official picture ID and proof of professional license or
                    certification, if applicable.
                b. Upon arrival to the staging area, the volunteer should be issued an incident
                    identification badge and have their professional license or certification verified.
                    Medical licenses can be verified on the website at <www.            Name of Medical
                    Licensing website>
                c. Upon verification of license, the volunteer should be assigned to a labor pool
                    director that has contact with the incident commander to determine where the
                    volunteer will be deployed.
       3. It is recommended that two staging areas be set up – one for licensed/certified healthcare
          providers and one for other volunteers that do not require professional credentialing. It is
          recommended that if possible, a tent or building be identified as the staging area for
          volunteers. This provides a definite site for volunteers to report and assists with combating
          adverse weather conditions. If possible, every attempt should be made to establish Internet
          access in the building or facility.

7.0    References/Additional Resources
       http://www.ahrq.gov/research/mce/mce6b.htm

8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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VOLUNTEER NOTIFICATION AND ALERTING




                  <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

            POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                   Origination Date

 Volunteer Notification and Alerting During an
                  Emergency                                         Page No.



1.0   Policy
      When using volunteer services in an emergency, the following procedures must be followed:

2.0   Purpose
      Volunteer services may be necessary to augment existing staff due to staff attrition or a greater
      than normal surge of public health services are needed due to disaster.

3.0   Persons Affected
      Key Emergency Personnel
4.0   Definitions
5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning
      “Available Immediately” does not mean “Available Immediately”
      Many volunteers who previously indicated that they would be ready to go “immediately” will in
      fact require 24-48 hours to deploy. Experience is showing that many medical professionals
      needed at least 48 hours to make accommodations.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines
      1.     Make sure to have a clear set of business processes for making calls, follow up calls,
             emailing, and updating and response information. Document businesses processes and
             make sure that everyone involved in the activity is following the same set of business
             rules. This will streamline the process and avoid any miscommunication to volunteers.
      2.     Create a script which answers the questions that all volunteers are likely to have.
             Suggested information includes:
             a. How long is the deployment?
             b. Where are the volunteers going?
             c. What identification and/or professional licensure documentation do the volunteers
                 need to bring?
             d. Where is the staging location?
             e. What personal items should a volunteer bring?
             f. What medical equipment (if any) should a volunteer bring?
             g. Will a volunteer be provided vaccinations?


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       3.      Make sure that people know what the key facts are in deploying to this kind of event
               and if possible, have some type of follow up documentation (web site, e-mail, etc…).
       4.      If you will be using volunteers to staff a call center, make it clear that callers must
               identify themselves as volunteers helping the state.
       5.      Even with the best script, volunteers will have a number of questions. Document these
               questions and update your script during the call down if you notice the same question
               being repeated with multiple callers.
       6.      If questions can’t be answered right away, make sure to follow up with e-mail or
               another phone call. If there are information needs specific to the volunteer, let the
               volunteer know to expect follow up via emails. This will save a lot of time.
       7.      Don’t leave messages on answering machines on the first call down. Leaving messages
               only creates the problem of managing the callbacks, potentially long after you have
               completed your deployment roster. Volunteers who do get your message in time will try
               to call back and potentially disrupt the call down process (especially for groups that
               have limited phone lines).
       8.      Anticipate a second round of calls for those you were not able to reach the first time.
               Consider leaving a message this time around with contact instructions (call back
               number, email address, web site, etc.); the group will be smaller and more manageable.
       9.      Do not spend too much time with people who cannot deploy immediately but are
               curious about what is happening.
       10.     For those able to respond, but need to get back to you, consider scheduling a time to re-
               contact them as opposed to waiting for their call. If they must call you back, consider
               setting up a dedicated line for call-backs.
7.0    References/Additional Resources
       http://www.astho.org/pubs/esarvhpKatrina_TECH1_VolunteerAlerts3_Final.pdf
       U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources Services Administration
       (HRSA) as well as Emergency Systems for Advance Registration of Volunteer Health Professionals
       (ESAR-VHP) Team: support@esarvhp.com

8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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CONTINGENT WORKFORCE




                  <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

            POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                   Origination Date



        Contingent Workforce During an                              Page No.
                  Emergency


1.0   Policy
      During an emergency, utilization of a contingent workforce may be necessary. The following
      procedures will be followed in assignment and monitoring of these employees:

2.0   Purpose
      During an emergency, work jurisdiction provisions of collective bargaining agreements may be
      suspended. Departments may need to utilize the services of employees outside of the
      bargaining unit’s jurisdiction to perform work and will need to consult with Human Resources
      Division Labor Relations if this becomes an issue.

3.0   Persons Affected
      Key Emergency Personnel

4.0   Definitions
      Agency contingent workers may fall into one of three general categories as follows:
      1. Contract Worker (CW) – an individual who is the employee of an authorized vendor to
          provide these resources. Generally, these workers are limited to 910 hours in a rolling 12-
          month period. CWs do not receive Agency benefits.
      2. Short-Term Temporary (STT) – an individual who is an agency employee and who may work
          for six months (910 or 1040 hours) in a calendar year. STTs do not receive agency benefits.
      3. Term-Limited Temporary (TLT) – an individual who is an agency employee and who may
          work for greater than six months up to three years (which may be extended for an
          additional two years for specific categories). TLTs receive agency benefits.

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning
      Departments must preplan and identify classifications which may be needed during an
      emergency so that they may more quickly staff their work units.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines


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1.   The requirements for Reassignment and Recall releases are waived. However, during
     the emergency, departments are to check in with Reassignment every three months.
2.   Monitoring CW, STT and TLT contingent workers is a joint responsibility of the
     department and the Human Resources Division. Monitoring CW also involves the
     authorized vendor for CWs. It is the responsibility of the department to obtain any
     necessary departmental approvals prior to submitting a contingent worker request.
3.   All contingent worker positions shall be reviewed for potential assignment by the
     Reassignment Program for Employees with Disabilities. For CW & STTs, the requesting
     department obtains this release. For TLTs, the Human Resources Division requests the
     release after the TLT is reviewed in the Human Resources Division. The normal
     turnaround time for the Reassignment Program’s review is 24 hours.
4.   The majority of CW used in the agency are in the administrative, financial, and
     information technology fields. The primary (and most used) agency is <Approved
     Staffing Agency>. <Approved Staffing Agency> is designated as the secondary provider.
     The other heavily used area for CW is in nursing. <Approved Nursing Staffing Agency>
     and <Second Approved Nursing Staffing Agency> are other agency CW vendors.
5.   Emergency Modifications apply to emergency planning and response for backfilling
     regular staff. During the planning phase for an emergency:

        a. Departments shall identify the classifications of staff needed to accomplish
           needed functions and notify the Human Resources Division of these
           classifications.
        b. Departments should pre-complete forms in order to have the necessary
           documentation already completed and ready to use if an emergency is declared.
        c. If a retiree is considered as a resource, all required documentation should be
           completed during this planning phase.
               i.    Hiring of Retirees should be administered as follows:
                           Refrain from making any verbal and/or written return-to-work
                              agreements with an employee before the employee’s
                              retirement. A violation of this provision of the law may be
                              considered a criminal offense.
                           Conduct the hiring process as follows:
                                   a) Complete a Position Eligibility Worksheet for the body
                                        of work or vacancy you will be filling to determine if the
                                        position is eligible for retirement benefits.
                                   b) Conduct the selection process appropriate for the type
                                        of position, i.e. short-term temporary, term-limited
                                        temporary, ongoing appointive, career service or civil
                                        service position.
                           Should the person selected for hire be a retiree and the position
                              is a retirement eligible position, submit a justification request
                              for approval using a Retiree Hiring Approval Form. The
                              justification should be reviewed and approved by the
                              appropriate agency executive(s).



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           d. A Position Eligibility Worksheet (PEW) must be completed for STTs or TLTs in the
              planning phase and submitted to Benefits and Retirement Operations (BROS) to
              obtain an eligibility determination in advance of a proclaimed emergency.
              Departments requiring emergency help will notify BROS when a position will be
              filled and when a pre-approved PEW is no longer necessary.
           e. The Human Resources Division will compile the classifications submitted by
              departments into a master list. This list will be provided to CW agencies and the
              Reassignment and Career Support Services programs to identify the
              classifications that will be needed for an emergency. This will allow the CW
              agencies to acquire the resources necessary in advance for a 24-hour response
              to a request, and to obtain pre-release from the Reassignment and Career
              Support Services programs.

6. During an emergency phase:
           a. Contract Workers - Departments may go directly to the CW agency to hire the
              classifications identified. Departments remain responsible for coding CWs’
              hours during the emergency.
              Reassignment Program processes for employees with disabilities will be
              suspended. However, departments needing contract workers should contact
              the program and check to see if and when processes will resume every three
              months during an emergency.
           b. Short-term temporary - Departments may immediately hire STTs to backfill for
              the classifications identified. The STT requests will be entered into temp track.
           c. Term-Limited Temporary - Departments may immediately hire TLTs to backfill in
              the classifications identified.
           d. During the period of a declared emergency, layoff/recall processes will be
              suspended for TLTs, or until otherwise instructed. However, when practicable,
              departments should attempt to work with the Reassignment Program and hire
              former <Your Agency> employees who have been laid off instead of a TLT.
           e. No Position Description Questionnaire (PDQ) will be required during the period
              of a proclaimed emergency for TLTs. A PDQ will be required for any TLT that
              continues after the emergency is declared at an end.
           f. During an emergency, New Employee Orientation will not be required for STTs.
              TLTs shall attend New Employee Orientation as soon as practicable after the
              emergency is declared over (7 days after the emergency is declared over is
              ideal). In both cases, departments should contact BROS to obtain alternative
              delivery methods for required new employee information (video, handouts,
              etc.).




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7.0    References/Additional Resources
       See Appendix: Contingent Workforce

8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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TEMPLATES: VOLUNTEER SERVICES AND CREDENTIALING



VOLUNTEER SERVICES WAIVER AND RELEASE


                                      VOLUNTEER SERVICES
                                     WAIVER AND RELEASE

The undersigned, on behalf of themselves and their estate, hereby waives any right of recovery and
releases <Your Agency>, their officers, officials, employees and agents, from liability arising from any
injury to Undersigned, arising from or out of the Undersigned’s activities and participation in volunteer
services at the <Your Agency> <INSERT DEPARTMENT AND DIVISION NAME>.
The Undersigned further acknowledges and agrees that <Your Agency> does not assume any
responsibility whatsoever for any property of the Undersigned and the Undersigned shall not hold the
agency liable for any loss or damage to same. The Undersigned give their permission to be
photographed and have their image used in <Your Agency> publications.

Signature: __________________________________________ Date: ____________

For youth under 18 years of age: ____________________________________ (print) has my permission

to accept an assignment as a volunteer for Agency.


Signature of Guardian: ________________________________Date: _____________




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CONTINGENT WORKFORCE
                                        (STT and CW Request Form)

                     Job class/title:

                     Work location:

                        Supervisor:

               Supervisor mail stop:

                 Mark if internship:

               Number of positions:

                      Request date:

                         Start date:

                   Hours per week:

          Total hours to be worked:

                     Organization #:

                       Department:

                           Division:

                             Union:

                     Contact name:

                     Contact phone:

                    Pay range/step:

                    Hourly pay rate:

                     Skills required:

        Education/licenses required:        Yes           No

                                        If so, explain:

            Duties to be performed:

                 Short Term Temp?

                    Contract Work?




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ADDITIONAL RESOURCES: VOLUNTEER SERVICES AND CREDENTIALING


VOLUNTEER STAFFING AND ESAR-VHP

Staffing
Many aspects of staffing may depend on the specific type of event. Medical staff volunteers probably
would be more abundant for a geographically limited noninfectious mass casualty event (MCE), for
example, than for a geographically generalized (pandemic) infectious MCE. Even in situations where
there will be adequate staffing, the issues of verification, credentialing, supervision, and command and
control will exist. Development of the Emergency Systems for Advance Registration of Volunteer Health
Professionals (ESAR-VHP) will help address these issues. The ESAR-VHP structure of verified health
professional credential levels increases health system personnel capacity by providing a standardized
way to identify significant numbers of credential-verified health professionals across a State. In addition
to providing State-based advance registration, verification, and credentialing of medical volunteers, the
system should enable interstate sharing of volunteers. Further development of the Medical Reserve
Corps (MRC), with their local units of medical volunteers, including paramedics if available, also may
help address some of these staffing issues. In 2005, more than 1,500 MRC members were willing to
deploy outside their local jurisdiction on optional missions to hurricane-affected areas with their state
agencies, the American Red Cross, and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

Although some staffing levels for Acute Care Settings (ACSs) can be proposed in advance, unique staffing
requirements tend to be event and population specific. The level of patient acuity certainly will have an
impact on staffing needs. One option is that in situations in which the ACS is used to decompress
hospitals, only those hospitals that contribute staffing would be allowed to send patients to the ACS.
Planners should consider other staffing options, including the following:

Regional hospital alliances could designate in advance a small number of key staff members, including
pharmacists, laboratory workers (to be responsible for the point-of-care testing), respiratory therapists,
and administrators, to help support ACS operations. Given the aggregate number of allied health
professionals employed per hospital, recruitment of such a relatively small number of staff members
should not be overly burdensome.

A single hospital may adopt an ACS and in so doing may be able to provide staffing for an entire ACS.
The faith-based community and community health workers also may be viable sources of volunteers.

Medical Reserve Corps units are community-based and function as a way to locally organize and utilize
volunteers who want to donate their time and expertise to prepare for and respond to
emergencies. MRC volunteers supplement existing emergency and public health resources. For more
information go to http://www.medicalreservecorps.gov/HomePage

Moreover, in a geographically limited MCE, where there is a large possibility of volunteers from outside
the impacted area, academic medical centers may be a source of teams of health care workers who
could assist with staffing needs. This concept could be further refined through the establishment of
partnerships with centers outside of the local geographic area in advance of an event. Tapping into the


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administrative structures of large, geographically diverse health care systems also could assist in
meeting staffing needs.

Other Staffing-related Issues to Consider

   The provision of housing for the staff may be an issue.
   Identification of staff members (and patients and their family members) becomes an issue in the
    rapidly changing environment of an ACS and should be addressed by providing a name badge
    system that could be as simple as stick-on nametags or as complicated as a site-generated photo ID.
   It may be appropriate to negotiate overtime contracts in advance in cases where municipal-owned
    buildings are to be used as ACSs with municipal workers providing support staffing.

Despite having staff members from distinct and separate health care organizations, there are many
more similarities than differences evident in the delivery of medical care, particularly in any given
region. Planners need to establish guidelines and protocols in advance for the care and management of
patients treated in an ACS. These guidelines should help to minimize the difficulties inherent in bringing
a new team of health care professionals to work together for the first time.

Operational Support
Actual operation of an ACS will require a host of support services, including meals, sanitary services,
infrastructure maintenance, and security. Although some of these needs will be driven by the nature of
the event, much planning can and should be done in advance for many of these support issues.

Documentation of Care
Given the extraordinary conditions that will exist to require the use of ACSs for patient care delivery,
only modest means for patient care documentation should be expected to be used. Electronic medical
records are not likely to be available or practicable, particularly given the learning curve associated with
their use and the dependence on technology that may not be operable. Rather, simple paper-based
charting will be required. Forms for patient records (including nursing notes and flow sheets), patient
tracking and discharge planning should be prepared in advance; there should be an adequate supply of
such forms, as well as clipboards and pens.

Security Issues
In the chaos and confusion that accompany any large-scale MCE, security assumes an increased level of
importance, especially since law enforcement resources will be severely taxed. To this end, planners
must develop robust security plans. It is helpful if security personnel have previous experience in dealing
with patients, especially those with behavior disorders. The best potential source of security staff would
be off-duty hospital security personnel, but these individuals may not be available. Other potential
sources would include on- or off-duty police officers, activated members of the National Guard, or
volunteers.




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CHAPTER 4.0: CONTRACTS AND PROCUREMENT

CHAPTER SUMMARY

In the event of an emergency, timely arrival of aid and supplies are of the utmost import. Given that the
timeline of a typical agency policy for procurement and contract establishment is lengthy, it is vital that
the necessary actions are expedited to ensure this timely arrival. Policies and procedures should reflect
an expeditious process.



CHAPTER ACRONYMS

EPHI:           Electronic Protected Health Information
FEMA:           Federal Emergency Management Agency
HIPAA:          Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act
MRC:            Medical Reserve Corps
PHI:            Protected Health Information




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POLICY AND PROCEDURES: CONTRACTS AND PROCUREMENT


REQUEST FOR A NEW CONTRACT DURING AN EMERGENCY




                    <YOUR AGENCY>                                   Policy No.

            POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                   Origination Date

      Request for a New Contract During an
                   Emergency                                        Page No.



1.0   Policy
      If a new contract must be initiated during an emergency, the following procedures must be
      followed:

2.0   Purpose
      Typical contracting policies may have too lengthy a timeline to effectively obtain help
      contracting help in a timely manner. Contracting with outside agencies may be necessary to
      assist during an emergency.

3.0   Persons Affected
      Designated Key Personnel

4.0   Definitions

5.0   Responsibilities /Preplanning
      Consider preplanning as a priority as opposed to being heavily reliant upon finding contracted
      assistance during an emergency. Some preplanning considerations include:
      1. Estimate level of assistance that would be needed during an emergency (e.g. who, what,
          where, when, and why?).
      2. Plan a strategy for how priorities would be made in the event there is a need to allocate
          limited assistance (e.g. limited staff due to illness).
      3. Plan strategies for using normal and alternative channels for procuring needed resources (It
          is helpful to have agencies in place that may be forecasted to be of help during an
          emergency).
      4. Develop a list of alternative contractors for assistance (e.g., local volunteers, Medical
          Reserve Corps (MRC)).



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      5. Develop a process to track and exchange information with other response partners, in real-
         time, regarding the status of your available assistance resources that could be shared.
      6. Establish a Procurement Unit Leader (responsible for administering all financial matters
         pertaining to vendor contracts, leases, and fiscal agreements). Maintain lists of procurement
         personnel with emergency contact information, and disburse to appropriate personnel.
      7. Have back-up paper documents for use during and after disasters when mainframe systems
         are unavailable (i.e., requisitions, solicitations, purchase orders and tabulations.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines
      There are two types of emergencies:
              1. Usual Emergencies-those brought about during the normal course of business.
              2. Catastrophic Emergencies-where a state of emergency has been declared by local,
                  state, or federal jurisdiction.

      1. Understanding that under normal circumstances the following rules of contracting are
         typically true:
             a. No employee of <Your Agency> who approve, awards or administers a contract
                  with <Contracting Agency> involving the expenditure of public funds or the sale or
                  lease of government property, may have an interest in a contract which is within the
                  scope of the employee's official duties. This prohibition includes employees who, in
                  their official capacity, recommend the approval or award of the contract or who
                  supervises a person who approves, awards or administers the contract.
             b. <Your Agency> programs intending to contract with an outside individual or agency
                  must first obtain initial approval from the appropriate Supervisor. In obtaining
                  approval, the program must clearly state what is expected of the Contractor in a
                  manner that would permit someone who is not a party to the contract to know
                  what the Contractor is to do.
             c. All contracts must be sent to <Your Agency’s Emergency Contract Official> for final
                  approval.
             d. Contracts over __($xxxx.xxxx)__ also require special approval.

      2. During usual emergencies a Procurement Unit Leader may make, or authorize others to
          make, emergency contracts when a designated person of authority declares that there
          exists an imminent threat to the public health, welfare, safety, or public property under
          emergency conditions. The following procedures will still be followed:
              a. Pre-approved contractors should provide the best pricing, and should be utilized
                   before seeking other methods if they can satisfy your delivery requirements.
              b. Look for contractors who have provided information that should assist you in
                   determining how quickly they can provide products and services. This information
                   includes:




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                       Contractor’s name and emergency primary/alternate phone numbers/email
                        addresses (These emergency contact numbers provided are, in some cases,
                        owner’s and/or employees’ personal cell and home phone numbers, which
                        are to be used only during an emergency situation, outside of normal
                        business hours.)
                     The contractor’s normal hours of operation
                     Whether contractor can provide products and services outside of their
                        normal hours of operation, and if their contract prices will apply
                     Information on alternate shipping locations, if they exist, to provide product
                        if the facility is rendered inoperable
                     Location of facility from which supplies/services will be provided
                     Any special requirements by contractor
                     Contingency Contract information, which will be activated prior to an
                        anticipated disaster (i.e., natural disaster), but cannot be utilized until a
                        position of authority (i.e., president or governor) declares a State of
                        Emergency.
            c. If none of the existing contracts satisfy your needs, you should attempt to obtain
               telephone or fax bids depending on your capabilities at the time.
            d. Maintain files for each contract (single or multiple items) and document your
               efforts. Example: Obtained telephone or fax bid from Company A, Company B, and
               Company C (which are all bona fide providers of Product or Service X). Awarded to
               the lowest bidder or state reason for how the selection was made. This type of file
               documentation is important when applying for Federal Emergency Management
               Agency (FEMA) reimbursement.
            e. Contract suppliers may be in area(s) impacted by a disaster. When this happens,
               attempt to contact each contractor for alternate suppliers, distributors, telephone
               numbers, contact names, and relevant information.
            f. Have back-up paper documents for use during and after disasters when mainframe
               systems are unavailable (i.e., requisitions, solicitations, purchase orders and
               tabulations)

3. During catastrophic emergency situations such as terror threats, natural disasters, or biological
   events may necessitate the expedition of traditional contract pathways, the following
   exceptions may be made:
           a. Contractors who are available for assistance during an emergency may have
               personal interest in a contract which is within the scope of the contracting
               employee's official duties. This includes employees who, in their official capacity,
               recommend the approval or award of the contract or who supervises a person who
               approves, awards or administers the contract.
           b. Programs intending to contract with an outside individual or agency obtain final
               approval from the Unit Procurement Officer, or other individual recognized in an
               appropriate position of power in an emergent duties roster.
           c. In obtaining approval, the program must clearly state what is expected of the
               Contractor in a manner that would permit someone who is not a party to the
               contract to know what the Contractor is to do.


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                d. Contracts over __($xxxx.xxxx)__ which may normally require additional approval will
                   not require special endorsement.

    4. It is important to remember protected information, even in an emergent situation. All
       employees will endeavor to adhere to the following practices when dealing with sensitive
       information:
                a. If the consultant/provider is to retain PHI in an electronic format, the following
                    provision shall be included: <Consultant/Provider> shall ensure that all appropriate
                    safeguards are implemented to protect the confidentiality, integrity and availability
                    of the electronic protected health information (EPHI) created, received, maintained,
                    or transmitted on behalf of <Your Agency>.
                b. <Consultant/Provider> shall ensure that any agent, including a subcontractor to
                    whom it provides such information, agrees to implement reasonable and
                    appropriate safeguards to protect any EPHI <Consultant/Provider> received.
                c. Protected Health Information Provision – All DOH contracts must contain one of the
                    following provisions related to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability
                    Act (HIPAA):
                     Contracts Not Involving Protected Health Information (PHI)This contract does
                         not require (Consultant/Provider) to engage in a function or activity involving
                         the use or disclosure of Protected Health Information (PHI) as defined in the
                         Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).
                     Contracts with Other HIPAA Covered Entities Involving PHI
                         <Consultant/Provider> is a "covered entity" as defined in the Health Insurance
                         Portability and Accountability Act, and will abide by the rules and regulations set
                         forth in HIPAA.
                d. (Consultant/Provider) shall not be allowed to distribute protected health
                    information (PHI) to any other person or entity except _____________________,
                    and then only for the following purposes:__________________________________.
7.0    References
       http://www.medicalreservecorps.gov/HomePage
8.0    Revisions

        Date        Rev. #    Change                                                      Reference(s) Section



Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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ROUTINE SERVICE DELIVERY DURING AN EMERGENCY




                    <YOUR AGENCY>                                   Policy No.

            POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                   Origination Date

 Routine Service Delivery During an Emergency
                                                                    Page No.

1.0   Policy
      It is the expectation of <Your Agency> that its employees will be available for work in both
      routine and extraordinary circumstances. It is <Your Agency>’s responsibility to assist
      employees in being ready to do so. It is not <Your Agency>’s responsibility to accommodate
      employees’ personal needs to the exclusion of their availability to work. This policy applies when
      staffing for routine service delivery is reduced.

2.0   Purpose
      Staffing reductions may be related to high rates of staff illness, weather conditions, community
      emergencies or activation of an Emergency Response Plan.

3.0   Persons Affected
      Key Emergency Personnel

4.0   Definitions

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning
      A well thought out preplan should include the following:
      1. Staff should be informed of expectations.
      2. Employees should have a family care succession plan in place.
      3. Essential employees that typically telecommute to perform duties should be aware that
         they may be required to come to work site.
      4. All employees should be prepared to perform duties outside their normal station.
      5. Employees should be equipped to work outside their normal job duties by virtue of advance
         cross-training and understanding of potential other duties they may be asked to perform in
         an emergency.
      6. Develop strategies for maintaining the agency’s core missions and continuing to care for the
         greater good of the community.
      7. Develop criteria that determine when to cancel low priority services.
      8. Develop plans that consider catastrophic staffing declines and shifting services away from
         the agency.
      9. Discuss plans with local, state, tribal, or regional planning contacts.

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      10. Develop plans that address ethical issues concerning how decisions will be made in the
          event services must be prioritized and allocated (e.g., decisions based on probability of
          survival).
      11. Develop a procedure for communicating changes in agency status to other health
          authorities and the public.
      12. Alternative methods of safe child and elder care have been provided to required emergency
          staff.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines
      1.     Employees Are Expected to Work in both Routine and Non-Routine Circumstances
             The agency is responsible for assuring appropriate staffs are available to respond to the
             public health and social service needs of the community. This could result in the
             cancellation of planned absences such as meetings, training, and in extreme cases,
             vacations.
      2.     Authority to Interrupt Routine Services during Non-Routine Circumstances
             Authority to stop routine service delivery during non-routine situations resides with
             <Your Agency’s Approved Emergency Director> and depends on the level of available
             staff due to the event.
      3.     Level 1 Emergency: Authority: Program Managers and Environmental Health Senior
             Staff
             Program Managers maintain normal operations. A small number of program staffs are
             unavailable for normal duties. Routine operations are maintained, based on mix of staff
             available, within existing resources.
      4.     Level 2 Emergency: Authority: Director/Environmental Health Director
             Director authorizes reduced service delivery in consultation with Program Managers as
             to projected public health fiscal and contractual impacts. At this level, operations are
             sustained with existing resources.
      5.     Level 3 Emergency: Authority: Health Officer / Director
             Health Officer or Director authorizes maximum staff call-out for alternative work
             assignments. Only highly time-critical normal services are maintained. Resources
             beyond <Your Agency> may be activated (see Contracting during an Emergency).
      6.     Management Preparation for Reduced Staffing
             <Your Agency’s Authority> is responsible for assuring sufficient staff is available to
             respond to public health needs. In order to prepare for adverse conditions, which may
             limit availability of staff for routine or extraordinary situations, managers will make the
             following preparations:
      7.     Redundancy
             Staff will be cross-trained to provide redundancy in areas of time-critical services. Staff
             assignments will be limited to areas of competence within their scope of practice.
      8.     Consider Time Critical Services



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               Managers will consider the time-critical nature of services in order to maintain those
               services for which the health impact is most time-sensitive.
       9.      Cancel Planned Leave or Time Away from Normal Job Duties
               Managers will have the option of changing planned training, meetings and vacations.
       10.     Encourage Advance Planning by Staff for Home and Family
               Managers will direct and support staff to make advance plans for home and family so
               that they can be on the job during extraordinary situations.

7.0    References

8.0    Revisions

       Date         Rev. #   Change                                                     Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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PROCUREMENT DURING A USUAL EMERGENCY

                   <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

             POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                   Origination Date

      Procurement During a Usual Emergency                           Page No.


1.0    Policy
       During usual emergencies a Procurement Unit Leader may make, or authorize others to make,
       emergency procurements when a designated person of authority declares that there exists an
       imminent threat to the public health, welfare, safety, or public property under emergency
       conditions. The following procedures will still be followed:

2.0    Purpose
       Typical procurement policies may have too lengthy a timeline to effectively obtain supplies in a
       timely manner. Large numbers of supplies not typically required by <Your Agency> may be
       needed to fulfill community needs during an emergency.

3.0    Persons Affected
       All <Your Agency> Employees

4.0    Definitions
       There are two types of emergencies:
       1. Usual Emergencies-those brought about during the normal course of business.
       2. Catastrophic Emergencies-where a state of emergency has been declared by local, state, or
           federal jurisdiction.

5.0    Responsibilities/Preplanning
       Consider preplanning as a priority as opposed to being heavily reliant upon finding supplies
       during an emergency. Some preplanning considerations include:
       1. Estimate quantities of essential materials, equipment, and personal protective equipment
           (e.g., masks, respirators, gowns, gloves, and hand hygiene products), that would be needed
           during an emergency (e.g. eight-week pandemic with subsequent eight-week pandemic
           waves).
       2. Plan a strategy for how priorities would be made in the event there is a need to allocate
           limited equipment (e.g. decontamination gear), pharmaceuticals (e.g. vaccine), and other
           resources (medical supplies, food).
       3. Plan strategies for using normal and alternative channels for procuring needed resources;
           pre-existing partnerships with agencies may increase efficiency of emergent supply needs.
       4. Have supply agencies or contact information for SNS in place that may be of help during an
           emergency.




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      5. Develop a list of alternative vendors for supplies, pharmaceuticals, and contracted services
         (e.g., laundry, housekeeping, food services, laboratory).
      6. Develop a process to track and exchange information with other response partners, in real-
         time, regarding the status of your available resources that could be shared.
      7. Establish a Procurement Unit Leader (responsible for administering all financial matters
         pertaining to vendor contracts, leases, and fiscal agreements).
      8. Have back-up paper documents for use during and after disasters when mainframe systems
         are unavailable (i.e., requisitions, solicitations, purchase orders and tabulations)

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines
      1.     Written quotations – Every effort shall be made to obtain quotations from three or
             more vendors when supplies, services, or major repairs are to be purchased on an
             emergency basis, except for standard equipment parts for which prices are established.
             Immediate purchasing shall be discouraged as much as is practical. When supplies,
             services, or major repairs are urgently required and time does not permit the obtaining
             of written quotations, the procurement leader may obtain quotations by telephone or
             otherwise, but such quotations shall be made on the relative purchase requisitions. So
             far as practicable, quotations shall be secured from institutions of the state as provided
             by law. Any offer accepted shall be confirmed in writing.
      2.     Determination required –The Procurement Unit Leader shall make a written
             determination of the basis of the emergency that includes the facts and circumstances
             leading to the conclusion that such procurement was necessary, as well as a written
             determination detailing the steps taken prior to selecting a particular contractor and the
             basis for the final selection. The written determination shall be included in the contract
             file either prior to contracting, or as soon thereafter as practicable.
      3.     Scope of Emergency Procurement – Emergency procurement shall be limited to only
             those supplies, services, or major repair items necessary to meet the emergency (i.e., do
             not purchase two year’s supply of goods when the emergency only requires 3 months’
             of supplies).
      4.     Record – A record of emergency procurement shall be maintained that lists:
                             Each contractor’s name and phone number;
                             The amount and type of each contract;
                             A listing of the supplies, services, or major repairs procured under each
                              contract; and
                             The identification number of each contract file.

7.0   References

8.0   Revisions




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       Date        Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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PROCUREMENT DURING A CATASTROPHIC EMERGENCY




                  <YOUR AGENCY>                                       Policy No.

            POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                     Origination Date

 Procurement During a Catastrophic Emergency                          Page No.

1.0   Policy
      During a catastrophic emergency a Procurement Unit Leader may make, or authorize others to
      make, emergency procurements such as terror threats, natural disasters, or biological events it
      may be necessary to expedite traditional procurement pathways, the following procedural
      exceptions may be made:

2.0   Purpose
      Typical procurement policies may have too lengthy a timeline to effectively obtain supplies in a
      timely manner. Large numbers of supplies not typically required by <Your Agency> may be
      needed to fulfill community needs during an emergency.

3.0   Persons Affected
      All Employees

4.0   Definitions
      There are two types of emergencies:
      1. Usual Emergencies-those brought about during the normal course of business.
      2. Catastrophic Emergencies-where a state of emergency has been declared by local, state, or
          federal jurisdiction.

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning
      Consider preplanning as a priority as opposed to being heavily reliant upon finding supplies
      during an emergency. Some preplanning considerations include:
      1. Estimate quantities of essential materials, equipment, and personal protective equipment
          (e.g., masks, respirators, gowns, gloves, and hand hygiene products), that would be needed
          during an emergency (e.g. eight-week pandemic with subsequent eight-week pandemic
          waves).
      2. Plan a strategy for how priorities would be made in the event there is a need to allocate
          limited equipment (e.g. decontamination gear), pharmaceuticals (e.g. vaccine), and other
          resources (medical supplies, food).
      3. Plan strategies for using normal and alternative channels for procuring needed resources;
          pre-existing partnerships with agencies may increase efficiency of emergent supply needs.
      4. Have supply agencies or contact information for SNS in place that may be of help during an
          emergency.


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       5. Develop a list of alternative vendors for supplies, pharmaceuticals, and contracted services
          (e.g., laundry, housekeeping, food services, laboratory).
       6. Develop a process to track and exchange information with other response partners, in real-
          time, regarding the status of your available resources that could be shared.
       7. Establish a Procurement Unit Leader (responsible for administering all financial matters
          pertaining to vendor contracts, leases, and fiscal agreements).
       8. Have back-up paper documents for use during and after disasters when mainframe systems
          are unavailable (i.e., requisitions, solicitations, purchase orders and tabulations)

6.0    Procedures/Process Guidelines
       1. Purchases may be made by employees (within the scope of the contracting employee's
          official duties) who may have personal interest in a supply vendor. This includes employees
          who, in their official capacity, recommend the approval of the purchase of such supplies or
          who supervises a person who approves, awards or administers the purchase.
       2. Programs intending to purchase from an outside company or agency may obtain final
          approval from their immediate Supervisor, Procurement Unit Leader, or other individual
          recognized in an appropriate position of power in an emergent duties roster.
       3. Purchases over __ ($ xxxx.xxxx)__ that may typically require additional approval will not
          require special endorsement.
       4. Keep in mind that although strict compliance with the Procurement Code may be waived by
          a position of authority such as the President of the United States or a state governor, civil
          servants should be prudent spenders of the taxpayer’s money.
       5. The following documentation of emergency purchases should include the following:
          a. receipts
          b. invoices
          c. purchase orders
          d. rental agreements
          e. Any other documentation which may serve to document the purchase.
       6. This documentation will serve as a basis for settlement of claims and will support the
          request for supplemental federal or state assistance.
7.0    References
8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section



Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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CHAPTER 5.0:            INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

          CHAPTER SUMMARY

During an emergency, the ability to access Information Technology resources is vital to the success of
the response efforts. A number of areas that are important to the day-to-day operations of Information
Technology (IT) become even more important, given the enhanced need for communications, data
collection, and data-sharing capacity. Additionally, telecommuting options and appropriate use of
technology are vital to continuity of operations, as well as the security of likely sensitive information
related to response efforts. Therefore, this chapter of the Resource Guide provides examples of
emergency response IT policies and information to be considered for policy planning.

          CHAPTER ACRONYMS

AOL:            America On-Line

CD-R:           Compact Disk, Readable (also CD-RW: Compact Disk, Readable, Writable)

CHAP:           Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol

DLCI:           Data Link Connection Identifier

E-mail:         Electronic Mail

FAX:            Facsimile (machine)

HIPAA:          Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act

ISDN:           Integrated Services Digital Network

IT:             Information Technology

PC:             Personal Computer

PDA:            Personal Digital Assistant

PHI:            Protected Health Information

POD:            Point(s) of Dispensing

URL:            Uniform Resource Locator

VPN:            Virtual Private Network




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POLICIES AND PROCEDURES: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY


DATA COLLECTION AT POINTS OF DISPENSING




                    <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

               POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                  Origination Date

 Data Collection at Points of Dispensing (PODs)                       Page No.



1.0   Policy

      It is the policy of <Your Agency> to coordinate and standardize data collection at Points of
      Dispensing (PODs), and other emergency response facilities, to ensure consistent format, to
      expedite the traffic flow, and to take reasonable steps to safeguard Protected Health
      Information (PHI) and protect the privacy of patients according to all regulations, policies,
      standards or other requirements set forth by Federal, State, or local authorities.

2.0   Purpose

      The purpose of this policy is to assure that data collection undertaken at any Point of Dispensing
      (POD) is consistent with the formatting of other PODs within the jurisdiction, does not impede
      the traffic flow of the POD or other emergency response facility, and protects the privacy of
      patients.

3.0   Persons Affected

      Mission-critical personnel assigned to PODs and those employees who collect patient PHI at
      public health clinics or other emergency response facilities and PODs during an emergency
      response and authorized personnel who have direct contact with patients or are responsible for
      data entry before, during, or after an emergency response.

4.0   Definitions

      Authorized personnel: <Your Agency> personnel, emergency responders assigned to PODs,
      <Your Agency>, or hospital personnel, who work with quality assurance, safety, and
      communicable disease control activities (e.g., surveillance, reporting, investigations) or
      personnel in charge of communications regarding communicable disease or related public
      health issues.


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      Authorized user: Individual given permission to use electronic systems employed by <Your
      Agency>; this individual must be a public health authority, hospital representative, or an
      individual granted emergency authority to access the systems using data to fulfill the public
      health mission.

      PHI: Personal Health Information

      POD: Point of Dispensing – a pre-defined location at which prophylaxes and emergency
      medications are distributed to victims or potential victims of a public health threat.

      Surveillance: ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of data (e.g., regarding
      agent/hazard, risk factor, exposure, health event) essential to the planning, implementation,
      and evaluation of public health practice, closely integrated with the timely dissemination of
      these data to those responsible for prevention and control. (Centers for Disease Control and
      Prevention)

      VPN: Virtual Private Network – a network that uses the Internet to provide remote offices for
      individual users with secure access to an organization's network

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning

      Authorized personnel who have direct contact with patients or are responsible for data entry
      before, during, or after an emergency response must ensure that data are shared only with
      individuals or organizations that are authorized and fulfilling a public health mission, that data
      are entered cleanly and consistently into the system, and that data collection does not impede
      the flow of patient traffic within the POD.

      1. Full training of personnel regarding patient privacy and confidentiality of Personal Health
         Information (PHI) will be required.
      2. Departments must predetermine:
         a. Employees, contractors, vendors, and authorized agents that will be granted access to
              PHI, either in person or during data entry;
         b. Employees, contractors, vendors, and authorized agents that will be granted access to
              information systems for input of PHI;
      3. Departments must pre-plan to provide access to PHI to emergency responders, according to
         standard operating procedures and protocols existent in <Your Agency>.
      4. Departments must pre-plan to provide space in PODs for confidential interviews and
         cordoned-off areas free from public view for entry of data.
      5. Employees, contractors, vendors, and authorized agents must sign confidentiality
         agreements prior to conducting interviews or accessing any PHI.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines




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1.    Ensure Privacy. Authorized users shall ensure that the privacy of any patient, physician,
      or health care provider is protected from being divulged directly or indirectly before,
      during, and after an emergent event, during the interview process, transportation of
      forms or storage media, data entry, investigation, research, or reporting.

2.    Patient Paperwork. Personnel assigned to providing and collecting patient interview
      paperwork shall provide only one copy per person. In the case of minors,
      parents/guardians shall be provided one copy on which to enter information for each
      minor.

3.    Paperwork Privacy. Each POD shall provide tables or areas in which patients can fill out
      paperwork with a reasonable level of privacy.

4.    Possession of Paperwork. Once collected by POD personnel, paperwork shall remain in
      the possession of authorized personnel unless additional information or clarification is
      needed from the patient. In such cases, the paperwork will be given to the patient in the
      Interview Area for completion and collected upon completion by authorized personnel.

5.    Interview Areas. Each POD shall provide specific areas which enable patient interviews
      to be conducted in privacy. Standard Epidemiology and Surveillance practices will be
      followed according to <Your Agency> policy.

6.    Interview. During the interview process, interviewers shall make every effort to ensure
      that the conversation cannot be overheard or otherwise witnessed by any nearby
      unauthorized individual(s).

7.    HIPAA. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. All POD personnel shall be
      trained and follow <Your Agency> HIPAA Privacy and Security policies, procedures, and
      protocols.

8.    Electronic Access. Electronic Access to systems for data entry at the POD will be granted
      only to authorized personnel. Access requests are processed by <Information
      Technology Department Name> and reviewed by an <Epidemiology and Surveillance
      Department Name> representative. Once access is granted, the individual is contacted
      with password and username to be used when logging on to the system.

9.    Safeguards. Once access is granted, authorized users must implement appropriate
      safeguards to assure the confidentiality of data (including patient, physician, and health
      care provider identifiable information) during entry, use, storage, and transmission of
      data.

10.   E-Mail. <Surveillance System Name> users are not to e-mail files containing confidential
      information outside of a secure network. This security is best maintained by sharing
      internet-linked data rather than downloaded files. No data containing PHI will be shared
      via email from the POD site.



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       11.     Electronic Transmission of PHI. All data containing PHI in electronic format will be
               collected and transmitted via <Your Agency> systems in batches at agreed upon
               intervals. Transmission may take place via transport of storage device, access to
               headquarters or authorized systems via VPN, or other secure method provided by
               <Agency Information Services Name>.

       12.     Identity Protection. Authorized users shall not identify any patient, physician, or health
               care provider or divulge any PHI, directly or indirectly, to any person not specifically
               identified as an authorized agent within the POD.

       13.     Information Security. All electronic information shall be protected in a manner
               consistent with <Your Agency> Information Security policy.

7.0    References/Additional Resources:
       <Your Agency> HIPAA Privacy Rule Compliance Policy
       <Your Agency> Electronic Records Protection Policy
       <Your Agency> HIPAA Security Policy

8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #       Change                                                  Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Agency Director of Policies>




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MAINTAINING CONFIDENTIALITY OF EMERGENCY SURVEILLANCE DATA




                      <YOUR AGENCY>                                    Policy No.

                 POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                 Origination Date

      Maintaining Confidentiality of Emergency                         Page No.
                 Surveillance Data


1.0     Policy

        It is the policy of <Your Agency> to take reasonable steps to safeguard Protected Health
        Information (PHI) and protect the privacy of patients according to all regulations, policies,
        standards or other requirements set forth by Federal, State, or local authorities.

2.0     Purpose

        The purpose of this policy is to assure that individuals accessing data collected emergency
        response activities comply with confidentiality and privacy requirements.

3.0     Persons Affected
        Mission-critical personnel and those employees who collect or access patient Protected Health
        Information at public health clinics and remote point of dispensing locations.

4.0     Definitions

        Surveillance: ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of data (e.g., regarding
        agent/hazard, risk factor, exposure, health event) essential to the planning, implementation,
        and evaluation of public health practice, closely integrated with the timely dissemination of
        these data to those responsible for prevention and control. (Centers for Disease Control and
        Prevention)

        POD: Point of Dispensing – a pre-defined location at which prophylaxes and emergency
        medications are distributed to victims or potential victims of a public health threat.

        Relevant personnel: <Your Agency> personnel, emergency responders assigned to PODs, <Your
        Agency>, or hospital personnel, who work with quality assurance, safety, and communicable
        disease control activities (e.g., surveillance, reporting, investigation) or personnel in charge of
        communications regarding communicable disease or related public health issues.



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      Authorized user: Individual given permission to use electronic surveillance systems employed by
      <Your Agency>; this individual must be a public health authority, hospital representative, or an
      individual granted emergency authority to access the systems using data to fulfill the public
      health mission.

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning

      Authorized users who access confidential information collected during a response to an
      emergent public health threat must ensure that data are shared only with individuals or
      organizations that are authorized and fulfilling a public health mission. No confidential
      information may be shared, intentionally or unintentionally, with any entity not affiliated with
      the immediate response activities or authorized to receive such information by <Your Agency>.

      1. Full training of emergency response personnel regarding patient privacy and confidentiality
         of Protected Health Information (PHI) will be required.
      2. Departments must predetermine:
         a. Employees, contractors, vendors, and authorized agents that will be granted access to
              PHI during an emergency;
         b. Employees, contractors, vendors, and authorized agents that will be granted access to
              information systems for input of PHI during an emergency.
      3. Departments must pre-plan to provide access to PHI to emergency responders, according to
         standard operating procedures and protocols existent in <Your Agency>.
      4. Employees, contractors, vendors, and authorized agents must sign confidentiality
         agreements prior to accessing any PHI.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines

      1.      Electronic Access. Electronic Access requests are processed by <Information
              Technology Department Name> and reviewed by an <Epidemiology and Surveillance
              Department Name> representative. Once access is granted, the individual is contacted
              with password and username to be used when logging on to the system.

      2.      Authorized Users. Only authorized users may access <Surveillance System Name>.

      3.      Safeguards. Once access is granted, authorized users must implement appropriate
              safeguards to assure the confidentiality of data (including patient, physician, and health
              care provider identity) during use, storage, and transmission of data. This security is
              maintained by accessing <Surveillance System Name> solely via secure data networks
              as defined by <Information Technology Department Name>.

      4.      Downloaded Data. Authorized users are responsible for implementing measures that
              prevent the unintentional sharing of downloaded data (on computers, disks, mass
              storage devices, etc.).


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       5.      E-Mail. <Surveillance System Name> users are not to e-mail files containing confidential
               information outside of a secure network. This security is best maintained by sharing
               internet-linked data rather than downloaded files.

       6.      Identity Protection. Authorized users shall not identify any patient, physician, or health
               care provider or divulge any PHI, directly or indirectly, during public meetings, press
               conferences, interviews with the media, academic meetings, or in publications.

       7.      Ensure Privacy. Authorized users shall ensure that the privacy of any patient, physician,
               or health care provider is protected from being divulged directly or indirectly before,
               during, and after an emergency, during the interview process, transportation of forms,
               data entry, investigation, research, or reporting.

       8.      Interview. During the interview process, interviewers shall make every effort to ensure
               that the conversation cannot be overheard by any nearby individual(s). The emergency
               facility shall provide areas for confidential interviews that are separate from highly
               populated areas.

7.0    References/Additional Resources:
       <Your Agency> HIPAA Privacy Rule Compliance Policy
       <Your Agency> Electronic Records Protection Policy
       <Your Agency> HIPAA Security Policy

8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #       Change                                                  Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Agency Director of Policies>




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HIPAA PRIVACY DURING AN EMERGENCY




                    <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

            POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                     Origination Date

      HIPAA Privacy During an Emergency
                                                                      Page No.

1.0   Policy
      It is the policy of <Your Agency> to abide by the following procedures in order to comply with
      HIPPA Privacy regulations.

2.0   Purpose
      Federal HIPAA regulations must be followed as closely as possible to ensure client
      confidentiality. These guidelines emphasize how the HIPAA Privacy Rule may be followed during
      an emergency.

3.0   Persons Affected
      All Employees

4.0   Definitions

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning
      Educate all employees regarding HIPAA compliance during an emergency.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines

      Providers and health plans covered by the HIPAA Privacy Rule can share patient information in
      all the following ways:

      TREATMENT: Health care providers can share patient information as necessary to provide
      treatment. Treatment includes:
      1. Sharing information with other providers (including hospitals and clinics),
      2. Referring patients for treatment (including linking patients with available providers in areas
          where the patients have relocated), and
      3. Coordinating patient care with others (such as emergency relief workers or others that can
          help in finding patients appropriate health services).
      4. Providers can also share patient information to the extent necessary to seek payment for
          these health care services.


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           NOTIFICATION: Health care providers can share patient information as necessary to
           identify, locate and notify family members, guardians, or anyone else responsible for the
           individual’s care of the individual’s location, general condition, or death.
           1. The health care provider should get verbal permission from individuals, when possible;
               but, if the individual is incapacitated or not available, providers may share information
               for these purposes if, in their professional judgment, doing so is in the patient’s best
               interest.
               a. Thus, when necessary, the hospital may notify the police, the press, or the public at
                    large to the extent necessary to help locate, identify or otherwise notify family
                    members and others as to the location and general condition of their loved ones.
           2. In addition, when a health care provider is sharing information with disaster relief
               organizations that, like the American Red Cross, are authorized by law or by their
               charters to assist in disaster relief efforts, it is unnecessary to obtain a patient’s
               permission to share the information if doing so would interfere with the organization’s
               ability to respond to the emergency.

           IMMINENT DANGER: Providers can share patient information with anyone as necessary to
           prevent or lessen a serious and imminent threat to the health and safety of a person or the
           public -- consistent with applicable law and the provider’s standards of ethical conduct.

           FACILITY DIRECTORY: Health care facilities maintaining a directory of patients can tell
           people who call or ask about individuals whether the individual is at the facility, their
           location in the facility, and general condition.

           Of course, the HIPAA Privacy Rule does not apply to disclosures if they are not made by
           entities covered by the Privacy Rule. Thus, for instance, the HIPAA Privacy Rule does not
           restrict the American Red Cross from sharing patient information.

7.0    References

8.0    Revisions

       Date         Rev. #   Change                                                     Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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ELECTRONIC DOCUMENT STORAGE




                    <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

               POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                  Origination Date

          Electronic Document Storage                                 Page No.



1.0   Policy

      It is the policy of <Your Agency> to standardize the storage of electronic documents, files, and
      folders in a manner consistent at emergency facilities throughout the jurisdiction and to ensure
      the security of information, media and systems under the control of <Your Agency>.

2.0   Purpose

      The purpose of this policy is to assure that all emergency response data under the control <Your
      Agency> (at headquarters, PODs, or any other remote locations) are stored in a manner
      consistent with the policies, procedures, and protocols set forth by <Agency Information
      Services Name> and are protected accordingly.

3.0   Persons Affected

      Mission-critical personnel assigned to PODs and those employees who have access to systems at
      PODs and other emergency response facilities during an emergency response, as well as
      authorized users of <Your Agency>-owned equipment and systems which store <Your Agency>
      information before, during, or after an emergency response.

4.0   Definitions

      USB : Universal Serial Bus – a hardware interface for attaching peripheral devices to a computer.

      CD-R: Optical medium which allows recording to disk only one-time, but is readable multiple
      times for as long as the disk remains viable.

      Document Capture: The process of converting paper documents into digital images and index
      data.

      Metadata: "Data about data"; describes how and when and by whom a particular set of data
      was collected, and how the data is formatted.

      POD: Point of Dispensing

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      Other Emergency Response Facility: Any facility in use during an emergency response effort,
      including existing public health clinics, where Protected Health Information is collected for
      public health purposes.

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning

      Authorized personnel who have direct contact with patients or are responsible for data entry
      before, during, or after an emergency response must ensure that data are securely transmitted
      to and stored on <Your Agency>-approved media and servers, that data are entered cleanly and
      consistently into the system, and that data collection does not impede the flow of patient traffic
      within the POD.

      1. Full training of personnel regarding proper storage of electronic files in any format will be
         required.
      2. Departments must predetermine employees, contractors, vendors, and authorized agents
         that will be granted access to <Your Agency> systems and equipment;
      3. Departments must pre-plan to provide access to confidential information, electronic
         systems, and equipment to emergency responders, according to standard operating
         procedures and protocols existent in <Your Agency>.
      4. Departments must pre-plan to provide essential equipment and storage media on which to
         store confidential and other agency-specific information to all public health emergency
         response sites, including PODs.
      5. Employees, contractors, vendors, and authorized agents must sign confidentiality
         agreements prior to accessing <Your Agency> systems or equipment.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines

      1.      On-Site Storage. All files and data will be stored onsite on the POD or emergency
              facility’s server. Individual workstations shall store saved files by copying them to CD-R
              only. USB thumb drives and external hard-drives are not permitted for use on
              emergency facility computers or servers. CD-RWs (Read/Write) are not permitted for
              use on emergency facility computers or servers.

      2.      Data Entry. All data at PODs must be entered consistent with software and applications
              provided by <Agency Information Services Name>. All word processing will be entered
              into <word-processing software name> and saved in <.doc/.rtf/.txt> format.

      3.      Record Revision. All revisions, updates, or deletions to a document or record must be
              logged at the <beginning/end> of the document. Previous versions of documents must
              be archived and placed in a sub-folder marked “Archive.” When a file is deleted, it must
              exist in the “Archive” folder until the emergency response is concluded.

      4.      Data Security. When records containing Protected Health Information (PHI) are
              transferred to portable storage media, the files must be password-protected and
              authenticated by encryption standards consistent with <Agency Information Services
              Name> policy. The use of proprietary encryption algorithms is not allowed for any



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      purpose, unless reviewed by qualified experts outside of the vendor in question and
      approved by <Agency Information Services Name>.

5.    Confidentiality. All data, records, and files during an emergency response are
      considered confidential until otherwise designated by the Incident Commander. All
      personnel will closely follow <Your Agency> policies and procedures for HIPAA,
      Encryption, Information Sensitivity, Passwords, Remote Access, and Appropriate Use.

6.    Document Capture. The process of converting paper documents into digital images and
      index data will be accomplished through scanning of paper documents and saving the
      new file in Adobe Acrobat .pdf format.

7.    Metadata. Any metadata will be embedded and therefore saved internally (in the same
      file as the data) only, allowing for increased portability.

8.    File Management. All software in use at PODs will have a default setting to allow
      automatic saving of documents at intervals of no less than every 10 minutes. Employees
      will save documents and files prior to closing, leaving the computer, or moving into a
      new application.

9.    Storage Management. Each POD will have a disaster recovery plan which includes tape
      backup of systems and data at six-hour intervals. Tapes will be transported daily to
      central <Your Agency> headquarters for storage according to <Your Agency> policy.

10.   Record Availability. Patient Records collected at PODs or other emergency facility will
      be made available to patients upon written request to <Your Agency> headquarters,
      and will not be made available onsite during a response.

11.   Retention. Emergency response related data may be retained in perpetuity on tape
      backup at <Your Agency>’s data storage facility. During the response, and for 90 days
      following the response to allow for subsequent evaluation and investigation, emergency
      response related data shall be retained on tape backup at <Your Agency> headquarters,
      under the supervision of the Director of <Agency Information Services>.

12.   Media Renewal. Digital records transferred on CD-R will be reformatted to a
      standard storage medium when transferred to <Your Agency> archives.
      Reformatting is justified when the storage technology is upgraded and/or storage
      devices replaced. Digital records transferred on a standard storage medium will be
      copied using a medium of the same format specification to create a preservation
      copy.

13.   Disposal. Only when a paper document has been scanned and saved on the POD or
      emergency response facility’s server AND tape backup has occurred, the paper
      document can be shredded. Paper shredding shall occur on-site only. Some paper
      records cannot be shredded, and must be filed for transfer to <Your Agency> archives.
      Any data and/or files stored locally on individual computers at the facility (which are not



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               necessary to run applications or services) will be deleted every six hours, following tape
               backup.

       14.     Naming Conventions. All files will be saved in a consistent format, and will include the
               date prior to the suffix. (i.e. - patient_interview_08102009.pdf)

       15.     Readability. All scanned documents and records must be examined for readability on
               the computer prior to saving the file. If unreadable, the scanning process must be
               redone. Prior to transfer to external medium, such as CD-R, documents must be visually
               examined on the computer for readability.

       16.     Safeguards. Physical access to computers will be granted only to authorized personnel.
               Each POD will incorporate <Your Agency> information security protocols when granting
               access to applications. External devices or media (including USB thumb-drives, external
               hard drives, CD-R/RWs, or any device that can connect directly to the facility’s computer
               workstations) are prohibited unless authorized by the Incident Commander (or
               delegate) and <Agency Information Services Name> authorized representative. CD-R
               shall be provided ONLY by <Agency Information Services Name> representatives, shall
               be secured in a locked storage cabinet, and must be tracked as inventory throughout
               the duration of the response. Other security safeguards to prevent tampering and
               unauthorized access to protected information will be at the discretion of the Incident
               Commander (or delegate).

       17.     Retention Schedule. Data, records, files, backup tapes, or other storage media shall be
               retained for a period of no less than one year following the end date of an emergency
               response activity. Only after it is determined by <Your Agency> Director that the
               information is no longer needed for continued investigation can data, records, files,
               backup tapes, or any related media be archived. Disposition of data, records, files,
               backup tapes, or any related media will occur no sooner than five years following the
               end of an emergency response activity, and only by order of <Your Agency> Director.

7.0    References/Additional Resources:

8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #       Change                                                  Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Agency Director of Policies>



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TELECOMMUTING DURING RESPONSE TO AN EMERGENT EVENT




                     <YOUR AGENCY>                                   Policy No.

                POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                Origination Date

      Telecommuting during Response to an                            Page No.
               Emergent Event


1.0    Policy

       This policy is activated when an emergency has been declared or proclaimed affecting the <Your
       Agency>. In addition, this policy may be activated when a <Your Agency> emergency has not
       been proclaimed, but a department director has received authority from <Your Agency
       Executive> to activate this policy because the emergency has negatively impacted department
       business continuity, the following procedures will be executed.

2.0    Purpose

       The purpose of this policy is to provide support for social distancing (when needed or required),
       facilitation of alternate worksites during an emergency response, or other emergency response
       goals as necessary to respond to an emergent event. This policy applies only to emergency
       planning and response for employees that have been identified as appropriate personnel for
       telecommuting and/or essential to emergency response activities. This policy is designed to
       minimize the potential exposure to <Your Agency> from damages which may result from
       unauthorized use of <Your Agency> resources. Damages include the loss of sensitive or <Your
       Agency> confidential data, intellectual property, damage to public image, damage to critical
       <Your Agency> internal systems, etc.

3.0    Persons Affected
       Mission-critical personnel and those employees who need to access <Your Agency> information
       technology (IT) resources from a home-office or other alternate workplace or location.

4.0    Definitions

       Telecommuting: A work arrangement in which supervisors direct or permit employees to
       perform their usual job duties away from their central workplace, in accordance with work
       agreements. Telecommuting is also referred to as Flexiplace, Telework, Work-at-Home, and
       Flexible Workplace. Three main categories of telecommuting can exist:




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              1. Regular, recurring telecommuting may be full-time or part-time, such as one or two
      days a week or parts of each workday (to avoid peak commuting hours). This level of
      telecommuting requires a formal agreement between the employee and supervisor.

              2. Periodic, intermittent telecommuting arrangements may arise, for example, where
      an employee is assigned a project with a short timeframe or one that requires intense
      concentration that is best completed outside of the office. This level of telecommuting does not
      require the formal agreement or checklist process. It only requires verbal agreement between
      the employee and supervisor.

               3. Temporary or emergency telecommuting may be used during short-term illness,
      transportation emergency due to weather, a natural disaster, or pandemic health crises. During
      this type of telecommuting arrangement a formal agreement is not required.

      Primary Workplace: The telecommuter’s usual and customary workplace.

      Alternate Workplace: Any workplace other than the employee’s usual and customary workplace
      (primary workplace) and may include the employee’s home.

      Telecommuting Agreement: A signed document that outlines the understanding between the
      agency and the employee regarding the telecommuting arrangement.

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning

      Required by Supervisor: During the event of an emergency, supervisors may require an
      employee to telecommute. A requirement to telecommute shall be documented. Such
      documentation shall occur within one week of the start of the directive to telecommute or as
      soon as practicable thereafter. A supervisor may document the change via email, memorandum,
      fax or other documented method.

      (A sample email/memorandum/fax requiring telecommuting is attached at the end of this
      Chapter.)

      Employee Request: Employees initiate a telecommuting arrangement by submitting a written
      Telecommute Request form to their immediate supervisor. Telecommuting may be approved by
      the appointing authority for set periods up to one year. If the request is denied, the employee
      need not be provided with a written explanation of why the request has been denied.

      Acceptable Use, Information Technology Equipment, and Third-Party (when applicable)
      Agreements will be required.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines

      1.      Duties: The employee’s duties, responsibilities, and conditions of employment remain
              the same as if the employee were working at <Your Agency>’s primary workplace. The
              employee will continue to comply with federal, state, and agency laws, policies, and
              regulations while working at an alternate location. The employee shall remain subject to



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     all agency disciplinary policies and procedures while performing work at the alternate
     workplace.

2.   Work Hours: Work hours and location are specified as part of this agreement. The
     employee must be accessible during the specified work hours. The agency and the
     employee agree that, at <Your Agency> discretion, the employee may perform assigned
     work for the agency at a location other than the agency’s onsite office as a
     “telecommuter.”

3.   Pay and Attendance: The employee’s salary and benefits remain the same as if the
     employee were working at <Your Agency>’s primary workplace. The employee will
     continue to comply with federal, state, local, and <Your Agency> laws, regulations,
     policies, and procedures while working at the alternate workplace. If the employee
     works less than the employee’s normal work week, salary and benefits must be adjusted
     accordingly.

4.   Advancement: Telecommuting will not adversely affect an employee’s eligibility for
     advancement or any other employee right or benefit. An employee will be compensated
     for all pay, leave, and overtime (for non-exempt employees) as if all duties were being
     performed at the employee’s primary workplace.

5.   Leave and Overtime: Requests to work overtime and use sick, annual, or any other
     leave must be approved by <Your Agency> in the same manner as when working at the
     agency’s primary workplace. An employee shall not work overtime unless authorized in
     advance. The employee agrees that telecommuting is not to be viewed as a substitute
     for dependent care. Telecommuters with dependent care issues are encouraged to have
     someone else provide dependent care services during the agreed upon work hours.

6.   Office and Telecommuting Location: The employee agrees to work at the primary
     workplace or the alternate workplace, and not from another unapproved site. Failure to
     comply with this provision may result in termination of the agreement, and other
     appropriate disciplinary action. <Your Agency> agrees to establish agreed-upon
     expectations relative to the time the employee would need to spend in the primary
     workplace and to give adequate notice when these expectations are subject to change.
     However, the employee may be required to report to the primary workplace without
     advanced notice, upon request by <Your Agency>.

7.   Appropriate Equipment: <Your Agency> shall ensure that the employee has
     appropriate equipment to safely perform the job without increased risk of injury and
     shall establish minimum safety requirements. For example, the employee shall
     demonstrate s/he has a reasonable supporting structure and location for the equipment
     that will be used.

8.   Insurance: The employee shall have homeowner’s insurance general liability coverage
     and provide a designated person at <Your Agency> with evidence of this insurance.



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9.    Insurer Notification: <Your Agency> shall notify the employee that it is his/her
      responsibility to notify their insurer about working in the home. Payment for any
      resulting surcharge imposed by the insurance company may be negotiated between the
      employee and <Your Agency>.

10.   Personal Property: Personal property used for business purposes for the benefit of the
      <Your Agency>shall be identified and receive prior approval. It is the employee’s
      responsibility to ensure that any personal property is insured.

11.   Documentation of Property: Written documentation of <Your Agency>property to be
      kept in the employee’s home shall be compiled as part of the approval process.

12.   Check-in: The employee shall call in or e-mail at intervals set by <Your Agency>, unless
      the agency is able to monitor on-line activity. The employee shall also attend staff
      meetings and required training; expenses associated with these items shall be
      addressed during the pre-approval process.

13.   Personal Business: The employee shall take personal leave time to accommodate
      personal business at his/her home and shall notify the supervisor of this leave time.

14.   Application of work rules: <Your Agency> work rules should apply to telecommuters
      the same as they apply to office-based employees. Substance abuse or negligence
      pertaining to work product or hours, for example, should be appropriately addressed by
      the supervisor the same as they are in the office.

15.   Appropriate Use of <Your Agency>-Owned Equipment: All policies/guidelines/rules
      regarding appropriate use of equipment apply to any equipment assigned to the
      employee by the <Your Agency>. Appropriate Use policy is available for review in this
      chapter.

16.   Business Use: Statement that state-provided equipment/software is provided for
      business use and shall not be used for personal business or by persons other than the
      employee shall be provided to employee and signed by employee prior to working from
      alternate location.

17.   Safety/Security: Safety/security requirements for equipment/data must be followed as
      though equipment is and the employee is working in the office.

18.   Security Lock-up: Requirement that the employee’s home computer shall be
      programmed to go to lock-up if there has been no activity at the Personal Computer
      (PC) for 15 minutes. This lock-up is to help provide information security and prevent
      unauthorized use. The employee shall be required to re-enter a password to continue.

19.   Backups: Backups of all <Your Agency> work shall be done with a copy retained off-site,
      unless the employee is hooked up to the network. The backup shall be done no less than
      once a week and more frequently depending on the type of work the employee is doing.


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20.   Records Management: The same records management policies used in the office for
      records preservation and retention apply to telecommuters.

21.   Emergency Contacts: Emergency contacts and procedure shall be implemented in the
      event the employee does not answer his/her telephone or respond to e-mail messages
      within established timeframes.

22.   (The Telecommuting form is attached at the end of this Chapter.)

23.   Performance Measured: “Output” standards shall be established and shall be the same
      as those for office-based employees performing the same duties. Further, these
      standards shall ensure that the telecommuting relationship will not in any way disrupt
      or create delays in providing customer service.

24.   Review of Work: Supervisors shall review the work product and ensure that the
      telecommuting employee receives the same training and information as office-based
      employees. Telecommuting employees shall also receive the same consideration as
      their office-based peers for personnel transactions, such as promotion, transfer, etc.

25.   Remote Access Security: Secure remote access must be strictly controlled. Control will
      be enforced via one-time password authentication or public/private keys with strong
      pass-phrases. For information on creating a strong pass-phrase see the Password Policy.

26.   Password Protection: At no time shall any <Your Agency> employee provide their login
      or email password to anyone, not even family members.

27.   Split-Tunneling: <Your Agency> employees and contractors with remote access
      privileges must ensure that their <Your Agency>-owned or personal computer or
      workstation, which is remotely connected to <Your Agency>'s corporate network, is not
      connected to any other network at the same time, with the exception of personal
      networks that are under the complete control of the user.

28.   Dual Homing: Reconfiguration of a home user's equipment for the purpose of split-
      tunneling or dual homing is not permitted at any time.

29.   Non-Agency E-mail Accounts: <Your Agency> employees and contractors with remote
      access privileges to <Your Agency>'s network must not use non-<Your Agency> email
      accounts (i.e., Hotmail, Yahoo, AOL), or other external resources to conduct <Your
      Agency> business, thereby ensuring that official business is never confused with
      personal business.

30.   CHAP: Routers for dedicated Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) lines configured
      for access to the <Your Agency> network must meet minimum authentication
      requirements of Challenge- Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP).




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         31.       Frame Relay: Frame Relay must meet minimum authentication requirements of Data
                   Link Connection Identifier (DLCI) standards.

         32.       Configurations: Non-standard hardware configurations and security configurations for
                   access to hardware must be approved by <Your Agency Information Systems Security>.

         33.       Anti-Virus Software: All hosts that are connected to <Your Agency> internal networks
                   via remote access technologies must use the most up-to-date anti-virus software <URL
                   to agency software site>; this includes personal computers. Third party connections
                   must comply with requirements as stated in the agency’s Third Party Agreement.

         34.       Access Requirements: Personal equipment that is used to connect to <Your Agency>'s
                   networks must meet the requirements of <Your Agency>-owned equipment for remote
                   access.

         35.       Non-Standard Remote Access: Organizations or individuals who wish to implement non-
                   standard Remote Access solutions to the <Your Agency> production network must
                   obtain prior approval from <Your Agency Information Systems Security>.

         36.       Call-In by Supervisor: Employees may, at the discretion of their immediate supervisor,
                   be called to work at their centrally located worksite on their regular telecommute day
                   during their regular work hours to meet workload requirements or to attend meetings.

         37.       Return of Equipment: The employee shall promptly return all <Your Agency>-owned
                   equipment and data documents when requested by the employee's supervisor.

         38.       Software Licensing: The employee agrees to follow all software licensing provisions
                   agreed to by <Your Agency>.

         39.       Damaged Property: The <Your Agency> may pursue recovery from the employee for
                   any <Your Agency> property deliberately or negligently damaged or destroyed while in
                   employee’s care, custody and control.

         40.       Private Property: The <Your Agency> is not responsible for private property used, lost
                   or destroyed.

7.0      References/Additional Resources:
8.0      Revisions

         Date           Rev. #       Change                                                   Reference(s) Section



Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:


<Your Agency Director of Policies>


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REMOTE ACCESS TO AGENCY NETWORK




                  <YOUR AGENCY>                                    Policy No.

               POLICY AND PROCEDURES                               Origination Date

      Remote Access to Agency Network                              Page No.



1.0   Policy

         1. It is the responsibility of <Your Agency> employees, contractors, vendors and
            authorized agents with emergency remote access privileges to <Your Agency>'s network
            to ensure that their remote access connection is given the same consideration as the
            user's on-site connection to <Your Agency>’s network.

         2. General access to the Internet for recreational use by immediate household members
            through the <Your Agency> Network on personal computers is permitted for employees
            that have flat-rate services. The <Your Agency> employee is responsible to ensure the
            family member does not violate any <Your Agency> policies, does not perform illegal
            activities, and does not use the access for outside business interests. The <Your Agency>
            employee bears responsibility for the consequences should the access be misused.

         3. It is the employee’s, contractor’s, vendor’s, or authorized agent’s responsibility to
            review the <Your Agency> Encryption, Virtual Private Network (VPN), Wireless
            Communications, and Acceptable Use Policies for details of protecting information when
            accessing the corporate network via remote access methods, and acceptable use of
            <Your Agency>'s network:

         4. For additional information regarding <Your Agency>'s remote access connection
            options, including how to order or disconnect service, cost comparisons,
            troubleshooting, etc., contact the <Your Agency> <Information Technology
            organization name> office or visit the <Information Technology organization
            name>website.

      This policy is activated when an emergency has been declared or proclaimed affecting <Your
      Agency>. In addition, this policy may be activated when a <Your Agency> emergency has not
      been proclaimed, but a department director has received authority from <Your Agency
      Executive> to activate this policy because the emergency has negatively impacted department
      business continuity, the following procedures will be executed.



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2.0   Purpose

      The purpose of this policy is to define standards for connecting to <Your Agency>'s network
      from any host. These standards are designed to minimize the potential exposure to <Your
      Agency> from damages which may result from unauthorized use of <Your Agency> resources.
      Damages include the loss of sensitive or <Your Agency> confidential data, intellectual property,
      damage to public image, damage to critical <Your Agency> internal systems, etc.

3.0   Persons Affected
      Mission-critical personnel and those employees who need to access <Your Agency> Information
      Technology (IT) resources from remote locations.

4.0   Definitions

      Virtual Private Network (VPN): A network that uses the Internet to provide remote offices or
      individual users with secure access to an organization's network

      Split Tunneling: The process of allowing a remote VPN user to access a public network, most
      commonly the Internet, at the same time that the user is allowed to access resources on the
      VPN. This method of network access enables the user to access remote devices, such as a
      networked printer, at the same time as accessing the public network.

      Dual Homing: Having concurrent connectivity to more than one network from a computer or
      network device.

      Frame Relay: Efficient data transmission technique used to send digital information quickly and
      cheaply in a relay of frames to one or many destinations from one or many end-points.

      Data Link Connection Identifier (DLCI) – a channel number which is attached to data frames to
      tell the network how to route the data

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning

      1. Acceptable Use, Information Technology Equipment, and Third-Party (when applicable)
         Agreements will be required.
      2. Departments must predetermine:
         a. Employees, contractors, vendors, and authorized agents that will be granted remote
            access to <Your Agency> network and systems;
         b. Roles that will be required to access <You Agency> network and systems remotely
            during an emergency;
         c. Acceptable Use, Telecommuting, Email, Third-Party Agreement, and Wireless
            Communication Policies;
         d. Authentication methods for secure log-in to agency network;



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      3. Departments must pre-plan to provide access to <Your Agency> network and systems,
         including provision of any equipment, authentication devices, and granting of permissions to
         employees, contractors.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines

      1.     Secure Access: Secure remote access must be strictly controlled. Control will be
             enforced via one-time password authentication or public/private keys with strong pass-
             phrases. For information on creating a strong pass-phrase see the Password Policy.

      2.     Password: At no time should any <Your Agency> employee provide their login or email
             password to anyone, not even family members.

      3.     Split-Tunneling: <Your Agency> employees and contractors with remote access
             privileges must ensure that their <Your Agency>-owned or personal computer or
             workstation, which is remotely connected to <Your Agency>'s corporate network, is not
             connected to any other network at the same time, with the exception of personal
             networks that are under the complete control of the user.

      4.     External Resources: <Your Agency> employees and contractors with remote access
             privileges to <Your Agency>'s network must not use non-<Your Agency> email accounts
             (i.e., Hotmail, Yahoo, AOL), or other external resources to conduct <Your Agency>
             business, thereby ensuring that official business is never confused with personal
             business.

      5.     Routers for dedicated ISDN lines configured for access to the <Your Agency> network
             must meet minimum authentication requirements of Challenge- Handshake
             Authentication Protocol (CHAP).

      6.     Reconfiguration of a home user's equipment for the purpose of split-tunneling or dual
             homing is not permitted at any time.

      7.     Frame Relay must meet minimum authentication requirements of DLCI standards.

      8.     Non-standard hardware configurations must be approved by <Your Agency’s Remote
             Access Services>, and<Your Agency Information Systems Security> must approve
             security configurations for access to hardware.

      9.     All hosts that are connected to <Your Agency> internal networks via remote access
             technologies must use the most up-to-date anti-virus software <URL to agency software
             site>, this includes personal computers. Third party connections must comply with
             requirements as stated in the agency’s Third Party Agreement.

      10.    Personal equipment that is used to connect to <Your Agency>'s networks must meet
             the requirements of <Your Agency>-owned equipment for remote access.




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       11.     Organizations or individuals who wish to implement non-standard Remote Access
               solutions to the <Your Agency> production network must obtain prior approval from
               <Your Agency Remote Access Services> and <Your Agency Information Systems
               Security>.

7.0    References/Additional Resources:

8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #     Change                                                    Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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PORTABLE EMERGENCY SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT




                    <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

               POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                  Origination Date

  Portable Emergency Systems and Equipment                            Page No.



1.0   Policy

      It is the policy of <Your Agency> to maintain and protect emergency systems and equipment
      that are portable and allow for redundancy and continuity of operations at PODs and other
      emergency response facilities. All such systems and equipment are the responsibility and under
      the control of <Agency Information Services Name> until released to a POD or other emergency
      response facility.

2.0   Purpose

      The purpose of this policy is to assure that all portable emergency response systems and
      equipment under the control of <Agency Information Services Name> (at headquarters, PODs,
      or any other remote locations) are maintained and protected in a manner consistent with the
      policies, procedures, and protocols for systems and equipment set forth by <Agency
      Information Services Name>.

3.0   Persons Affected

      Mission-critical personnel assigned to PODs and those employees who have access to systems
      and equipment at PODs or other emergency response facilities during an emergency response,
      as well as authorized users of <Your Agency>-owned systems and equipment before, during, or
      after an emergency response.

4.0   Definitions

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning

      Authorized personnel who have access to portable emergency systems and equipment before,
      during, or after an emergency response must ensure that the systems are used in manners
      consistent with <Your Agency> policies for Information Technology assets. The POD Incident




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      Commander, <Name of POD IC for Your Agency>, is ultimately responsible for the security of
      portable emergency systems and equipment.

      1. Departments must predetermine employees, contractors, vendors, and authorized agents
         that will be granted access to <Your Agency> systems and equipment;
      2. Departments must pre-plan to provide access electronic systems and equipment to
         emergency responders, according to standard operating procedures and protocols existent
         in <Your Agency>.
      3. Departments must pre-plan to provide secure areas for storage and use of portable
         emergency equipment at PODs and other emergency response facilities.
      4. Employees, contractors, vendors, and authorized agents must sign appropriate use
         agreements prior to accessing <Your Agency> systems or equipment.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines

      1.     On-Site Storage: POD Incident Commander or delegate must identify and maintain a
             secure space for the storage of portable equipment.

      2.     VPN: When secure internet connection is present, records and files will be transferred
             at least once every six hours to <Your Agency> headquarters via Virtual Private
             Network (VPN) connection, according to <Agency Name> policies and procedures for
             document delivery. Tape backups and CD-R copies will still be made and delivered daily.

      3.     Laptops: All laptop computers (including Tablet-style PCs) assigned to a POD shall be
             governed and allocated according to <Your Agency> policies and procedures for
             assigned equipment. Personnel shall check-out equipment only during their shift and
             must check equipment back in prior to the end of the shift. Laptops assigned to the POD
             shall NOT leave POD premises without written consent of POD Incident Commander.

      4.     Cellular Phones/PDAs: Cellular phones and Personal Digital Assistants may be assigned
             to employees for the duration of an emergency response, subject to the policies and
             procedures set forth by <Your Agency> for assigned equipment.

      5.     Walkie-Talkies/Radios: Walkie-talkies and handheld radios assigned to a POD are for
             use only during emergency response activities, and are governed and allocated
             according to <Your Agency> policies and procedures for assigned equipment. Personnel
             shall check-out equipment only during their shift and must check equipment back in
             prior to the end of the shift.

      6.     Portable Tactical Communications Systems: Tactical redundant systems are for use only
             in case of power failure or complete loss of connectivity during an emergency response.
             When in use, only personnel who are authorized by the <Director of Agency
             Information Services Name> shall set up and access the systems. All communications
             via the systems are subject to <Your Agency> policies and protocols for assigned
             equipment.




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       7.      Independent Power Supply: Only personnel authorized by POD Incident Commander
               may access and use <Your Agency>-owned gas-powered generators, battery packs, or
               other independent power supply equipment.

       8.      Security: All portable systems and equipment at the POD will be locked and secured.
               On-site POD security personnel will be stationed to guard systems and equipment.
               Personnel granted access to systems and equipment shall be trained on its use and shall
               comply with <Your Agency> information security policies and procedures.


7.0    References/Additional Resources:

8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #       Change                                                  Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Agency Director of Policies>




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TEMPLATES: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY


SAMPLE ASSIGNMENT TO TELECOMMUTE EMAIL/MEMO/FAX

From:           Appointing Authority
Sent:           Date
To:             <Employee’s Name>
Subject:        Assignment to Telecommute during an Emergency

Please be advised that effective <date> and continuing until approximately <date> I am assigning you to
telecommute on the following days and times:

<Monday through Friday> from ___a.m. to ___p.m.

Your meal break is from ___a.m. to ___ p.m. each day and be sure to take your rest breaks.

Your approximate voicemail message call-in times are: ______________

Please be advised that you may be called to work at <Agency Worksite> on your regular telecommute
day during your regular work hours to meet workload requirements. (For Overtime eligible employees:
You may also be required to work overtime.) Please note the following:

       Telecommuting equipment and services expenses, such as an additional telephone line or
        software, must be approved in advance by <your immediate supervisor>. If any equipment or
        services have been pre-approved, the expenses will be paid or reimbursed.
       You may not use any <Your Agency> equipment for private purposes, nor allow family
        members’ or friends’ access to that equipment.
       You shall promptly return all <Your Agency>-owned equipment and data documents when
        requested by <Immediate Supervisor>.
       You must follow all software licensing provisions agreed to by <Your Agency>.
       <Your Agency> may pursue recovery from you for any <Your Agency> property deliberately or
        negligently damaged or destroyed while in your care, custody and control.
       <Your Agency> is not responsible for the private property that you use, lose or destroy.
       You may not meet with customers or clients in your home. Meetings should be scheduled in the
        office or via phone- or web-conferences.

Thank you for your assistance during this difficult time.

cc: department or division director
    Department Human Resources Service Delivery Manager
    Department payroll staff




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TELECOMMUTING FORM

                             <YOUR AGENCY> TELECOMMUTING FORM

            (Employee must submit this form to their immediate supervisor for consideration.)

Name: ___________________________________________________

Office phone: _____________________________________________

Home phone: _____________________________________________

Supervisor: _______________________________________________

Office phone: ______________________________________________

Proposed Schedule:

1) Telecommuting Days: MON __ TUE __ WED __ THU __ FRI __ VARIABLE __

2) How many days a month do you expect to telecommute? _____ Days

3) Telecommuting day Schedule:

         Start   __________ a.m. /p.m.             End       __________ a.m. /p.m.

         Lunch starts _________ a.m. /p.m.         Lunch ends __________ a.m. /p.m.

4) What hours can you be reached at home:          _______to ________

(Note: If you have one phone line and will be working on-line, what hours can you be reached at home)

Tasks:

What functions or types of tasks will you be doing at home? (i.e., data entry, word processing, etc.)



Equipment:

Place a check by the following equipment or services that you will need to telecommute. For each item
needed, please indicate whether you plan on providing the equipment or if you request that the <Your
Agency> supply the item(s).




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ITEM:                                                                       Provided by   Provided by   N/A
                                                                            Self          Agency


Second telephone line


Telephone answering machine


Residential voice mail


Computer


Computer surge protection


Software used at office (specify)


Printer


Modem


FAX machine


Remote access to the <Your Agency> network


Other




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TELECOMMUTING AGREEMENT



                                     TELECOMMUTING AGREEMENT
       These conditions for telecommuting must be agreed to by the employee and supervisor.

My telecommuting arrangement will begin on (effective date):_______ and end on _______ (agreement
shall not exceed 12 months).

I will work at the following location:

I will telecommute ____ days per week. My telecommuting work hours will be from ___a.m. to ___p.m.
(meal break from___a.m/p.m.. to ___a.m./p.m.)

I agree to call the office or my voice-mail to obtain messages at least ___ times per day while working at
home/remote location (or agree to forward my office phone line to my telecommute location when I
telecommute).

Approximate voicemail message call-in times:

I will be using the following <Your Agency>-owned equipment at the work location shown above and
understand that I am responsible for said equipment, as stated in the <Your Agency>’s Telecommuting
policy:


I understand and agree to the job assignments or tasks to be completed under my telecommuting
arrangement with my supervisor. (Supervisors may attach a specific written statement of job
assignments and additional expectations if desired.)

Telecommuting equipment and services expenses (such as an additional telephone line or software)
must be approved in advance by your immediate supervisor. If any equipment or services have been
approved, the expenses will be paid or reimbursed.

Employees who will be working with confidential <Your Agency> information at their home must attach
information describing what strategies will be used to maintain that the information remains secure and
confidential in a manner consistent with existing <Your Agency> policies.




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CHAPTER 6.0: MEDIA RELATIONS AND COMMUNICATION

CHAPTER SUMMARY

During an emergency response, a key element is effectively communicating the response efforts and
measures to their personnel, partners, public officials, and the general public in a community in crisis.
Many times, this is accomplished through the media. Sound and thoughtful communications are
required before, during, and after an emergency. This chapter focuses on planning and strategies for
effective communications with the media, the public, partners, personnel, and other stakeholders.

It is imperative that clear, consistent messages are conveyed from the public health department at all
times. However, it is even more important during an emergency, when fear and tension are at their
highest among the general public, as well as those providing public health services to the public, that
each agency still operates at a high and efficient level. When communicating to their employees, their
partners, other responders, the media, or the general public, agencies must coordinate closely with the
designated public information officials to ensure that all agency messages are clear, concise, fact-based,
and consistent.

CHAPTER ACRONYMS

EAS:            Emergency Alert System

EPI:            Emergency Public Information

EOC:            Emergency Operating Center

EOP:            Emergency Operating Procedure

ESL:            English as a Second Language

ICS:            Incident Command System

JIC:            Joint Information Center

JPIC:           Joint Public Information Center

NIMS:           National Incident Management System

NRP:            National Response Plan

PIC:            Public Information Center

PIO:            Public Information Officer




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POLICY AND PROCEDURES: MEDIA RELATIONS AND COMMUNICATION


FILMING/PHOTOGRAPHY OF CLIENTS AND FACILITIES




                  <YOUR AGENCY>                                   Policy No.

            POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                 Origination
                                                                  Date



      <Filming/Photography of Clients and                         Page No.
                  Facilities>



1.0     Policy

        On the basis of legal restrictions on the release of sensitive, confidential or personally identifying
        materials regarding public health clients, it is the policy of the <Your Agency> that no filming,
        videotaping or photographing of <Your Agency> clients shall be performed without prior official
        approval of a signed authorization form from the <Agency Department> and written consent by
        the client.

2.0     Purpose

        This Policy establishes the policy and procedures for filming and/or photographing of <Your
        Agency> clients and employees.

3.0     Persons Affected

        All clients and employees of the <Your Agency> or those assigned to work under the purview of
        the <Your Agency>.

4.0     Definitions

5.0     Responsibilities/Preplanning

        If <Your Agency> should have on file their Approval for Filming and/or Photographing Form and
        Employee and/or Client Consent Form.

6.0     Procedures/Process Guidelines



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       Approval must be obtained for the filming, videotaping or taking of photographs of <Your
       Agency> employees while on the job, as well as filming, videotaping or taking any photographs
       of any <Your Agency> facility, including those that do not contain images of people.

       1.      All requests for photographs or filming of <Your Agency> clients, employees or facilities
               must be submitted to, and approved by, the <Agency Department>/PIO.

       2.      All requests must be submitted via the attached forms, which are available through the
               <Media Relations Department>.

       3.      Written consent must also be obtained from each client (or parent/legal guardian)
               and/or <Your Agency> employee to be filmed or photographed. The attached consent
               form, approved by the <Agency Attorney>, will be used as appropriate for each client or
               employee and will be kept on file in the <Agency Department>.

       4.      Once approval has been granted or denied, the <Agency Department> will notify the
               department manager, as well as the person submitting the request.

       5.      When a member of the news media requests an interview and/or photographs of
               patients during a public health concern, permission may be given by the patient(s) in
               coordination with the PIO and <Media Relations Department> staff member.

       6.      These procedures also apply to all staff, clientele or patient interactions filmed,
               photographed, or otherwise recorded for educational purposes.

7.0    References


8.0    Revisions

       Date         Rev. #   Change                                                     Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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MEDIA POLICY




                <YOUR AGENCY>                                   Policy No.

         POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                  Origination
                                                                Date

                 <Media Policy>                                 Page No.



1.0   Policy

      It is the policy of the <Your Agency> that:

      All print and broadcast media requests and contact attempts are referred immediately to the
      <Agency Department> and PIO.

      <Your Agency> recognizes the right of the media to report public information and recognizes
      the importance of media coverage to educate the public about health matters, healthcare
      services and healthcare news. In order to safeguard the life, health and legal rights of the public,
      staff, or <Your Agency> clients, and to prevent the reporting of erroneous speculation or
      opinions, the following policies and procedures have been established. To ensure that all media
      opportunities are handled in an appropriate, prompt, and efficient manner that complies with
      HIPAA and other laws, the <Your Agency> is implementing the following policy and procedures:

2.0   Purpose

      This Policy establishes the policy and procedures for preparing information and responding to
      public information requests. The <Agency Department> is dedicated to cooperating with the
      media and its partner institutions to promote the dissemination of important health and
      medical information to the public.

3.0   Persons Affected

      All employees of the <Your Agency>or those assigned to work under the purview of the <Your
      Agency>.

4.0   Definitions

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines



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       To provide accurate and productive interchange with the media the following procedures are
       established:

       1. Upon approval of the <Agency Department> and PIO, various <Your Agency> employees
          may be designated as official spokespersons and interview subjects when media requests
          are made.
       2. If you are not a designated spokesperson and are approached by the media, be polite. Tell
          them you are not a <Your Agency> spokesperson and prefer not to be interviewed,
          photographed or videotaped. Offer to refer them to the <Agency Department> and PIO at
          <Insert Telephone #s>.
       3. Please remember that you become the representative of the <Your Agency> when you
          speak to the media in your capacity as a <Your Agency> employee.
       4. If you are in a situation in which you are speaking to the media about matters not directly
          related to the <Your Agency> activities, do not refer to your professional position or duties
          within the <Your Agency>.
       5. The content and distribution of informational materials on <Your Agency> programs and
          activities should be cleared through your department before submitted to <Agency
          Department> and PIO for design and editorial services. The <Agency Department> should
          have knowledge of all literature such as pamphlets, brochures, leaflets, and fliers, which are
          distributed to groups or the public at large concerning the <Your Agency> programs and
          services.
       6. Do not refer to Policy <#>, Filming/Photographs of Clients and Facilities concerning
          photographs of clients.
       7. During an emergency, there will a great deal of media attention focused on the <Your
          Agency>. Media representatives will most likely be present in large numbers, eager to
          pursue any <Your Agency> employee willing to talk to them. It is essential that no <Your
          Agency> employee speak to the media regarding <Your Agency> activities unless you are a
          designated <Your Agency> spokesperson or PIO. This policy ensures that the media will
          receive current, accurate and consistent information at all times.
7.0    References
8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section



Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICER (PIO)

                     <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

               POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                   Origination Date

               Public Information Officer                              Page No.


1.0 Policy

    It is the policy of <Your Agency> to designate and appoint a Public Information Officer (PIO). <Name
    of individual> from <indicate normal job title and organization> is delegated as the Public
    Information Officer (PIO) for<Your Agency>. In the event he/she is unavailable, <name of
    designated back-up> from <indicate normal job title and organization> will serve as the Public
    Information Officer.

2.0 Purpose

    A Public Information Officer is appointed from within local government to coordinate the collection
    and dissemination of all newsworthy information and to act as official spokesperson for the
    community in times of public health emergencies or disasters. This policy and procedures
    establishes the emergency operating course of action for the <Your Agency> Public Information
    Officer.

3.0 Persons Affected

    To reduce the vulnerability of people and property to disasters and to establish capabilities to
    respond effectively to the occurrence of disaster, the <Agency/Department> mandates the
    preparation of Emergency Operation Plans. The preparation of individual departmental Emergency
    Operating Procedures (EOPs) is intended to utilize existing departments and agencies to the fullest
    extent possible during disaster operation and to assign disaster related duties similar to the normal
    duties of the department. This plan establishes the Public Information Officer’s responsibilities for
    emergency operations. When approved, it shall be the duty of the PIO to perform the functions
    assigned by this plan and to maintain this plan in a current state of readiness at all times.

4.0 Definitions

5.0 Responsibilities/Preplanning
    The responsibilities of the PIO are outlined in the following:

        Emergency Public Information
        1. Assist in the preparation and review of pre-scripted Emergency Public Information (EPI)
           materials, including materials for non-English speakers and materials for the visually
           impaired.


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       2. Ensure that EPI materials are distributed to the media.
       3. Ensure EPI materials are reviewed annually and updated as necessary.
       4. To support rumor control efforts, establish and publicize an information hotline to provide
          disaster information to the public when appropriate.
       5. On a day-to-day basis, develops and distributes educational material on the hazards that
          face the community.
       6. Recruits, selects, and activates staff as necessary to perform Public Information duties.

       Media
       1. Maintain a working relationship with radio stations, television stations, and newspapers to
          utilize in the release of public information.
       2. Arrange information briefings for media representatives when appropriate.
       3. Clear information with the County Manager, and/or the Emergency Management Director
          prior to release to the media.
       4. Ensure updated media contact information and applicable authorization codes are
          maintained and copies are kept on file in the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) resource
          manual.
       5. Ensure that all information received and disseminated is verified for accuracy.

       Policy Development
       1. Develop and maintain guidelines for the coordination and release of information to the
           public during disaster operations.

       Records
       1. Maintain records of expenditures, obligations, narratives, and operational journals of
          response action, including all activities associated with public health disaster operations in
          accordance with the Finance Director’s EOP.

       EOC Activation
       1. Report to the EOC upon request to coordinate all public information activity.
       2. Ensure that two alternate staff members are adequately trained to carry out the duties and
          responsibilities identified herein during disaster operations.
       3. To guarantee continuity of government during disaster operations, ensure that a delegation
          of authority to a minimum of two staff members is submitted to the Purchasing Director and
          kept current at all times.

6.0 Procedures/Process Guidelines

   Describe the specific tasks and actions the PIO and his/her staff is responsible for performing before,
   during and after an emergency or disaster.
   Mitigation/Preparedness Phase
       1. Review the Public Information Guidelines to the Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) at least
           annually and update it as changes occur.
       2. Review and update documents that support the Public Information Guidelines, such as this
           Emergency Public Information SOP and the community’s Resource Manual.


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    3. Assemble emergency public information personnel, including clerical support staff, and
        conduct training exercises at least annually.
    4. Maintain working relationships with public information personnel from local response
        agencies, PIOs in adjacent jurisdictions, and private organization public relations personnel
        so that mutual needs may be fulfilled during public health emergencies and disasters.
    5. Provide training to EOC staff to ensure they are familiar with public information concepts.
    6. Maintain media contact lists.
    7. Conduct annual training with local media representatives and share with them the details of
        the plan.
    8. Periodically review the Emergency Alert System (EAS) Area Plan. Assist the Warning Officer
        with developing stock messages with blanks that can be filled in quickly during emergencies.
        The Warning Officer is responsible for activating the Emergency Alert System (EAS) and
        providing a message.
    9. Prepare and obtain educational material for each potential hazard that could affect the
        jurisdiction. Distribute this information to the public.
    10. Prepare “camera ready” information that can be quickly printed and distributed to each
        affected household at the time of an emergency.
    11. Select a facility near the EOC that can be utilized as a Joint Public Information Center (JPIC)
        during an emergency. Make arrangements for use of this facility. Select alternative facilities
        for use.
    12. Develop status boards, maps, etc. for Joint Public Information Center. Store in a convenient,
        safe location.
    13. Make arrangements for communications equipment and other supplies/equipment
        necessary for JPIC functioning.
    14. Maintains a file of emergency instructions that can be quickly disseminated at the time of an
        actual or impending public health emergency or disaster.
Response Phase
    1. Fully mobilize the emergency public information organization, determine shift assignments,
        brief emergency public information staff on status of emergency situation and their duties.
    2. Maintain contact with the EOC to obtain the latest information, verify information, and have
        news releases authenticated.
    3. Activate JPIC as necessary. If media interest is intense, a Joint Public Information Center
        (JPIC) is established in conjunction with all other government and private agencies involved.
        This center becomes the central location from which news releases are issued and where
        public inquiries are addressed. The PIO functions as official spokesperson at the JPIC, if
        activated, and organizes a staff to operate it.
    4. Review and evaluate supply of written public information material and distribute as
        necessary.
    5. Provide copies of all written news releases and summaries of all press conferences to the
        chief executive.
    6. Make contact with the PIOs in other affected jurisdictions and, at other government levels,
        and within the private sector, and jointly release information from the JPIC.
    7. Monitor published and broadcast information for accuracy. Correct misinformation
        whenever possible.



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      8. Obtain and release telephone numbers the public can call for additional information or
          specific questions (Rumor Control Center).
      9. Obtain and release telephone numbers the public can call to volunteer assistance.
      10. Obtain and release the telephone number for the Missing Person Information Center.
      11. Maintain status boards and maps at the JPIC.
      12. Keep the Rumor Control Section staff apprised of the status of the emergency situation.
      13. Maintain a log and a file of all information released to the media.
      14. Arrange for media tours of the EOC and/or emergency scene if it will not hinder response
          efforts.
      15. Arrange media briefings on a regular basis. Announce and post briefing times well in
          advance.
      16. Dispatch public information team, if appropriate to the scene to take pictures, etc. for the
          media to use.
      17. Release information about approved areas from which persons may view the disaster scene.
          In choosing viewing areas, consider safety, traffic flow, and availability of parking areas.
  Recovery Phase
      1. Continue to release information from the JPIC as long as media interest is present.
      2. Accommodate state and federal public information officers and assist them in releasing
          information on assistance programs.
      3. Gather all records kept during all phases of the emergency and prepare a chronological
          summary of all events, actions taken, inquiries made, and responses given. Collect
          newspaper clippings and TV videotapes, if available.
      4. Survey staff and local media for suggestions to improve public information response
          procedures in future emergencies.
      5. Write an after-action report and provide copies to the emergency management coordinator
          and appropriate elected officials and local agency representatives.

       6. The following plans, procedures, and resource lists are the responsibility of the Public
          Information Officer. The plans, procedures, and resource lists identified are required to be
          update annually and forwarded to the <Agency Department> by <Date> of each year.

7.0 References

8.0 Revisions

       Date        Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>



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EMERGENCY PUBLIC INFORMATION (EPI)




                   <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

             POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                   Origination Date



          Emergency Public Information                               Page No.




  Acronyms used in this Policy:

  EAS:        Emergency Alert System

  EPIS:       Emergency Public Information System

  EOC:        Emergency Operating Center

  EOPs:       Emergency Operating Procedures

  ICS:        Incident Command System

  JIC:        Joint Information Center

  JPIC:       Joint Public Information Center

  NIMS:       National Incident Management System

  NRP:        National Response Plan

  PIO:        Public Information Officer



  The Emergency Public Information System (EPIS) supports the Incident Command System (ICS) by
  communicating critical health and safety information during emergencies or disasters. This
  responsibility falls on local, state and federal agencies to provide accurate, timely, appropriate, and
  easily understood information to the external audiences like the media and public, as well as
  internally to local, state, and federal agencies, jurisdictions, responders, and elected officials at all
  levels. Meeting this responsibility requires a Joint Public Information Center (JPIC) where all affected
  or supporting jurisdictions and agencies communicate using “one voice” to provide coordinated
  information. The JPIC is designed to support the ICS under the National Incident Management




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   System (NIMS) and National Response Plan (NRP). It works equally well for Single, Unified and Area
   Command structures.

   This plan recognizes and acknowledges the importance of providing the general public and the
   media with pertinent information as rapidly as possible in case of an emergency/disaster. Every
   effort will be made to cooperate with the news media in providing information about the incidents,
   within the limits of safety and efficient operations, and in recognition of the rights of the news
   media to perform their duties.


1.0 Policy

   Develop a media relations program for the <Your Agency> that will be utilized under routine and
   emergency conditions to effectively respond to media inquiries and public interests. Disseminate
   information, emergency instructions and protective actions to the public through the media to
   enhance public health, safety and welfare and economic stability in <Agency Area>.


2.0 Purpose

   The purpose of this policy is to establish a strategy for providing information to the public through
   the media and equal access to information for the news media during public health emergencies or
   disasters.
       1. Provide guidance and procedures for disseminating Emergency Public Information (EPI) in
           support of the <Jurisdiction’s> response and recovery to an emergency or disaster.
       2. Provide for the effective collection, monitoring, management and dissemination of accurate,
           useful and timely information to media outlets during public health emergencies or
           disasters.
       3. Disseminate emergency instructions and protective actions to the public.
       4. Maintain procedures to disseminate public information and instructions for obtaining
           disaster assistance.
       5. Provide procedures to develop and disseminate public information regarding governmental
           response and recovery operations.
       6. Coordinate EPI to avoid panic, fear and confusion resulting from rumors and hearsay.
       7. Provide long-term public education efforts related to hazard awareness, family protection
           planning and emergency self-help.

  The following information concerning major emergencies/disasters will be provided to the media as
  soon as possible:
       1. Nature of disaster
       2. Location of disaster
       3. Time of disaster
       4. Number of people involved
       5. Continuing hazards
       6. Environmental impact
       7. Economic impact

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       8. Agencies involved in response
       9. Scope of agency involvement and activity
       10. Extent of estimated public and private damages
       11. Safety instructions
       12. How/where to get assistance for livestock and companion animals
       13. How the public may volunteer and provide assistance
       14. Telephone numbers for donations and donations policy


3.0 Persons Affected

   All clients and employees of the <Your Agency> or those assigned to work under the purview of the
   <Your Agency>. All persons residing, working or visiting within the boundaries of <Agency
   Jurisdiction>.

4.0 Definitions

5.0 Responsibilities/Preplanning

   1. Effective measures can be taken to enhance survival and minimize hardship during a State of
      Emergency or Major Disaster by providing Emergency Public Information (EPI) to the public.
      During an emergency or disaster, the public requires survival instructions, information regarding
      disaster relief and government response and recovery operations.

   2. When an emergency or disaster strikes, the Emergency Public Information System (EPIS) cannot
      always react in time to inform the public about the hazard and appropriate safety precautions.
      Therefore, it is important to inform the public of hazards, protective actions and preparedness
      measures they can employ to reduce the impact of hazards on themselves and their community
      before an emergency occurs.

   3. A public affairs program combining both public education and community information will help
      to significantly reduce disaster related casualties, property damage and economic loss. People
      will want more emergency preparedness information during an emerging crisis. Accelerated
      printing and/or distribution of advisories or flyers will be made directly to the public and/or
      media.

   4. The principal means by which EPI will be disseminated will include Emergency Alert System
      (EAS), television, radio, cable-outlets, the <Your Agency> web-site, newspapers, press services
      and flyers. A back up means for public information will include vehicle public address systems
      and door-to-door contact during critical periods and in locations with life-safety incidents.

   5. Special needs groups will be considered based on the ability of people to receive, act on or
      understand EPI messages. These might include sight or hearing impairments, custodial
      institutions, i.e., schools, nursing homes, hospitals and prisons.




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   6. Major public health events create significant media interest that will bring out-of-state
      reporters, photographers and camera crews to an incident. This will create a heavy demand on
      the state and local EPI structure requiring augmentation. External sources will be interested in
      major operations, devastation, high impact and human interest events.

6.0 Procedures/Process Guidelines

   <Your Agency> media relation efforts will provide information on such activities as the <Your
   Agency> Emergency Operations Center (EOC) operations and related state response functions. It is
   important to keep the media informed of the general progress of associated events. Efforts will be
   made to report positive information regarding emergency response to reassure the public that the
   situation is being dealt with, utilizing appropriate resources.

       1. Education efforts will be directed toward increasing public awareness about hazards and
          how people can successfully deal with them.

       2. Information and education efforts will rely on the cooperation of commercial media
          organizations, including both electronic news gathering and print sources.

       3. EPI will provide information and instructions to the public for obtaining disaster relief and
          assistance.

       4. EPI will disseminate information regarding state and local governmental response activities
          and operations in support of life safety activity.

       5. Restriction of erroneous or conflicting information presented to the public will be
          conducted.

       6. Establish and maintain contact with the media before, during and after termination of a
          public health event.

   County agencies involved in emergency response operations will coordinate news releases regarding
   their operations with <Your Agency> Public Information Officer (PIO). <Your Agency> PIOs will
   ensure that the <Agency Executive Board> is aware of information releases that are being made by
   county agencies.

   The <Your Agency> PIO will advise the <Agency Executive Board> of pertinent policy issues
   regarding emergency information and establish press conferences for the Board. <Your Agency>
   PIOs will support and assist in these efforts in concert with the PIOs from other county and state
   agencies and the private sector.

   When a Presidential Declaration of an Emergency or Major Disaster has been issued, the <Your
   Agency> PIO will coordinate with the State PIO to establish policies concerning joint news releases.
   This information will be relayed to the <Agency Executive Board>. Coordination of these functions
   will be maintained and managed by the <Your Agency>.


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   A Joint Information Center (JIC) may be established upon the recommendation of the <Your
   Agency> to coordinate multi-agency news releases. The EAS and Media Alert System will be used to
   convey information releases to the media for immediate dissemination to the public. In certain
   instances, it may become necessary for the Governor or other designated public officials to request
   activation of the EAS to provide information directly to the public.

7.0 References
                 Emergency Public Information (EPI) Release Priorities

8.0 Revisions

       Date          Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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PROVIDING FOR THE ESL COMMUNITY DURING AN EMERGENCY




                       <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

               POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                     Origination Date

      Providing for the ESL Community During an
                      Emergency                                          Page No.



1.0      Policy
         During an emergency <Your Agency> will adhere to the following procedures in order to
         accommodate the needs of the community’s English as a Second Language (ESL) clients.

2.0      Purpose
         Preplanning and emergency procedures need to reflect the special needs of clients whom speak
         English as a second language. This population may need different resources to accommodate
         cultural or language differences.

3.0      Persons Affected
         ESL Clientele

4.0      Definitions

5.0      Responsibilities/Preplanning
            1. Understand your community’s population in terms of ESL clientele:
                     a. What percentage of your population is ESL?
                     b. What languages are primarily spoken?
                     c. What are the cultural beliefs regarding emergency preparedness within these
                         special populations?
                     d. What methods of communication are trusted sources within these special
                         populations?
            2. Prepare written materials in your population’s primary language, taking into
               consideration cultural biases and literacy levels; including:
                     a. What constitutes an emergency?
                     b. Public health emergency preparedness
                     c. Specific biological and chemical agents
                     d. Whom to contact for information during an emergency

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                  e. How to find help during an emergency (what resources are available to the
                      public)
           3. Develop partnerships with community entities that are trusted by the special
              populations as sources of aid and information (community and religious organizations,
              word of mouth from trusted sources such as school nurses, pediatricians, etc.)
           4. Provide educational opportunities (with interpreters) about how <Your Agency> is
              preparing for future emergencies.
                  a. How vaccine will be distributed during an outbreak
                  b. Where medical help will be available during the emergency
                  c. How they can help during an emergency

6.0    Procedures/Process Guidelines
          1. When an emergency is declared, notify community partners; distribute ESL written
              material to partners for distribution to the special populations.
          2. Utilize interpreters, as available (AT&T Interpreter Services), to provide consistent
              emergency information to the special populations.
          3. Provide up to date information to local radio and television that cater to the special
              populations.
          4. Provide opportunities for willing volunteers to help during and after the emergency.

7.0    References

8.0    Revisions

       Date         Rev. #   Change                                                     Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS)




                 <YOUR AGENCY>                                  Policy No.

             POLICY AND PROCEDURES                              Origination
                                                                Date



             Emergency Alert System                             Page No.



   The Emergency Alert System (EAS) permits federal, state and local governments to communicate
   instructions and essential information to the public during emergencies through commercial and
   public radio and television broadcast stations. The EAS provides an organized method for public
   officials to rapidly disseminate emergency information to the public in order to reduce loss of life
   and property, and to promote rapid recovery in the event of a natural disaster, a technologic or
   manmade disaster, or an attack on the United States.

   There will be times when it is critical to warn the public and local officials of threatening or occurring
   public health emergencies or disasters. There is no single method of warning available in <Agency
   Area>, so a combination of warning methods must be utilized. The EAS is one method used in
   cooperation with local broadcasters. It will be used as a last resort and for the purpose of saving
   lives.

   Examples of incidents that may require warning and the use of the EAS include, but are not limited
   to: earthquake, volcanic activity, severe weather, flood and hazardous materials release. There are
   many other natural, social technological incidents that are addressed in the <Agency Handbook>
   that may warrant the use of the EAS.

1.0 Policy

   It is the policy of <Your Agency> government to activate the EAS in order to alert and warn residents
   of life threatening public health emergencies. This method will be utilized as a last resort and when
   the following criteria are met:

       1. Lives must be in danger.

       2. Direction provided via the EAS has the potential to save lives.

       3. Effective warning cannot be accomplished by any other means.

   After EAS activation, further instructions and information to the public will be disseminated to the
   media by the affected public safety agency(s).



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2.0 Purpose

   Authorized federal, state and local authorities may activate the EAS to warn the public of potential
   life threatening events. These authorities are the President, the director of the State of <Agency’s
   State> Emergency Management Division, or the director of the <Agency/Department>, or their
   respective designees. The EAS operates through the use of participating radio and television
   stations.

   The decision to activate the EAS for weather related incidents will generally be the responsibility of
   the National Weather Service. For localized non-weather related incidents, the
   <Agency/Department> will be the designated authority for activating the EAS. The <Department>
   <Duty Officer> is available on a 24-hour basis and in the point of contact for the activation of EAS.
   The <Duty Officer> is reached by calling <telephone #>.

   Certain equipment is required to initiate EAS messages. An encoder can generate warnings which
   may be preset requiring only the pressing of a button. A decoder accepts digital bursts and
   translates it into an audio and/or printed message. A computer can be used with the encoder to
   send customized messages. Messages are limited to two minutes and must contain concise warning
   instructions. Before the message is broadcast or displayed, two 8-second attention bursts are
   initiated and the upcoming message is announced.

   The method of transmitting these messages between local agencies and broadcasters is via a UHF
   radio system. By using radios, many broadcast stations are able to receive messages at the same
   time. Those stations outside the frequency range or who do not have decoders will need to receive
   the message from other broadcast stations.

3.0 Persons Affected

   All clients and employees of the <Your Agency> or those assigned to work under the purview of the
   <Your Agency>. All persons residing, working or visiting within the boundaries of <Agency
   Jurisdiction>.

4.0 Definitions

5.0 Responsibilities/Preplanning

       1. The public health event is occurring, or will occur, within a short period of time, making
          conventional methods of warning and media notification inadequate.

       2. Lives must be in jeopardy and will be saved with immediate precautions.

       3. Communications paths will be available between the EAS activation points and broadcast
          stations.

       4. Other methods of warning will be used in addition to the EAS, when possible.

       5. The EAS is a useful method of warning the general population. In the event of a real disaster
          the EAS will be activated and a message preceded by three short bursts of sound will be

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           transmitted via air wave through the radio and television sets, as long as they are on.
           Additional technology will become available so that the sets will not have to be on in order
           to receive EAS messages.

       6. Radio, television and cable providers will broadcast EAS messages in a timely manner.

       The <Agency/Department> has the primary responsibility for activating the EAS for all
       jurisdictions within <Area of concern>, and the notification of those jurisdictions. Should <Your
       Agency> be unable to perform this function, the <Area Law Enforcement Agency> shift
       supervisor will activate the EAS. The National Weather Service may activate the EAS for weather
       related incidents. It is the responsibility of <Your Agency> to:

       1. Maintain the EAS so it can be activated 24 hours a day.

       2. Designate personnel who will send EAS messages.

       3. Develop and train personnel on operating procedures. (<Your Agency> will be the lead
          authority for training.)

       4. Test the EAS equipment and procedures regularly.

6.0 Procedures/Process Guidelines

   Notification of affected jurisdictions and government officials will occur prior to the sending of the
   EAS message when time allows. There will be times when warning the public is time critical and the
   EAS message will be made to neighboring or other affected jurisdictions as well as <State
   Emergency Management Division> and the <Agency Jurisdiction> public safety answering points. In
   addition, other affected agencies within <Agency Jurisdiction> and the participating agencies in the
   <Regional/District EAS Plan> will be notified. The method of notification may include, but is not
   limited to, telephones, VHF radios, computers, <other methods>. <Agency/Department> will make
   the appropriate notifications. All EAS messages sent will include the following information:

       1. The name and title of the person delivering the message.

       2. What will happen.

       3. When it will happen.

       4. Where it will happen.

       5. Geographic area affected.

       6. Emergency protection measures for the public.

       7. If evacuation is required, identify hazard areas and specify desirable transportation routes.

       8. Reassurance that officials are addressing the incident.




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       9. Identify <Radio Stations/Frequencies> as the station that the public should monitor for
          further information and instructions.

       The <Agency/Department> will identify the Public Information Officer (PIO) that is currently
       available for questions from the media. Personnel will also be available to handle inquiries from
       the public or other agencies. It may be appropriate to establish a Joint Information Center (JIC)
       for media inquiries and a citizen hotline to respond to inquiries from the public. In most cases,
       the affected agency will open an Emergency Operations Center (EOC) to support agencies
       responding to the event. Situation reports will be transmitted to agencies affected by the
       incident.

       Request for Activation

       When the incident commander or highest ranking official at the scene of an incident determines
       that an EAS message must initiated to save lives, have the potential to save lives and if there is
       no other way to warn the public, they will contact the authorized individual from their
       jurisdiction who has the authority to request activation of the EAS. That person will contact the
       <Agency/Department> <Duty Officer> by calling <telephone #> to request activation. If there is
       any question as to the validity of the request, the <Department> will verify that the incident has
       occurred by contacting the affected public safety answering point(s).

       If the <Agency/Department> cannot be contacted, the <Area Law Enforcement Agency> has
       the authority to activate the EAS. This is accomplished through regular dispatch procedures. All
       requests for activation must meet the following criteria:

       1. Lives must be in danger.

       2. Direction provided via the EAS has the potential to save lives.

       3. Effective warning cannot be accomplished by any other means.

7.0 References

8.0 Revisions

       Date        Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section



Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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MEDIA ACCESS/SECURITY




                  <YOUR AGENCY>                                Policy No.

             POLICY AND PROCEDURES                             Origination
                                                               Date



              Media Access/Security                            Page No.




1.0 Policy

   <Your Agency> will maintain a policy for media access to the EOC and other <Your Agency>
   facilities.

2.0 Purpose

   In recognition of the media and public’s right to know as much as possible about a disaster, state
   agencies involved in emergency response will cooperate by allowing representatives of the news
   media access to emergency response information and facilities when appropriate.

3.0 Persons Affected

   All clients and employees of the <Your Agency> or those assigned to work under the purview of the
   <Your Agency>.

4.0 Definitions

5.0 Responsibilities/Preplanning

6.0 Procedures/Process Guidelines

   News media representatives will be governed by the following guidelines:
   1. Representatives of the news media will have access to the EOC, when authorized by the
      <Agency Director/ PIO>.

   2. Audio and video recordings and personnel interviews of public debriefing or addresses will be
      permitted in the <Your Agency> when authorized by the PIO.
   3. The PIO of <Your Agency> will escort reporters and schedule/coordinate interviews in the <Your
      Agency> EOC and other facilities.


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   4. Media crews, reporters, videographers and photographers who enter any <Your Agency>
       property without clearance or escort from a member of the <Agency/Department>
       communications staff will be detained by security until the <Media Relations Department> can
       be contacted. This is to ensure the privacy of our staff, clients, or patients.
   5. Members of the media are not allowed in patient treatment areas of the <Your Agency>
       without prior authorization and appropriate escort. <Insert Treatment Areas> where patients
       are located are considered treatment areas.
   6. In accordance with <State Law>, interviews may not be recorded, by anyone, without prior
       knowledge and agreement of all parties being taped. Agreement of taping should be recorded at
       the beginning of the tape being utilized.
   7. All requests concerning public documents, such as <Agency Executive Board> minutes, salaries,
       budgets, correspondence, expenses, etc., must be in writing from the inquiring party to <Your
       Agency> President/Chief Executive Officer. For questions regarding this process please contact
       <Your Agency> PIO.
   8. Information regarding staff members is confidential. Any inquiries regarding workforce
       members should be directed to the PIO and Director of the appropriate department.
   9. Due to HIPAA privacy concerns, media are not allowed to interview, photograph or film in the
       <area> unless authorized and accompanied by the PIO or a <Media Relations Department>
       representative.
   10. The PIO of <Your Agency> must be present whenever a member of the media is at an <Your
       Agency> facility, even if the <Your Agency> staff did not initiate the interview.
   11. The <Your Agency> reserves the right to deny media entrance to its facilities if the above
       requirements are not met, or if media presence will be disruptive to the patient care
       environment or other normal operating procedures.

7.0 References

8.0 Revisions

       Date        Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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ADDITIONAL RESOURCES: MEDIA RELATIONS AND COMMUNICATION


EMERGENCY PUBLIC INFORMATION (EPI) RELEASE PRIORITIES


EMERGENCY PUBLIC INFORMATION (EPI) RELEASE PRIORITIES
<Your Agency> Emergency Public Information Standard Operating Procedures

EMERGENCY PUBLIC INFORMATION RELEASE PRIORITIES
In the event of an emergency/disaster the Public Information Officer (PIO) is responsible for collecting
and disseminating information. It is the responsibility of the PIO to prioritize information in order to
assure that the public receives information in a timely manner.
Information of an immediate concern that should be compiled and disseminated includes the following:
      Description of disaster.
      Time period involved.
      Affected/contaminated areas to avoid and areas closed to traffic.
      What actions to take if in-place sheltering is ordered.
      What actions to take if evacuation is ordered.
      Location of shelters and routes to take.
      How to obtain transportation to shelters.
      How to shut off utilities.
      Number to call for medical care and rescue services.
      Medical measures the public can take before help arrives.
      Procedures to take to protect property and livestock.
      How to improvise shelter.
      Status of schools and children (i.e., Are children retained in school or have they been sent
        elsewhere? Should they be picked up?)

It is important to keep the public informed of the status of the situation on an ongoing basis. This type
of information includes the following:
       Number of deaths and injuries.
       Amount of public and private property damage and agricultural damage.
       Number of persons evacuated.
       Number of persons in public shelters.
       Number of homes without power.
       Response efforts being taken by government and private agencies.
       Status of local emergency declaration, Governor’s Proclamation, Presidential Declaration.
       Establishment of Emergency Information/Rumor Control center, telephone number.
       Time before utilities will be restored.
       Essential services available.
       Time before evacuated persons can return home.
       How long in-place sheltering will be needed.
       Agricultural information (i.e. sources of feed, monetary assistance, etc.)


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      Disaster assistance available and how to apply (monetary, temporary housing, food, etc.).
      Response efforts of volunteers and telephone number for people to call volunteering assistance.
      Telephone number for Missing Person Information Center.
      Temporary morgues and victim identification measures being taken.

Other types of interesting information, but not of immediate concern, include the following:
    Human interest stories.
    Charts/photographs/statistical information regarding the disaster.
    Names of persons killed (release only after next of kin have been notified).
    Sequence of events occurring before, during and after disaster.




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INFORMATION MANAGEMENT CYCLE AT THE JOINT INFORMATION CENTER

Information Management Cycle
Within a Joint Information Center (JIC), information is considered a tangible commodity. In a real sense,
information is the “fuel” that runs the engine of the JIC. Without information, the JIC cannot move; with
too much information, the JIC will falter. Successful information management depends upon seven
steps:

Step One: Gather – The JIC must gather information from as many sources as possible. When
information comes to the JIC, it must be collected in an organized way. This requires trained,
experienced staff that can look at information and put it into a useful form.

Step Two: Analyze – Information arrives from multiple sources and must be verified and analyzed.
Information analysts will spend much of their time evaluating incoming information and deciding which
pieces are critical to internal and external audiences. Analysts must also share information with the JIC
staff responsible for producing informational products.

Step Three: Organize, Write, Produce – The public needs information presented in a useable form,
organized by category, priority and value. In the early stages of an emergency, a “one sheet” concept
can be used in which one sheet of paper is maintained with critical information listed in bullet format.
Public information also is produced in other forms, such as maps, pictures and videos.

Step Four: Review/Coordinate – A quick yet thorough review of all information to be released is an
essential part of the information management process. Reviewers should look for inconsistencies,
inaccuracies, clarity and completeness. Most important, reviewers must coordinate with all agencies
that have information to be released.

Step Five: Document – Proper documentation is mandatory for all ICS/NIMS functions, including public
information. In order to resolve a miscommunication or dispute, or in the case of litigation, decisions
and activities must be documented. Each supervisor should maintain a personal log. It may also mean
that dates, times and notes from certain actions are kept for each shift. At the end of each shift,
supervisors must file the documentation.

Step Six: Dissemination – JIC staff must use every means available to provide prompt information to
those who need it, in the proper format. Dissemination also must include internal audiences involved in
the response.

Step Seven: Monitor – Monitoring the media is a crucial function of the JIC. Ideal candidates for this job
are experienced former reporters, producers, editors and public affairs professionals. Staff must know
what to watch and listen for, and spot issues and inaccuracies that could cause problems for people in
affected areas, as well as for emergency officials.




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 COMMUNICATION AND CONSISTENT MESSAGING

Recommendations: This section sets forth many useful reminders and suggestions on effective
communication.

Significant issue: With the aid of central service agencies, departments and agencies are responsible for
educating their employees and ensuring that communications personnel are trained for emergency
communications.

Preplanning: Departments not only need to identify key internal and external stakeholders but also the
methods that will be used to communicate with them. Departments, together with Labor Relations,
need to communicate to labor unions and employees that certain provisions of their respective
collective bargaining agreement may be suspended.

One of the key elements in responding to any disaster, including an emergency, is effective and timely
communication. Agency departments must plan their internal communications strategies now, before
the crisis. Sound and thoughtful communications will be required before, during and after an
emergency. This section provides guidance on internal communications planning and strategies.

When communicating to their employees, agencies should coordinate closely with their department
public information officer and the Agency Executive’s communications director to ensure that agency
messages align.

Understanding the core values of communications is a fundamental goal of the agency’s response to any
emergency. This goal is to provide clear, consistent, candid communications to employees and agencies.
This goal applies to communications at every level, from the Executive’s Office to departments and
divisions.

As departments contemplate and develop communications, they should adhere to these guidelines:

           There will be a great demand for accurate and timely information that will provide guidance
            and ease anxiety. There will be a need to build and maintain trust.
           Know your stakeholders, and develop a communications strategy for each one. Different
            types of information will need to be communicated to different audiences.
           Basic messages may change over the duration of the emergency. Departments will need to
            develop a phased communications plan that can be partially or fully implemented as
            needed.
           There may be a need to counteract the circulation of conflicting information,
            misinformation and rumors.

Communication Objectives during a Public Health Crisis

       To instill and maintain public confidence in leadership’s credibility, its healthcare system, and its
        ability to work in coordination with civilian authorities to respond to and manage a crisis. Public
        messages from the agency will provide accurate, rapid, and complete information to educate,
        calm fears, and maintain public order.


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       To minimize, as much as possible, public panic and fear related to the crisis.
       To rapidly provide the public, healthcare providers, policymakers, and the media access to
        accurate, consistent, and comprehensive information about the public health crisis, and the
        management of the situation.
       To address, as quickly as possible, rumors, inaccuracies, and misperceptions.
       To provide accurate, consistent, and highly accessible information and materials through the
        coordination of communication efforts with other federal, state, and local partners.

Key Information to Remember During the Crisis

       Liaison and work with the local public affairs officer to augment local capabilities.
       Follow the local crisis communication plan.
       Share information with other agencies working the issue.
       Do not release any information unless it is cleared by the local PAO, the Incident Commander,
        and the local Command. Ensure that other agencies are also aware of the information you plan
        to release. If the incident involves terrorism, the FBI must approve all information to be released
        to preserve their investigation. For natural disasters, make sure you coordinate with FEMA and
        state emergency management officials so everyone speaks with one voice.
       Prepare those speaking with the media and other stakeholders so that they are knowledgeable
        of the situation and instill confidence with the public via the media.

The Dynamics of a Public Health Crisis

The purpose of this section is to describe the dynamics of a public health crisis to increase situational
awareness and provide context for communications during a crisis. Any scenario involving a public
health crisis will result in:
     Fear and panic among members of the public;
     A frenzied response from local, regional, national, and international media outlets;
     A series of emergency response actions from agencies at the local, regional, national, and
        international levels; and
     Dreaded consequences, including death, overloaded health care systems, and potential civil
        disorder resulting from media reports, panic, and possible quarantine actions for serious,
        contagious diseases.

Because of the nature of a crisis, the scene at the disaster site or clinics may be chaotic. Many
organizations and agencies will move rapidly into the area to accomplish their respective missions.
Cooperation among these organizations and agencies is expected and necessary. It is important to
understand the respective missions of the many organizations and jurisdictions involved.

It is anticipated that a crisis will involve many of the characteristics listed below:

           General confusion caused by sketchy information and lack of details, especially during the
            initial days of the crisis.
           Citizens will demand information about precautions and immediate steps they can take to
            protect themselves and their families. In natural disasters, people will demand and expect


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            basic life necessities to be provided: food, water, shelter. The public outrage factor will be
            high.
           Policy decisions may change on a daily basis. These changes will affect communication
            effectiveness.
           There will be high demand for action to combat the crisis.
           An abundance of caution will be exhibited by national experts during the initial phase of the
            crisis—they’ll want to make the right calls and will desire concrete information before doing
            so. Public frustration may be apparent as information appears slow in development.
           The collective focus of all responding organizations and agencies will be public health,
            safety, and the prevention of further spread of disease. In terrorism incidents, the FBI will
            also be concerned about the criminal investigation. In spite of these shared interests, there
            will be competing agendas and varying opinions about “how” to perform these missions.
           The media will air widely varying viewpoints from public health professionals, political
            entities, and other organizations.

The keys to effectiveness in the situation described above include the following:

           Focus efforts on public safety and prevention.
           Coordinate actions among agencies and organizations responding to the crisis.
           Share information—internally and externally. Give factual information. Do not over
            reassure. Tell people this is a serious situation and what to expect. Be confident in telling
            the public what you do know, but acknowledge uncertainty. “What we know is …. I wish I
            could give you more information but there are many things we don’t know yet. We’ll give
            regular updates as we learn more.”
           Express empathy for the victims and their families, and acknowledge people’s fears.
           Accommodate the information needs of the media and the general public.
           Maintain flexibility. The situation will constantly change and you will need to adapt to new
            information and shift gears. The plan you developed one hour ago may no longer be valid.
           Maintain a high state of situational awareness.
           Do no further harm.

Employees and Communications

           The most knowledgeable and informed county employee on a particular issue is the best
            person to respond. Any employee who speaks on behalf of the county to the news media is
            responsible for what is said.
           While any county employee may answer a question from a reporter, media questions
            beyond straightforward factual information should typically be reviewed with the
            employee's supervisor, department director and-or the Department of Communications. All
            employees shall also make every effort to respond directly to the Department of
            Communications when requested.
           County employees must inform their supervisor or department director whenever a
            reporter calls. The Department of Communications also must be notified after an interview
            has occurred.




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           County employees should understand that their comments on public issues could be
           interpreted as county government's point of view.
          No employee shall be required to talk with the news media. Employees who are
           uncomfortable in this role should refer calls to their supervisor or department director or, if
           they are unavailable, the Department of Communications.
          All department news releases are to be reviewed by the Department of Communications
           before being submitted to the news media.

Assessing department communications resources and needs -- Before an emergency strikes,
departments shall assess their communications strengths and weaknesses.

   Communications resources

          Determine whether adequate human resources are available during all phases of an
           emergency. Remember, an emergency may last for several months. Departments must
           ensure that they will have the people available to implement a sustained communications
           plan. Prepare for resource contingencies by training extra staff for emergency
           communications responsibilities.
          Identify and communicate to others which employees have authority to communicate
           directly with employees.
          Communicate which employees who have authority to issue news releases or communicate
           with the media.
          Schedule crisis communication training for all employees who will have a communications
           role.
          Establish procedures that will ensure technology such as networks and servers are readily
           available, tested, and backed up. Ensure access to laptops, fax machines, and other
           hardware for appropriate personnel. Provide risk communications priority over standard
           business use.

   Communications needs

          Develop and regularly review an emergency communications plan.
          Develop policies to implement the communications plan and to deploy resources during an
           emergency.
          Familiarize key management with available communications resources.
          Prepare basic templates and other communications materials in advance, and update them
           during an emergency as needed.
          Monitor the effectiveness of communication messages, vehicles, and timing and refine them
           as necessary.

By educating your employees through early and ongoing communications, departments can reassure
their employees and assist in protecting their health.


          The agency and departments should tell employees about the threat of an emergency, and
           describe the steps they are taking to prepare for it.


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          The agency and departments should communicate potential changes to personnel policies
           located in this manual in response to an emergency and must emphasize that these changes
           apply only to the emergency response, not for routine operation.
          Departments should communicate changes in business culture in response to an
           emergency. Changes may include social distancing, increase in telecommuting or
           suspension of non-essential functions.
          Departments should communicate the importance of staying home if employees are ill or
           have symptoms.
          Departments should distribute practical information on maintaining a healthy work
           environment. For example, the Department of Public Health and the Centers for Disease
           Control and Prevention provide materials that demonstrate the simple steps employees can
           take to protect themselves and their families.
          Departments should recognize that an emergency may provide physical, social, and
           emotional challenges to employees. Morale building communications will be essential.

In order to maintain business continuity and to ensure efficient communications, departments should:

          Identify and communicate the department’s critical functions and the employees who can
           perform them. Build depth through cross-training. Keep in mind that absentee rates may
           top 25-30%, so build in the redundancy necessary to ensure that essential work will be
           done.
          Ensure that authority (such as hiring or purchasing) is delegated to appropriate employees
           and that such authority is fully communicated.
          Update employee phone lists and make sure management has access to up-to-date data.
          Ask employees to update their emergency contact information.
          Develop a list of union business representatives and provide that list to directors, managers,
           and supervisors.
          Ask for feedback and plan for disability accessibility requirements that may be necessary
           due to an emergency. These requirements may include additional disability access services
           or translation services.
          Ensure that essential reporting can be maintained. For example, departments should make
           sure that staff absenteeism can be monitored and reported.


When developing a communication plan, departments should identify their key internal stakeholders
and the methods that will be used to communicate with them. For most departments, these
stakeholders will include:

          Employees. As detailed earlier in this section, departments must establish on-going and
           frequent communications with employees. Plan to implement two or more
           communications methods which may include an Internet web site, central telephone
           number with pre-recorded information, central telephone number staffed by informed
           communications personnel, e-mails or hard copy (print) materials.




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          Department management. Departments will need to communicate business continuity
           issues and changes to policies and procedures. Again, plan to implement two or more
           communications vehicles to ensure the messages are received.

          Agency management. In addition to the “business as usual” communications required,
           departments may need to provide the Executive’s Office or other agencies with a record of
           decisions made during an emergency and other information such as employee absence
           rates.

When developing a communication plan, departments should identify their key external stakeholders
and the methods that will be used to communicate with them. For most departments, these
stakeholders will include:

          Labor representatives. Departments should work with their labor negotiators and must
           establish on-going and frequent communications with labor representatives. Plan to
           implement two or more communications methods which may include an Internet web site,
           central telephone number with pre-recorded information, central telephone number staffed
           by informed communications personnel, e-mails or hard copy (print) materials.

          The public. Departments and agencies will need to communicate business continuity issues
           and changes to policies and procedures. Again, plan to implement two or more
           communications vehicles to ensure the messages are received.




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RISK COMMUNICATION CHALLENGES POSED BY BT AND EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES



COMMUNICATION IN RISK SITUATIONS: RESPONDING TO THE COMMUNICATION
CHALLENGES POSED BY BIOTERRORISM AND EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES


                                                Introduction
The purpose of this material is to provide a guideline for the communication of health risk information
to diverse audiences in response to the risks posed by bioterrorism and emerging infectious diseases. It
is intended for public information staff and state public health officials who must respond to media and
public concerns about public health emergencies – natural or manmade.

Much of this material deals with establishing trust and credibility – two of the cornerstones of effective
risk communications. When an issue is of high concern, such as the 2001 anthrax incidents or the threat
of a smallpox outbreak, trust and credibility on the part of communicators is essential. Without them
your message will not be heard, people will not make informed decisions, and problems can escalate.

It is critical to have a plan in place to deal with a crisis before it happens. Communicating information
about possible life threatening issues can be difficult, but if it is not done well, the communicator can
put the public at greater risk by creating misunderstanding or possibly inciting panic. Professional
communicators owe it to the people and agencies they represent, as well as to the public, to be
prepared to deal with a crisis – natural or manmade.



RISK COMMUNICATION RULES



You should have a plan in place before a crisis occurs whenever possible. The first 24 hours are critical.
Be prepared to do the following:

       Contact local TV and radio stations
       Build or update a web site to disseminate information
       Set up and staff a 24-hour hotline
       Write and distribute educational fliers in the major languages spoken in your region
       Coordinate with police, fire, and emergency services personnel
       Prepare press materials to announce your response to the crisis

Don’t let the issue be defined by someone else. Don’t think that keeping a lid on the story will prevent
the public from seeking information.




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Accept and involve the public as a partner.
Your goal is to inform the public, not to defuse public concerns or replace actions.

Plan carefully and evaluate your efforts.
Different goals, audiences, and media require different actions.

Listen to the public's specific concerns.
People often care more about trust, credibility, competence, fairness, and empathy than about statistics
and details.

Be honest, frank, and open.
Trust and credibility are difficult to obtain. Once lost, they are almost impossible to regain.

Work with other credible sources.
Conflicts and disagreements among organizations make communication with the public much more
difficult.

Meet the needs of the media.
The media are usually more interested in politics than risk, simplicity than complexity, danger than
safety.

Speak clearly and with compassion.
Never let your efforts prevent your acknowledging the tragedy of an illness, injury, or death.




RISK COMMUNICATION THEORIES



One of the most important things to remember in risk communication is that perception equals reality.
The following theories help to explain what happens to an individual’s ability to assimilate information
when they feel threatened.

Risk = hazard + outrage

Trust determination theory: when people are upset they often distrust that others are listening, caring,
empathetic, honest, open, competent, expert, dedicated, or committed.

Factors that build trust are:

       Caring and empathy
       Competence and expertise
       Honesty and openness
       Dedication and commitment

Your audience will evaluate the credibility of your communications against these factors and over 50%
of your credibility will be dependent upon whether or not you are perceived as empathetic and caring.


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In most communications your audience will decide this in the first 9-30 seconds. The higher the level of
your audience’s emotion or distrust, the more you will need to consistently communicate that you are
listening, that you care, and that you are empathetic. You can build trust and credibility by using support
from credible third party sources. A lower credibility source takes on the credibility of the highest
credible source that agrees with its position on an issue. When a lower credibility source attacks the
credibility of a higher credibility source, the lower credibility source loses additional credibility.
Remember, the only information source that can effectively attack the credibility of another source is
one of equal or higher credibility.

Who typically has the highest credibility?

       High:           health professionals, scientists, educators, advisory groups
       Medium:         media, activist groups
       Low:            industry, paid external consultants

Mental noise theory: when people are upset they have difficulty hearing, understanding, and
remembering.

       Send a limited number of clear messages: 3 key messages
       Keep messages brief: 10 seconds or 30 words
       Repeat messages: tell them what you’re going to tell them. Tell them. Tell them what you told
        them.
       Use visual aids: graphics, slides
       Be aware that it takes three positive messages to balance one negative statement
       Avoid unnecessary use of the words: no, not, never, nothing, none


Guidelines

       Be prepared. If you know your subject and know your audience, most questions can be
        anticipated. Develop and practice responses.
       Track Your Key Messages. Use your responses as opportunity to reemphasize your key
        messages.
       Keep Your Answers Short and Focused. Your answer should be less than 2 minutes long.
       Practice Self-Management. Listen. Be confident and factual. Control your emotions.
       Speak and Act with Integrity. Tell the truth. If you don't know, say so. Follow up as promised. If
        you are unsure of a question, repeat or paraphrase it to be certain of the meaning.
       Whenever possible develop message maps

Message maps are risk communication tools that are used to help address mental noise. They help
organize complex information and make it easier to express current knowledge.

       Limit to 3 key messages
       Maximum of 3 supporting statements for each key message




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WORKING WITH THE MEDIA AND INTERVIEW TIPS

Because working with the media is one of your primary opportunities for communicating with the
public, your positive relationships with the media are crucial. Consider what to do before, during, and
after an interview, and in a crisis.

In general, the media is interested in the following:

       Human interest stories
       Bad news more than good news
       People's perspectives
       Yes or no/safe or unsafe answers
       Front-page news stories

The media will seek information on: Who? What? When? Where? Why? How? To maximize your
impact, prepare and practice delivering your key message.



Interview Tips

The following tips apply to any interview, but are especially useful in the event of a crisis.

                                            Before the Interview

       Ask who will be conducting the interview.
       Ask which subjects they want to cover.
       If you are not the correct person to do the interview, say who is and why.
       Ask about the format and duration.
       Ask who else will be interviewed.
       Prepare and practice.

        Don't:
       Tell the news organization which reporter you prefer.
       Ask for specific questions in advance.
       Insist they do not ask about certain subjects.
       Demand your remarks not be edited.
       Insist an adversary not be interviewed close-up.
       Assume it will be easy.

                                                         During

       Be honest and accurate.
       Stick to your key message(s).


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   State your conclusions first, and then provide supporting data.
   Be forthcoming to the extent you decide beforehand.
   Offer to get information you don't have.
   Explain the subject and content.
   Stress the facts.
   Give a reason if you can't discuss a subject.
   Correct mistakes by stating you would like an opportunity to clarify.

    Don't:
   Lie or try to cloud the truth.
   Improvise or dwell on negative allegations.
   Raise issues you don't want to see in the story.
   Fail to think it through ahead of time.
   Guess.
   Use jargon or assume the facts speak for themselves.
   Speculate, discuss hypothetical situations.
   Say, "No comment."
   Demand an answer not be used.

                                                After

   Remember you are still on the record.
   Be helpful. Volunteer to get information. Make yourself available. Respect deadlines.
   Watch for and read the resulting report.
   Call the reporter to politely point out inaccuracies, if any.

    Don't:
   Assume the interview is over or the equipment is off.
   Refuse to talk further.
   Ask, "How did I do?"
   Ask to review the story before publication or broadcast.
   Complain to the reporter's boss first.




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INVOLVING THE COMMUNITY

Involvement is important because (a) people are entitled to make decisions about issues that directly
affect their lives; (b) input from the community can help you make better decisions; (c) involving the
community in the process leads to greater understanding of - and more appropriate reaction to - a
particular risk; (d) those who are affected by a problem bring different values and perspectives to the
problem-solving equation; and (e) cooperation increases credibility. Finally, battles that erode public
confidence and agency resources are more likely when community input isn't sought or considered.

To the extent possible, involve the community in the decision-making process.

       Involve the community at the earliest stage possible.
       Clarify the public's role from the outset.
       Acknowledge situations where the agency can give the community only limited power in
        decision making.
       Find out from the communities what type of involvement they prefer.

When appropriate, develop alternatives to public hearings. In particular, hold smaller, more informal
meetings.

       If you cannot avoid a large public meeting, the logistics should enable both the public health
        department and the community to be treated fairly.
       Be clear about the goals for the meeting. If you cannot adequately fulfill a citizen's request for a
        meeting, propose alternatives.
       In certain situations, one-to-one communication may work best.

Recognize that people's values and feelings are a legitimate aspect of public health issues, and that
such concerns can convey valuable information.

       Provide a forum for people to air their feelings.
       Listen to people when they express their values and feelings.
       Acknowledge people's feelings about an issue.
       When people are speaking emotionally, respond to their emotions. Do not merely follow with
        data.
       Show respect by developing a system to respond promptly to calls from community residents.
       Recognize and be honest about the values incorporated in agency decisions.
       Be aware of your own values and feelings about an issue and how they affect you.




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PUBLIC MEETINGS

What you do and how you do it will affect your audiences' perceptions of you, your organization, and
the information you are providing. Prepare and present effectively.
Know Your Audience(s)

       Anticipate interests, concerns, and questions.
       Consider them in preparation.

Prepare Your Presentation

       Develop a strong introduction.
       Develop a maximum of three key messages.
       Assemble your supporting data.
       Prepare audiovisual aids.
       Practice.

Prepare for Answering Questions

       Anticipate what questions will arise and prepare answers to them.
       Practice questioning and responding.

A strong opening presentation sets a tone for the meeting and is crucial in attempting to establish trust
and build credibility. Its elements include the following:

I. Introduction

Remember that perceived empathy is a vital factor in establishing trust and building credibility, and it is
assessed by your audience in the first 9-30 seconds. Include the following in your introduction:

Statement of personal concern

Example: "I can see by the number of people here tonight that you are as concerned about this issue as I
am."

Statement of organizational intent

Example: "I am committed to protecting the environment and the public. We of the "x" have been
involved with this community for a long time and want to work with the community on this issue."

Statement of purpose and plan for the meeting. (Do not use the same statement at each meeting.)

Example: "Tonight, we would like to share with you the findings of the report for approximately 15
minutes, then we would like to open the floor for discussion, questions, and concerns. We will be



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available after the meeting for anyone who wishes additional information or to continue the
discussion."

II. Key Messages and Supporting Data

The key messages are points you want your public to have in mind after the meeting. They should
address central issues, and be short and concise.

Example: "We have run extensive tests on samples of chicken from the ABC restaurant and found no
evidence of salmonella or E. coli.”

To develop your key messages:

       Brainstorm. Think freely and job down all pieces of information you wish to communicate.
       Select key messages. Identify the most important ideas. Repeat the process until your list is
        down to three items.
       Identify supporting data. Other information you listed probably provides support to your key
        messages; organize it to reflect this.

III. Conclusion

       Restate verbatim your key messages.
       Add a future action statement: What is your organization going to do on this project in the short
        term? Long term?

IV. Measure Your Effectiveness

In designing your communication program, establish measurable objectives. For each component,
determine what went well, what could have gone better, and why.

For each portion of the program, ask the following questions:

       Were the objectives met?
       What went well? Why?
       What could have gone better? Why?
       How can the program be improved?
       What lessons are there to be learned?

Factors That Influence Risk Perception

An individual’s perceptions of the magnitude of risk are influenced by more than numerical data. For
example, more people die each year in automobile accidents than in airplane crashes, yet more people
are afraid to fly than they are to drive.



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   Risks perceived to be voluntary are more accepted than risks perceived to be imposed.
   Risks perceived to be under an individual's control are more accepted than risks perceived to be
    controlled by others.
   Risks perceived to have clear benefits are more accepted than risks perceived to have little or no
    benefit.
   Risks perceived to be fairly distributed are more accepted than risks perceived to be unfairly
    distributed.
   Risks perceived to be natural are more accepted than risks perceived to be manmade.
   Risks perceived to be statistical are more accepted than risks perceived to be catastrophic.
   Risks perceived to be generated by a trusted source are more accepted than risks perceived to
    be generated by an un-trusted source.
   Risks perceived to be familiar are more accepted than risks perceived to be exotic.
   Risks perceived to affect adults are more accepted than risks perceived to affect children.




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METHODS OF COMMUNICATION

Achieving effective communication with your various publics depends on selecting methods of
communication that will reach them. Consider your messages and your target audiences in selecting the
most appropriate communication media. Here are a few suggestions.
Coworkers:
       News releases and fact sheets
       Site tours
       Meetings to address questions and concerns
       Hotlines
       Intranets
       E-mail
       Internal newspaper articles

Area residents

       Community meetings
       Newspaper articles and ads
       Web sites
       Hot lines
       Door-to-door visits
       Radio and TV talk shows
       Fact sheets
       Fliers
       Films, videos, and other materials at libraries
       Direct mailings

Elected officials, opinion leaders, and activists

       Frequent telephone calls
       Fact sheets
       E-mail
       Web sites
       Personal visits
       Invitations to community meetings
       News releases
       Advance notices

Media

       News releases that focus on your message


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      Clear, informative fact sheets
      Site visits
      News conferences
      Web sites
      E-mail

Using Risk Comparisons

Remember:

      Comparisons can help put risk in perspective.
      Benefits should not be used to justify risks.
      Irrelevant or misleading comparisons can harm trust and credibility.

Managing Hostile Situations

       Issues of health and environment can arouse strong anger and hostility. Consider some things
       you can do to diffuse anger and re-direct hostile energy.
       Remember
      Environmental issues can arouse strong emotions, including anger and hostility.
      Hostility is usually directed at you as a representative of an organization, not you as an
       individual.
      Dealing ineffectively with hostility can erode trust and credibility.

Some Things You Can Do

      Acknowledge the Existence of Hostility.
            You are sending the message that you are in control.
            The worst thing you can do is pretend it's not there.
      Practice Self-Management.
            Control your apprehension.
            Anxiety undercuts confidence, concentration, and momentum.
            Listen.
      Be Prepared
            Plan, prepare, and practice your presentation and anticipated questions and answers.
      Communicate Empathy and Caring.
            Recognize people's frustrations.
            Use eye contact.
            Assume a listening posture.
            Answer questions carefully and thoughtfully.
      Track Your Messages.
            Turn negatives into positives.
            Bridge back to your messages.



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CDC BIOTERRORISM GUIDANCE: COMMUNICATION

The following guidance concerns the development of core and enhanced capacities for providing risk
communications. It was published as part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention grant
guidance for bioterrorism appropriations in March 2002 and provides a sound basis for communication
preparedness.

CRITICAL CAPACITY: to provide needed health/risk information to the public and key partners during a
terrorism event by establishing critical baseline information about the current communication needs
and barriers within individual communities, and identifying effective channels of communication for
reaching the general public and special populations during public health threats and emergencies.

           Develop an interim plan for risk communication and information dissemination to educate
            the public regarding exposure risks and effective public response.
           Conduct a needs assessment to evaluate the communication and information needs for
            health and risk information for public health threats and emergencies.
           Review appropriate risk communication strategies and resources from the private sector,
            the media, and federal emergency management sources, including the CDC Public Health
            Emergency Preparedness and Response Web site (http://www.bt.cdc.gov), other national
            Web sites, state/local Health Alert Networks, online and hard-copy “bulletin boards,”
            hotlines and clearinghouses, and other tested communication strategies, and concepts.
            Develop a plan and implement effective channels of communication for reaching the
            general public and special populations during public health emergencies.
            As part of the final plan, identify key public health spokespersons and ensure their
            competency, awareness, and ongoing training necessary to effectively communicate with
            the public and media to prepare for and respond to public health emergencies (especially in
            times of crisis).
           Activities that may be considered:
            1. Establish an emergency public information system, including call-down lists of public
                health contacts, backup personnel who can be activated to address communications
                and information dissemination issues during an emergency.
            2. Institute a regular testing program for routine and emergency communication channels
                and equipment, including unannounced drills and exercises.
            3. Ensure access to key technical communication expertise—directly or through other
                organizations—including scientific, health, and risk communicators, health educators,
                technical information specialists, scientific writers/editors, scientific illustrators, graphic
                specialists, Web specialists, and public inquiries specialists.

ENHANCED CAPACITY: to identify, develop, and pretest communication concepts, messages, and
strategies to ensure that state and local public health agencies prepare in advance and produce effective
and culturally appropriate public information for bioterrorism, other infectious disease outbreaks, and
other public health threats and emergencies.

       Assess, with local public health agencies, existing standard policies, procedures, and legal
        authorities and agreements for conducting risk communication.



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   With local public health agencies, describe existing communication and contingency plans and
    establish pre-arranged channels for communication, including presentation to community
    partners, local medical and professional staff; links to peer communities; and journals,
    newsletters, and other publications.
   Provide access to summaries of current investigations/issues and standard protocols for
    development, review, clearance and presentation of findings, and identify standard templates
    and expertise for translating scientific findings into practical guidelines.
   With local public health agencies and other partners responding to an emergency, establish
    mechanisms for design, development, and dissemination of communication messages and
    materials.
    With local public health agencies and other stakeholders, establish the capacity to conduct
    awareness and outreach campaigns, including town hall meetings, focus groups, and community
    outreach to civic organizations, schools, businesses, and special ethnic and cultural groups.
   With local public health agencies, establish mechanisms for tracking and monitoring message
    dissemination and exposure, media coverage, audience reaction and feedback, and changing
    communication issues and priorities.
   With local public health agencies, ensure that consistent and accurate information is
    disseminated, especially among adjacent state and local public health jurisdictions, and establish
    a formal evaluation of the impact of communication on public health practice, community
    behaviors, and on key policy decisions.
   Ensure that the competencies and credentialing requirements for communications specialties
    are reviewed annually and that requirements for continuing education are met. Attention
    should be paid to the recruitment, training, and the proper career development of these
    personnel.




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CHAPTER 7.0: SECURITY

CHAPTER SUMMARY

Security is the condition of being protected against danger or loss. During an emergency or disaster,
safety precautions are needed to guard agency infrastructure and personnel from hazards or risks so
that, ultimately, the public may be served. It is paramount that public health agencies are able to secure
their physical infrastructure on a day-day basis as well as have the tools to properly access their facilities
to respond in an emergency. To prepare for a potential public health threat, we address four aspects of
security, as described in the Main Chapter Policies Areas below.



CHAPTER ACRONYMS

DOH:            Department of Health
EMS:            Emergency Medical Services
FBI:            Federal Bureau of Investigation
HAZMAT:         Hazardous Materials
HVAC:           Heating Ventilation and Cooling
ID:             Identification
IED:            Improvised Explosive Device
IND:            Improvised Nuclear Device
psi:            pounds per square inch
RDD:            Radioactive Dispersal Device




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POLICIES AND PROCEDURES: SECURITY


PHYSICAL ACCESS TO FACILITIES DURING AN EMERGENCY




                    <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

            POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                     Origination Date

      Physical Access to Facilities During an
                   Emergency                                          Page No.



1.0   Policy
      <Your Agency> shall implement reasonable and appropriate security measures to limit physical
      access to facilities and electronic information systems and the facilities where these are kept,
      while ensuring that properly authorized access is allowed.
      <Your Agency> shall establish and implement as needed, reasonable and appropriate
      procedures under a disaster recovery plan and emergency operations plan to allow access to the
      facility in support of restoration and recovery efforts.
      <Your Agency> shall implement reasonable and appropriate security measures to safeguard the
      facility and the equipment from unauthorized physical access, tampering and theft.
      <Your Agency> shall implement reasonable and appropriate procedures to control and validate
      a person’s access to facilities based on their role or function, including visitor control, and
      control of access to software programs for testing and revision.
      <Your Agency> shall implement reasonable and appropriate procedures to document repairs
      and modifications to the physical components of a facility that are related to security (such as
      hardware, walls, doors and locks).

2.0   Purpose
      Critical employees need access to their facility to protect public health in an emergency. To
      maintain a secure facility while allowing access to needed personnel.

3.0   Persons Affected
      All Employees

4.0   Definitions

5.0   Responsibilities /Preplanning:
      1. Staff should be informed of expectations and should be equipped to perform their duties in
         advance.


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      2. Employees should expect to be identified properly
      3. Develop plans for facilitating identification (e.g., special badges) of non-facility healthcare
         personnel and volunteers by security staff and facilitating their access to the facility when
         deployed; security personnel provide input into procedures for enforcing facility access
         controls.
      4. Recruitment and training of additional security personnel (e.g., local police, national guard)
         that is coordinated by the local health authority.
      5. Develop plans for establishing a controlled, orderly, flow of patients within the facility.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines

      1. Identification
         People entering or within the workplace are identifiable either because they are personally
         known to you or they display the proper identification badge.
         Types of Badges
               <Your Agency> ID Badge (POLICY: Worn at all times)
               Visitor Badge - Issued in secure sites and worn at all times
               Other Agency ID Badge - Used only to establish ID
         If an ID Badge is lost or non-functioning, report immediately to <Your Agency> Badge
         Station or Supervisor responsible for badge maintenance. ID cards must be used at all
         times. 'Tailgating' (multiple people entering on one badge) is prohibited.

      2. Entry Control
         Depending on whether you are in a secure building (total access control) or a public
         building, these are the only ways to know if a person has proper access authority:

                         SECURE BUILDING                               PUBLIC BUILDING
              Has ID Badge                                   Has ID Badge
              Visitor with Visitor Badge (With Escort)       Visitor - No Badge (Confirm Access)

      No matter what type of site you are in, persons who have no ID badge, or are unescorted should
      have their access authority confirmed. Do this as a security and customer service function.
      In the event a critical employee is unable to show their ID Badge due to loss or destruction,
      agencies may opt to keep a list of key employees needed to report to work. This list should
      include photos of the employee, so that security may positively identify the employee. A copy
      of the list should be kept at each entry into the building.


      *Small Agency/Satellite Office Note*
      For small agencies or satellite offices, it would be sufficient to ensure that the facility has locks
      and that there is some control over who has access to keys, as well as ensuring that keys are
      collected from individuals who no longer need access.


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       The agency is responsible for controlling access to electronic protected health information even
       if the physical space is shared with other persons or organizations. For example, agencies that
       share office space need to have control of hardware and electronic media containing electronic
       protected health information (keeping them in a locked room, using passwords, etc.).

7.0    References

8.0    Revisions

       Date         Rev. #   Change                                                     Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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REPORTING SERIOUS OR UNUSUAL INCIDENTS




                     <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

             POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                     Origination Date

      Reporting Serious or Unusual Incidents
                                                                       Page No.

1.0    Policy
       There are multiple varieties of threats to public health. This policy focuses on threats received
       at an agency level. Agency staff shall be educated on the various forms of threats that may exist
       for this agency. The employee is then responsible to be the eyes and ears for the agency in
       detecting if a threat is present. Staff will be educated on how to respond when a threat is
       detected, starting a cascade of events destined to maintain the safety of the clients and staff at
       large within agency grounds.

2.0    Purpose
       Sentinel surveillance is important for early warning and initiation of emergency plans.
       Awareness of suspicious activities and early detection of potential threats is essential.

3.0    Persons Affected
       All Employees

4.0    Definitions

5.0    Responsibilities/Preplanning:
       1. Educate staff on how to recognize various threats
       2. Develop a plan addressing how potential and varying agency threats will be handled
       3. Educate agency staff regarding plan procedures
       4. Develop drills such that staff may practice their skills in handling a threat

6.0    Procedures/Process Guidelines
       Types of Threats:
       IMPROVISED EXPLOSIVE DEVICES
       Identification: Improvised Explosive Device (IEDs) are a “homemade” device that is designed to
       cause death or injury by using explosives alone or in combination with toxic chemicals, biological
       toxins, or radiological material. IEDs can be produced in varying sizes, functioning materials,
       containers, and delivery methods. They are unique in nature because the IED builder has had to



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improvise with the materials at hand. IEDs share a common set of components and consist of
the following:
       i. An initiation system
      ii. Explosive fill
     iii. A detonator
     iv. A power supply for the detonator
      v. A container

Control: Environmental Health may contact Hazardous Materials (HAZMAT) experts on
decontamination and exposure reduction procedures. The local emergency response team will
lead the immediate response to save lives and property. They will be comprised principally of
HAZMAT teams, law enforcement, emergency medical services (EMS), emergency management
and fire departments.

Outbreak Measures: <Your Agency> will provide initial local public health response. <Your
Agency> will provide information pertaining to exposure, health affects, etc. to <Higher Agency>

NERVE AGENTS
Event Response and Considerations: Recognition of event involving nerve agents will rely on
quick evaluation of casualties considering the clinical signs and symptoms, liquids present,
vapors or objects noted in the area of site. Diagnosis will be made from clinical signs and
symptoms. No one casualty will have all of the “classical” signs and symptoms. Pre-hospital
management is critical due to toxicity of agents and potential for rescuer/caregiver
contamination. Responders must be protected by wearing appropriate Personal Protective
Equipment, including respiratory protection, facemask, gloves, impermeable protective suit, and
boots.

Casualties are to be removed from contamination, and contamination must be removed from
casualties.

Casualties must be removed from source; upwind from source, and out of structures to fresh air.

If it is positive exposure only to vapor, outer clothing should be removed.

If it is possible the contamination was a liquid, all clothing is to be removed and victim showered
or washed with soap and water, dilute chlorine solution, or at minimum plain water.

Atropine and pralidoxime chloride (2-PAM-CL) are antidotes for nerve agent toxicity. Triage
category will determine time available and necessary imminence of antidote requirements.
Immediate – any casualty convulsing, not breathing, or involvement of two or more organs
(muscle, breathing, weakness, and consciousness levels) requires antidotes immediately to save
their lives.




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Delayed – any casualty suspecting having, or had, liquid agent on skin is to be kept under
observation for 18 hours; any casualty having received 4mg or more of atropine and recovering
is also triaged as delayed.

Minimal – any casualty able to walk and talk after vapor exposure may or may not require
antidote.

NUCLEAR DEVICE
Identification: An Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) is a device incorporating radioactive
materials designed to result in the dispersal of radioactive material or in the formation of a
nuclear-yield reaction. Such a device may be fabricated in a completely improvised manner or
may be an improvised modification to a United States (US) or foreign nuclear weapon. Due to
the security associated with protection of the US and foreign nuclear weapons, this type of
device is less likely to be encountered than is the Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD).

Four types of potential damage:

        Blast – The rapid release of energy in an explosion creates a shock wave of
        overpressure. Very close to the center of a nuclear explosion, overpressure is
        equivalent to several thousand pounds per square inch (psi).
        Thermal Radiation – Thermal radiation includes light and heat. Nuclear weapons
        release a huge amount of energy as light (ultraviolet, visible, and infrared). The heat at
        the center of the explosion (epicenter) is sufficiently intense to vaporize most
        materials. The thermal radiation creates a fireball which expands rapidly outward
        consuming oxygen and, combined with the blast effect, creating near total destruction
        for some distance from the epicenter.
        Initial Nuclear Radiation – Initial radiation consists mostly of gamma rays and neutrons
        which are generated in the nuclear reaction.
        Fallout – Fallout consists of large numbers of particles, from the earth, buildings, and
        other ground objects, which are irradiated by the explosion, mixing with the radioactive
        products of the explosion itself and then being distributed over a wide area by wind.

    Control: Environmental Health may contact Hazmat experts on decontamination and
    exposure reduction procedures.

    Outbreak Measures: Sheltering in place or evacuation; Surveillance – Public Health may be
    involved with monitoring short and long term effects of radiation exposure of victims.
    Protective actions range from developing recommendations, communicating them to the
    public and making pharmaceutical decisions and efficiently distributing drugs.

    RADIOLOGICAL DISPERSAL DEVICE – Dirty Bomb
    Identification: A dirty bomb is a mix of explosives, such as dynamite, with radioactive
    powder or pellets. When the dynamite or other explosives are set off, the blast carries
    radioactive material into the surrounding area. A dirty bomb cannot create an atomic blast.
    Possible terrorist events could involve introducing radioactive material using explosives like


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      dynamite to scatter radioactive materials. The main danger from a dirty bomb is from the
      explosion, which can cause serious injury, property damage, and contamination with
      radiation which may cause immediate and long lasting health problems.

      Control: Environmental Health may contact Hazmat experts on decontamination and
      exposure reduction procedures.

      Outbreak Measures/Surveillance: Public Health may be involved with monitoring short and
      long term effects of radiation exposure. Sheltering in place and/or evacuation of downwind
      populations will be required and must occur immediately/quickly. Public health may be
      involved with developing recommendations regarding pharmaceutical decisions and the
      distribution of them.

      RICIN
       Identification: Ricin is a poison that can be made from the waste left over from processing
      castor beans. It can be in the form of powder, a mist, a pellet, or it can be dissolved in water
      or weak acid.

      It is a stable substance, not affected much by extreme conditions such as very hot or very
      cold temperatures. Castor beans are processed throughout the world to make castor oil.
      Ricin is part of the waste “mash” produced when castor oil is made.

      Outbreak Measures/Surveillance: Signs and symptoms depend on route of exposure and
      dose received. Initial symptoms within 12 hours by inhalation (Respiratory distress, fever,
      cough, nausea, tightness of the chest, diaphoresis, pulmonary edema, cyanosis, low blood
      pressure, respiratory failure may occur, leading to death). Ricin in powder or mist form can
      cause redness and pain of the skin and eyes. Initial symptoms within 6 hours of ingestion of
      a significant amount of Ricin( Vomiting and diarrhea that may become bloody, severe
      dehydration, followed by low blood pressure. Other signs and symptoms may include
      hallucinations, seizures, blood in urine, liver, spleen, and kidney failure). Death from Ricin
      poisoning can occur within 36-72 hours of exposure depending on route of exposure and
      dose received. If death has not occurred in 3-5 days the victim usually recovers.

      Ricin poisoning is not transmitted person-to-person. It would take a deliberate act to make
      Ricin and use it to poison people. Accidental exposure to Ricin is highly unlikely (Airborne
      transmission in Ricin mist or powder (aerosol), Ingestion with water or food (food supply
      sabotage), Injection of Ricin dissolved in liquid). Poisoning by inhalation causes symptoms
      within 8 hours of exposure; poisoning by ingestion, less than 6 hours. There is no antidote
      for Ricin. If exposure cannot be avoided get Ricin off or out of the body as quickly as
      possible. Treatment includes:

                                  Ingestion                       Skin                       Eyes
Assist victim to fresh   Do not induce vomiting/do        Remove                    Immediately flush
air                      not give fluids to drink         contaminated              with large amounts
                                                          clothes—should be         of tepid water for at


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                                                           cut off and not pulled    least 15 minutes
                                                           over the head
Assist   victim      to Rinse mouth                        Rinse skin with large     Seek medical
upright position                                           amounts of water or       attention
                                                           shower (with soap if      immediately
                                                           possible)
Administer Oxygen         Use slurry of activated          Seek medical
                          charcoal                         attention
                                                           immediately
CARDIO                    Do not give anything P.O.
PULMONARY                 if individual drowsy or
RESUSCITATION             unconscious
(CPR) if necessary
Seek medical              If vomiting, lean patient
attention                 forward or place on left
                          side (head down position
                          if possible) to maintain
                          open airway and prevent
                          aspiration


 TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICAL SPILL/RELEASE
 Identification: Any substance or material that when involved in an accident and release in
 sufficient quantities, poses a risk to one’s health, safety, and/or property. These substances and
 materials include explosives, radioactive materials, flammable liquids or solids, combustible
 liquids or solids, poisons, oxidizers, toxins and corrosive materials.

 Outbreak Measures: Assist with local authorities as needed regarding evacuation and/or
 shelters. Public health may be involved with monitoring short and long term effects of people
 exposed. <Your Agency> will act in conjunction with the <STATE/Higher Agency> (Department
 of Community Health, Office of Public Health Preparedness and the Division of Environmental
 Occupational Epidemiology) to guide support activities of state, federal and local agencies and
 will help to protect the health and to prevent adverse health effects from and explosive event.


 BOMB THREAT
 Identification: A bomb threat is when a person receives a phone call, letter, or other message
 concerning a bomb, destructive device, or other threat of destruction against people and/or
 property. Bomb threats are a reality of our society and should never be taken lightly.
 Employees should be alert for possible situations and/or objects that may indicate an explosive
 device is on the premises.

 Outbreak Measures/Surveillance: Be alert to suspicious activities. Look for objects which are
 conspicuously out of place or foreign to the area. Insure visitors do not leave packages or other
 objects in the building unattended. REPORT AND LEAVE UNTOUCHED any object foreign to the


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       area. Remember to report all suspicious activities to Security and your supervisor. If a package
       appears suspicious, treat it like a real threat.

                i.   DO NOT USE CELL PHONES.
               ii.   DO NOT USE TWO-WAY PHONES.
              iii.   DO NOT TOUCH A LIGHT SWITCH.
              iv.    DO NOT USE THE ELEVATORS.
               v.    DO NOT DISMISS A THREAT AS UNFOUNDED.

       What should you do if you receive the call? (see Appendix: Bomb Threat Phone Call Checklist)
             i.  Remain calm.
            ii.  Obtain as much detailed information below as possible and write down the exact
                 wording of the threat.
           iii.  Immediately contact the Police and Security in your building.
           iv.   If instructed to evacuate the building, do not use the Fire Alarm.
            v.   Employees are to report to their assembly/evacuation areas.

7.0    References

8.0    Revisions

       Date          Rev. #   Change                                                     Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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HANDLING SUSPICIOUS MAIL




                    <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

            POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                     Origination Date

             Handling Suspicious Mail
                                                                      Page No.

1.0   Policy
      It is the policy of <Your Agency> employees to be aware of how to handle suspicious envelopes
      or packages. The following procedures will be followed:

2.0   Purpose
      The likelihood of receiving a package or letter containing suspicious substances is remote;
      however, employees must be prepared to handle the situation appropriately.

3.0   Persons Affected
      All Employees

4.0   Definitions

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning
      <Your Agency> must train all employees to handle suspicious mail.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines
      1. In the event a suspect envelope or package is received by <Your Agency>, the employee
         should:
         a. Isolate the envelope/package
         b. Evacuate the immediate area
         c. Promptly notify the appropriate mail contact (<CONTACT Name – LOCATION>)

      2. Report of a Bioterrorism Event or Suspected Event
         a. Identification: Reports of a bioterrorism event or suspected bioterrorism event by the
            public should always go to law enforcement first who will report the event to the
            Department of Public Safety and Department of Health.
         b. Outbreak Measures/Surveillance: Staff receiving calls from the public reporting a
            bioterrorism event or suspected event should first determine whether or not the event
            or suspected event has been reported to law enforcement. If it has been reported, staff
            should gather details from the caller regarding the event or suspected event. If the


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       caller has not reported the event or suspected event to law enforcement, the staff
       should instruct the caller to notify the proper authorities (i.e., Federal Bureau of
       Investigation (FBI)/police) in their jurisdiction. Staff should not be the ones to relay
       details to the law enforcement.
    c. Staff should report calls and details to the State Epidemiologist.

3. UNKNOWN POWDER SUBSTANCES:
   a. Identification: Immediately upon discovery of an unknown powder substance, it shall be
      the duty of the person discovering it to immediately contact the supervisor.
   b. Outbreak Measures/Surveillance: Pulling the fire alarm could shut down the elevators,
      and since there is no fire, we want to be able to evacuate those persons who have
      impaired mobility down the elevators. The supervisor will call 911 and report the type of
      emergency, and the location of the emergency. The supervisor will also contact the
      Building Manager or the Security Desk (if applicable). They will contact supervisors on
      the other floors and shut down the heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC)
      system. The Supervisor will instruct the individual who has discovered the powder and
      those in the immediate area to go into an isolated office, while the others on the floor
      remain in place until the Hazardous Materials (HAZMAT) Team has released them. Then
      the supervisor will determine whether to follow either option 1 or 2.
   c. Option 1: No Evacuation – If a little powder is spilled on a desk or on the floor inside a
      building, it is appropriate to:
      Isolate exposed persons in an office. All persons who were in the area where the
      product was discovered MUST STAY TOGETHER until released by the HAZMAT Team
      Officer-In-Charge. It is imperative not to expose additional persons. No one is to enter
      or leave the floor. There is no need to evacuate the building. Close off the area if
      possible (close doors but do not lock them).
      Secure stairs and elevator and post with signs. Call 911; report what has occurred, what
      symptoms the people who were near the product are experiencing (if no one has
      symptoms, report that too!), and what steps people have taken so far. If you have
      substance visible on your clothing, immediately remove clothing (outer layer only) that
      might have come in direct contact with the product. If possible, place the clothing in a
      clear plastic bag. Seal the bag. Wash hands and face with soap and water. DO NOT PULL
      THE FIRE ALARM!!!
   d. Option 2 – Evacuation – If there is a powder that has clearly been aerosolized (a puff
      or cloud of powder has occurred), it is appropriate to:
      Isolate exposed members in an office. NO ONE IS TO ENTER OR LEAVE THE FLOOR. All
      persons who were in the area where the product was discovered MUST STAY
      TOGETHER until released by the HAZMAT Team Officer-In-Charge. At the same time,
      evacuate the remainder of the entire building. THIS SHOULD NOT BE DONE BY
      ACTIVATING THE FIRE ALARM SYSTEM, unless people are showing signs of exposure
      (difficulty breathing, seizures, unconsciousness, etc.). Instead, notifying staff of
      evacuation can be accomplished by using a walk through or phone tree. Supervisors
      should be used for this type of operation or any other means of communication.




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               While evacuating, close off the area if possible (close doors but do not lock them). Block
               the latch on a cipher lock if possible, with folded paper so the door will close but not
               lock.

               Call 911; report what has occurred, what symptoms the people who were near the
               product are experiencing (if no one has any symptoms, report that too!), and what steps
               people have taken so far. If you have substance visible on your clothing, immediately
               remove any clothing (outer layer only) that might have come in direct contact with the
               product. Place the clothing in a clear plastic bag if possible. Seal the bag. If possible,
               wash hands and face with soap and water. DO NOT LEAVE THE AREA until released by
               the HAZMAT Team Officer-In Charge. On those floors that will be evacuated, the
               Warden will immediately evacuate persons through the stairwells. Do not attempt to
               finish your work or take the time to shut off office machines. Once outside, go to the
               area on the property designated for your floor as described in Evacuation Procedures for
               Fire. Wardens are to take roll to determine if someone is still in the building. Remain
               there until you have been advised by your Warden or an alternate that it is safe to
               return. The Wardens will be advised by the HAZMAT Team when it is safe to return to
               the building.

7.0    References

8.0    Revisions

       Date         Rev. #   Change                                                     Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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FACILITY SECURITY AND SAFETY/THEFT REPORTING




                       <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

               POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                     Origination Date

      Facility Security and Safety/Theft Reporting
                                                                         Page No.

1.0      Policy
         An employee of the <Your Agency> shall immediately report any injury to person or property;
         violation of law; violation of <Your Agency> policy; professional misconduct; or other incident
         which may expose <Your Agency> to liability. Further, it is the responsibility of the employee to
         act in a fashion supportive of the security of the agency building. The central premise of security
         is to protect <Your Agency> assets; information, communications, facilities/equipment and
         people. Controlling security and safety of facility and information (hard copy, communications,
         people, and physical assets) is one of the keys to maintaining a high security posture. The most
         basic elements to promote are:
               CHALLENGING AN INDIVIDUAL
               PROPER LOCKUP PROCEDURES
               CLEAN AND NEAT APPEARANCES
               PERSONAL PRECAUTIONS

2.0      Purpose
         Facility security is vital in maintaining the safety of its occupants and is dependent upon staff
         being acutely aware of their surroundings.

3.0      Persons Affected
         All Employees

4.0      Definitions

5.0      Responsibilities/Preplanning
             Educate staff regarding the different threats to building security.
             Educate staff how to react to varying threats to building security.

6.0      Procedures/Process Guidelines
         1.     Challenging an Individual




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        This is not an adversarial action. Never place yourself in a threatening or dangerous
        position.
            a. Ask 'May I help you?' or 'Who are you trying to locate?'
            b. After learning who or where the person is looking for:
                     i.  Call the requested person to come and get the visitor.
                    ii.  Take the visitor to the named person or place.
                   iii.  If indicated, call Security and 911 immediately.

            c. If a suspect person immediately exits or you feel, for any reason, that something
               is not right - immediately report to Security at <telephone #> or the <Local
               Police> at <telephone #> or 911. Heightened awareness of those around us is
               the best way to provide a safe and secure workplace.

2. Proper Lockup Procedures
   It stands to reason when something is locked up and unavailable it is more secure. This
   includes buildings or any assets within a facility or any work area within it. When building or
   area doors are locked, they should not be propped open for any reason. NOTE: Magnetic
   locks will open automatically during evacuations. Special unattended areas such as
   centralized printing/copying rooms, FAX machines, and mail drop areas need special
   attention. NO sensitive material (reports, memos, etc.) should ever be left unattended in
   these areas. If you print, copy, or receive/send sensitive items immediately remove them
   from these places. Sensitive material such as boxed reports or sensitive files in file cabinets
   should be locked up or stored out of view away from prying eyes. Allowing, or being
   responsible for unauthorized access of information is a CRIMINAL OFFENSE.
   Lastly, when leaving your work area, even for a short time, always place your monitor in
   'secure screen' ({Ctrl} + {Alt} + {Delete}). This way you cannot be held responsible, even
   accidentally, for unauthorized access to information.

3. Clean and Neat Appearances
   Keeping your work area neat and clean is not only a security concern, but also a safety
   issue. It's just too easy to misplace sensitive or dangerous items in a messy environment.
   Keep your desktop clean and clear of sensitive items (report, memos, etc.). Pay attention
   to potential dangerous items in your work area:
           Pencil/pen cups - sharp objects pointed down.
           Center desk drawers clear of sharp objects; razor blades, protractors, pins, etc.
           Properly secure cords; electric, communications, computer.
           Make storage areas allow for unrestricted movement.
           By maintaining a clean work area, it allows for one to be aware of all pertinent
                items and information. If an item is stolen from a work area, report to security at
                <telephone #> or supervisor.

4. Personal Precautions
   Here are the things to be especially careful to monitor each day in your workplace:
           Challenge anyone who is not wearing a badge or is unknown.


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              Locked doors stay locked. Lockup all sensitive items.
              Never leave printers, FAX's, or copiers unattended when processing sensitive
               material.
              Keep valuable personal items locked up or out of sight. Items in full view are
               there for anyone to take.
              Use 'Secure Screen'. You don't give up your password. Never let someone use
               your identity while you're absent.

5. Workplace Violence
   Workplace violence can happen in many forms:
           Suicide threats
           Threats to injure or the injury of property or persons
           Fisticuffs
           Shootings
           Stabbings
           Sexual Assaults
           Unauthorized use of deadly weapons or explosives

       What should you do?
       Do not confront the perpetrator.
       If you observe an individual with a firearm other than a law enforcement officer you
       should leave the area immediately.
       Immediately call 911 and Security in your building.
            a. Notify Police and Security of the incident location, any injuries, type of weapon
               (if appropriate), and number of hostages (if appropriate).
            b. If possible give a description of the assailant:
                Approximate height
                Approximate weight
                Hair color
                Gender
                Facial features
                Clothes description
                Identifying marks: tattoos, scars, glasses, etc.
                Ethnicity if able to determine.
            c. If there are injured individuals, keep them calm and obtain proper first aid
               assistance as soon as possible. Follow directions for evacuation of the area or
               building. Do not re-enter an area until given clearance.

   6. Security during an Outbreak
      Law enforcement personnel may need to guard vaccine storage facilities, guard vaccine
      as it is transported, provide a secure environment at clinic sites, and accompany public
      health field workers that make home visits to provide vaccine. In addition to securing
      vaccine supplies, extra security measures will be needed for patients in isolation at
      hospitals and in quarantine facilities and may be needed for suspect cases and contacts.
      Health authorities should coordinate their plans and have contact lists for local police or


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               other law enforcement agencies. In addition, local health authorities need to be familiar
               with emergency procedures for maintaining essential systems such as water, electricity,
               and waste disposal at vaccine, isolation, quarantine, and other sites.

7.0    References

8.0    Revisions

       Date         Rev. #   Change                                                     Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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BUILDING CLOSURE




                  <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

            POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                   Origination Date

                   Building Closure                                 Page No.

1.0   Policy
      In the event that weather or other emergency conditions warrant the all-day closing or delayed
      opening of <Your Agency>, announcements will be made between the hours <Insert times> on
      the following radio and television stations <Insert stations>. Employees shall be expected to
      execute their normal work schedule during a building closure if equipped to do so
      (telecommuting).
2.0   Purpose
      In the event of severe weather or emergency, the agency building may need to be closed.
      Employees need to be informed of building closure.
3.0   Persons Affected
      All <Your Agency> Employees
4.0   Definitions
5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning
      Staff should be informed of expectations during building closure; essential employees may have
      to telecommute to perform duties and should be equipped to do so in advance.
6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines
      1. The following radio and television stations are the only stations authorized to announce
           closings and delayed openings. <Insert radio and television stations>
      2. Calls should NOT be made to the <Local Police>, radio, or television stations to verify <Your
           Agency> closing. Calls may be made to <telephone number> to hear a recorded message
           regarding the closing or delayed opening of <Your Agency>.
      3. Closing information will also be posted on the <Your Agency> home page at <Insert home
           page address>. <Insert stations> will post notices on their site at <Insert station websites>.
      4. During the day, the decision to shorten the work schedule due to adverse weather
           conditions will normally be made by <Insert time>. On such occasions, the <Your Agency>
           will notify all Supervisors and Directors so that they may inform their employees.
      5. Bargaining Unit Agreement: In the event that conditions warrant the closing of the <Your
           Agency> or shortening of the workday, the decision of the designated <Your Agency
           Official> will be conveyed to all departments by the <Your Agency Office> in accordance
           with the procedure below:



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                    a. During the day, the decision to shorten the work schedule will normally be
                        made by <Insert time>. Non-essential evening work will also be canceled at the
                        time notice is given to shorten the work schedule. When <Your Agency> is to
                        close early we will notify the following offices in order for them to pass the
                        information on to their respective employees: <Your Agency Offices>. <Your
                        Agency> ‘s phone switchboard will also be notified for informational purposes.
                    b. The decision to cancel work scheduled in the morning will be made by <Insert
                        time>. If work is canceled, the designated <Agency Official> will notify major
                        television and radio stations; the <Your Agency> telephone switchboard; and
                        the <Agency Departments>. Employees shall receive their regular rates of pay
                        for time missed due to <Your Agency> weather closing. Employees shall receive
                        their regular rates of pay for time missed due to <Your Agency> closing caused
                        by other exigencies until they are designated for layoff. Employees required to
                        work during University closings will normally receive compensatory time off
                        with pay equal to one-and-one-half (1-1/2) times the actual hours worked.
                        However, at Management's discretion, employees may receive pay equal to
                        one-and-one-half times the base rate for hours actually worked during such
                        closing, in lieu of compensatory time off, but such pay, when made, will not be
                        pyramided or duplicated with any other premium or overtime pay.
          6. It is expected that during winter months, employees will allow themselves extra time to
               arrive at work on schedule. Under unusually difficult weather circumstances, however, a
               grace period, not to exceed the first <Insert hours> of an employee's workday, may be
               allowed following the beginning of the workday.
          7. Employees who are assigned to work on the first and third shifts will be notified on their
               next regularly scheduled work day if an emergency closing has been declared.
          8. <Your Agency> closing provides an authorized paid absence from work to those non-
               essential employees who were scheduled to report to work that day. Therefore, an
               employee who is on approved vacation leave when <Your Agency> closing is declared is
               not eligible for the <Your Agency> closing day(s).
7.0    References
8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section



Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>


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TEMPLATES: SECURITY


BOMB THREAT PHONE CALL CHECKLIST

Try to remain calm. Write as much of the conversation down as possible. Signal a coworker to notify authorities and get an
extension, if possible. Keep talking and don’t hang up. If Caller I.D. shows a number write it down.

Exact time and Date of call: ________________________________________________________________________________

Exact words/threats of caller: _______________________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Sex of caller: ________________ Approximate age of caller: ________________

Questions to Ask:

1. When and where is the bomb going to explode? ______________________________________________________________

2. Where is the bomb? _____________________________________________________________________________________

3. What does it look like? ___________________________________________________________________________________

4. What type of bomb is it? _________________________________________________________________________________

5. What will cause it to detonate? ____________________________________________________________________________

6. Did you place the bomb? _________________________________________________________________________________

7. Why are you doing this? _________________________________________________________________________________

8. Where are you calling from? ______________________________________________________________________________

9. What is your address? ___________________________________________________________________________________

10. What is your name? ____________________________________________________________________________________

Caller’s Voice (circle)

Calm       Disguised      Nasal       Angry     Broken     Stutter     Slow    Sincere    Lisp     Rapid

Giggling     Deep         Crying     Squeaky    Excited    Stressed   Accent   Loud      Slurred Normal

If the voice is familiar, who did it sound like? __________________________________________________________________

Were there any background noises? _________________________________________________________________________

Remarks: _______________________________________________________________________________________________

Person receiving the call: __________________________________________________________________________________

Telephone number call received ____________________________________Date____________________________________




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CHAPTER 8.0: CONTINUITY OF OPERATIONS

CHAPTER SUMMARY

Continuity of operations for various state and local agencies, businesses, and governmental
jurisdictions may be disrupted during an emergency; therefore, it is important for these entities
to ensure they can execute their essential missions in the event of a threat to normal continuity
of operations. Continuity of Operations Plans, or “COOP” are federally mandated plans and
procedures to assure that services required by law or considered essential are provided in the
event that the current facilities housing those services becomes inoperable.

COOP planning is intended to ensure the performance of essential functions across a wide range
of all-hazards emergencies, and a COOP is part of an All Hazards Response Plan. Traditional
COOP planning assumes that a hazard will occur during a relatively brief period, and then a
reconstitution period begins. Typical hazards include earthquakes, hurricanes, fire, terrorist
attacks, etc. The Federal Executive Branch Continuity of Operations Plan provides guidance to
Federal Executive Branch Departments and Agencies for developing COOP and contingency
plans.

This Chapter provides a framework that establishes procedures to respond to and recover from
the effect of a wide range of emergencies which may disrupt normal agency operations. Its
purpose is to ensure that the essential functions of the agency will continue. The Chapter is
designed to help agencies cope with serious staff reductions and support systems which may be
unavailable during a pandemic flu or other large-scale disaster. For example, the policies and
templates address how to transfer authority when key personnel are unable to report to work or
are otherwise occupied. This is called delegation of authority and leadership succession. COOP
Chapter objectives are to ensure that agencies can:
     Continue essential public health functions
     Ensure the succession of key leaders and transfer authority
     Protect agency personnel and develop contingency staffing plans
     Protect essential facilities, equipment, records, and other assets
     Plan for an alternate site and a smooth transfer

CHAPTER ACRONYMS

COOP:           Continuity of Operations Plan
EOC:            Emergency Operations Center
ES:             Essential Staff
FLSA:           Fair Labor Standards Act
HM:             Household Members
IM:             Instant Messaging
MOU:            Memorandums of Understanding
MAA:            Mutual Aid Agreements
SOP:            Standard Operating Procedure
VPN:            Virtual Private Network


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POLICY AND PROCEDURES: CONTINUITY OF OPERATIONS


COOP ACTIVATION, NOTIFICATION, AND TERMINATION PROCEDURES




                 <YOUR AGENCY>                                   Policy No.

          POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                  Origination
                                                                 Date



      COOP Activation, Notification, and                         Page No.
          Termination Procedures


1.0    Policy
       It is the policy of <Your Agency> to have COOP (Continuity of Operations Plans)
       Activation, Notification, and Termination Procedures.
       <Your Agency> will activate the COOP in consultation with the Emergency Manager and
       <Other Agency Authorities> depending on the emergency’s nature and severity.
       After assessing the nature and extent of the emergency, <Your Agency> will notify key local
       and state contacts about the emergency and COOP activation.

       <Your Agency> will terminate the COOP when staff resources have returned to normal
       levels and/or the threat no longer exists.
2.0    Purpose
       COOP (Continuity of Operations Plans) Activation, Notification, and Termination
       Procedures need to be pre-planned and in place before an emergency arises.
3.0    Persons Affected
       All <Your Agency> staff, Emergency Managers, Political Leaders, other agencies affected
       by the emergency.

4.0    Definitions

5.0    Responsibilities/Preplanning
        Ensure management staff are versed in rules surrounding the Declaration of an
          Emergency
        Ensure management staff are versed in COOP
        Create and maintain contacts lists for key agencies and staff (Emergency Managers,
          Politicians, etc.) referred to in this policy

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6.0    Procedures/Process Guidelines

       1. COOP Activation

           <Your Agency> will activate the COOP in consultation with the Emergency Manager
           and the <Jurisdiction Political Heads> depending on the nature and severity of the
           emergency, in response to:
           a.   extensive or unusual usage of sick/family leave by personnel
           b.   an emergency as determined by the <Your Agency>
           c.   an emergency as determined by the local Emergency Management Director
           d.   notification by the Emergency Management Agency
           e.   notification from the Dept. of Public Health
           f.   a declared State of Emergency by the Governor

       2. COOP Notification

           After assessing the nature and extent of the emergency, the <Your Agency> will
           notify key local and state contacts about the emergency and COOP activation.

           Depending on the situation, contact all <Your Agency> staff, the Emergency
           Manager, jurisdiction Political heads, Fire, Police, schools, other agencies (e.g.
           utilities, etc.), and the Department of Public Health to inform them about contact
           information for key personnel, relocation addresses, and other details, as necessary.

       3. COOP Termination

           <Your Agency> will terminate the COOP when <Your Agency> staff resources have
           returned to normal levels, and/or the threat no longer exists.
7.0    References

8.0    Revisions

       Date         Rev. #   Change                                             Reference(s) Section



Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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CLARIFYING ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS




                  <YOUR AGENCY>                                   Policy No.

            POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                 Origination
                                                                  Date



           Clarifying Essential Functions                         Page No.




1.0   Policy
      It is the Policy of <Your Agency> to immediately clarify essential functions in an
      emergency. Some essential functions of <Your Agency> are required by
      regulation/statutes.

2.0   Purpose

      In an emergency, <Your Agency> may have to limit activities to only those functions that
      provide vital services to the community, maintain safe operations, and ensure the safety
      of <Your Agency> members and staff, until sufficient personnel and resources are
      available.

3.0   Persons Affected
      All <Your Agency> employees as well as the community at large.

4.0   Definitions

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning
      Below is a suggested list of essential functions. Depending on the nature of the
      emergency, and the configuration of <Your Agency>, you may need to modify the list.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines

      Essential Functions of <Your Agency>:

      1.    Oversee <Your Agency>’s operations and finance functions
      2.    Ensure the health and safety of <Your Agency> staff
      3.    Provide Risk Communications with clients, public, and local officials
      4.    Ensure safe water, food, and shelter for all citizens
      5.    Maintain communicable disease surveillance and control


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       6.   Initiate isolation and/or quarantine and disease prevention measures
       7.   Investigate complaints and enforce Public Health laws and regulations
       8.   Provide resources, equipment, and supplies to maintain essential functions
       9.   Maintain <Your Agency>’s vital records and databases


7.0    References

       For this Policy, Please Fill out Templates at end of Chapter:

       Worksheet: Continuity of Operations Plan: Lead Staff, Training, and Contact
       Information

       Worksheet: Essential Tasks, Workforce, Supplies, and Records

       Worksheet: Essential Functions by Incident Command and Staff Positions

8.0    Revisions

       Date         Rev. #   Change                                             Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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PLANNING CONTINGENCY STAFFING




                <YOUR AGENCY>                                   Policy No.

          POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                 Origination
                                                                Date



       Planning Contingency Staffing                            Page No.



1.0   Policy
      It is the Policy of <Your Agency> to plan for contingency staffing in an emergency. The
      procedures below will be followed.

2.0   Purpose

      In a pandemic influenza outbreak or similar emergency, up to 40% of the population
      may become ill. Agency staff will be among those affected. Personnel may also be
      absent as they care for sick family members. In an emergency that requires the agency
      to activate a COOP, it is important to be able to maintain essential functions. Agencies
      may need to replace key staff members who normally take care of these essential
      functions.
3.0   Persons Affected
      <Your Agency> employees.

4.0   Definitions
      Memorandums of Understanding (MOU)
      Mutual Aid Agreements (MAA)

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning

      It is understood that small agencies with volunteer staff may be unable to meet the
      following recommendations. Furthermore, during an emergency, qualified people may
      not be available. Evaluate staffing levels as well as immediate and future needs and
      implement alternative staff options. Make the best plan you can.

      1. Plan for contingency staffing to include qualified individuals in your community, e.g.
         retired health agents, nurses, doctors and school nurses.




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       2. Plan to share essential services with other Health Departments under
          Memorandums of Understanding (MOU) and Mutual Aid Agreements (MAA).
       3. Cross-train staff as much as possible.
       4. Plan to contract services to agencies and establish MOU for this.


6.0    Procedures/Process Guidelines

       1. Evaluate staffing levels and implement alternative staff options.

       2. Include qualified individuals in your community, e.g. retired health agents, nurses,
          doctors and school nurses.
       3. Share essential services with other Health Departments under Memorandums of
          Understanding (MOU) and Mutual Aid Agreements (MAA).
       4. Contract services to other agencies as appropriate using MOU s.


7.0    References

       For this Policy, Please Fill out Templates at end of Chapter:

       Worksheet: Continuity of Operations Plan: Lead Staff, Training, and Contact
       Information

       Worksheet: Essential Functions by Incident Command and Staff Positions

8.0    Revisions

       Date         Rev. #   Change                                             Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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ESTABLISH DELEGATION OF AUTHORITY AND LEADERSHIP SUCCESSION




                  <YOUR AGENCY>                                   Policy No.

            POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                 Origination
                                                                  Date



      Establish Delegation of Authority and                       Page No.
              Leadership Succession


1.0     Policy
        It is the policy of <Your Agency> that if key staff are unavailable due to illness or
        absence for any other reason, <Your Agency> can delegate authority.
        <Your Agency> will specify who is authorized to make decisions or act on their behalf
        and on behalf of other key <Your Agency> personnel.

2.0     Purpose

        Authority is pre-delegated to ensure that <Your Agency> personnel are aware of their
        responsibilities during an emergency. When key personnel are unavailable or unable to
        assume their duties you should have a plan for Order of Succession.
3.0     Persons Affected
        Key <Your Agency> personnel

4.0     Definitions

        An Order of Succession is a formula that specifies who will automatically fill a position if
        it is vacated and therefore, allow for an orderly and predefined transition of leadership.
        The designated successor retains all assigned obligations, duties, and responsibilities of
        the incumbent until officially relieved by an individual higher on the list of succession, or
        until an individual higher on the list of succession reassigns the responsibilities.

        If a designated individual is unavailable, authority will pass to the next individual on the
        list. Unavailable means that the designated person is:

           incapable of carrying out the assigned duties by reason of death, disability, or
            distance from/response time to <Your Agency>
           unable to be contacted within 30 minutes (change this to suit your circumstances)
           has already been assigned to other emergency activities



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5.0     Responsibilities/Preplanning

        1. Plan for and document these delegations of authority
        2. Determine to which position the authority will be delegated
        3. Plan for your Order of Succession
           a. Specify who will automatically fill a position if it is vacated to allow for orderly
                and predefined transition of leadership
        4. Consider which authorities you may need to transfer, based on your essential
           functions list
        5. Plan to terminate the delegation of authority when the person is available to re-
           assume duties or after a specified period of time
        6. Make sure that the delegations are specific and limited. For example, authority for a
           given responsibility might be conferred while personnel are out of contact due to
           illness or travel
        7. Establish other limitations on the authority. For example, you may not want to
           delegate financial authority

6.0 Procedures/Process Guidelines

       1. Delegate authority
       2. Use <Your Agency>’s pre-determined Order of Succession
       3. The designated successor retains all assigned obligations, duties, and responsibilities
           of the incumbent until:
           a. officially relieved by an individual higher on the list of succession, or until
           b. an individual higher on the list of succession reassigns the responsibilities
       4. Transfer authorities based on your essential functions list
       5. If a designated individual is unavailable, authority will pass to the next individual on
           the list
       6. Terminate the delegation of authority when the person is available to re-assume
           duties or after a specified period of time
7.0 References

        For this Policy, Please Fill out Templates at end of Chapter: Worksheet: Limitations on
        Delegation of Authority during a Declared Emergency

8.0 Revisions

        Date        Rev. #    Change                                             Reference(s) Section


Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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DESIGNATING MISSION-CRITICAL PERSONNEL AND DELEGATING AUTHORITY




                <YOUR AGENCY>                                   Policy No.

         POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                  Origination
                                                                Date

 Designating Mission-Critical Personnel and                     Page No.
           Delegating Authority


1.0   Policy
      This policy is activated when an emergency has been declared or proclaimed affecting
      <Your Agency>. In addition, this policy may be activated when an emergency for <Your
      Agency> has not been proclaimed, but a department director has received authority
      from <Your Agency Executive> to activate this policy because the emergency has
      negatively impacted department business continuity, the following procedures will then
      be executed.

2.0   Purpose
      This policy and procedures provides guidance and direction to assist all departments,
      divisions and work units to develop plans for identifying essential functions, lines of
      management succession and delegation of authority in the event of an emergency.

3.0   Persons Affected
      <Your Agency> mission-critical personnel and key employees who must identify those
      personnel.

4.0   Definitions

5.0   Responsibilities

      Preplanning:
       Multiple management lines of succession will be required.
       Departments must identify:
                     First responder functions;
                     Essential functions vs. non-essential functions;
       Departments must pre-plan to provide access to crucial information such as payroll
         functions.


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6.0     Procedures/Process Guidelines

        1.       Departments shall identify 1st responder functions, essential functions and non-
                 essential functions; including critical times of year when certain functions must
                 be performed (the discharge of certain essential work may be specific to the
                 time of season, year or month or dependent on other factors directly affecting
                 the function).

        2.       Departments shall identify personnel who perform first responder functions,
                 essential functions5 and non-essential functions as well as the minimum number
                 of staff necessary to perform the functions.

        3.       Departments shall identify non-essential functions that may be suspended while
                 personnel are assigned to more critical roles. Departments should identify the
                 time period that these functions can be suspended and the functions that may
                 be done on a less frequent basis than would occur under normal conditions.

        4.       Departments should identify secondary personnel that have the skills and
                 abilities to perform other functions. Such personnel may be:

                 a. Employees in the same classification series as those who normally perform
                    the function;
                 b. Employees who have previously performed the work and are currently
                    employed elsewhere in organizations within <Your Agency>; and
                 c. Employees who can be trained either in advance of the need, or on-the-job
                    when the need arises.

        5.       Departments should identify other personnel who may be available to perform
                 the essential functions. Such personnel may include retired employees, former
                 employees, temporary workers and contract workers.

        6.       Payroll is a key function that needs to be carefully planned for to allow business
                 continuity and employee functioning in an emergency.

                 a. Each department shall identify the payroll function as an essential function
                    and shall have a plan of succession and cross-training for the payroll
                    function.

                 b. There should be at least 3 employees; one of whom may include the Payroll
                    Supervisor, who are trained to perform the payroll function.



5
 When making a determination about which personnel are essential, managers should consider whether
employees need to arrange care for school-aged children or dependents over 16 if their family profile
requires it. See School and Daycare Closures. In the event that such employees cannot make alternative
care arrangements, management may consider modifying their essential personnel roster in advance.


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7. Human Resources is a key function that needs to be carefully planned for to allow
   business continuity and employee functioning in an emergency.

    a. Each department shall predetermine the human resource management function
       as an essential function and shall have a plan of succession and cross-training
       for the human resource management function. There should be at least 3
       employees who are trained to perform the human resource management
       function.

8. Departments, divisions and work units shall establish a Management Line of
   Succession Plan. A Line of Succession Plan provides a list of predetermined
   alternates for key leadership positions in each department, division or work unit.

        a. The succession plan should be 7 to 10 employees in depth, where possible.
           The personnel identified for the line of succession should know the
           operations of the work unit; have the confidence of the principal to act in
           his or her absence; clearly understand the scope of the powers and duties
           delegated to him or her; and clearly understand the constraints, if any, of
           the powers and authorities she or he will be delegated.

        b. The succession plan should clearly identify the names of designated
           personnel and their regular titles and how they can be contacted. (Consider
           having the principal’s phone, work cell-phone, pager and email forwarded
           to the person who assumes the powers and duties of the principal in his/her
           absence.)

        c. The names and order of succession of designated personnel shall be
           communicated to division and work unit personnel.

        d. The plan should clearly set forth the powers and duties that will be
           performed and by whom. The departments shall predetermine the
           individuals who will have the delegated authority to make decisions and
           communicate that these individuals will have that authority to division and
           work unit personnel.

        e. If all of the personnel identified for the Line of Succession Plan are
           unavailable (which may be the case in small work units where there is a
           limited number of leadership personnel), the department should provide for
           alternate lines of succession that identifies other personnel who can assume
           the powers and duties outside of the work unit. The Line of Succession Plan
           should be updated whenever a pertinent staff change occurs.

        f.   Departments should determine if those in the Line of Succession Plan may
             need to be cross-trained in advance and provide such training where
             needed. Advance cross-training for essential functions, such as the payroll
             function, is imperative. The department may provide resources which may



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                   be accessed to train employees to perform other functions (video tapes,
                   outside trainers, procedures manuals, teleconferencing, consultants, etc.).

               g. Departments should construct a method by which those in the Line of
                  Succession Plan will have access to information and needed items (i.e.
                  computer passwords, calendars for employee approved time off, office
                  keys, file cabinet keys, etc.) should they take over leadership
                  responsibilities.

               h. Succession plans shall be documented by divisions and/or work units and
                  forwarded to the department director. Copies shall be provided by the
                  department director to Chief of Staff; Assistant Agency Executive;
                  Department of Executive Services Director; and Human Resources Division
                  Director.


7.0    References/Additional Resources

8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #    Change                                            Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PERSONNEL ESSENTIAL AND NON-ESSENTIAL STAFF




                <YOUR AGENCY>                                   Policy No.

           POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                Origination
                                                                Date

      Emergency Operations Personnel:                           Page No.
       Essential and Non-Essential Staff


1.0   Policy
      This policy will be in effect whenever <Agency Executive Title> or his/her designee, in
      accordance with <Your Agency’s> Emergency Plan, declares that public health
      emergency conditions warrant use of this policy either in preparation for, or as a
      reaction to, a potentially disastrous event. Each emergency situation is unique and while
      this policy is intended for overall guidance, <Your Agency> reserves the right to evaluate
      this policy and issue alternative procedures as dictated by the circumstances of the
      emergency. Upon declaration of an emergency, Department Heads are authorized to
      release employees in Tiers 2– 4 from duty as outlined below.

2.0   Purpose
      The community depends on our employees to report to work during and in the
      aftermath of a disaster and/or public health emergency to assist in the restoration of
      essential public services required for the health, safety and quality of life. In order to
      respond effectively, agencies must differentiate between essential and non-essential
      staff.

3.0   Persons Affected
      All <Your Agency> employees and Department Heads. The policy does not apply to
      employees of any Elected or Appointed Official unless that official adopts it in writing.
      Any such adoption may be terminated at any time.

4.0   Definitions

5.0   Responsibilities

      Preplanning: Emergency Operation/Staffing: Emergency Workers
      1.     Develop a list of key personnel necessary in an emergency.

      2.      Department Heads must appoint individual classifications to each of their
              employees.

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      3.     Every agency employee will have one of the following classifications. Any
             employee classification can be immediately, permanently, or temporarily
             reclassified upwards or downwards depending on the needs of the agency.

             a. “Tier 1” – ESSENTIAL: Employees with specific responsibilities who remain
                in the jurisdiction area of the job or at a designated location during an
                emergency.

             b. “Tier 2” – RESERVE ESSENTIAL: Employees who report to or remain on the
                job preceding an emergency for the preparatory phase and are subject to
                being re-designated as needed.

             c. “Tier 3” – RE-ENTRY ESSENTIAL: Employees who must return to supplement
                or relieve Tier 1 or Tier 2 employees immediately upon roads becoming
                accessible.

             d. “Tier 4” – NON-ESSENTIAL: Employees whose presence is not essential in
                carrying out the emergency plan, but who cannot leave their positions until
                released by their supervisor, and must return to work as usual under normal
                operations after emergency status has ended.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines

      1.     Emergency Operation/Staffing: Emergency Preparation Phase

             a. <Your Agency> property will be secured and protected and other actions
                will be taken as necessary in individual departments as required by the
                agency’s Emergency Plans, and departmental Emergency Plans and
                Standard Operating Procedures.

             b. Employees not at work are responsible for remaining in contact with their
                supervisor regarding assignments, and to stay abreast of the situation by
                monitoring, radio/television for instructions or by calling the Emergency
                Operations Center (EOC) as to when to report to work.

             c. Department Heads will reconsider and reschedule or cancel, if necessary, all
                vacation leave requests of Tier 1 or Tier 2 employees who are on approved
                vacation, or are scheduled for vacation.

             d. When assigned tasks under the Preparation Phase are completed in
                accordance with the Departmental Emergency Plan, Tier 3 and Tier 4
                employees released from duty may choose to evacuate. Tier 1 and Tier 2
                employees will be allowed to secure their property and make arrangements
                for their families as scheduled by the Department Head.

      2.     Emergency Operation/Staffing: Emergency Services Phase




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     a. This phase occurs during the emergency situation. Only those employees
        whose assigned functions are necessary for the benefit of the general public
        during the emergency situation will work during the Essential Services
        Phase. Tier 1 and Tier 2 employees will not be authorized to evacuate.

     b. Shifts during the Essential Services Phase will be established according to
        departmental needs. Employees who are assigned ON CALL status must
        advise supervisors of locations where they can be contacted at all times.

     c. Employees released from work will follow instructions regarding evacuation
        and shelter applicable to the general public as issued through public
        notification of evacuation and other disaster actions by the Office of
        Emergency Management (EOM).

3.   Pay Provisions

     a. Exempt Status: Any employee who is classified as Exempt, in accordance
        with the provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act, and is assigned to
        remain on duty at the EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER (EOC) or a
        designated station during the emergency, is not eligible for overtime pay.
        Comparable time off will be granted for the number of hours worked
        beyond 40 hours per week coinciding with <Your Agency>’s pay period.
        Compensatory time earned is to be utilized as soon as practical. This time
        may not be converted to pay during the course of employment or upon
        termination.

     b. Non-Exempt Status: Any employee classified as Non-Exempt in accordance
        with the provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act and assigned to remain
        on duty, will receive overtime pay or compensatory time at a rate of one
        and one-half times their normal rate for the time worked beyond 40 hours
        per week coinciding with <Your Agency’s > pay period.

     c. Exempt/Disaster Pay

               Employees released from duty by their Department Head will be
                compensated at their regular rate of pay until the <Agency Executive
                Title> or his designee declares the date and/or time when all employees
                are expected to return-to-duty.

               If additional days are needed once business has resumed, the employee
                may request vacation time or compensatory time off for personal
                emergency recovery.

               Employees not requesting vacation or compensatory time for personal
                emergency recovery or preparations will be docked.

4.   Emergency Operation/Staffing: Return to Duty Phase



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     a. Good Faith Effort: By reporting to work on the return-to-duty date and/or
        time specified by the <Agency Executive Title>, each employee meets their
        responsibility to work with other County employees as a team in helping to
        restore the community to normal service levels following a disaster period.

     b. Hours of Operation: Employees who chose to evacuate must report to work
        at the start of their next normal shift on the return-to-duty date.

5.   Departmental Responsibilities: Department Heads

     a. Must give a copy of this Emergency Policy to their employees.

     b. Must identify each position in which employees in their department are
        required to work during an emergency. This list of positions and employees
        who occupy them must be maintained and posted on the department’s
        official bulletin board or circulated to all their employees.

     c. Must develop, post, communicate and circulate to all their employees the
        Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) under each phase of an emergency.

     d. Must hold an annual meeting to reiterate to employees their individual
        responsibilities and to inform them of any changes in this policy or the SOP.

     e. Must ensure that all job descriptions state the Emergency Classification of
        their positions.

     f.   Must complete the “Emergency Preparedness Employee Classification
          Form” for every employee. Each employee must be provided with a copy of
          their form. The original must be forwarded to the Human Resources
          Department.

     g. Must obtain an executed “Employee Acknowledgement Form” from each
        employee and return the original form to the Human Resources Department
        as soon as possible.

6.   Departmental Responsibilities: Supervisors

     a. Must assist with the responsibility of the consistent and fair implementation
        of this policy.

     b. Must document and initiate any disciplinary action resulting from any
        violations of this policy.

7.   Departmental Responsibilities: Employees

     a. Must know his/her responsibility under this policy. Compliance with this
        policy is mandatory.




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      b. Must be responsible for complying with waiver requests procedures as
         outlined this policy.

8.    Departmental Responsibilities: Human Resources Department

      a. Will provide general information about this policy to all new employees.

      b. Will maintain the signed originals of the “Employee Acknowledgment Form”
         and the “Emergency Preparedness Employee Classification Form” in each
         employee’s personnel file.

      c. Will maintain documentation of any disciplinary action in the affected
         employee’s personnel file.

      d. Will maintain an original copy of any submitted “Waiver Request Forms” in
         the employee’s confidential file.

9.    Departmental Responsibilities: Emergency Management Office

      a. The Emergency Management Coordinator will provide assistance to
         departments in planning and coordinating the activities for the preparation
         and initial services phases to ensure consistency with the agency Emergency
         Plan.

10.   Waivers

      a. Requirements: If an employee has personal circumstances which would
         affect his/her ability to work during any phase of this Policy, he/she must
         file a “Waiver Request Form” with his/her Department Head upon
         employment or within 30 days of the onset of the extenuating
         circumstances. Factors that qualify for a release from service are detailed in
         Section 2 below.

      b. Waiver Requests will be reviewed and approved/disapproved by each
         department and forwarded to the Human Resources.

      c. Factors to be Considered for a Waiver:

                 An employee who is a single parent with primary responsibility for a
                  child or children under the age of 17 or who needs to care for an
                  elderly family member.

                 An employee, who personally suffers from serious health problems,
                  has a physical impairment, or who has primary responsibility for a
                  family member under similar circumstances.

                 In families where both husband and wife work for the County and
                  are classified as Tier 1 or Tier 2 employees, only one must comply
                  with this policy at their discretion.

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                           Tier 1 and Tier 2 employees who have a spouse employed by
                            another governmental entity, hospital, or other essential public
                            service provider, and who must report under comparable policy
                            requirements will be handled on a case by case basis.

       11.     Policy Violations

               a. Prohibitions

                           Refusing to perform assigned duties required by this Policy or to
                            disobey any order made or direction given by a supervisor under
                            this policy.

                           Failing to report for duty as directed during any phase of this policy.

                           Failing to abide by <Your Agency> Policy, Departmental Rules or
                            regulations, and Standard Operation Procedures (SOP).

                           Exhibiting conduct which interferes with the proper and orderly
                            conduct of <Your Agency> business or brings discredit on public
                            service.

                           Exercising other inappropriate behavior which may be determined
                            to be of equal seriousness with those listed above, causing an
                            employee to be given discipline/dismissal based on those additional
                            types of behavior.

               b. Violation of Policy

                   Any violation of this policy may result in disciplinary action up to and
                   including termination. <Your Agency> will attempt to follow its regular
                   discipline and appeal policy during weather related emergencies. However,
                   <Your Agency> reserves the right to depart from the discipline and appeals
                   policy as may be required by the situation.

7.0    References/Additional Resources:

8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #     Change                                           Reference(s) Section



Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>



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ALTERNATE SITE PLAN DEVELOPMENT




                <YOUR AGENCY>                                   Policy No.

          POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                 Origination
                                                                Date



      Alternate Site Plan Development                           Page No.



1.0   Policy
      It is the policy of <Your Agency> to have an Alternate Site Plan and Procedures in place
      in the case that the current agency facility is not available as a base to provide essential
      services.
2.0   Purpose
      If current agency offices or facilities are not available because of a flood, fire, or other
      threat, agencies need to establish an alternate site for operations, from which to
      provide essential services.
3.0   Persons Affected
      All <Your Agency> staff as well as the community at large

4.0   Definitions

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning

      1. Establish a meeting place (rallying point) outside of <Your Agency> office in case it is
         unavailable (fire, flood, etc.) and make sure everyone knows about it.
      2. Determine the location of an alternate site for <Your Agency> operations.
                a. Make sure it is accessible, is an adequate size, has good communication
                   capabilities, etc.
                b. If needed, get a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that allows you
                   to use the location in an emergency.
      3. List required resources for the alternate site that will enable you to maintain your
         essential functions.
                a. List the location of these resources if they are not available onsite.
                b. Check these annually.



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6.0    Procedures/Process Guidelines

       1. Establish <Your Agency>’s rallying point.
       2. Establish an alternate site. Obtain an MOU.
       3. List needed equipment at the alternate site and where you will obtain it.
7.0    References

       For this Policy, Please Fill out Templates at end of Chapter:

       Worksheet: Developing an Alternate Site Plan Template/Checklist

       Worksheet: Alternate Site Supplies and Resources


8.0    Revisions

       Date         Rev. #   Change                                             Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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PROTECTING VITAL AGE NCY RECORDS




                <YOUR AGENCY>                                   Policy No.

          POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                 Origination
                                                                Date



      Protecting Vital Agency Records                           Page No.



1.0   Policy
      It is the policy of <Your Agency> to have procedures in place to protect vital agency
      records.
2.0   Purpose
      In COOP planning, vital records are the records that agencies need to carry out essential
      functions. They include documents or files, which, if damaged or destroyed, would
      disrupt agency operation and information flow, cause considerable inconvenience, and
      require replacement at considerable expense.

3.0   Persons Affected
      All <Your Agency> staff, especially managers.

4.0   Definitions
      Examples of vital records include your Emergency Management Plan, the COOP plan,
      reference material, copy of regulations, personnel roster and records, and fiscal
      documentation.

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning

      1. Determine which records are vital for each essential function.

      2. Note and record location of primary and backup copies of records.

      3. Optional: Complete emergency contact wallet cards and distribute to agency staff.
         (Note: These cards can be printed double sided on standard business card stock.)

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines

      1. Back-up all vital records regularly and store back-ups off site.




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       2. Know the exact location of all vital records and their backup. Take into
           consideration that someone who is not familiar with the agency may need to
           locate them quickly.
       3. Consider keeping all vital COOP records together in one place.
       4. If agency computers are password protected, ensure that more than one
           person knows how to obtain the files.
7.0    References

       For this Policy, Please Fill out Templates at end of Chapter:

       Worksheet: Vital Records

8.0    Revisions

       Date         Rev. #   Change                                             Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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DEPARTMENT EMERGENCY PAGER USE




               <YOUR AGENCY>                                    Policy No.

           POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                Origination
                                                                Date

      Department Emergency Pager Use                            Page No.



1.0   Policy
      All staff must be familiar with the Emergency Pager’s function and the procedures for
      calling it for an afterhours department emergency situation.

2.0   Purpose
      For timely notification of key staff regarding emergency warnings or events, <Your
      Agency> employs a 24/7 Emergency Pager.

3.0   Persons Affected
      All employees

4.0   Definitions

5.0   Responsibilities

      Preplanning:
      1. Develop an emergency paging system and number prior to an emergency.
      2. The Emergency Pager number is <telephone #>
      3. SUGGESTED PROTOCOL TO INTEGRATE: Create a code system whereby if the pager
         displays 911, specific staff will be notified immediately.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines

      1.      During regular business hours, use the usual communications channels. The
              emergency pager is only for after hours and weekends.

      2.      The emergency pager is the 24/7 contact for <Your Agency> and is carried at all
              times by the Director or a member of the Senior Management Team. It is a one-
              way communication device used to notify <Your Agency> of an emergency or
              public health threat.




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       3.      When a message is received, the person holding the emergency pager is
               expected to return the call immediately by dialing the phone number listed in
               the pager message.

       4.      Once an emergency has been confirmed, <Your Agency> Director, Assistant
               Director, the Senior Managers (as appropriate) and the <Agency Emergency
               Response Team Name> will be contacted immediately. Additional staff will be
               contacted as needed.

       5.      To leave a message on the pager, simply dial the number and, when prompted,
               enter the number you are calling from. No additional message is required.

       6.      SUGGESTED PROTOCOL TO INTEGRATE: If the pager displays 911, specific staff
               will be notified immediately.

       7.      Remember that pager messages are conveyed via cell towers and relays. Rural
               areas may have “dead” areas where no cellular service is presently available.

7.0    References/Additional Resources:

8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #    Change                                            Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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COOP PERSONNEL ISSUES




                <YOUR AGENCY>                                   Policy No.

          POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                 Origination
                                                                Date



            COOP Personnel Issues                               Page No.



1.0   Policy
      It is the policy of <Your Agency> to have Procedures in place to support employees and
      thus allow for Continuity of Operations (COOP).
2.0   Purpose
      During an emergency, agency personnel may need support to help them deal with long
      hours, death, and other extreme situations. These issues must be planned for in
      advance.

3.0   Persons Affected
      All <Your Agency> staff and regular volunteers

4.0   Definitions

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning

      1. Complete Worksheet: Emergency Payroll Plans; Personnel Issues.
      2. Have <Your Agency> employees and volunteers prepare a Family Emergency Plan.
      3. Staff Notification: Make sure all staff members know about the COOP plan and their
         expected emergency roles. Staff should be notified annually of proposed staffing
         contingency plans and pay provisions, as well as delegation of authority and
         succession orders.
      4. Agencies may need to offer flexible work options.
      5. Personnel may need behavioral health assistance.
      6. Assess liability/workers compensation issues for contracted and volunteer staff.
      7. Determine emergency compensation/payroll plans per jurisdiction Continuity of
         Government and emergency operations plans.
      8. If your agency has employee unions, inform them of staff contingency plans
         regarding overtime, as well as sharing and shifting of responsibilities among workers.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines


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       1. Staff Notification: Make sure all staff members know about the COOP plan and their
          expected emergency roles.
       2. Activate agency staff and volunteer Family Emergency Plans.
       3. Offer flexible work options if appropriate
       4. Offer personnel behavioral health assistance, as appropriate (also see Chapter 10:
          Behavioral Health and Critical Incident Stress management)
       5. Handle liability/workers compensation issues for contracted and volunteer staff.
       6. Handle emergency compensation/payroll plans.
       7. Inform any employee unions of staff contingency plans regarding overtime and
          sharing and shifting of responsibilities among workers.

7.0    References

       For this Policy, Please Fill out Template at end of Chapter:

       Worksheets: Emergency Payroll Plans and Personnel Issues


8.0    Revisions

       Date         Rev. #   Change                                             Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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REDUCTION IN FORCE POLICY




                <YOUR AGENCY>                                   Policy No.

           POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                Origination
                                                                Date

           Reduction in Force Policy                            Page No.



1.0   Policy
      Decisions as to facility closures or reductions in force will be made on a case-by-case
      basis, in conjunction with <Your Agency’s>Human Resources Division and <Your
      Agency> executive’s office. If a reduction in force is in place, the following procedures
      will be executed.

2.0   Purpose
      The agency may currently affect facility closures and reductions in force as necessary to
      meet business needs. A reduction in force may be instituted as the result of an
      emergency.

3.0   Persons Affected
      All employees

4.0   Definitions

5.0   Responsibilities

      Preplanning:
      1. Agencies should review standard reduction in force template letters and update as
         necessary to address an emergency.
      2. In the event of large-scale reductions in force, the economic impact of vacation
         payouts and unemployment benefits may be at issue and should be considered in
         advance.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines

      1.      Administrative offices and Agency operations should remain open during
              emergency situations that do not pose an immediate life, health, or safety risk



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     to its occupants unless directed otherwise by the executive or the respective
     department director, per Personnel Guidelines.

2.   Because of potential staffing shortages, employees may be deployed to
     provide support for varied agency operations in alternative worksites and
     should expect to come to work.

3.   In the case of closure of specific offices, employees will be sent home as a last
     resort. Should employees be sent home, payment of wages to employees will
     be made in accordance with the established emergency processes under agency
     Personnel Guidelines as follows:

     a. If a facility is closed by order of the executive and no alternative site is
        designated for the employee to report to, regular, provisional, probationary
        and term-limited temporary employees scheduled to work will be paid their
        normal pay until such time as the facility is reopened, alternative worksites
        are arranged or a reduction in force is implemented.

     b. If the shutdown extends for more than one week, the status of displaced
        workers may be reviewed by the executive to determine whether a
        reduction in force due to either lack of funds or lack of work is in order. This
        applies to affected employees who are exempt from the overtime
        provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and the state’s Minimum
        Wage Act, as well as hourly employees who are not exempt from the
        overtime provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and the state’s
        Minimum Wage Act.

     c. Employees who, prior to a facility closure, have previously requested and
        have been approved for time off (e.g., vacation, sick leave, compensatory
        time off, executive leave, leave of absence) will have hours deducted from
        their accruals as approved in accordance with established policies.

     d. Temporary (other than provisional, probationary and term-limited
        temporary), administrative interns, and non-regular part time employees
        will be paid only for hours actually worked during a facility closure.

     e. Employees designated as first responder employees who are unable to
        report to work will have their time charged to vacation, compensatory time
        (FLSA overtime non-exempt hourly), executive leave (FLSA exempt) or leave
        without pay unless the department director or designee determines that
        regular pay is warranted and waives the charging of the time missed.

     f.   If the facility closes after the start of an employee’s shift, employees who
          are scheduled to report to work but do not report to work and do not
          contact the appointing authority or designee prior to a facility closure are
          considered to have been absent without leave and will be subject to leave
          without pay for the full day. However, the appointing authority may at his


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                   or her discretion authorize the use of vacation, compensatory time or
                   executive leave for the absence as individual circumstances warrant.

               g. When a department or division director or agency administrator closes
                  operations in his or her agency during the work day or orders employees to
                  leave the premises because of safety concerns, employees (regular,
                  provisional, probationary and term-limited temporary) scheduled to work
                  will be paid for the normally scheduled work day.

       4.      Departments should make every reasonable effort to allow employees who
               have reported to work to check on the status of their families, providing that
               doing so does not compromise emergency response functions.

7.0    References/Additional Resources:

8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #    Change                                            Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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CLOSURE OF SCHOOLS AND DAYCARE FACILITIES




                 <YOUR AGENCY>                                   Policy No.

          POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                  Origination
                                                                 Date

      Closure of Schools and Daycare Facilities                  Page No.



1.0    Policy
       If the Health Officer or other empowered executive orders schools and daycare facilities
       closed, the following procedures will be executed. It is anticipated that this action would
       occur in coordination with an emergency proclamation.

2.0    Purpose
       In an emergency, especially one involving a presumed contagious disease outbreak,
       Health Officers are empowered to close large social gatherings, which may include
       closing schools and large day care centers as a social distancing strategy. School and
       daycare closure will have a significant cascading effect on staff absenteeism in both the
       private and public sectors. First responders must report to work, but agencies must be
       prepared for a reduction in its staff resulting from healthy parents staying home to take
       care of healthy children or other healthy dependants.

3.0    Persons Affected
       All employees, especially those who care for children.

4.0    Definitions

5.0    Responsibilities

       Preplanning:
       1. School and daycare closure will have a significant cascading effect on staff
          absenteeism in both the private and public sectors.
       2. In the event that this occurs, staff should be informed of expectations, depending
          upon their department designation as first responders (employees who exercise civil
          authority and maintain the safety and well-being of agency citizens), essential
          personnel and non-essential personnel.
       3. If schools and daycare centers are closed, employees will not be allowed to bring
          their children to work.
       4. Employees should have a family care succession plan in place.



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       5. Essential employees may have to telecommute to perform duties and should be
          equipped to do so in advance. Closure of schools and daycare facilities directly
          impacts this ability and needs to be pre-planned for.

6.0    Procedures/Process Guidelines

       First Responders: must report to work, notwithstanding school and daycare closures. All
       first responders should have a family care succession plan in place.

       Essential Personnel: should make every effort to report to work in the event of school
       and daycare closures. All essential personnel should have a family care succession plan
       in place.

       In the event that child and dependent care coverage may become impossible,
       arrangements should be made in advance with department management to
       telecommute, if appropriate and feasible. Otherwise, essential personnel may use
       accrued vacation leave, accrued compensatory time, holiday leave or previously
       awarded executive leave or may request approval for leave without pay for such an
       absence. Sick leave may not be used by healthy parents who are staying home to take
       care of healthy children or other healthy dependants due to lack of day care
       arrangements.

       Non-essential Personnel: all non-essential personnel should make every effort to
       report to work in the event of school and daycare closures. All non-essential personnel
       should have a family care succession plan in place.

       In the event that child and dependent care coverage becomes impossible, non-essential
       personnel may use accrued vacation leave, accrued compensatory time, holiday leave or
       previously awarded executive leave for such an absence or may request approval for
       leave without pay. Sick leave may not be used by healthy parents who are staying home
       to take care of healthy children or other healthy dependants due to lack of daycare
       arrangements.

7.0    References/Additional Resources:

8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #    Change                                            Reference(s) Section



Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>



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TEMPLATES: CONTINUITY OF OPERATIONS


PUBLIC HEALTH EMERGENCY ROLES LIST

In an emergency situation, many agency staff will be required to assist in the response. If
possible, staff will be matched to their interests and skills. Please complete the following
checklist to express your interests. Check four (4) roles which you would be interested in filling
during an emergency. Staff that would normally fill clinical, professional and Incident
Command System roles should select four other possible roles.


WORKING WITH PEOPLE:                                    WORKING WITH INFORMATION:

    ___ Special needs care                                   ___ Data entry & forms management

    ___ Child care                                           ___ Consent and witness

    ___ Translators & interpreters (Language:                ___ Educators & information distributors
    ______)
                                                             ___ Pre-Screeners, check-in, & check-out
    ___ Patient care (non-medical)

    ___ Home visitors

    ___ Vehicle escort

    ___ Greeters, traffic control & security

    ___ Animal transport & care


WORKING WITH MATERIALS:                                 WORKING WITH MEDICAL SUPPLIES OR
                                                        INVESTIGATIONS:
    ___ Supply, runners & logistics
                                                             ___ Dispensers of medications
    ___ Shipping & receiving
                                                             ___ Disease investigator
    ___ Repackaging
                                                             ___ Contact tracer
    ___ Facilities & site manager
                                                             ___ POD (Point Of Dispensing) manager
   ___ Inventory manager




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AGENCY ESSENTIAL FUNCTION AND STAFF ALTERNATE CONTACTS




Essential Function:       <Agency Division/Office/Department>


                                  Primary                     Alternate                Second Alternate


                          TITLE/ROLE                  TITLE/ROLE                      TITLE/ROLE
People Responsible
                          EMPLOYEE NAME               EMPLOYEE NAME                   EMPLOYEE NAME

                                                      ###-###--#### (w)               ###-###--#### (w)
                          ###-###--#### (w)
Phone Numbers
                          ###-###--#### (emerg. #)    ###-###--#### (emerg. #)        ###-###--#### (emerg. #)


Essential Function:       <Agency Division/Office/Department>


                                  Primary                     Alternate                Second Alternate


                          TITLE/ROLE                  TITLE/ROLE                      TITLE/ROLE
People Responsible
                          EMPLOYEE NAME               EMPLOYEE NAME                   EMPLOYEE NAME

                                                      ###-###--#### (w)               ###-###--#### (w)
                          ###-###--#### (w)
Phone Numbers
                          ###-###--#### (emerg. #)    ###-###--#### (emerg. #)        ###-###--#### (emerg. #)




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WORKSHEET: CONTINUITY OF OPERATIONS PLAN: LEAD STAFF, TRAINING, AND CONTACT INFORMATION

Agency Director should fill in as completely as possible. Attach copies of all MOU (Memorandum of Understanding).


 <Your Agency>                               Contact:                                     Phone:                                   Date Completed:


 Emergency Relocation site:                  Contact:                                     Phone:                                   MOU Date:




 Essential Position           Required Training         Contact
                                                                         Current Staff                          Backup Staff 1            Backup Staff 2
                              Levels                    Information


                                                        Name


                                                        Work
                              Incident Command
    Department Head           System (ICS)
                                                        After Hours
   Director/Chief/Agent
                              ICS 200 or better
                                                        Mobile


                                                        Email


          Staff               ICS 100 or better
                                                        Name
     Responsibilities:




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                                            Work


                                            After Hours


                                            Mobile


                                            Email


                                            Name


                                            Work
         Staff          ICS 100 or better
  Responsibilities:
Public Health Nurse,                        After Hours
Visiting Nurse Assoc.

                                            Mobile


                                            Email




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WORKSHEET: ESSENTIAL TASKS, WORKFORCE, SUPPLIES, AND RECORDS

Essential Functions      Essential Tasks           Essential             Backup Staff     Essential                            Essential Records      Backup
                                                   Workforce                              Supplies/Equipment                                          Locations(s)

                         -PPE and training
Administrative:                                    Ex.: Health Officer                    PPE, training guide
                         -Log of Activities
                         -Collect files, records
                         -Coordinate with PIO                                             Records, Forms                       Log Book
-Safety of Staff         and issue guidance
-Finances                -Issue Orders and                                                Computer, Cell Phone
-Maintain Agency         Emergency
Records                  Declarations
-Risk Communications                                                                      Risk Communications Guide
-Isolation and
Quarantine                                                                                Isolation & Quarantine Guide         Copies of all orders
                                                                                                                               issued

Inspections:             -Inspect and monitor
                         food, water                                                      Thermometers, flashlights,           Copies of Inspection
                                                                                          inspection forms, batteries, radio   Reports
-Safe food, water,       -Investigate serious
housing                  complaints as needed
-Complaint                                                                                Log Book                             Log Book
investigations
                                                                                          Guide to Surveillance &              Case Reports
-Disease Investigation                                                                    Reporting
and Control
                                                                                          Telephone                            Log of calls


                                                                                          Internet connection
                                                                                          Fax connection



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WORKSHEET: ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS BY INCIDENT COMMAND AND STAFF POSITIONS



This chart shows essential functions and lists the relevant Incident Command role, as well as the staff person normally responsible. Choose the staff position from
the lists provided in Column 2. List the preferred qualifications to achieve the essential function. Next, include the name of the staff person or volunteer who
normally performs the function. Finally, list backup staff/volunteers and their contact information. Look for backup staff from: VNA’s (Volunteer Nurses
Association), school nurses, retired medical personnel, MRC (Medical Reserve Corps) and CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) volunteers, doctors,
veterinarians, pharmacists, behavioral health responders, computer experts, etc. If you have additional backup personnel list them too.


 Essential Functions by       Critical Staff        Preferred             Contact
                                                                                            Current Staff              Backup           Backup 2
 Incident Command Role        Position              Qualifications        Information


                                                                          Name


                                                                          Work
 Agency Control operations,
 including financial             Health Director
                                                    MAHB certification
 oversight                       Other Manager                            After Hours
                                                    Experience
                                 _______________
 Incident Command
                                                                          Mobile


                                                                          Email




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Essential Functions by        Critical Staff       Preferred             Contact
                                                                                           Current Staff              Backup     Backup 2
Incident Command Role         Position             Qualifications        Information


                                                                         Name


                                                                         Work
Personnel Management to          Health Director
                                 Public Health
protect health and safety                          MAHB certification
                              Nurse
of agency and staff                                                      After Hours
                                 Epidemiologist    Experience
                                 Other Manager
Safety Officer and Planning      _______________
                                                                         Mobile


                                                                         Email

                                 Health Director
Communicate with clients,        Public Health                           Name
                                                   Empathy
public and state officials    Nurse
                                                   Risk Communication
                                 Epidemiologist
                                                   training Experience
Public Information Officer       Other Manager                           Work
                                 PIO
                                 _______________




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Essential Functions by   Critical Staff       Preferred                 Contact
                                                                                          Current Staff          Backup     Backup 2
Incident Command Role    Position             Qualifications            Information


                                                                        After Hours


                                                                        Mobile


                                                                        Email


                                                                        Name


                                                                        Work
Ensure resources            Health Director
equipment and supplies      Public Health
                                              Knowledge of
available to provide     Nurse
                                              procurement rules         After Hours
essential services          Epidemiologist
                                              Experience
                            Other Manager
Logistics                   _______________
                                                                        Mobile


                                                                        Email


Maintain agency vital       Health Director   Understanding of
                            Public Health     required                  Name
records and databases
                         Nurse                documentation
                            Epidemiologist
Finance and                                   Familiarity with
                            Other Manager                               Work
Administration                                computers
                            _______________


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Essential Functions by      Critical Staff        Preferred               Contact
                                                                                            Current Staff            Backup     Backup 2
Incident Command Role       Position              Qualifications          Information


                                                                          After Hours


                                                                          Mobile


                                                                          Email


                                                                          Name


                                                                          Work
                               Health Director
Initiate isolation and/or                         Isolation and
                               Public Health
quarantine and disease                            Quarantine training
                            Nurse
prevention measures                                                       After Hours
                               Epidemiologist     Understanding of
                               Other Manager      disease prevention
Operations
                               _______________
                                                                          Mobile


                                                                          Email

                               Health Director    Registered Sanitarian
                               Public Health                              Name
Investigate complaints,                           Public Health
                            Nurse
enforce laws/regulations                          Certifications
                               Epidemiologist
that ensure and protect
                               Other Manager      Familiarity with laws   Work
public health
                               Health Inspector   and regulations


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Essential Functions by     Critical Staff        Preferred               Contact
                                                                                          Current Staff             Backup     Backup 2
Incident Command Role      Position              Qualifications          Information

Operations
                                                                         After Hours


                                                                         Mobile


                                                                         Email


                                                                         Email


                                                                         Name


                                                 Registered Sanitarian
                              Health Director                            Work
Ensure safe water, food,      Public Health      Housing Inspection
shelter and housing        Nurse                 Well & Sanitary
                              Epidemiologist     Inspection Training     After Hours
Operations
                              Other Manager
                              Health Inspector   Septic System
                                                 Trainings
                              _______________                            Mobile
                                                 Shelter Trainings


                                                                         Email

                                                 RN or MPH
                              Health Director
                                                                         Name
Conduct communicable          Public Health      Disease Surveillance


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Essential Functions by     Critical Staff       Preferred                Contact
                                                                                           Current Staff           Backup     Backup 2
Incident Command Role      Position             Qualifications           Information

disease surveillance and   Nurse                & Investigation
control                       Epidemiologist    Training                 Work
                              Other Manager
Operations                    _______________
                                                                         After Hours


                                                                         Mobile



                                                                         Email




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WORKSHEET: LIMITATIONS ON DELEGATION OF AUTHORITY DURING A
DECLARED EMERGENCY




  Worksheet: Limitations on Delegation of Authority during a declared emergency

                                   Effective when the Board of Health, Chairman, Health
                                    Agent or Public Health Nurse is out of contact
Delegation Circumstances           Other (specify)




                                   None
Limitations on Delegated           Financial authority or contract signing authority.
Authority
                                   Other (specify)




                                   Authorities in contact and can assume duties

Termination                        Automatic termination after 30 days (or specify)




                                   Authority is delegated by the Board of Health

Delegating Authority               Re-delegation per leadership succession




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WORKSHEETS: EMERGENCY PAYROLL PLANS AND PERSONNEL ISSUES

Complete Worksheet: Emergency Payroll Plans; Personnel Issues and have each agency employee
and volunteer prepare a Family Emergency Plan.


                                 Worksheet: Emergency Payroll Plans


    Payroll Problems due to Emergency                 Strategies to be used (Check all that apply)


                                               Sick Leave

                                               Family Leave
 Employees unable to work
                                               Unpaid Leave

                                               _________________________________________


                                               Vacation pay

                                               Re-assignment
 Normal Work or Workspace not available
                                               Unpaid Leave

                                               _________________________________________


                                               Line of Credit
 Insufficient Funds
                                               _________________________________________


                                               Average of recent paychecks
 Payroll information not available
                                               _________________________________________


                                               Pay in advance

                                               Direct Deposit

 Check writing system unavailable              Cash

                                               Pay in arrears

                                               _________________________________________


                                           List resources and strategies:
 Other
                                           ____________________________________________



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Worksheet Personnel Issues: Determine which options your agency will provide and note details


                                 Strategies to be used (Check all that apply)


Flexible Work Options include

   Flextime to allow employees to address personal and family needs while continuing critical tasks

   Telecommuting

   Off-site work location

   _____________________________________________________________________________


Behavioral Health Response will include

   Employee Assistance Program (EAP)

   Department of Mental Health

   Crisis Intervention Teams

   Personal health insurance provisions

   _____________________________________________________________________________


Home Care Support will include

   Public Health Nurse

   Home Care Team established

   _____________________________________________________________________________

   Neighborhood Volunteer Support Teams (Clergy, NGO, etc.) List here:

   _____________________________________________________________________________


Job Descriptions and Contracts are amended to include

   All essential personnel must report to work during a declared emergency

   All vacations and leaves are automatically cancelled during a declared emergency

   Personnel may be re-assigned to other essential positions during an emergency

   Personnel must cross train for other critical positions



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    Personnel may be required to work from home or at other designated locations

    _____________________________________________________________________________


Workforce Protection Plans: Personal Protective Protocols (PPP)

    Worksites will be provided with appropriate hand washing and sanitation procedures

    Workforce will be provided with appropriate Personal Protective Equipment as available

    Workforce will be provided with PPP and PPE training as appropriate and available

    Workforce will be encouraged to stay home when sick or becoming sick

    Workforce will be expected to practice universal infection control precautions like cough and sneeze
etiquette, hand washing, avoiding touching face, only eating cooked foods unless washed

    Workers have been encouraged to have Family Emergency Plans, including providing for ill dependents,
school closures, Social Distancing requirements (e.g. closures of daycare, etc.)

     Workers are encouraged to form networks to support each other in emergencies, including the delivery
of food, medicines, books, movies, etc; transportation and emergency home repairs.

    Town/city to provide appropriate PPE and PPP for providers as available.


Liability Assessment for staff, contractors and volunteers should be assessed by Town/City Council and
findings inserted here.

     Appointed all volunteer staff, including MRC Teams as Special Municipal Employees for comprehensive
liability protection

    _____________________________________________________________________________

    _____________________________________________________________________________




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WORKSHEET: DEVELOPING AN ALTERNATE SITE PLAN TEMPLATE/CHECKLIST




 Alternate Site Plan                                            Details


Alternate Site Location


Contact Information


Back Up Alternate Site


Rallying Point Location


Alternate Site Equipment                               List resources available:
and Resources
                               Basics: Enclosed, desks, chairs, lights, heat, electricity, toilets

                               Communications: Telephones, fax, internet (DSL?), radios

                               Computers: onsite (list) ________ other(list)_________________

                               Other: _______________________________________________

                               Basic Office Supplies: _________________________________

                               Kitchen facilities (refrigeration for vaccines)

                               Telephones, radios and other communication devices, pagers, mobile
                               units, small walkie-talkies available at: (list location)

                               Personal Protective Equipment

                               Thermometers, other inspection equipment

                               Reference materials (e.g. Emergency Plan, COOP plan, Infectious
                               Disease Investigation Book and CD)

                               To-Go kit is prepared and located at: (Choose location). For contents see
                               Go Kit Checklist.

                               Add others as needed

Alternate Transportation   Private vehicles and agency vehicles




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WORKSHEET: ALTERNATE SITE SUPPLIES AND RESOURCES

List needed supplies and resources and who might provide them. Also, list where you store or can access personal protective equipment. Think
about supplies for the clinic (medical, office, food) and for communication (radios, phones, copiers, and computers). Expand this list as needed.

                                                                     Department/Agency
Supply/Resource                  Estimated Costs           MOU                                   Contact            Contact Information
                                                                     /Company
                                                                                                                    Work
                                                                                                                    After Hours
                                                                                                                    Mobile
                                                                                                                    After Hours
                                                                                                                    Work
                                                                                                                    After Hours
                                                                                                                    Mobile
                                                                                                                    After Hours
                                                                                                                    Work
                                                                                                                    After Hours
                                                                                                                    Mobile
                                                                                                                    After Hours
                                                                                                                    Work
                                                                                                                    After Hours
                                                                                                                    Mobile
                                                                                                                    After Hours
                                                                                                                    Work
                                                                                                                    After Hours
                                                                                                                    Mobile
                                                                                                                    After Hours




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WORKSHEET: VITAL RECORDS

Consider the records the agency would need to have on hand in order to provide essential services. Describe in some detail and be very specific
about the location. For example, note the exact location in the office. You might want to keep these records together in one place. Many records
may already be backed up; note these locations. If agency computers are password protected, does anyone else know how to access files?

   Essential function             Associated Vital               Description            Record Form          Location (Be Specific)   Backup Location
                                      Record

Ensure the health and          Emergency Management       Plans that outline agency         Paper
safety of agency staff         Plan, COOP Plan, and       procedures during an
                                                                                            Electronic
                               Personnel Records re       emergency
                               salary                                                       Other


Communicate with               Contact Information in     Phone numbers,                    Paper
clients, public and state      Reference Materials        addresses of media                Electronic
officials                                                 outlets, DPH, etc.                Other


Ensure safe water, food                                                                     Paper
and shelter for all citizens
                                                                                            Electronic
                                                                                            Other


Conduct communicable                                                                        Paper
disease surveillance and                                                                    Electronic
control                                                                                     Other




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Initiate isolation and/or                                                                Paper
quarantine and disease                                                                   Electronic
prevention measures                                                                      Other


Enforce laws and            Local regulations                                            Paper
regulations that ensure                                                                  Electronic
and protect public health                                                                Other


Agency Operations           Past year minutes                                            Paper
                                                                                         Electronic
                                                                                         Other




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TEMPLATES: CONTINUITY OF OPERATIONS, ISOLATION AND QUARANTINE


EMERGENCY DETENTION ORDER

                                    EMERGENCY DETENTION ORDER


___________________________, you are hereby ordered to detention at

(name of individual or group)

______________________________________ pursuant to <Agency Jurisdiction Legal Code>.

(premises subject to isolation or quarantine)

Your isolation or quarantine commences on ________________ and ____________.

                                                   (date)                      (time)

This order will remain in effect until ________________ and ____________

                                             (date)                       (time)

unless otherwise rescinded, but not to exceed 10 days.



Suspected Communicable Disease or Infectious Agent if Known:
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________

Measures taken by the Local Health Officer to seek voluntary compliance OR basis on which Local Health
Officer determined seeking voluntary compliance would create risk of serious harm:
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________

Medical basis on which decision to Isolate or Quarantine is justified:

_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________



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Special Instructions:

Failure to comply with this Emergency Detention Order is a misdemeanor pursuant to <Agency
Jurisdiction Legal Code>.

It is very important for the protection of your own health and that of others that you abide by this
Emergency Detention Order. If you have any questions about this order or need assistance in
complying, please call _______________________________.

If isolation or quarantine is necessary beyond the ten-day period allowed under this order, the Health
Officer may petition the Superior Court for an order authorizing continued isolation or quarantine for a
period up to 30 days.

_____________________________________

<Agency Jurisdiction Health Officer>

_____________________________________

<Agency Jurisdiction Disease Control Officer>

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                                       IMPORTANT NOTICE:

You have the right to petition the Superior Court for release from isolation or quarantine in accordance
with <Agency Jurisdiction Legal Code>. You have a right to legal counsel. If you are unable to afford
legal counsel, then counsel will be appointed for you at government expense and you should request
the appointment of counsel at this time. If you currently have legal counsel, then you have an
opportunity to contact that counsel for assistance.



Internal Use Only:

Date and time of delivery of written order to person or group of persons:

_____________________                     ______________

         (date)                           (time)

Method of delivery: ________________________________




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VOLUNTARY PUBLIC HEALTH ISOLATION REQUEST (NON-TB)

<Agency Seal Here>
                                                  Patient name: __________________________________
                                                  Hospital Name: _________________________________
                                                  Health Care Provider Name: _______________________
Date:                                             Health Care Provider Telephone Number: ____________
                                                  Code: ___________________
                                                  Health Care Provider—Please provide your patient with
Dear __________________________,                  a copy of this form and fax a copy to Public Health -
                                                  <Agency Name> <Agency Public Health phone #>
I have determined that your isolation or
quarantine is necessary for the preservation and protection of the public’s health. This determination is
based on the medical diagnosis that you are suspected to have __________________, an infection that
is communicable to other people. It is very important that you take precautions to prevent the spread
of your illness to others.

Therefore, your compliance is hereby requested. You are requested to remain in isolation at all
healthcare facilities to which you are admitted for care and upon discharge from the healthcare facility,
or if not admitted to a healthcare facility, to report to, or remain at:
_______________________________ effective ________________

    (premises subject to isolation)                    (date and time)

Please read this information carefully and follow the enclosed recommendations. Public Health
requests that you stay home from work, school, child care, and other public areas until we notify you
that isolation is no longer needed and it is safe to resume your normal activities. This time period
usually lasts for ____________________________________________. Upon your request, we will
provide a letter stating that your isolation period has been completed.

We understand that staying home may cause significant inconvenience to you. However, it is very
important for the protection of your own health and that of others that you abide by this request for
isolation. If you have any questions about this request or need assistance in complying, please call
Public Health at <Agency Public Health phone #>. Failure to comply with this request may result in
the issuance of an emergency detention order, pursuant to <Relevant Agency Codes>.

We are including information on what you can do to help prevent the spread of _____________ to
others, including your household contacts. You can find current information about _____________ on
the <Agency Public Health website address> and _____________________.

Sincerely,

_________________________________

<Agency Jurisdiction Health Officer>

(Suggested) Attachments: 1. Information about Isolation and Quarantine 2.      <Relevant Agency Codes>



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WORKER HEALTH AND SAFETY GUIDELINES: ESSENTIAL STAFF PLANNING SHEET

Please provide the following information. This form is being used for planning purposes to determine
the appropriate amount of medication/prophylaxis for staff and their families, as well employee familial
responsibility during an emergency (i.e., child care, school, etc.).
Definition of Essential Staff: Those individuals having a role in the event of a major emergency/crisis
situation. Every employee in the <Your Agency> is considered essential staff.
Definition of Essential Staff Household Members: Immediate household members are identified as
those who regularly live in the same residence as essential staff.
Essential Staff (ES) Employee Information (Please print information clearly)


Name     ______________________________________________________________________

Home Address _________________________________________________________________

Personal Phone #1 _____________________________ #2 ______________________________


Household Members (HM) Information

Last Name                    First Name                    Birth Date             Planning Considerations

                                                                                  < 8 yrs         Homebound

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

Total Household (ES+ HM)                                                          # <8 yrs         # Homebound




I acknowledge that the information provided above is accurate and adheres to the definition of family members
provided above. I will inform my employer of any changes within my immediate family that affects this planning
document. By signing this document, I agree to respond, as directed by my employer and local authorities, to the
emergency event that activates this plan.

Signature _______________________________________________________Date ______________



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ADDITIONAL RESOURCES: CONTINUITY OF OPERATIONS


PRE-PLANNING AGENCY CHECKLIST: CRITICAL PERSONNEL, SUCCESSION PLANNING, AND
BUSINESS CONTINUITY

Determine Critical Functions and Personnel

       Identify personnel who perform first responder functions

       Identify personnel who perform essential functions

       Identify personnel who perform non-essential functions

       Identify functions that may be suspended while personnel are assigned to more critical roles

       Identify secondary personnel who have the skills and abilities to perform other functions

       Identify other personnel, such as retired employees, former employees, temporary workers, and
       contract workers, who may be available to perform essential functions

       Identify potential volunteers who have the skills to perform needed departmental functions

Succession Planning

       Predetermine the payroll function as an essential function and have at least 3 employees cross-
       trained for the payroll function

       Predetermine the human resources management function as an essential function and have at
       least 3 employees cross-trained for the human resources management function

       Establish and identify a 7 to 10 employee management line of succession plan which lists
       predetermined alternates for key leadership positions in each department, division or work unit

       Identify the individuals who will have the delegated authority to make decisions and
       communicate that succession plan to division and work unit personnel

       Provide for alternate lines of succession

       Provide for access to information and needed items to those in the line of succession (i.e.
       computer passwords, office keys, file cabinet keys, etc.)

       Forward document succession plans to the department director




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Review Business Hours, Work Schedules and Mode of Service Delivery

       Review business hours and work schedules to determine if they can be modified in a manner
       that best promotes social distancing, business continuity or other relevant emergency response
       needs

       Identify essential functions that may be accomplished via telecommuting and whether the
       function needs access to all systems and applications or only email and/or voice
       communications

       Identify technical planning methods such as the World-Wide-Web (www), Virtual Private
       Network (VPN), Instant Messenger (IM) and teleconferencing to be implemented prior to an
       emergency

       Pre-complete forms, such as a Position Eligibility Worksheet for the expected need to hire
       additional staff

Develop a Communications Plan

       Communicate with employees about the threat of an emergency, and describe the steps they
       are taking to prepare for it such as:

              Potential changes to personnel policies located in this Guide
              Changes in business culture which may include social distancing, increase in
               telecommuting, or suspension of non-essential functions
              The importance of staying home if employees are ill or have symptoms

       Distribute practical information on maintaining a healthy work environment

       Update employee emergency contact information

       Identify key internal and external stakeholders and the methods that will be used to
       communicate with them

       Communicate to labor unions and employees that certain provisions of their respective
       collective bargaining agreement may be suspended such as:

              Use of employees outside of the bargaining unit to perform the work
              Previously approved vacation, compensatory time, leave of absences may be rescinded
               with minimal notice
              Employees may be required to report for work with minimal notice
              Employees’ work schedules and/or hours of work may change with minimal notice
              Employees may be required to telecommute with minimal notice
              Employees may be assigned overtime with minimal notice
              Employees may be assigned special duty with minimal notice
              Employees may be assigned to other work units with minimal notice




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CHAPTER 9.0: EMERGENCY FACILITY

CHAPTER SUMMARY

In an emergency, facilities that don’t normally perform emergency public health response functions may
be called upon to operate under emergency conditions and become operationally multi-faceted. For
example, they may need to function as temporary homes for employees and their families, day care
facilities, hospitals and triage units, or command centers. It is prudent to preplan for the most likely
possible facility re-uses that may be needed in an emergency. Agency heads should ask themselves a
series of questions: what are the potential uses of my facility? Which rooms are appropriate for which
operations? What comfort measures should be in place? Are there adequate bathrooms? What type of
emergency back-up power is available?

In addition, agency heads should plan for employee support and security. Are agency employees
prepared to work in an emergency? For most individuals, family health and safety concerns will take
precedence over work needs. Adequate preplanning to alleviate fear and support employee family
safety and well-being is crucial to establishing a willing and able workforce in an emergency. Worker
safety and well-being must be addressed: will there be power available to perform jobs adequately? Are
there comfort measures in place to make it easier for workers to perform their duties?

CHAPTER ACRONYMS
CDC:           Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
CPR:           Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation
Dtap:          Diptheria tetanus acellular pertussis
Hep A:         Hepatitis A
Hep B:         Hepatitis B
Hib:           Haemophilus influenza b
ICS:           Incident Command System
IPV:           Inactivated Polio Virus
MCV4:          Meningococcal Vaccine 4
MMR:           Measles Mumps Rubella
OSHA:          Occupational Health and Safety Administration
PCV7:          Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine 7
PDA:           Personal Digital Assistant
PPD:           Purified Protein Derivative
PPV23:         Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine 23
Td:            Tetanus diphtheria
Tdap:          Tetanus dipetheria acellular pertussis
TIV:           Trivalent inactivated Influenza Vaccine
UPS:           Uninterrupted Power Supply




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POLICY AND PROCEDURES: EMERGENCY FACILITY


EVACUATION/SHELTER IN PLACE




                    <YOUR AGENCY>                                   Policy No.

            POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                   Origination Date

           Evacuation/Shelter in Place                              Page No.



1.0   Policy
      When an order comes from the Chief Administrative Officer, Security Officers, the
      Fire/Rescue/Police Incident Commander, or another designated Incident Commander to shelter-
      in-place, the following procedures will be executed.

2.0   Purpose
      Due to chemical, biological, or radiological contaminants released accidentally or intentionally
      into the environment, a Shelter in Place may be ordered. There may also be circumstances such
      as severe weather that a Shelter-in-Place may also be ordered.

3.0   Persons Affected
      All <Your Agency> employees

4.0   Definitions

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning
      1. Develop a list of key personnel necessary in an emergency.
      2. Employees should have a family care succession plan in place.
      3. Essential employees may have to telecommute to perform duties and should be equipped
         to do so.
      4. Determine the safest place for employees to be in the building. Select a room or rooms to
         serve as shelter rooms during chemical emergencies. The rooms should be large enough to
         provide at least 10 square feet per person sheltered. A shelter room should have as few
         windows, vents and doors as possible. A windowless room is best. Break rooms or
         conference rooms with few or no windows can be used for shelters. Hallways are
         sometimes used in institutional settings. In a closet or other storage area in the shelter



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            room, supplies for sheltering should be stored. Before a chemical accident occurs, outfit
            your shelter kit with the following:
      5.    Plastic sheeting - Pre-cut plastic sheeting to fit over any windows or vents in the sheltering
            area.
      6.    Flashlight with fresh batteries.
      7.    Battery operated radio with fresh batteries - In the event of a power outage, a battery
            operated radio is necessary to hear emergency announcements including the “all clear”
            when the emergency is over.
      8.    Duct tape - Rolls of duct tape to be used to secure the plastic over windows/vents and to
            seal doors.
      9.    Develop a plan that determines what rooms in the building will be used for what operations
            (i.e., sleeping quarters, first aid/sick room, communications room).
      10.   Ask employees to develop and maintain a Personal Safety Kit.
      11.   If family will be sheltering in, employees must develop Personal Safety Kits for each family
            member.
      12.   Employees cannot be forced to shelter in place. Therefore, it is important to develop your
            shelter in place plan with employees to maximize the cooperation of employees with the
            shelter plan.
      13.   Determine if all employees will shelter or if some will leave the building before shelter
            procedures are put in place.
      14.   Develop an accountability system. You should know who is in your building and where they
            are if an emergency develops.
      15.   Visitors should be made aware of your office’s decision to shelter in place if advised by
            emergency management officials.
      16.   Duties should be assigned to specific employees. Those employees should have backups.
      17.   Drills should be planned and executed on a regular basis.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines
      1.     Close the agency for business.
      2.     Bring everyone into the room(s). Shut and lock the door(s).
      3.     If there are customers, clients, or visitors in the building, provide for their safety by
             asking them to stay – not leave.
      4.     When authorities provide directions to shelter-in-place, they want everyone to take
             those steps now, where they are, and not drive or walk outdoors.
      5.     Unless there is an imminent threat, ask employees, customers, clients, and visitors to
             call their emergency contact to let them know where they are and that they are safe.
      6.     Turn on call-forwarding or alternative telephone answering systems or services. If the
             business has voice mail or an automated attendant, change the recording to indicate
             that the business is closed, and that staff and visitors are remaining in the building until
             authorities advise it is safe to leave.
      7.     Close and lock all windows, exterior doors, and any other openings to the outside.
      8.     If you are told there is danger of explosion, close the window shades, blinds, or curtains.
      9.     Have employees familiar with your building’s mechanical systems turn off all fans,
             heating and air conditioning systems. Some systems automatically provide for exchange



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               of inside air with outside air – these systems, in particular, need to be turned off, sealed,
               or disabled.
       10.     Gather essential disaster supplies such as Personal Safety Kits, nonperishable food,
               bottled water, battery-powered radios, first aid supplies, flashlights, batteries, duct
               tape, plastic sheeting, and plastic garbage bags.
       11.     Select interior room(s) above the ground floor, with the fewest windows or vents. The
               room(s) should have adequate space for everyone to be able to sit in. Avoid
               overcrowding by selecting several rooms if necessary. Large storage closets, utility
               rooms, pantries, copy and conference rooms without exterior windows will work well.
               Avoid selecting a room with mechanical equipment like ventilation blowers or pipes,
               because this equipment may not be able to be sealed from the outdoors.
       12.     It is ideal to have a hard-wired telephone in the room(s) you select. Call emergency
               contacts and have the phone available if you need to report a life-threatening condition.
               Cellular telephone equipment may be overwhelmed or damaged during an emergency.
       13.     Use duct tape and plastic sheeting (heavier than food wrap) to seal all cracks around the
               door(s) and any vents into the room.
       14.     Write down the names of everyone in the room, and call your business’ designated
               emergency contact to report who is in the room with you, and their affiliation with your
               business (employee, visitor, client, customer.)
       15.     Keep listening to the radio or television until you are told all is safe or you are told to
               evacuate. Local officials may call for evacuation in specific areas at greatest risk in your
               community.
7.0    References/Additional Resources:           http://nicsinfo.org/SIP%20Center.htm
8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #    Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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PERSONAL SAFETY KITS




                    <YOUR AGENCY>                                   Policy No.

            POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                   Origination Date

                Personal Safety Kits
                                                                    Page No.

1.0   Policy
      It is incumbent upon the employee to prepare a Personal Safety Kit to be kept at their place of
      work in case of an emergent event necessitating the act of Sheltering-in-Place or for use during
      an emergency.

2.0   Purpose
      Key Employees may be called to stay at work, or be called into work during an emergency.
      Employees must be prepared to feed, clothe, and tend to their own comfort needs as resources
      may be scarce.

3.0   Persons Affected
      Employees designated as key personnel during an emergency.

4.0   Definitions

5.0   Responsibilities
      Employees should prepare Personal Safety Kits in preparation for an emergency. An appropriate
      storage area should be identified where this kit may be easily accessed in an emergency.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines

      1.      A predetermined storage place will be designated by the agency. This storage place will
              be easily accessible by the employee in an emergency and is conducive to long term
              storage of food items (i.e., not too hot or exposed to the elements).

      2.      Employees will maintain and update their Personal Safety Kit by rotating expired food
              items, medications, or other items subject to expiration (recommended rotation every
              six months).

      3.      Employees are responsible for deciding what items are to be stocked in their Personal
              Safety Kits.


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       4.      If family members are required to Shelter-in-Place with the employee, the employee
               should stock additional items in their Personal Safety Kit to accommodate their needs.

7.0    References/Additional Resources
       http://www.redcross.org/services/prepare/0,1082,0_91_,00.html
       http://emergency.cdc.gov/preparedness/kit/disasters/

8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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EMERGENCY PUBLIC HEALTH DRILLS AND EXERCISES




                    <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

            POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                     Origination Date

  Emergency Public Health Drills and Exercises
                                                                      Page No.

1.0   Policy
      An emergency drill will be performed in your agency biannually. <Your Agency> will coordinate
      testing, training, and exercises for staff following a multi-year strategy.

2.0   Purpose
      Testing, training, and exercises familiarize staff members with their roles and responsibilities
      during an emergency, ensure that systems and equipment are maintained in a constant state of
      readiness, and validate certain aspect of emergency plans. Human behavior in an emergency
      dictates that the more practiced an employee is, the better they are able to perform under
      stress.

3.0   Persons Affected
      All employees

4.0   Definitions

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning
      1. Develop an emergency plan and checklist with your employees.
      2. Discuss emergency procedures with all employees.
      3. Plan an emergency strategy: employees should be assigned specific duties during an
         emergency.
      4. Perform emergency drills (at least two annually).
      5. Invite outside drill monitors to observe your drill and to participate in an after-drill critique.
         Critiques can provide you with valuable insights to improve protection for you and your
         employees during chemical emergencies.
      6. Put together a Shelter Kit (plastic sheeting, scissors, duct tape, flashlight, radio, batteries).

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines
      1.     Emergency training should provide:
                 a. Individual and team training of agency personnel.
                 b. Internal agency testing and exercising of emergency plans and procedures.

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                   c. Testing of alert and notification procedures.
                   d. Refresher orientation for key emergency personnel.
                   e. Join interagency exercising of emergency plans, if appropriate.
       2.      <Your Agency> executive staff has the responsibility to ensure that members of the
               response organization and all agency employees have received training relative to their
               position and function during an emergency. Training will be provided to employees to
               support agency emergency preparedness and continuity of operations and will be
               coordinated with the appropriate section/department head to ensure a minimal
               interruption of normal work duties.
       3.      The training will be conducted at least annually and will include:
               a. An overview of the planning efforts that have been done by the agency and
                   familiarizing staff with the kind of protective measures the agency has developed to
                   respond to any emergency, including identifying how the employees will be
                   directed/ warned in an emergency.
               b. Include Incident Command System (ICS) training, focusing on individual roles.
               c. The policies and mechanisms that will be employed in maintaining the operations of
                   the agency, including utilizing an alternate facility.
               d. Include periodic exercises and drills to evaluate capabilities and the level of agency
                   preparedness.
               e. Information on the characteristics of hazards and their consequences on the agency
                   as a whole.
               f. What is expected of each employee and provide references on emergency
                   preparedness for them and their families.
       4.      Document drills and training performed in a designated emergency binder with written
               agency emergency plans. Date, time, and comments should be noted, along with
               changes to be made to written plan.

7.0    References/Additional Resources
       http://nicsinfo.org/SIP%20Center.htm
8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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TELECOMMUNICATIONS FAILURE DURING AN EMERGENCY




                     <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

             POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                     Origination Date

      Telecommunications Failure During an
                 Emergency                                             Page No.



1.0    Policy
       <Your Agency> will have communication systems in place that support connectivity to internal
       organizations, other agencies, critical customers, and the public. Interoperable Communications
       should provide:
            1. Capability commensurate with an agency’s essential functions
            2. Ability to communicate with essential personnel
            3. Ability to communicate with other agencies, organizations, and customers
            4. Access to data and systems
            5. Communications systems for use in situations with and without warning
            6. Ability to support COOP operational requirements
            7. Ability to operate at the alternate facility within 12 hours, and for up to 30 days
            8. Interoperability with existing field infrastructure
       In addition, systems that facilitate communication in the absence of person-to-person contact
       will be used to minimize workplace risk for essential employees. Planning will carefully consider
       the use of laptops, high-speed telecommunications links, Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs), and
       other systems that enable employees to perform essential functions while telecommuting. This
       includes the identification, availability, redundancy, and testing of critical communications
       systems that support connectivity to internal organizations, external partners, critical
       customers, and other key stakeholders.
2.0    Purpose
       With the onset of disaster, telecommunications may fail, necessitating a back-up plan for agency
       communication.

3.0    Persons Affected
       All employees

4.0    Definitions

5.0    Responsibilities /Preplanning
       Develop a strategy to communicate with outside agencies without standard telephone use.
       Purchase/inventory necessary equipment that may replace telephones during an emergency.


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6.0    Procedures/Process Guidelines
       1. To ensure communications during emergent events, the following modes of communication
           have been put in place as means of communication during telephone failure.
       2. 800 MHz Radios – 800 MHz radios with access to all agency frequencies. In addition the
           radios can access frequencies from various law enforcement agencies and emergency
           responders.
       3. Cell Phones –Cell phones, which are text message compatible. In addition, Personal Digital
           Assistance (PDA) devices with active cell phone service and remote email capabilities.
       4. Establishment of a Hotline-establish an issue-specific hotline. Identify a coordinator who
           arranges for staffing of the hotline. Two 800 Mghz radios should be available to the Hotline
           managers.
       5. Email Groups –Email groups can be established for most partnering agencies, as well as all
           agency employees.
       6. PDAs –Contact information lists and other digital resources are stored on the devices in the
           form of spreadsheets or documents.
       7. Phone Bridge/Conference Calls – Conference calls can be used as needed. Prescheduled
           calls may be coordinated through agency coordinators or arranged for using email groups.
       8. State and local health alert network/partner communications and alerting – Many states
           have developed a statewide health alerting system for just such an occasion.
       9. Web Site Postings – All press releases can be posted on the agency web site.
       10. USB Flash Cards –USB flash cards that act as external storage drives for laptop and desktop
           computers. These cards allow for quick transfer of data and documents between computers.
           Their storage capacity varies.
       11. Ham radio operations- Pre-training/licensing is necessary to utilize this mode of
           communication. During planning, local Ham radio groups may be contacted to be included
           in emergency operations.
       12. Two way radio capabilities-Some cell phones also have this capability.

7.0    References

8.0    Revisions

       Date         Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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POWER FAILURE DURING AN EMERGENCY




                    <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

            POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                     Origination Date

      Power Failure During an Emergency
                                                                      Page No.

1.0   Policy
      During an emergency or disaster, power failure may occur. If power is not available, the
      following procedure will be followed:

2.0   Purpose
      With the onset of disaster, power may fail, necessitating a back-up plan for agency functioning
      without a reliable power source. Power failure will severely disrupt agency functioning.

3.0   Persons Affected
      All employees

4.0   Definitions

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning
      Develop a plan to function within the agency without reliable power. Purchase/inventory
      necessary equipment that may aid agency function during an emergency power failure.

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines
      1.     Upon detection of a power failure/brown out, contact the Maintenance Technician who
             will contact the Health Officer to provide information regarding the situation. The
             Health Officer will make the determination of closure status. If the Maintenance
             Technician is not available, contact an Administrative Staff member.
      2.     A single line telephone will be connected to the fax machine telephone line. Calls would
             be answered one at a time. Office cell phone numbers could be provided to the public.
             Staff that are answering the cell phones and single line telephone must be instructed
             with the hotline message or be able to answer the public’s questions and concerns.
      3.     If the power is not available at either site, but is available in an alternative site, a
             number will be given to the public and a hotline will be established at the site with
             power.
      4.     Prioritize Critical and Non-critical Services (see Templates: Power Outage).
      5.     Determine Alternate Facilities:



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               The determination of the alternate facilities will be made at the time of activation by the
               Health Officer in consultation with Board of Commissioners-Chairperson or designee
               and the agency’s Emergency Management Coordinator and will be based on the
               incident, threat, risk assessments, and execution timeframe. To ensure the adequacy of
               assigned space and other resources, all alternate facilities should be reviewed annually.
               The Health Officer will be advised of the results of this review and any updates to the
               alternate facility information.
               Alternate facilities should provide:
                      Sufficient space and equipment
                      Capability to perform essential functions within 12 hours, up to 30 days.
                      Reliable logistical support, services, and infrastructure systems
                      Consideration for health, safety, and emotional well-being of personnel
                      Interoperable communications
                      Computer equipment and software
       6.      If the power is not available at either site, a hotline and staff could be relocated to
               another location (Schools, 911 Dispatch Center, Hospitals).
       7.      Before leaving the building, staff should make a final check of the building to assure all
               clients have vacated the building. All light switches and any other electrical appliance
               that might be damaged by return of power should be turned off. All doors normally
               locked at closing should be locked.
       8.      It is important to establish priorities before a power outage emergency to ensure that
               the relocated staff can complete the essential functions. All staff shall ensure that
               essential functions can continue or resume as rapidly and efficiently as possible during
               an emergency relocation. Any task not deemed mission essential must be deferred until
               additional personnel and resources become available.
       9.      Identify Essential Staff:
                      Management team members
                      Clinical personnel
                      Clinic direct support staff
                      IT staff
                      Facilities staff
                      Key supervisors of any displaced mission essential function
7.0    References
       http://www.redcross.org/services/disaster/0,1082,0_133_,00.html

8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #    Change                                                      Reference(s) Section



Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>


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WATER SOURCE LOSS DURING AN EMERGENCY




                     <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

             POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                     Origination Date

      Water Source Loss During an Emergency
                                                                       Page No.

1.0    Policy
       <Your Agency> must establish priorities before a water loss emergency to ensure that staff can
       complete the essential functions. All staff shall ensure that essential functions can continue or
       resume as rapidly and efficiently as possible during a water loss emergency. Any task not
       deemed mission essential should be deferred until water resources become available.
       Relocation of agency personnel and services may be necessary. Designate a core group of
       employees to remain on site to keep all services operational if the facility remains open. In the
       event of an emergency where the agency’s water source has been contaminated or disrupted,
       the following procedures will be followed:

2.0    Purpose
       With the onset of disaster, water sources may be contaminated or lost, necessitating a back-up
       plan for agency functioning without a reliable water source. Water source loss may disrupt
       agency functioning.

3.0    Persons Affected
       All employees

4.0    Definitions

5.0    Responsibilities /Preplanning
       Develop a plan to function within the agency without a reliable water source.
       Purchase/inventory necessary equipment that may aid agency function during an emergency
       water source loss. Identify:
       1. The total demand for potable water.
       2. The quantity of replacement water (e.g., bottled water) required (A normal active adult
           should drink at least 1/2 gallon of water per day. Additional water is needed for cleaning.
           Store as much water as you have space for, but a three days’ supply is considered to be a
           minimum amount when the water system is down.
       3. Develop a water storage method (i.e., Well sealed containers can be kept for at least a year.
           Mark containers with the current date and place in a cool, dark place. Replace soft plastic
           bottles within one year of the storage date. CAUTION: Do not use empty bleach bottles and
           other containers which were not used for beverages; these are not food grade bottles and

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           the plastic may slowly decompose into the water. However, large five gallon hard plastic
           drinking bottles can be reused for several years. Plastic milk jugs with screw on tops are also
           inexpensive.
      4.   Mechanisms for emergency water distribution
      5.   Procedures for making non-potable water safe for use and consumption.
      6.   Incorporate community support and involvement (e.g., media alerts, news, and
           transportation).
      7.   Develop in advance strategies for transferring clients to other services as needed.
      8.   Develop strategies for sharing supplies and providing essential services among participating
           facilities.
      9.   Identify sources for emergency provisions (e.g., bottled water).

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines
      1.     Move clients and clean/sterile supplies away from the area of contaminated water.
      2.     Redirect traffic away from contaminated water sources.
      3.     Post advisory notices against consuming tap water, ice, or beverages made with water.
      4.     Depending on the type of contamination (e.g., biological), water may be treated by
             heating to a rolling boil for one minute. If boiling is not possible, chlorination may
             provide an alternative using the following method:
             -Use liquid chlorine bleach with 5.25% hypochlorite.
             -Add to water using an eye dropper in the amount indicated below. Stir. Wait 30
             minutes before drinking.

                           Amount of Water               Amount of Bleach                Amount of Bleach
                                                            (clear water)                 (cloudy water)
                       1 gallon                       8 drops                        16 drops
                       5 gallons                      ½ teaspoon                     1 teaspoon

      5. Water may also be distilled using the following procedure:
             Distillation involves boiling water and then collecting the vapor that condenses back to
             water. The condensed vapor will not include salt and other impurities. To distill, fill a pot
             halfway with water. Tie a cup to the handle on the pot's lid so that the cup will hang
             right-side-up when the lid is upside-down (make sure the cup is not dangling into the
             water) and boil the water for 20 minutes. The water that drips from the lid into the cup
             is distilled.
      6. If water supply is disrupted, emergency water supplies may be found (note: these sources
         should be treated before drinking or other consumption):
              a. Rainwater
              b. Streams, rivers and other moving bodies of water
              c. Ponds and lakes
              d. Natural springs
              e. Swimming pools
              f. water in hot-water tank
              g. Ice cubes



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       7. Avoid water with floating material, an odor or dark color. Use saltwater only if you distill it
          first. You should not drink flood water.
       8. Use waterless hand sanitizers for hand hygiene.
       9. Toilets may be flushed manually by pouring clean, untreated water into the tank, then
          flushing.

7.0    References/Additional Resources
       http://www.redcross.org/services/disaster/0,1082,0_563_,00.html

8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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TEMPLATES: EMERGENCY FACILITY


POWER OUTAGE

Critical Functions Prioritization Sheet (restore immediately or within 12 hours):


         Priority        Critical Function                      Where Function is Performed


         1.                                                     (fill out this column only if you have
                                                                multiple HD sites)


         2.


         3.


Priority Functions Prioritization Sheet (restore within 24 hours):


         Priority        Priority Function                      Where Function is Performed


         1.                                                     (fill out this column only if you have
                                                                multiple HD sites)


         2.


         3.


Identification of Essential Staff
     Management team members
     Clinical Personnel
     Clinic Direct Support Staff
     IT staff
     Facilities Staff
     Key Supervisors of any displaced mission essential function




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ADDITIONAL RESOURCES: EMERGENCY FACILITY


SAFETY EQUIPMENT/GO BAGS

Major consideration: During an emergency /disaster, special safety equipment needs to be utilized to
help ensure the well-being of staff. Go Bags should be developed to ensure portability of services if the
agency building is not safe to remain in, or duty dictates services be rendered in the field.

Significant issue: Employees must be outfitted with safety equipment and know where to find it when
and emergency occurs.

Preplanning: Outfit key disaster staff with safety equipment. Establish an update and maintenance
schedule for safety equipment. Provide a logical storage place for safety equipment to be kept. Educate
staff how to use safety equipment and where it is kept.

       Survey the workplace to identify potential hazards and pay special attention to working
        conditions or processes that can produce the following hazards:

               falling objects
               objects that could puncture the skin
               objects that could roll over workers' feet
               toxic chemicals
               heat
               harmful dust
               radiation

       Reassess potential hazards whenever necessary, especially when new equipment is
        incorporated or following disasters.

       Develop a list of safety equipment needed for safely working in a disaster environment. Include
        enough quantity and variety of sizes to adequately meet the needs of the emergency staff.

        Examples of appropriate safety equipment include:
            Safety glasses (shatterproof)
            Heavy-duty work gloves (leather)
            Hardhats
            N 95 masks
            Ear protection (ear muffs or ear plugs)
            Heavy-duty boots (employee-supplied due to size variance)
            Disposable gowns/gloves (in anticipation of chemical or biological contamination).
       Educate employees how to properly use the equipment and provide fitting sessions to find
        appropriate size for employee.

       Develop an update and maintenance plan to check for degradation/expiration of equipment.
        Maintain up to date variety of sizes to accommodate/mirror current staffing.

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       Create a storage area specifically designated to house safety equipment. Educate employees
        where this area is located.

       Develop and perform drills that address the proper use of safety equipment under a variety of
        potential scenarios (i.e., natural disaster, biological hazard, chemical spill).

Go Bags/Drive Away Kits:

Specialized, pre-supplied bags that are easily moveable may be necessary in certain emergencies or
disasters. Examples of the inventory of these bags are as follows:

Communicable Diseases:

       Cell Phone
       800 MHz 2-Way communication radio w/ charger
       Sample Collection Kit
              Stool (5)
              Urine (1)
              Sputum (3)
       Medication (20 – 30 day supply bottles of :)
              INH
              Vitamin B6
              3 bottles of Rifampin
       N-95 Masks
       Agency’s Communicable Disease Manual

Immunizations:

       Biologics:
             (Dtap), (Tdap), (Td), (Dtap-IPV-Hep B),(Hib), (Hib-Hep B)
             (Hep B) – Adult & Pediatric Formulations
             (Hep A) – Adult & Pediatric Formulations
             (PPD Skin Testing)
             (IPV), (MMR), (Varicella), (PCU7), (PPU23), (MCU4), (TIV)
*Include a variety of each brand of vaccine or a number of each particular vaccine.
     Insulated Coolers
     Three (3) large transport cooler & ice packs
     Three (3) smaller individual cooler & ice packs
     Thermometers
     Syringes and Needles:
             25 gauge 1” needle with 3cc syringe
             25 gauge 1” needle
             27 gauge ½” needle for Tb testing
     Thirteen (13) Vaccine Information Statements
     Emergency Equipment:
             O2


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            Ambu bag
            Epinephrine
            Benadryl
            Ammonia Inhalants
            Three (3) 3cc syringes
            Blood Pressure Cuff (Infant, Pediatric, Adult)
            Stethoscope
      PPE:
            Eyewash
            Goggles
            Apron
            Scrubs
            Dustpan & Broom
            Gloves
      Cotton Balls
      Rubbing Alcohol
      Antiseptic Wipes
      Band-Aids: Three (3) or Four (4) Boxes – 100 count
      Hand Sanitizer: Purel – Four (4) bottles
      Blue Disposable Towels: Three (3) Packages – 80 count
      Drape Sheets: Twenty Five (25)
      Sharps Container: Three (3) 2 gallon
      Garbage Bags: Twenty Large
      Basic Office Supplies:
            Pens, Pencils, Clip Boards, Immunization Consent Forms,
            Vaccine Administration Records
            Tb Skin Test Cards
            Agency Forms
            Stickers for Children

Environmental Health Food Safety:
     State Forms
     Stem Thermometers
     Chlorine
     Dish Machine Heat Sensitive Test Strips
     Iodine Test Strips
     Alcohol Preps
     Note Pads
     Pens
     Flash Lights
     Hair Restraints
     Facilities List for All Foods
     Area Coverage Maps
     Nitrile-Xtra Powder-Free Gloves


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Environmental Health Water Safety:
     Sample Collection Instructions for Public
     Referral/Complaint Forms
     Chlorine Test Kits
     Chlorination/Sanitation Instructions for Public & Staff
     Nitrile-Xtra Powder-Free Gloves
     List of Area Laboratory Services

General Office:
    Pens (red and black), pencils
    Pencil sharpener
    Tape dispenser
    8 1/2x11 yellow pads
    Small note pads
    Post-it notes
    Stapler with extra staples
    Staple puller
    Clipboards
    Paper clips (large and small)
    Binder clips
    Permanent markers (red and black)
    Yellow highlighters
    Scissors
    Rubber bands
    Calculator
    White-out
    Glue sticks
    Calendar
    Large wall Post-it’s




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CHAPTER 10.0:   BEHAVIORAL HEALTH AND CRITICAL INCIDENT STRESS
MANAGEMENT (CISM)

CHAPTER SUMMARY

Behavioral health concerns exist in all aspects of disaster preparedness, response and recovery
activities. In order to address these functions in the most efficient and effective manner some
preliminary planning and implementation must occur. Behavioral Health addresses mental health issues
as well as other severe emotional stress reactions that follow emergencies and disasters. Behavioral
health issues have a tremendous impact on the lives of victims and their families. The <Your Agency>
recognizes the need to include the entire behavioral health community in training and readiness
activities for meeting the psychological and social needs of people following a disaster.

No one who experiences a disaster is untouched by it. However, most survivors of a disaster are normal,
well-functioning people struggling to cope with the disruption and/or loss caused by the disaster. A
traumatic event can have more of an effect on some people and for a longer period than on others,
depending on the scope of the disaster and the personal history of the individual experiencing the
event. Initial efforts to assist victims are to first meet the basic needs and then efforts will likely focus on
determining the fate of missing loved ones, dealing with the recovery of bodies and (depending on the
event) major damage to homes and property. Support at this level is best offering a compassionate
presence for those suffering terrible losses.

Agencies must be committed to managing behavioral health needs of staff, their families and victims in
the community and providing access to and knowledge of benefits and services available in times of
crisis or trauma. To assist in the management of behavioral health needs of the community, many
employees have undergone extensive training in the field of critical incident stress management. The
result is the implementation of the Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) Team. The Team is
dedicated to minimizing the impact of a traumatic event and accelerating the normal recovery process
in people exposed to a very abnormal or unusual critical incident. A critical incident is defined as any
event that has emotional power to overwhelm an individual’s usual coping mechanism immediately or
in the future.

The purpose of these guidelines is to address the behavioral health impact following disasters,
determine target populations for interventions, along with preparedness, response and recovery
activities designed to meet behavioral health needs confronting first responders and other disaster
survivors. Utilizing mutual aid agreements with community partners, behavioral health agencies and
crisis intervention teams will allow us to leverage our resources in order to achieve the most
comprehensive response. In doing so, we can close the capability gap to prevent, protect against,
respond to, and recover from behavioral health issues resulting from an emergency or disaster.

These guidelines include, but are not limited to, the following strategies:

        • Identify behavioral health resources available during an emergency or disaster

        • Establish a community Behavioral Health Resource Network (BHRN) utilizing regions


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        • Identify and define special populations in each region and their unique response needs in a
        disaster

        • Provide training and educational materials to prepare first responders, vulnerable populations
        and the community for potential stress symptoms and management of those symptoms during
        and after a disaster

Legal Authorities

The legal authorities cited in the Public Health Code and Emergency Management Act identifies the
powers and duties ascribed to local public health and emergency management including overall
command and control responsibilities.



CHAPTER ACRONYMS


BHRN            Behavioral Health Resource Network

CERC            Crisis Emergency and Risk Communications

CISD            Critical Incident Stress Debriefing

CISM            Critical Incident Stress Management

CMB             Crisis Management Briefing

CMH             Community Mental Health

EAP             Employee Assistance Plan

EMS             Emergency Medical Services

EOC             Emergency Operations Center

FEMA            Federal Emergency Management Agency

ICISF           International Critical Incident Stress Foundation

NIMS            National Incident Management System

OCC             On-Call Coordinator

PIO             Public Information Officer




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POLICY AND PROCEDURES: BEHAVIORAL HEALTH


BEHAVIORAL HEALTH COMMAND AND MANAGEMENT

                  <YOUR AGENCY>                                      Policy No.

               POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                 Origination Date

Behavioral Health Command and Management                             Page No.

1.0   Policy

      <Your Agency> representatives, along with <Your Agency> Human Service Agency
      representatives, and the Director of the <Your Agency> will coordinate the assessment and
      collection of data and monitoring the behavioral health needs of the community(s) while
      positioned in the Emergency Operations Center (EOC). Working with <Your Agency>, the
      behavioral health resources and services available during an emergency or disaster will be
      coordinated and deployed. Post-event triage for behavioral health needs in the community is
      the responsibility of <Your Agency>.
2.0   Purpose
      The capacity to respond to the psychological effects of a disaster must be organized and
      implemented at the local level, utilizing mutual aid agreements if necessary.
3.0   Persons Affected
      All <Your Agency> Employees
4.0   Definitions
5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning
      Relationships and networking are very important. People will often rely on who they know,
      rather than a protocol that is in any plan. It is important to establish relationships based on the
      plan before any disaster occurs, so the appropriate people are in position to assist with response
      and recovery efforts.
6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines

      1. Key assumptions in these guidelines include, but are not limited, to:
            a. The <Your Agency> will be the lead agency in activation and coordination for
                vulnerable populations
            b. The <Agency Team> will be the lead team for service delivery of critical incident
                stress interventions to first responders and others addressed in these guidelines
            c. The capacity to respond to the psychological effects of a disaster must be organized
                and implemented at the local level, utilizing mutual aid agreements if necessary
            d. Disaster behavioral health response is part of a larger, multi-layer, multidisciplinary
                disaster response. Disaster behavioral health responders work in concert with first
                responders, emergency management, and other volunteers



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               e. Any behavioral health disaster response activities will utilize the National Incident
                   Management System (NIMS) Incident Command system
               f. Disaster behavioral health services will be systemic and long-term, with the goal of
                   restoring or rebuilding the social fabric of a community
               g. Disaster behavioral services are appropriately delivered and customized according
                   to the type, scope, and phase of the disaster
               h. Provision of behavioral health education and training is provided <Your Agency>
                   team
       2. Communication Resources
          The <Your Agency> Crisis Emergency Risk Communications (CERC) Guidelines will serve to
          facilitate access to the services and resources available for behavioral health needs in the
          community. Media may publish and the community may request the contact information of
          the <Your Agency> team coordinator or the clinical director to request CISM services or for
          more information.
       3. Staff Communication
          The <Your Agency> will design and implement a Family Emergency Hotline service to
          maintain communication between staff and their families, assuming standard
          communication systems are functional. Regularly planned and scheduled communication
          with family members back home is important not only for the family, but for the responders
          and staff themselves. This hotline will provide the staff‘s family members with a secure
          telephone number to leave emergency messages during the response and recovery efforts
          of the disaster. Emergency messages retrieved from the hotline make their way to the
          proper staff during designated break times. At that time, staff may respond using personal
          cell phones or draft a message that the hotline coordinator will send back to the family on
          his or her behalf. Keeping the staff connected to their families and loved ones on a regular
          basis – as much as possible given the disaster – is paramount to maintaining a focused and
          capable set of workers. To address any potential traumatic stress and anxiety that may and
          often does occur as the staff respond, the <Agency Team> will ensure the staff have
          available to them interventions and/or services of the <Agency Team>, as well as resources
          offered by other community agencies – in a timely manner.
7.0    References
8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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TARGET POPULATIONS IN BEHAVIORAL HEALTH




                     <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

              POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                    Origination Date

      Target Populations in Behavioral Health
                                                                       Page No.


1.0    Policy
       <Your Agency> director and the <Your Agency> Health Officer will ensure, at a minimum, the
       following for all staff during the phases of disaster response:

             Assessing workers’ functioning regularly

             Rotating workers between low, mid and high-stress tasks

             Encouraging breaks and time away from scene or assignment

             Education about signs and symptoms of worker traumatic stress and provide written
              information on stress management and effective coping strategies

             Provide individual interventions and group defusing and debriefings

             Develop an exit plan for workers leaving the operation, including debriefing, reentry
              information, opportunity to critique, and formal recognition for service

2.0    Purpose
       During a disaster, stress and other behavioral health issues could adversely affect the job
       performance of first responders as well as disaster victims, hindering the overall collective
       efforts to mitigate the impact of the disaster on the entire community. Engaging in rescue and
       recovery efforts in the wake of a disaster or traumatic event is challenging. The long hours,
       breadth of victims’ needs and demands, ambiguous roles, and exposure to human suffering can
       adversely affect even the most experienced professional.

3.0    Persons Affected
       First Responders

4.0    Definitions




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      In these guidelines, we use the term first responder to identify police, fire, EMS, and public
      health workers, along with Medical Reserve Team, Emergency Response Team and any other
      deployed volunteers.

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning

      Because the first responder is usually first on scene of any local emergency or disaster, they are
      often the first contact disaster victim’s encounter. This makes it crucial that first responders not
      only understand how to take care of themselves, but how to assist with immediate behavioral
      health strategies until the professionals arrive. In order to provide first responders with the
      necessary tools to adequately assess and refer disaster victims exhibiting stress symptoms or
      other behavioral health issues, the <Agency Team> Division will provide first responder agencies
      with critical incident stress education and/or training. The information will include
      presentations, CISM courses and educational handouts covering self-care techniques, peer care
      techniques and referral sources for seeking a higher level of behavioral health care.


6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines

      1. All <Your Agency> staff, in the event of an emergency or disaster, must first implement their
         personal/family emergency plans. To protect first responder staff and their families,
         prophylaxis treatment at the beginning of any response effort where medication will
         mitigate the effects of a particular agent or chemical found in connection to the disaster, is
         standard. Once ensuring the safety of their families, all staff must report to a designated
         staging area or work site, at which time they will receive instruction and assignments, as
         well as any personal protective equipment necessary. Depending on the scope of the
         emergency or disaster, public health staff may be required to work numerous shifts and be
         subject to a variety of stimuli. Staff will receive education and training similar to that of the
         first responders. This will include, but is not limited to, brochures on how to develop a
         family emergency plan, handouts demonstrating self-care techniques to use during a
         disaster, and information of ways to assist family members in crisis.

      2. Faith-based Organizations
         In the event of massive destruction and loss of life, the emotional recovery will proceed at a
         very different pace than reconstruction efforts. While victims may struggle to cope with the
         day-to-day reality of the destruction around them, it could be additionally stressful as they
         attempt to cope with the loss of loved ones. Many victims begin to question their religious
         beliefs and/or turn to their place of worship to find guidance, answers and/or comfort from
         their religious leaders. Handling the overwhelming needs of their parishioners becomes
         difficult, at best. Establishing relationships with behavioral health service providers becomes
         essential.

      3. Vulnerable Populations
         Vulnerable populations are people who may need to be prepared in a specific manner and
         may react differently than other populations during an emergency or disaster. Individuals


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    needing special assistance in the event of a disaster should register with their local police
    and fire departments to ensure their inclusion in case of an evacuation before or during an
    emergency. Behavioral health workers must thoroughly assess and understand the impact a
    disaster may have on vulnerable populations. For these guidelines, vulnerable populations
    refer to the following groups:

        a.   Children
        b.   Individuals with Mental Illness/Dementia
        c.   Elderly
        d.   Hearing Impaired
        e.   Mobility Impaired/Home Bound
        f.   Visually Impaired
        g.   Individuals with Medical Conditions/Oxygen Dependent
        h.   People with Developmental Disabilities
        i.   Non-English Speaking Persons

    The primary resource for behavioral health services for vulnerable populations is <Your
    Agency>. The <Agency Team> leadership, in conjunction with the <Your Agency>
    Emergency Preparedness unit will collaborate with <Your Agency> to form the Behavioral
    Health Resource Network (BHRN).

4. Children
   Children respond to disasters in different ways. It is important for caregivers to be able to
   identify the normal reactions associated with trauma, based on a child’s developmental
   and/or age level in order to assist this population. Research indicates that a family with a
   well-prepared and practiced family emergency and disaster plan is likely to have less severe
   emotional reactions coming from their children. Specific training is needed for behavioral
   health workers related to trauma and children.

    Children respond better to calm and prepared parents, caregivers and first responders, and
    are less likely to react as severely. In addition, it will be important for parents to receive
    information and/or training to assist in mitigating the reactions children may have after the
    event is over. Training for behavioral health issues will be provided to <Agency Team>
    members during a quarterly training session. The training will outline the specific stress
    reactions of children. This will allow a large number of CISM workers to respond with
    behavioral health workers to intervene with children as the need arises.

    Often times, a child’s reactions are based upon whether or not they feel safe. Food, water,
    shelter, and reuniting with parents or caregivers will be imperative in decreasing the
    likelihood of posttraumatic stress. Although utilizing other types of responses (debriefings,
    one-on-ones etc...) are important, often times this will be based on whether or not the
    children have been directly exposed to the event. The need for behavior health
    interventions can be determined during a needs assessment for food, water, health care,
    etc. Referrals to both the <Agency Team>, as well as community agencies, are available.



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5. Individuals with Mental Illness/Dementia
   Research indicates that people with mental illness and dementia function best under
   conditions of low to moderate stimulation, firm structure, and high predictability. In a
   disaster, it is likely that none of the above is possible due to the conditions the disaster has
   left behind. Therefore, this population is particularly vulnerable. It is important when pre-
   planning to coordinate activities to ensure that people with serious mental disorders have
   continuing access to the treatment, medications and support they need to prevent further
   crises from occurring.

    It is most important to assist those with mental illness/dementia in obtaining their basic
    needs including food, water, medication, clothing, shelter, and reunification with family
    members. Continuing with a stable medication regimen is often crucial for persons with
    mental illness/dementia to remain symptom free. A strong alliance with Community Mental
    Health (CMH), Alzheimer’s Association Safe Return Program, and other local agencies will be
    vital, as medications may be lost during a disaster. It will be extremely important to provide
    as much structure as possible for those with mental illness/dementia. This will likely
    decrease the potential for posttraumatic stress and decrease anxiety felt by those with
    mental illness/dementia when a normal routine is broken.

    It will be important for the behavioral health worker to ensure basic needs prior to any
    other form of intervention. Once addressed, the next step is reuniting an individual with
    caregivers, as it will be important for someone suffering from mental illness/dementia to be
    with those he/she is familiar. One-on-one intervention, preferably with the primary
    psychiatric care provider, is the most appropriate way to care for those diagnosed with
    mental illness/dementia. If individuals are exhibiting symptoms at the time of the disaster,
    they are generally not going to respond to intervention other than acute psychiatric care.
    That is why it is important to address the symptoms of mental illness/dementia first and
    posttraumatic stress second.

6. Elderly
   Elderly individuals may be particularly vulnerable during disasters as they are more likely to
   have physical difficulties, often live alone, and have few resources. Reuniting survivors with
   family and friends should be a primary focus. Research indicates that it is common for
   elderly individuals to become more dependent on family members and quite skeptical of
   assistance from authorities. Therefore, any intervention attempts must be by highly trained
   and qualified individuals. It will be important for the elderly to have all basic needs cared
   for, especially any needed medications. Many elderly individuals are taking numerous
   medications that could severely affect their health if not taken regularly. During a needs
   assessment, it will be especially important for the worker to question medication regimens
   and refer to local health dept. or hospitals if medications are unavailable. Education,
   information, and one-on-one intervention will be the most helpful with elderly individuals
   who are victim of disaster.

7. Hearing Impaired



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    Individuals who are hearing impaired are particularly at risk due to being unable to receive
    warnings in the traditional sense (sirens, the media etc…). It will be especially important for
    individuals with hearing impairments to have a disaster specific plan that includes special
    arrangements to receive warnings. Individuals who have neighbors or family members with
    hearing impairments should include a designated individual to inform the hearing impaired
    of current events. In addition, those with hearing impairments should attempt to receive
    close caption television in order to stay informed. During the crisis, individuals who are
    fluent in sign language should assist disaster workers in completing a needs assessment. In
    addition, this will work to decrease stress as individuals with hearing impairments will feel
    less isolated when having someone with whom they can communicate. One-on-one
    intervention must utilize the assistance of a sign language interpreter. It will be especially
    important to link resources with local hearing-impaired agencies in order to identify
    interpreters as well as a referral base for the hearing impaired. As with all persons exposed
    to a disaster, it will be most important to fulfill the basic needs of the hearing impaired in
    order to provide relief. This along with allowing the hearing impaired to receive accurate
    and timely information will decrease the chances for posttraumatic stress. Federal
    Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) provides an information number for the hearing
    impaired. TTY 1-800-462-7585

8. Mobility Impaired
   Immobile individuals have very specific needs. Foremost, those who are mobility impaired
   need transportation to a safe environment. In addition, individuals will need access to
   handicap accessible facilities. Often times, additional medical illness may accompany the
   mobility impairment. It will be important for disaster workers to inquire about these needs
   and refer to medical staff as needed. As with all individuals, stress will likely decrease with
   basic needs fulfilled and reunification with family occurring. One-on-one intervention is the
   best course of action along with referrals to community resources.

9. Visually Impaired
   Individuals with visual impairments are particularly vulnerable as they are unable to see
   what is going on around them. The sounds and smells can prove to be just as stressful as
   witnessing an event. In addition, relying on a guide dog for assistance may prove to be futile,
   as often times guide dogs become confused or disoriented in a disaster or become lost.
   Regardless, guide dogs should remain with the visually impaired even if they are unable to
   lead, as they often provide comfort and emotional support to their owner. Information
   regarding evacuation should come from someone familiar to the visually impaired person as
   opposed to a stranger. The visually impaired should be placed in a setting that allows their
   guide dog to accompany them. It is important that the visually impaired be with family
   members, if possible. One-on-one intervention is an important tool for decreasing stress
   with visually impaired individuals. Referral sources and educational handouts available in
   Braille would allow the visually impaired access to important information.

10. Individuals with medical conditions
    Individuals with medical conditions need a detailed emergency plan prior to a disaster. The
    emergency plan should include specific information regarding their illness including a


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    complete list of medications and required treatments. In addition, a resource list including
    medical facilities, dialysis centers, etc. made available if an individuals’ normal site is not
    available. Not knowing where to go for treatment could cause unnecessary stress. Again,
    meeting basic needs, including specific medical needs, will be the first line of defense in
    mitigating symptoms of posttraumatic stress. One-on-one intervention will be most
    appropriate. Referral services and educational handouts will be helpful as well.

11. Individuals with developmental disabilities
    Individuals with developmental disabilities may need assistance with understanding and
    coping with disasters, depending on the disability. In addition, many developmentally
    delayed individuals have medical conditions. Linking with appropriate medical services is
    essential. Behavioral health workers should address an individual based on his/her
    developmental level and realize that individuals may regress in many of the same ways
    children do when reacting to stressful situations. It will be important to attempt at
    establishing a routine for individuals with developmental disabilities as well as reuniting
    them with family members as soon as possible. Families can be particularly helpful to their
    loved ones by preparing a detailed care plan as part of their emergency plans for a disaster.
    A list including the person’s name, type of developmental disability, family members to
    contact, and any type of medications would be an asset in decreasing stress. Interventions
    will be determined on case-by-case basis dependent of the individuals’ level of cognitive
    functioning.

12. Substance Use/Abuse and Disasters
    Current research indicates that although alcohol and other substance use increases after a
    disaster, it increases only for those who had pre-existing substance abuse issues. In general,
    disasters do not appear to trigger new cases of substance use in victims and first
    responders. The following groups may require outreach and additional service provision
    from substance abuse professionals and support systems following a disaster:
        a. Current clients of substance abuse treatment, detoxification, or methadone
            maintenance facilities
        b. Past clients who were affected by the disaster, who may be at risk for relapse
        c. Current substance abusers who are not in treatment
        d. Users who normally do not have a problem with their substance use (social drinkers,
            for example), but who increase their substance use after a disaster
        e. First responders who use substances, and are at increased risk for escalation of their
            substance use due to repeated exposure to stress

13. Stigma related to behavioral health support
    Individuals often avoid seeking assistance after an event due to the stigma of behavioral
    health assistance. It is particularly difficult to assist men whom have been exposed to a
    crisis, as “being a man” and “being a victim” are so frequently seen as incompatible. Men
    often face a dilemma; admitting a need for help is viewed a weakness while “being strong
    and dealing with it” is a sign of strength. Therefore, men often remain silent, avoid help, and
    develop long lasting symptoms of posttraumatic stress. This is seen in soldiers returning



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           from combat. The armed forces have attempted to address this issue by making debriefings
           mandatory at the end of a soldier’s tour of duty.

           The best line of defense against the stigma of receiving behavioral health services in a mass
           disaster is assessment and education. Routine needs assessments should include linking
           individuals with referral sources for behavioral health assistance. Fact sheets outlining the
           common reactions individuals experience when responding to an abnormal event are also
           useful. Normalizing the reactions may reduce the stigma and allow individuals to feel
           comfortable seeking assistance. This is another example of the importance of
           communicating with these populations.

7.0    References

8.0    Revisions

       Date         Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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BEHAVIORAL HEALTH RESPONSE ACTIVITIES




                    <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

            POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                     Origination Date

      Behavioral Health Response Activities
                                                                      Page No.


1.0   Policy
      <Your Agency> will develop behavioral health preparedness strategies, as well as response
      strategies to help mitigate the impact of public health disaster effects on employee behavioral
      health using the outlined preplanning concepts as well as the policies and procedures outlined
      below.

2.0   Purpose
      While all individuals have different levels of resilience to abnormal events, there are common
      reactions many people have when faced with a life changing situation. Preparedness involves
      marketing and outreach to first responders, staff and the community to deliver behavioral
      health education and training. Preparedness strategies include identifying vulnerable areas and
      future needs related to behavioral health. This is when identifying systems and resources that
      would be necessary in the area of behavioral health and incorporating educational materials
      into packets to address in trainings is useful. It is the time to gather primary agencies together
      and discuss a community plan for behavioral health assessment and needs.

3.0   Persons Affected

4.0   Definitions

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning
      <Agency Team> in collaboration with <Your Agency> and their core provider agencies, should
      establish a Behavioral Health Resource Network (BHRN). The network divides <Agency region>
      into regions, each with a coordinating agency. The responsibility of each coordinating agency is
      to identify special populations in their region; assess the behavioral health needs prevalent in
      those populations; identify all behavioral health resources available during an emergency; and
      how to obtain those resources, and then compile them into one easily accessible information
      network.




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      1. Regional Coordinator Responsibilities

              a. Review and document all current resources and assets - both on-hand (i.e.,
                 personnel and equipment) and those available during an emergency

              b. Maintain 24/7 contact information for obtaining those resources

              c. Know the communities you serve and document the special considerations for each
                 population (i.e., language barriers, predominant cultures, etc.) to better predict the
                 type of services to offer and the qualifications emergency personnel should possess

              d. Recruit back-up coordinator and train

              e. Keep BHRN Regional Coordinator apprised of any revision to resource lists

              f.   Review and revise, if necessary, subcontractors’ emergency plans and resource lists

      2. BHRN Coordinator Responsibilities

              a. Maintain and update BHRN database when changes are submitted from Regional
                 Coordinators

              b. Hold quarterly meeting with Regional Coordinators to keep appraised of new or
                 emerging issues related to emergency preparedness planning and resources

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines

      Immediate Response Activities – Response

      1. Assess the situation
      2. Begin assembling information about the disaster
      3. Get damage assessment information from Emergency Operations Center (EOC) as soon as it
          is available
      4. Note any high risk groups or special populations affected by the disaster and begin to
          estimate the size and extent of the behavioral health response needed
      5. Employ assessment and tracking protocols
      6. Distribute various tools available to record contacts, track materials, forms to assess
          behavioral, emotional, physical and cognitive reactions to the incident
      7. Utilize the BHRN to coordinate resources relevant to the behavioral health disaster
          response. Access closest and most appropriate resources
      8. Mobilize those with special skills as needed (i.e., language, older adults, hearing impaired,
          etc.)
      9. Build on local plans for deployment of resources
      10. Coordination will include liaison work with organizations such as:
               a. American Red Cross
               b. <Your Agency> Emergency Response & Preparedness
               c. Private behavioral health and substance abuse providers
               d. First responder groups


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           e. Utility companies deployed in clean-up efforts
           f. Federal resources
11.   Coordinate messages with the designated Public Information Officer (PIO)
12.   Use the skills of the behavioral health professionals identified as having expertise in the area
      of risk communication and/or threat assessment
13.   Work to ensure behavioral health professionals are available at hot line sites
14.   Have community messages geared toward Behavioral Health issues
15.   Be cognizant of the importance of cultural competence in the delivery of services

16. Among the breadth of intervention strategies available in the wake of a disaster, Critical
    Incident Stress Management (CISM) serves as an important resource for addressing the
    potential psychological effects of disasters. The <Agency Team> consists of licensed mental
    health professionals and trained peers, established to provide a form of crisis intervention
    specifically designed to help first responders, emergency workers and public health
    professionals cope with the psychological stress inherent in their professions.

17. Intervention Types
        a. Psycho-educational presentations
        b. Initial needs assessments
        c. Initial defusing
        d. Initial debriefings
        e. One-on-one interventions
        f. Crisis management briefings (CMB's)
        g. Follow-up defusing
        h. Follow-up debriefings
        i. Referrals

18. Intervention Sites
        The <Agency Team> should be prepared to deploy team members and other behavioral
        health partners to the following sites:
        a. Sites where survivors and families of victims gather; such as shelters, meal sites,
            disaster application centers, American Red Cross service centers, hospitals, schools,
            police stations, survivors’ homes, morgues, farms or ranches, etc…
        b. Mass care centers
        c. Mass clinics for immunizations and/or prophylactic medications
        d. Sites where first responders and other response workers gather
        e. Sites conducive to community education and outreach; such as community centers,
            shopping malls, schools, religious centers, business associations
        f. Organizations who request behavioral health response services including
            businesses, affected neighborhoods, farms or ranches

19. Recovery Strategies
       During an emergency, first responders and survivors may attempt to act as heroes;
       altruistic emotions are strong as they use their energy to save their own and others lives
       and property. During a disaster, getting the appropriate resources to first responders


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        and survivors for behavioral health needs is essential. Recovery is a process that occurs
        over time for individuals and communities. Psychological and social needs in recovery
        are dependent upon a number of factors, including the pre-existent state of individuals
        and communities, the nature, scope and severity of the disaster, and the type of
        assistance made available through formal response mechanisms.
        a. Coordinate activities/liaison with other responding agencies
        b. Behavioral health workers should seek membership on long-term needs groups that
            form in affected communities
        c. Gather and disseminate information that can help direct providers in their work
            with affected individuals and communities. Information that can illustrate the
            impact on individuals and communities may include emergency management needs
            assessment data, FEMA statistics, Hotline trends, and ongoing data collection from
            providers
        d. Assist local behavioral health providers in identifying additional resources needed to
            meet their current clients’ needs
        e. Provide information to providers about phases of recovery, normal reactions to
            stress and disaster, and planning for commemorative events
        f. FEMA and emergency management will not release information on people who
            have registered for disaster assistance. Have an alternate plan to get releases of
            information from people. It is also important to find out how to contact people
            displaced from their homes by the disaster

        Recovery involves returning an organization or an individual to normal status with
        minimal residual effects. Several months after a disaster, there is a strong sense of
        having shared a catastrophic experience and lived through it. Loved ones have been
        buried and the grieving process begun. There are also expectations of great assistance
        from official and governmental agencies. Pre-existing community groups and emergent
        community groups, born from specific needs caused by the disaster, collaborate.

        Survivors clear out debris and wreckage buoyed by promises of help in rebuilding their
        lives. As time goes by a strong sense of disappointment, anger, resentment and
        bitterness appear if there are delays, failures or unfulfilled hopes in promises of aide.
        People concentrate on rebuilding their own lives and solving individual problems. The
        feeling of shared community may be lost. Many outside agencies may now pull out.

        Indigenous community agencies may weaken. Alternative resources need to be
        explored. If recovery efforts are delayed, emotional problems that may be serious and
        intense resurface. Long-term behavioral health therapy may be needed especially if
        issues and feelings were not dealt with during the pre-planning phase or during the
        disaster itself.

20. Ongoing Plan Management and Maintenance
       Recovery activities occur over time and are dependent upon the remaining
       psychological and social needs of the individual or community once initial service
       delivery complete. Such strategies will serve as a means to facilitate access to more


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               traditional psychological and psychiatric services as needed. Interventions and/or
               services provided to <Your Agency> employees and the communities include critical
               incident stress debriefings (CISD), crisis management briefings (CMB), one-on-one
               intervention and preparedness activities such as stress management education and
               CISM trainings. Response activities include assessing the situation and coordinating
               emergency resources utilizing the BHRN.

           Mass disasters, acts of terrorism or other critical incidents may engender large-scale
           psychological consequences. “Psychological casualties” will virtually always outnumber the
           “physical casualties”. Enhancing community support and psychosocial components of all
           emergency response plans is crucial in facilitating access to more traditional psychological
           and psychiatric services, as needed. <Your Agency> understands the behavioral health
           efforts are on-going and long-term and will take the necessary steps to ensure our
           community leaves any disaster with minimal lingering stress effects.

7.0    References

8.0    Revisions

       Date         Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM POLICY

                   <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

              POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                  Origination Date

       Employee Assistance Program Policy
                                                                     Page No.
1.0    Policy
       Referral appointments to the Employee Assistance Program (EAP) during an emergency will be
       allowed during regular working hours during the course of the emergency if it does not interfere
       with the operations or functions of the workplace.
2.0    Purpose
       Should an emergency occur, referral to the <Your Agency> Employee Assistance Program (EAP)
       may be recommended to address personal problems that interfere with work performance. In
       particular, a crisis may cause stresses that compromise the effective functioning of a work unit.
       Further, there may be a need for “Critical Stress Debriefing Sessions” to assist a work unit with
       particular problems or traumatic events.
3.0    Persons Affected
       All <Your Agency> Employees
4.0    Definitions
5.0    Responsibilities/Preplanning
       Briefings need to occur so that managers and supervisors are prepared to address the employee
       stresses that may arise during a crisis and to know when a referral to EAP should occur.
6.0    Procedures/Process Guidelines
       The EAP is a service provided through the Human Resources Division for all <Your Agency>
       employees, regardless of benefits eligibility or career service or temporary employment status.
       The program’s primary purpose is to assist employees and managers with personal problems
       that are interfering with work performance. Services are available to benefits-eligible
       employees, their dependents and household members. EAP may be accessed 24 hours per day,
       7 days per week at <Insert Agency EAP telephone number>.
7.0    References
8.0    Revisions

       Date        Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>


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POLICY AND PROCEDURES: CRITICAL INCIDENT STRESS MANAGEMENT (CISM)


CRITICAL INCIDENT STRESS MANAGEMENT (CISM) TEAMS




                       <YOUR AGENCY>                                     Policy No.

                  POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                  Origination Date

      Critical Incident Stress Management Teams
                                                                         Page No.


1.0      Policy

         <Your Agency> will develop and support a Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) Team
         following the established procedures below.

2.0      Purpose
         <Your Agency> Critical Incident Stress Management Team is dedicated to minimizing the impact
         of a traumatic event and accelerating the normal recovery process in people who have been
         exposed to a very abnormal or unusual critical incident.

3.0      Persons Affected

4.0      Definitions

         A critical incident is defined as any event that has emotional power to overwhelm an individual’s
         usual coping mechanism immediately or in the future. Some examples of a critical incident are:
              Serious injury or death of family member, co-worker or friend
              Mass Casualty Incidents
              Serious automobile accidents
              Death of a child or violence to a child
              Incidents that attract major media coverage
              Any incident in which the circumstances are so unusual or the sights/sounds are so
                  distressing, it produces a high level of immediate and/or delayed emotional reaction

5.0      Responsibilities/Preplanning

6.0      Procedures/Process Guidelines



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1. Objectives
   The objectives of the <Agency Team> are as follows:
       a. Provide on-going pre-incident awareness and education for the community
       b. Provide initial contacts, arrange and assist in debriefings, defusings, crisis
           management briefings and follow-up services following a critical incident
       c. Assist in providing basic needs to first responders and other emergency service
           personnel on scene of an incident
       d. Arrange for appropriate CISM referrals as needed

2. Confidentiality Statement
      a. It shall be mandatory that <Agency Team> members maintain strict confidentiality
          in matters discussed in debriefings, defusings, or crisis management briefings. Any
          statement of discussion with team members while acting in his/her support role
          shall remain confidential. The exceptions to the confidentiality rule are as follows:
                i. If there is reason to believe a person presents danger to himself/herself or
                   others (i.e., threats or actions toward suicide, homicide, etc.)
               ii. There is a strong belief that a person has committed a felonious act
              iii. Participants will be advised of the confidential nature of each meeting and
                   the exceptions to the rule at the beginning of each debriefing, defusing, or
                   crisis management briefing. No mechanical recordings or written notes will
                   be made during an intervention. No media personnel allowed to film or
                   report on the contents of an intervention.

3. Membership Application Process
     a. Developing a strong team enables the <Your Agency> and <Agency Team> to
        respond quickly and efficiently following any type of traumatic or critical event.
     b. Members of the CISM team should have special qualities and a commitment to
        assisting others in need.
     c. Each interested party should fill out an <Agency Team> membership application
        and return it to <Team Coordinator>.
     d. The Leadership Committee will review and make recommendations to <Team
        Coordinator>.
     e. A member’s interests, values and interpersonal skill level are taken into account, as
        well.

4. Minimum Training Standards
      a. The <Agency Team> requires, at a minimum, the CISM Group Crisis Intervention and
         CISM Advanced Group Crisis Intervention trainings be completed by any team
         member interested in responding to a request for CISM services. Those members
         without the necessary training are required to complete these two trainings within
         the first 6-9 months of joining the team. <Team Coordinator> will ensue the new
         members receive the appropriate training within the allotted time.
      b. Members without the necessary training to respond to an intervention may assist
         <Team Coordinator> in setting up trainings, pre-incident education sessions and
         internal training team meetings. In addition, the Team Coordinator may assign daily

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           operational duties to non-qualified team members, to keep them active within the
           team prior to the receipt of necessary International Critical Incident Stress
           Foundation (ICISF) approved trainings. There will be no exceptions to this rule and
           all <Agency Team> members will strictly adhere to this policy standard.
        c. <Agency Team> members must attend at least 60% of the quarterly training
           sessions in order to maintain an active membership status.
        d. The <Agency Team> Internal Training Committee will address current issues and
           exercise CISM interventions using role-play at quarterly meetings. CISM team
           members must attend these meeting as part of active membership.

5. Revocation/Suspension of Membership
      a. The Clinical Director or Team Coordinator may revoke or suspend team
          membership.
      b. Poor performance from a team member can result in harm to a person or a group
          struggling through the stresses associated with a critical incident.
      c. Any of the following could be grounds for dismissal from the <Agency Team>:
                i. Any breach of confidentiality
               ii. Failure to follow local policies and procedures
              iii. Organizing or providing CISM services without notifying the Clinical Director
                   or Team Coordinator
              iv. Using one’s membership on the team to enhance one’s private business
                   concerns or social life
               v. Going to a scene or location of a critical incident to function on behalf of the
                   <Agency Team>
      d. Violations of these standards will result in the following:
                i. Verbal counseling by the Clinical Director and Team Coordinator
               ii. Written counseling by the Clinical Director and Team Coordinator and/or
              iii. Formal notification of removal from the <Agency Team>

Also See CISM Team Documents following:
CISM Team Membership Application,
General Team Membership Memorandum of Understanding

6. Types of CISM Services:
      a. Pre-Incident Education
                i. <Agency Team> members, with Leadership Committee and Marketing
                   Committee oversight may give educational presentations to the community.
               ii. The Marketing Committee will notify potential organizations and agencies
                   with higher risk of being involved in critical incidents of our services and the
                   tried and tested model that is utilized in our interventions.
      b. On-Scene or Near-Scene Debriefing
                i. On-site evaluation and counseling by a team member should be considered
                   for some critical incidents when time and circumstances permit.


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        ii. In such situations, team members should observe for acute stress reactions
            and provide support, encouragement and consultation.
       iii. CISM initial debriefings are conducted shortly after the critical incident;
            primarily informational, focused on updates and/or status report of the
            incident and related injuries. This is not a critique of the critical incident.
c. Formal Debriefing
         i. Formal debriefings are conducted away from the scene within 24 – 72 hours
            of the incident.
        ii. These sessions are confidential, non-judgmental discussions of the incident
            through exploration of the participants’ thoughts and feelings.
       iii. In addition, stress related symptoms are identified and reviewed with the
            victims.
       iv. The general format for CISM debriefings is as follows:
            1. Introductory Phase-Introduction of team members, a description of the
                  intervention process, and establishment of ground rules
            2. Fact Phase-Describe facts of the traumatic event from each participant’s
                  cognitive perspective
            3. Thought Phase-Share feelings experienced at the scene
            4. Reaction Phase-Identify the most traumatic aspect of the event for each
                  participant
            5. Symptom Phase-Identify personal symptoms of distress and transition
                  back to cognitive level
            6. Teaching Phase-Discuss stress response syndromes and normal signs,
                  symptoms, and emotional reactions
            7. Re-entry Phase-Wrap up loose ends, answer additional questions,
                  provide reassurances, and establish follow-up plan of action
d. Follow-up Debriefing
         i. Conducted weeks or months after the incident; these may be done
            informally and are primarily concerned with delayed and prolonged stress
            symptoms.
e. Individual (One-on-One) Consultations
         i. Individual consults consist of one-on-one sessions for any concerns related
            to the incident.
        ii. Participating in this type of intervention requires the team member(s) to
            have the One-on-One training.
f. Crisis Management Briefing
         i. The Crisis Management Briefing (CMB) is an intervention strategy that is
            used to target large homogenous groups (as many as 300 people at a time).
        ii. It is designed to last 45 – 75 minutes.
       iii. The CMB may be thought of as a form of “town meeting” for the expressed
            purpose of crisis intervention.


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                        iv. The CMB consists of four phases:
                                 1. Assembly,
                                 2. Information,
                                 3. Reactions, and
                                 4. Coping Strategies and Resources.
                         v. The CMB can be used to triage individuals for more intense and appropriate
                             intervention.
       Also See CISM Team Documents following:
       Introductory Remarks for Defusings and Debriefings
       Critical Incident Stress Management – The Core Components

7.0    References

8.0    Revisions

       Date         Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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CRITICAL INCIDENT STRESS MANGEMENT (CISM) TEAM ACTIVATION




                       <YOUR AGENCY>                                   Policy No.

               POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                   Origination Date



      Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM)                       Page No.
                     Team Activation



1.0      Policy
         When the On-Call Coordinator (OCC) is aware of an incident, and has determined the need for a
         CISM response, he/she shall begin contacting team members to ensure intervention services are
         offered to the participants in a timely manner. An initial contact should be offered within eight
         (8) hours of the incident, but should not be withheld if that period has lapsed. The <Agency
         Team> may be activated for any of the following incidents:
                  1. A mass casualty incident
                  2. An accident resulting in multiple injuries
                  3. Prolonged events < 90 minutes
                  4. Suicide or unexpected death of a family member, co-worker or friend
                  5. Pediatric trauma resulting in death
                  6. Line of duty deaths
                  7. Any event which a person requests CISM intervention services (according to the
         discretion of the On-Call Coordinator)

2.0      Purpose
         During an emergency, procedures must be in place to activate and notify CISM Team Members
         to help mitigate ill behavioral health responses to a traumatic event.

3.0      Persons Affected
         CISM Team Members

4.0      Definitions

5.0      Responsibilities/Preplanning

6.0      Procedures/Process Guidelines


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1. Obtaining Information from Requesting Party
The OCC must obtain, at minimum, the following information when responding to a request
for crisis intervention:
          a. Attendance
                   i. Identify the common themes and categorize homogenous groups.
                       Keeping the victims involved in the incident into common groups, assists
                       the flow of the intervention and assures that all participants share
                       common reactions and thoughts. However, all people involved in the
                       incident are invited to attend an intervention and/or debriefing. Obtain
                       estimate of number of attendees.
          b. Location of the intervention
                   i. Arrange for a location to conduct the intervention. The site should be
                       free of distractions and represent a neutral environment (i.e., schools,
                       church).
          c. Time
                   i. Select the time most convenient for the participants and team
                       members- usually early evening.
2. Coordination of the CISM Team Members
          a. The average team responding to a critical incident-debriefing request should
              consist of at least three members, one of which is a mental health professional.
          b. Team members should meet at the designated location one-half hour prior to
              the start time of the debriefing in order to review the type of incident and
              discuss the team role assignments.
          c. Team members are to wear their official CISM polo shirt and Khaki pants to all
              CISM activities.
          d. Utilizing the <Agency Team> Activation Request Form, the <Agency Team> will
              document the request and which team members have been deployed for the
              intervention. This log sheet will avoid tapping into the same team members
              more often than necessary.
          e. *Please note:
                   i. When an intervention is needed for an <Your Agency> Employee, the
                       request must come from a Supervisor, Manager, or someone in upper
                       level management.
3. After the Intervention
          a. Each <Agency Team> intervention is reported to <Team Coordinator> in order
              to track the number of events the team responds to per year.
          b. Only the fact that an intervention has taken place, with a general description of
              the event is necessary.
          c. Names of individuals participating will not be conveyed, although the names of
              the debriefers involved are necessary to avoid utilizing the same team members
              more often than needed.
          d. Debriefing Team reports are encouraged so that improvements can be made in
              procedures, if necessary.


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                   e. Reimbursements are available for refreshments and the cost of meeting space-
                      if applicable.
                           i. Requests for reimbursement of expenses incurred are forwarded to
                               <Team Coordinator> within 48 hours of the intervention.
                   f. The <Agency Team> will follow-up with the agency, agencies, or individual
                      whom requested the intervention within one week of said intervention.
                   g. Follow-up calls to participants whom have signed up to be contacted will be
                      handled within one week of the initial intervention.
                   h. Referral services are offered at this time and individual counseling provided, if
                      necessary.
       Also See- CISM Team Documents, following:
       Activation Request Form,
       Debriefing Report,
       Coordinator Follow-up Questions

7.0    References

8.0    Revisions

       Date         Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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DEBRIEFING THE DEBRIEFERS




                    <YOUR AGENCY>                                    Policy No.

            POLICY AND PROCEDURES                                    Origination Date

      Debriefing the Critical Incident Stress
      Management (CISM) Team Debriefers                              Page No.



1.0   Policy
      CISM Team Debriefers will attend a debriefing session with other <Agency Team> members
      following all interventions.

2.0   Purpose
      When a debriefing team has finished its work with the personnel involved in a critical incident,
      they are normally tired and ready to return to their own lives. They can often be described as
      being in a state of “excited exhaustion” where their minds are racing and excited by the work of
      the debriefing, but their energy level is depleted. However, they still have one piece of work left
      to be done, namely to take a few minutes to take care of themselves.

      Because they have spent several hours exposed to the pain of the personnel involved in the
      event, they too become participants of the event. As a result, the members of the debriefing
      team may be having reactions to the debriefing, a process called vicarious traumatizing.

3.0   Persons Affected
      All CISM Team Debriefers

4.0   Definitions

5.0   Responsibilities/Preplanning

6.0   Procedures/Process Guidelines

      1. Through the process of debriefing the debriefers, you are working to accomplish three
         goals:
                a. You are attempting to prevent negative reactions such as vicarious
                    traumatization, cumulative stress and the effects of negative self-judgment



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      b. You are using this as an opportunity to teach and reinforce skills demonstrated
         during the debriefing
      c. You are “practicing what you preach” to members of the team!
      d. By assuring that a debriefing of the debriefers is a standard operating procedure
         for the team, we are increasing their effectiveness and the overall longevity of
         the team. We are decreasing the chances for any negative personal reactions by
         members of the team and monitoring the team for any adverse reactions.
         Lastly, we are preparing the team for re-entry into the world.
      e. Normally, the debriefing is conducted shortly after the teams work is finished
         and before the team separates to go home. If a team has been involved in a
         particularly difficult debriefing or a series of defusings/debriefings/
         demobilizations over a prolonged event response, the debriefing might be best
         within a few days or a week later. This will allow the team an opportunity to
         process some of the event on their own, and then to finish the work together.
         The debriefing the debriefers process normally takes 15 to 30 minutes for
         “regular” debriefings and longer for particularly difficult or long debriefings.
2. Who should do it?
      a. Usually the team leader or an experienced peer can lead the debriefing process.
         Again, if the debriefing team has been through a particularly difficult or long
         debriefing process, someone who was not a direct part of the debriefing best
         accomplishes the debriefing. This allows all team members to participate in the
         full experience of the debriefing process. It also allows for “fresh eyes and ears”
         to provide feedback and teaching to the team.
      b. By using this structured approach to debriefing the debriefers, CISM teams are
         maximizing the opportunities for teaching members new skills, minimizing the
         chances for members returning home distressed or full of self-doubt and
         assuring its members that they are valuable assets to the team. Being involved
         in a CISM team ought to be a rewarding experience for all team members. It is
         our responsibility to take care of ourselves at least as well as we try to take care
         of others. If we believe in what we are doing for the individuals we serve, we
         should believe in what we are doing for the individuals providing the services!
3. How do you do it?
      a. The Debriefing Debriefers process uses a variation of the ICISF Model. It consists
         of three phases: REVIEW, RESPONSE and REMIND.
               i. The REVIEW phase is essentially a combination of the
                  Introduction/Fact/Thought phases of the regular debriefing. It utilizes
                  questions designed to have members think about and discuss the
                  debriefing and their participation in it. The following questions are
                  examples of this phase:
                       1. How did it go?
                       2. How do you think you did?
                       3. What “ditzy” thing did you do?
                       4. What themes emerged?
                       5. What was the participation level of the group?
                       6. Is there anything you are worried about?


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               7. During this phase, the leader can guide the discussion into
                    teaching what made the debriefing go well or give examples of
                    other ways to have handled some aspects of the debriefing.
       ii. The RESPONSE phase is a condensation of the Reaction/Symptom phase
           of the ICISF model and works to elicit comments on the self-perception
           of the team members and any concerns they may have about their
           performance. The following types of questions seem to work well:
               1. What did you say that you wish you had not?
               2. What did you not say that you wish you had?
               3. How has this debriefing affected you?
               4. What is the hardest part of this debriefing for you?
               5. During this phase, the leader guides some group discussion of
                    the member’s self impressions.
                        a. If the person is blaming him or herself for something or
                            is worried that they did something wrong, it usually
                            comes out during this phase.
                        b. What usually follows is reassurance by the team
                            members that no major errors occurred.
                        c. This is also an opportunity for the team leader and team
                            members to reassure each other that each individual
                            contributed to the process and to offer alternative
                            methods for handling problem issues.
                        d. This is the prime time to teach new techniques or
                            reinforce what the team actually did.
      iii. The REMIND phase correlates to the Teaching/Re-entry phase of the
           Mitchell model.
               1. Questions in this step serve to help the team member to do the
                    same sort of things that we encourage the debriefers to do:
                        a. Is there any follow-up to be done?
                        b. What are you going to do to take care of yourself in the
                            next 24 hours?
                        c. What will it take for you to “let go” of this debriefing?
b. Where to hold the debriefing of the debriefers?
        i. Any neutral site that provides enough privacy is appropriate for this
           process.
       ii. Team members should be able to relax and discuss thoughts
           confidentially and without interruptions. The more difficult the CISM
           responses were, the more privacy is needed.
c. Other Techniques
        i. Obviously, the model described above is one good technique for team
           maintenance.
               1. However, there are other techniques, which include:
                        a. Follow-up phone calls to provide private processing
                            time



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                                              b. Telling stories and relating experiences at regular
                                                 meetings
                                              c. Journaling or reporting about lessons learned
                                              d. Skill building games and exercises
                                              e. Role play, especially those concerning special challenges

       Also- See Debriefing Report

7.0    References

8.0    Revisions

       Date         Rev. #   Change                                                      Reference(s) Section




Approved and Effective this ________day of the month of_________________, 20XX by:



<Your Agency Director of Policies>




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TEMPLATES: BEHAVIORAL HEALTH AND CISM


CISM TEAM: APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP

CRITICAL INCIDENT STRESS MANAGEMENT (CISM) TEAM APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP
CONFIDENTIAL

Please read the following questions carefully and answer them as completely as possible. You are
strongly urged to review all of the questions before starting, to prevent providing the same information
more than once. All information in your responses will be kept confidential. Thank you for your interest
and commitment to the <Your Agency> Critical Incident Stress Management Team.

Demographic Information

Name: _________________________________________________________________

Employer_______________________________________________________________

Current Title: ____________________________________________________________

Phone Work: _____________________ Home: _________________________________

Cell: ____________________________ Pager: _________________________________

E-Mail _________________________________________________________________

Address ________________________________________________________________

City: _________________________________ Zip: ______________________________

Emergency Contact

Name: _______________________________________Relationship________________

Hm Phone: __________________Wk:___________________Cell: _________________

Name: ______________________________________Relationship:________________

Hm Phone: ________________Wk:____________________Cell: __________________

Work Experience (Related)

Employer Position Brief Job Description Dates of Employment

_______________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________



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___________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________

Education and Training: Formal education that may include high school, college, and any
additional education.


School          Dates of Attendance               Degree Earned               Area of Emphasis

_________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________

List and describe any formal training you have received in areas such as stress
management, crisis intervention, counseling, psychology, etc. (Include conferences,
seminars, or workshops you have attended).


Type of Training        Organization              Date              Hours of Training

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

Describe any personal or professional education that you have provided to others in the
area cited in the previous question (include meetings, presentations, articles, one-to-one
interventions, formal classes taught, etc.).
________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________



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Personal Information

List professional affiliations

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

List participation in professional and community activities

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

Describe your areas of interest apart from professional or work related activities. These
include hobbies, outside interests, or professional interests.
_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

Describe your personal style of working with people in crisis.



Questions

What are your reasons for wanting to be on the CISM Team?

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

What personal strengths do you have that you think will contribute to your effectiveness
as a team member?
_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

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_______________________________________________________________________

What are some of your shortcomings or "weaknesses" that might hinder your
effectiveness as a peer debriefer?
_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

Describe incidents in which you or others have been where a debriefing may have been
helpful and why?
_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

When would you be available to assist with team call outs (for example, would you only
be available in the evening, during the day, nights, weekends, etc.)?
_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________ __________________________

Signature                       Date




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CISM TEAM: ACTIVATION REQUEST FORM



Critical Incident Stress Management Team Activation Request Form

1. INITIAL CONTACT

Call received from: ______________________________ Date: ____________________

Agency Name: ___________________________________________________________

Address:

________________________________________________________________

Contact Person: __________________________________________________________

Home Phone: ________________________________ Work Phone: ________________

Chief Administrator: ______________________________________________________

Is this person aware of the request? Yes �� No ��

Telephone Number, if different: _____________________________________________

2. INCIDENT

Date/Time of Incident: ____________________________________________________

Nature of Incident: _______________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

Location: _______________________________________________________________

Agency (s) Involved: ______________________________________________________

Urgency of request: �� Immediate �� Within 24 hours �� Within 72 hours

3. ACTION TAKEN:

Request approved / team activated: �� Yes �� No

Names of team members responding: ________________________________________


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_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

Rendezvous Point: _______________________________________________________

Directions: _____________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

Time team members will meet: ______________________________ �� a.m. �� p.m.

Date & Time of Intervention: _______________________________________________

Type of Intervention: _____________________________________________________

Location of Intervention: __________________________________________________

Directions to location: ____________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

Debriefing for (specify populations): _________________________________________

Size of group expected: ___________________________________________________

REQUEST DENIED / Reason: _______________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

Alternate services offered or referred: _______________________________________

On-Call Coordinator Name: _______________________________________________




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CISM TEAM: DEBRIEFING TEAM REPORT

                         CRITICAL INCIDENT STRESS MANAGEMENT TEAM

                                       DEBRIEFING TEAM REPORT

Date: __________________________________

Intervention Site: ______________________________________________

Briefly describe the incident:

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

General themes discussed in the debriefing:

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

Summary of the instruction given to the participants of the debriefing by the CISM Team:

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________



Recorded By: ___________________________________________________________________




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ADDITIONAL RESOURCES: BEHAVIORAL HEALTH AND CISM


CISM TEAM: INTRODUCTORY REMARKS FOR DEFUSINGS

Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) Team

INTRODUCTORY REMARKS FOR DEFUSINGS AND CISD

The following remarks may be used by a CISM team to introduce a Critical Incident Stress Debriefing
(CISD) or Defusing. It is not necessary to state each item in each debriefing or defusing. These general
remarks cover the main introductory points for both types of interventions. It is best that the concepts
presented in this outline are given to a group in the words of the team. They should not be read -
verbatim - to the group from these pages. At times, it may be necessary to add additional comments not
shown here. This can be done at the discretion of the team. The order of the presentation of the items is
not of major importance. What is important is that the CISM team presents the basic guidelines during
the introductory phase of the debriefing.

This * identifies core items that must be presented!

       Team leader identifies self. *
       We are here because of (describe or name the critical incident). *
       Some of you do not want to be here. You feel you do not need a debriefing. Please remember
        even if you do not need help others present here may. Please stay. You may be able to help
        some of the people in this room simply by your presence. Please try to be helpful to one
        another.
       Some of you feel you can handle this on your own. That is probably true. However, experience
        demonstrates that people who try to handle everything alone take longer to do it. *
       A critical incident is any event that is extraordinary and produces significant reactions. The
        critical incident is so unusual that it overwhelms the usual, normal abilities people have
        developed to cope with a situation.
       The CISD (or defusing) process is designed to lessen the overall impact of an event and to
        accelerate recovery in normal people who are having common reactions to abnormal events. *
       We have found that people who talk about a bad incident eat better, sleep better, remain
        healthier, stay on the job longer and do not have as much disruption in their home lives.
       The CISD (or defusing) process is a discussion of an unusual event but it is not a critique or part
        of an investigation. *
       No note taking allowed. Neither do we allow recordings of what is said nor are the
        representatives of the media allowed.
       Everything that is said in this room is confidential. (Heavily emphasize confidentiality). Nothing
        leaves this room. *
       You will be asked to speak two times in the CISD. The first time we ask each of you to tell us who
        you are, what your role was at the incident, and what happened during the incident. In the



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    second question, we will ask if you could cite your first thought once you stopped functioning on
    “automatic pilot”.
   You do not have to speak at any time if you do not wish to. However, we do not recommend
    that because it can do more harm than good. We recommend instead, that you talk about the
    incident.
   Our main job is to get you back in service and keep you as healthy and satisfied as possible. We
    are not here to take you out of service. We are here to listen to you and help as best we can.*
   You may ask any questions you wish and we will try to help you out with some practical and
    useful information. Please ask questions anytime you wish.
   Please speak only for yourself. You cannot possibly speak adequately for how someone else is
    reacting. *
   Remember that confidentiality is the key. We need to have a pact of trust between us all.
    Everyone has already been hurt enough. Don’t use anything you learn or hear in this room
    except information the team teaches you about stress. *
   We do not want anyone to make judgment about anyone else. Every person has his own
    perspective. Let each person state it without judgment. *
   We will not take any breaks. If you have to take care of your personal needs during the
    debriefing, do so quietly and then return to this room. Leaving and not returning to this session
    may be harmful to you. Much of what we discuss at the end of the session is extremely valuable
    information that may be helpful. We don’t want you to miss it so please hang in there with us. *
   Please look around the room and point out anyone who does not belong in this room. The CISM
    team members will briefly raise their hands so that you may easily identify them. Anyone else
    whom you do not recognize please point out as well and we will challenge that person’s
    presence. If an officer was at the scene he or she belongs here. In the case of line of duty death,
    the entire department belongs in one of these sessions.
   No one has any rank during this session. We are all just people trying to struggle through some
    pain and make some meaning out of a chaotic situation. So forget your rank and be a person
    first.
   We will be around at the end of the session. If you want to talk to us, feel free. We are here for
    you. Anything you can’t tell us in the group, you are welcome to tell us alone. *
   We will begin in just a moment by asking you to tell us about the incident.
   We would appreciate you turning off your pagers, cell phones and radios to help avoid
    distractions.
   One final reminder about confidentiality before we get into the facts of the situation. Whatever
    is heard here in this room confidential! *
   We will have a handout or two at the end of the session.
   The next phase of the CISD, the fact phase, is now ready to begin.




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CRITICAL INCIDENT STRESS MANAGEMENT (CISM): THE CORE COMPONENTS

[From: Everly, G. & Mitchell, J. (1999) CISM: A New Era and Standard of Care in Crisis Intervention. Ellicott City, MD: Chevron Publishing.]



INTERVENTION                  TIMING                       ACTIVATION                   GOAL                        FORMAT


1. Pre-crisis preparation     Pre-crisis phase             Crisis anticipation          Set expectations.           Groups/Organizations
                                                                                        Improve coping. Stress
                                                                                        management.


2. Demobilization & Staff     Shift Disengagement          Event Driven                 To inform and consult,      Large Groups/ Organizations
consultation (Rescuers)                                                                 allow psychological
                                                                                        decompression. Stress
                                                                                        management.
3. Crisis Management          Anytime
Briefing (CMB) (civilians,
schools, business)            Post-crisis



4. Defusing                   Post-crisis (within 12       Usually symptom driven       Symptom mitigation.         Small groups
                              hours)                                                    Possible closure. Triage.


5. Critical Incident Stress   Post-crisis (1 – 10 days;    Usually symptom driven,      Facilitate psychological    Small groups
Debriefing (CISD)             3-4 weeks for mass           can be event driven          closure. Symptom
                              disasters)                                                mitigation. Triage.


6. Individual crisis          Anytime                      Symptom Driven               Symptom Mitigation.         Individuals
intervention 1:1                                                                        Return to function, if
                              Anywhere                                                  possible. Referral, if
                                                                                        needed.


7. Family CISM                Anytime                      Either symptom driven        Foster support &            Families/Organizations
                                                           or event driven.             communications.
                                                                                        Symptom mitigation.
8. Organizational                                                                       Closure, if possible.
consultation                                                                            Referral, if needed.


9. Pastoral Crisis            Anytime                      Usually symptom driven       To mitigate a “crisis of    Individuals Families Groups
Intervention                                                                            faith” and use spiritual
                                                                                        tools to assist in
                                                                                        recovery.


10. Follow-up/Referral        Anytime                      Usually symptom driven       Assess mental status.       Individual/Family
                                                                                        Access higher level of
                                                                                        care, if needed.




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CISM TEAM: COORDINATOR FOLLOW-UP QUESTIONS

CRITICAL INCIDENT STRESS MANAGEMENT TEAM: COORDINATOR FOLLOW-UP QUESTIONS

REMEMBER: A good CISM response rarely consists of a single intervention. Think follow-up!

After the team has completed an intervention, the coordinator should make contact with the
administration of the organization served to find out how the team’s efforts were perceived and to
assess need for further services.

A few specific goals of this contact are:

       To solicit feedback on satisfaction
       To learn how to improve procedures
       To continue triage or identification of individuals who may require further assistance
       To assess need for further interventions, of any type

The following questions are suggestions to help meet the above goals:

1. Can you give me a general reaction about the efforts of our team?

2. Is there any specific feedback for the team?

3. Have you noticed any differences in the way your employees are talking to each other since our
intervention?

4. Are there any specific improvements in employee functioning, attendance or morale?

5. Do you still have employees who are unable to work because of the incident?

6. Would anyone like a one-on-one follow-up conversation?

7. Are employees still expressing concern about how this event continues to affect members of their
family?

8. Is the event causing ongoing public relations problems in the community your agency serves (i.e.,
need for Crisis Management Briefing)?

9. Are there indications that your employee(s) might respond better to a pastoral crisis intervention?

10. Would you please remember to collect the “Debriefing Feedback Forms” which we distributed and
drop them in the mail to us?

11. Would you like to have a visit from one of our team coordinators to discuss the services we offer?




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ADDITIONAL RESOURCE: BEHAVIORAL HEALTH IN EMERGENCIES BIBLIOGRAPHY

American Psychiatric Association. “Treating Patients with Acute Stress Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder:
A Quick Reference Guide.” <www.psych.org>

American Psychiatric Association Help Center. “Disaster and Terrorism, Mind/Body Health: The Effects of
Traumatic Stress.” www.psych.org http://apahelpcenter.org/articles/article.php?id=122

Brown, Charles. “Local Special Needs Population Assessment for Local Public Health Departments: Final Report.”
Nov. 8 2004.

Callahan, Edward J. “Psychological Intervention for Unresolved Grief.” U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs June 11
2006. www.ncptsd.va.gov/publications/cq/v5/n2-3/callahan.html

Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Public Health Workbook to Define, Locate and Reach Special,
Vulnerable, and At-Risk Populations in an Emergency. www.bt.cdc.gov/workbook

Center for Mental Health Services’ Disaster and Trauma. “A Guide for Older Adults.” November 2002.
www.mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/publications/browse.asp
http://mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/publications/allpubs/KEN-01-0094/default.asp

---. “After a Disaster: Self-Care Tips for Dealing with Stress.”
www.mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/publications/browse.asp
http://mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/publications/allpubs/KEN-01-0097/default.asp

---. “After a Disaster: A Guide for Parents and Teachers.” December 2002.
www.mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/publications/browse.asp
http://mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/publications/allpubs/KEN-01-0093/default.asp

---. “Age-Specific Interventions at Home for Children in Trauma: From Preschool to Adolescence.” October 2002.
www.mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/publications/browse.asp
http://mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/publications/allpubs/NMH02-0138/default.asp

---. “How to Help Children after a Disaster.” April 2003. www.mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/publications/browse.asp
http://mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/publications/allpubs/KEN-01-0091/default.asp

Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress. “Hurricane Katrina: Sustaining Effectiveness in First Responders.”
www.centerforthestudyoftraumaticstress.org

---. “Leadership Stress Management.” www.centerforthestudyoftraumaticstress.org
http://www.centerforthestudyoftraumaticstress.org/downloads/LeadershipStressMgt.pdf

---. “Psychological First Aid: How You Can Support Well-Being in Disaster Victims.”
www.centerforthestudyoftraumaticstress.org
http://www.centerforthestudyoftraumaticstress.org/downloads/CSTS_Psych1stAid.pdf




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Everly, George S., Jr. “Crisis Management Briefing (CMB): Large Group Crisis Intervention in Response to Terrorism,
Disasters, and Violence.” International Journal of Emergency Mental Health: 53-57.
www.icisf.org/Acrobat%20Documents/TerrorismIncident/cmb.pdf

GAO Highlights. “Transportation-Disadvantaged Populations: Actions Needed to Clarify Responsibilities and
Increase Preparedness for Evacuations.” December 22 2006.www.gao.gov/highlights/d0744high.pdf

Mental Health and Psychosocial Preparedness Exemplar Group. “Mental Health and Psychosocial Preparedness
Education: A Compilation from the Centers for Public Health Preparedness.” September 2005.

Michigan Department of Community Health, Center for Disease Control and Prevention. “Diverse Populations
Plan.” January 16 2007.

National Center for Child Traumatic Stress. “Connecting with Others (2): Giving Social Support.”

---. “Psychological First Aid: Field Operations Guide.”

---. “Tips for Helping School-Age Children after Disasters.” National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.
“Reactions to a Major Disaster: A Fact Sheet for Survivors and their Families.” www.ncptsd.va.gov

National Child Traumatic Stress Network. “Medical Traumatic Stress: What Health Care Providers Need to Know.”
www.NCTSN.org http://www.nctsn.org/nctsn_assets/acp/hospital/brochures/ProviderBrochure.pdf

---. “Pediatric Medical Traumatic Stress Toolkit: Your Guide to Using the Toolkit Effectively.” www.NCTSN.org
http://www.nctsn.org/nccts/nav.do?pid=typ_mt_ptlkt

---. “Understanding Child Traumatic Stress.” www.NCTSN.org
http://www.nctsnet.org/nccts/nav.do?pid=faq_under

National Child Traumatic Stress Network, Childhood Traumatic Grief Task Force, Educational Materials
Subcommittee. “Childhood Traumatic Grief Education Materials.” www.NCTSN.org
http://www.nctsnet.org/nctsn_assets/pdfs/reports/childhood_traumatic_grief.pdf

Texas Department of State Health Services. “Emergency & Disaster Planning for Children with Special Health Care
Needs.” August 2006.

United States Department of Health and Human Services. “A Guide to Managing Stress in Crisis Response
Professions.” www.samhsa.gov http://mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/disasterrelief/publications/allpubs/SMA-
4113/default.asp

---. “Tips for Talking to Children in Trauma.” www.samhsa.gov
http://mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/publications/allpubs/tips/intervention.pdf




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APPENDIX A: METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS

To create this Emergency Preparedness Policies and Procedures Resource Guide, (hereafter referred to
as the Resource Guide), we contacted public health agencies across the U.S. to gather existing policies
and procedures agencies had developed specifically for use in an emergency. Once we received them,
we edited them to create generic sample documents for any public health agency to individualize and
incorporate into emergency preparedness plans or related documents and guides. The Resource Guide
is also web-based, located at: http://www.xxxxxxx and is available free of charge to any public health
agency. The approach for completing the Resource Guide was as follows:

We drafted a standardized letter asking state and local public health agencies for their help in the
development of a Resource Guide in conjunction with PHFE and Dekalb County (Georgia) Advanced
Practice Center. We sent out the letters April 16-22, 2008. We targeted fifty state agencies and sixty-
nine local agencies as contacts. Local agencies included all “Project Public Health Ready” agencies in the
NACCHO project of that name, as well as numerous big city and large county health departments. We
created contact sheets to capture all e-mail as well as phone responses and information regarding gaps
agencies found in their policy curriculum. Using standardized research and interviewing techniques, we
made follow-up phone calls two days after agencies received the email letter. When we contacted
agencies by phone, we asked them for any policies they might be willing to share to aid us in preparing
the Resource Guide.

While attempting to gather information regarding federal agency, non-profit organization, and private
policies and guidance, it became clear that outreach via phone and email was not as fruitful as it had
been to the state and local health departments. This was due to the size of the organizations and the
difficulty of obtaining the appropriate contacts. Private organizations were especially hesitant to share
any of their policies. While we did receive limited feedback from non-profits and a few federal contacts,
we found that guidance and actual policies readily available on the World Wide Web were sufficient
resources from which to draw for the purposes of this Resource Guide.

Agencies provided policy information via electronic or hard-copy format that we then catalogued and
sorted by policy type. We reviewed collected policies collaboratively using subject-matter experts.
When a policy was determined to be stand-alone and best practice, we revised it to remove any specific
agency information to maintain agency and individual privacy. Sometimes policy pieces were integrated
and hybridized with other policies, creating new policies using the clearest and most useful of several
documents from differing agencies and sources to create a best practice policy. Once we revised and
developed the policies, we integrated them into the Resource Guide chapters in this document.




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APPENDIX B: GLOSSARY



Chapter One:    Declaration and Activation of an Emergency

COOP            Continuity of Operations Plan

EOC             Emergency Operations Center

ICS             Incident Command System

Chapter Two:    Human Resources

ADA:            Americans with Disabilities Act

CAO:            Corporate Administrative Officer

CPR:            Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation

EAP:            Employee Assistance Plan

EEOC:           Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

FLSA:           Fair Labor Standards Act

FMLA:           Family Medical Leave Act

FTE:            Full-Time Employee

HR:             Human Resources

HRD:            Human Resources Division

MLE:            Making Life Easier

OPM:            Office of Personnel Management

OSH Act:        Occupational Health and Safety Act

SARS:           Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

SDM:            Special Duties Manager

Chapter Three: Volunteer Services and Credentialing

ACS:            Acute Care Setting

AHRQ:           Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

BRO:            Benefits and Retirement Operations

BT:             Bio-Terrorism


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CW:             Contact Worker

DHHS:           Department of Health and Human Services

ESAR-VHP:       Emergency Systems for Advance Registration of Volunteer Health Professionals

MCE:            Mass Casualty Event

PDQ:            Position Description Questionnaire

PEW:            Position Eligibility Worksheet

STT:            Short-Term Temporary

TLT:            Term-Limited Temporary

Chapter Four:   Contracts and Procurement

EPHI:           Electronic Protected Health Information

FEMA:           Federal Emergency Management Agency

HIPAA:          Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act

MRC:            Medical Reserve Corps

PHI:            Protected Health Information

Chapter Five:   Information Technology

AOL:            America On Line

CD-R:           Compact Disk, Readable (also CD-RW: Compact Disk, Readable, Writable)

CHAP:           Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol

DLCI:           Data Link Connection Identifier

E-mail:         Electronic Mail

FAX:            Facsimile (machine)

HIPAA:          Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act

ISDN:           Integrated Services Digital Network

IT:             Information Technology

PC:             Personal Computer

PDA:            Personal Digital Assistant

PHI:            Protected Health Information



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POD:           Point(s) of Dispensing

URL:           Uniform Resource Locator

VPN:           Virtual Private Network

Chapter Six:   Media Relations and Communications

EAS:           Emergency Alert System

EPI:           Emergency Public Information

EOC:           Emergency Operating Center

EOP:           Emergency Operating Procedure

ESL:           English as a Second Language

ICS:           Incident Command System

JIC:           Joint Information Center

JPIC:          Joint Public Information Center

NIMS:          National Incident Management System

NRP:           National Response Plan

PIC:           Public Information Center

PIO:           Public Information Officer

Chapter Seven: Security

DOH:           Department of Health

EMS:           Emergency Medical Services

FBI:           Federal Bureau of Investigation

HAZMAT:        Hazardous Materials

HVAC:          Heating Ventilation and Cooling

ID:            Identification

IED:           Improvised Explosive Device

IND:           Improvised Nuclear Device

psi:           pounds per square inch

RDD:           Radioactive Dispersal Device



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Chapter Eight:   Continuity of Operations

COOP:            Continuity of Operations Plan

EOC:             Emergency Operations Center

ES:              Essential Staff

FLSA:            Fair Labor Standards Act

HM:              Household Members

IM:              Instant Messaging

SOP:             Standard Operating Procedure

VPN:             Virtual Private Network

WWW:             World Wide Web

Chapter Nine:    Emergency Facility

CDC:             Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

CPR:             Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation

Dtap:            Diptheria tetanus acellular pertussis

Hep A:           Hepatitis A

Hep B:           Hepatitis B

Hib:             Haemophilus influenza b

ICS:             Incident Command System

IPV:             Inactivated Polio Virus

MCV4:            Meningococcal Vaccine 4

MMR:             Measles Mumps Rubella

OSHA:            Occupational Health and Safety Administration

PCV7:            Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine 7

PDA:             Personal Digital Assistant

PPD:             Purified Protein Derivative

PPV23:           Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine 23

Td:              Tetanus diphtheria



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Tdap:          Tetanus dipetheria acellular pertussis

TIV:           Trivalent inactivated Influenza Vaccine

UPS:           Uninterrupted Power Supply

Chapter Ten:   Behavioral Health and Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM)

BHRN:          Behavioral Health Resource Network

CERC:          Crisis Emergency and Risk Communications

CISD           Critical Incident Stress Debriefing

CISM:          Critical Incident Stress Management

CMB            Crisis Management Briefing

CMH:           Community Mental Health

EAP            Employee Assistance Plan

EMS            Emergency Medical Services

EOC            Emergency Operations Center

FEMA           Federal Emergency Management Agency

ICISF          International Critical Incident Stress Foundation

NIMS:          National Incident Management System

OCC:           On-Call Coordinator

PIO:           Public Information Officer




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APPENDIX C: SPECIFIC CITATIONS/REFERENCES

The agencies below represent those whose policies or procedures we adapted from web
materials and who directly requested specific citation or had online citation instructions.

Chapter 2: Human Resources

        U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: Human Resource Policies and Pandemic Planning
        Workplace Questions.
        http://www.pandemicflu.gov/faq/workplace_questions/human_resource_policies/index.html

Chapter 3: Volunteer Services and Credentialing

        Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Rockville, MD. AHRQ Publication No.
        07-0001, February 2007. Adapted from: Mass Medical Care with Scarce Resources: A
        Community Planning Guide. http://www.ahrq.gov/research/mce/mce6b.htm

Chapter 5: Information Technology

        TechSoup: Sample Nonprofit Acceptable Use Policy. 2005 CompuMentor.
        http://www.techsoup.org/learningcenter/webbuilding/page5445.cfm?cg=searchterms&sg=policy

        U.S. Department of the Army: Flexiplace Policy. http://www.monroe.army.mil/cpac/Flexiplace.htm

        U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights: HIPAA Privacy during
        an emergency. Hurricane Katrina Bulletin: HIPAA Privacy and Disclosures in Emergency
        Situations. September 2, 2005.

        U.S. Government Accounting Office (GAO): Appropriate Use Template.

Chapter 6: Media Relations and Communication

        Association for State and Territorial Health Officers (ASTHO): Communication in Risk Situations:
        Responding to the Communication Challenges Posed by Bioterrorism and Emerging Infectious Diseases.
        http://www.astho.org/pubs/ASTHO%20Risk%20Communication%20e-Workbook.htm

        U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine, Health Risk
        Communication Program: Crisis Communication and Emergency Risk Communication
        Guide. http://chppm-
        www.apgea.army.mil/news/Crisis%20Communication%20and%20Emergency%20Risk%20C
        ommunication%20Guide.pdf

Chapter 7: Security

        U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS): Hospital Checklist.
        http://www.pandemicflu.gov/plan/healthcare/hospitalchecklist.html

Chapter 8: Continuity of Operations




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                           Emergency Preparedness Policies and Procedures Resource Guide




        Public Health-Seattle and King County: Planning and Managing for Isolation & Quarantine Advanced
        Practice Toolkit. http://www.isolationandquarantine.com/law_tools.shtml

Chapter 9: Emergency Facility

        American Society for Healthcare Engineering/American Hospital Association, 2004. Water Source Loss
        During an emergency. Guidelines for Environmental Infection Control in Health-Care Facilities.
        Recommendations from CDC and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee
        (HICPAC). Sehulster LM, Chinn RYW, Arduino MJ, Carpenter J, Donlan R, Ashford D, Besser R, Fields B,
        McNeil MM, Whitney C, Wong S, Juranek D, Cleveland J., Chicago, IL.

        http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dhqp/pdf/guidelines/Enviro_guide_03.pdf

        U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Power
        Outage during an emergency. http://emergency.cdc.gov/preparedness/kit/ and
        http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/pdf/watersystemrepair.pdf




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