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Changes to the Burmese Report

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					ERRATA Since the launch of the Global Witness report "A Conflict of Interests - The uncertain future of Burma's forests" a number of factual errors have been discovered; these errors are highlighted below: 1. Page 9: R para 2: Replace: “This has lead to hundreds of thousands of deaths, the creation of 300,000 refugees, and one million internally displaced people (IDP) and, as a result of the Tatmadaw’s Four Cuts counterinsurgency campaign, widespread human rights abuse.” With: “This has lead to hundreds of thousands of deaths, the creation of over one million refugees, and one million internally displaced people (IDP) and, as a result of the Tatmadaw’s Four Cuts counterinsurgency campaign, widespread human rights abuse.” 2. Page 11: L para 2: Replace: “The timber trade also played a significant role, but it was not until the collapse of the CPB in 1988 and the KIA ceasefire in 1994 that logging took place on an industrial scale.” With: “The timber trade also played a significant role, but it was not until the collapse of the CPB in 1989 and the KIA ceasefire in 1994 that logging took place on an industrial scale.” 3. Page 18: L para 1: Replace: “War-related displacement has led to 300,000 refugees, in official camps, in neighbouring countries and one million internally displace people (IDP) in Burma. With: “War-related displacement has led to over a million refugees since 1948, in official camps, in neighbouring countries and one million internally displace people (IDP) in Burma. 4. Page 19: R para 3: Replace: “Government Employees were permitted to exchange these notes, but the move hit the remainder of Burma’s population hard wiping out their cash savings.” With: “The move hit Burma’s population hard wiping out their cash savings.”

5. Page 20: R para 2: Replace: “The NLD, with 52.9% of the vote and 392 seats (80%), in alliance with the 19 ethnic minority parties won the majority of the constituencies. The SLORC-sponsored National Unity Party (NUP) took 25% of the vote, but only 10 seats.” With: “The NLD, with 59.9% of the vote and 392 seats (80%), in alliance with the 19 ethnic minority parties won the majority of the constituencies. The SLORC-sponsored National Unity Party (NUP) and NUP alliance parties (Peasants Unity Organisation, Youth Unity Organisation, Workers Unity Organisation) took 25% of the vote, but only 10 seats.” 6. Page 22: R para 2: Replace: “Five ethnic minority groups (the SSA, the KNU, the Karenni National Progressive Party (KNPP), the Chin National Front, (CNF) and the Arakan Liberation Party (ALP)) were reported to have agreed in late February 2003 to let Thailand mediate truce talks between them and the SPDC.” With: “Five ethnic minority groups (the SSA(S), the KNU, the Karenni National Progressive Party (KNPP), the Chin National Front, (CNF) and the Arakan Liberation Party (ALP)) were reported to have agreed in late February 2003 to let Thailand mediate truce talks between them and the SPDC.”

7. Page 24: L para 2: Replace: “The Council is a 193-member body that is exclusively made up of senior military officers.” With: “The Council is a 13-member body that is exclusively made up of senior military officers.” 8. Page 39: R para 4: Replace: “In 2001 over one hundred 100 companies were exporting timber under the name of Woodlands.” With: “In 2001 over one hundred companies were exporting timber under the name of Woodlands.” 9. Page 74: R final para: Replace: “The DKBA is organised into four brigades: 333 based in Thaton, 555 in Northern Pa’an, 777 in Papun and 999 the largest brigade based at KoKo on the Moei River, north of Myawaddy, the Burmese border town adjacent to Mae Sot. With: “The DKBA is organised into four brigades: 333 based in Thaton, 555 in Northern Pa’an, 777 in Papun and 999 the largest brigade based at KoKo on the

Moei River, north of Myawaddy, the Burmese border town across the river from Mae Sot. 10. Page 75: L para 6: Replace: “However, in February 2003 a Shan Herald News Agency article reported that a key witness had retracted his statement saying that he had been coerced by the Tatmadaw to provide it, and that in fact it was the Tatmadaw that had carried out the killings.” With: “However, in February 2003 a Shan Herald Agency for News (S.H.A.N) article reported that a key witness had retracted his statement saying that he had been coerced by the Tatmadaw to provide it, and that in fact it was the Tatmadaw that had carried out the killings.” 11. Page 83: R Graph title: Replace: “Imports of timber into China from all countries and of all categories.” With: “Imports of logs into China from all countries.”

ADDENDUM

1. Page 10: L para 4: Replace: “In 2001, total Burmese timber exports were just over 688,000m 3 whilst China alone recorded imports of 850,00m3. With: “In 2001, according to Burmese customs figures, total Burmese timber exports were just over 688,000m3 whilst China alone recorded imports of 850,00m3. 2. Page 53: L para 1: Replace: “Until recently, forced labour was legal under the colonial era Towns and Village Acts of 1907. However, as a result of international pressure, to end forced labour in Burma, the SPDC passed Order 1/99 in May 1999. This order repealed the 1907 Act thereby making forced labour illegal in Burma except for emergencies.” With: “Forced labour under certain circumstances was permitted under the colonial Village Act (1908) and Towns Act (1907). As a result of international pressure, the SPDC issued Order 1/99 and Order Supplementing Order 1/99 (in May 1999 and November 2000 respectively), which instruct Chairmen of the Ward and Village Tract Peace and Development Councils and the responsible persons of the Department of General Administration and the Myanmar Police Force not to exercise powers under the 1907 and 1908 Acts.”

3. Page 53: L para 2: Replace: “Despite condemnation by the ILO and assurances by the SPDC to the ILO, during their May 2000 mission, that measures were being taken to end forced labour the situation is still serious particularly in border areas.” With: “Moreover, the SPDC’s orders do not amount to compliance with the recommendation made by the ILO Commission of Inquiry that the legislation be brought into line with the ILO Forced Labour Convention, 1930 (No. 29) to which Burma is party. The other two principal recommendations of the Commission of Inquiry are that in actual practice forced labour, especially by the military, should not imposed, and that those found guilty of exacting forced labour should be punished. Given Burma's failure to carry out any of these recommendations, the International labour Conference adopted a resolution in June 2000 (activated in November 2000 by the ILO Governing Body), which authorised ILO constituents (governments, workers and employers) and international organisations, to take steps that could amount to sanctions.”


				
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posted:11/2/2009
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