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Life in a Box Model Activity - Thanksgiving _Holidays_

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					                                     Thanksgiving
                                       (53 - Green)

1) Pumpkins near Berlin, Connecticut           4) Castle Garden--their first Thanksgiving dinner
http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-                     http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-
bin/query/r?pp/fsaall:@field(NUMBER+@band(     bin/query/r?pp/ils:@filreq(@field(NUMBER+@
fsa+8a27273))                                  band(cph+3b45443))+@field(COLLID+cph))




2) Thanksgiving festivities at Fort Pulaski,
Georgia, Thursday, Nov. 27
http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-
bin/query/r?pp/ils:@filreq(@field(NUMBER+@
band(cph+3b44090))+@field(COLLID+cph))         5) The first Thanksgiving 1621
                                               http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-
                                               bin/query/r?pp/ils:@filreq(@field(NUMBER+@
                                               band(cph+3a17442))+@field(COLLID+cph))




3) Birds. Turkey (gobbler)
http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-
bin/query/r?pp/horyd:@field(NUMBER+@band       6) Thanksgiving in camp sketched Thursday
(thc+5a35892))                                 28th 1861
                                               http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-
                                               bin/query/r?pp/ils:@filreq(@field(NUMBER+@
                                               band(cph+3a09637))+@field(COLLID+drwg))
7) Michael Hipa, Poarch Creek Indian tribal descendant,
enters the arena in the Grand Entry, 1988                 10) Dancers Tanya Nicholson and Otu Amoo dancing
http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cocoon/legacies/AL/20000            Bawa onstage at the Homowo Festival, August 21, 1998
2663.html                                                 http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cocoon/legacies/OR/20000
                                                          2932.html




8) Sarah J. Hale to Abraham Lincoln, Monday,
September 28, 1863 (Thanksgiving)
http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-
bin/ampage?collId=mal&fileName=mal1/266/26
69900/malpage.db&recNum=0
                                                          11) The frontier holiday; being a collection of
                                                          writings by Minnesota pioneers who recorded
                                                          their divers ways of observing Christmas,
                                                          Thanksgiving, and New Year's. Ed. and illus.
                                                          by Glenn Hanson.
                                                          http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-
                                                          bin/query/r?ammem/lhbumbib:@field(NUMBE
                                                          R+@band(lhbum+48053))




9) Pumpkin pies and Thanksgiving dinner at
the home of Mr. Timothy Levy Crouch
http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-
bin/query/r?ammem/fsaall:@field(NUMBER+@
band(fsa+8c04161))
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TITLE:    Pumpkins near Berlin, Connecticut

CALL NUMBER:       LC-USF33- 012440-M2 [P&P]

REPRODUCTION NUMBER:           LC-USF33-012440-M2 (b&w film nitrate neg.)

MEDIUM:     1 negative : nitrate ; 35 mm.

CREATED/PUBLISHED:         1939 Oct.

CREATOR: Lee, Russell, 1903- photographer.

NOTES: Title and other information from caption card. LOT 1275 (Location of corresponding print.)
Transfer; United States. Office of War Information. Overseas Picture Division. Washington Division;
1944.

TOPICS:Small towns, roadsides--Connecticut

SUBJECTS:United States--Connecticut--Berlin.

FORMAT:Nitrate negatives.

PART OF: Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection (Library
of Congress)

REPOSITORY:      Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, DC 20540 USA

DIGITAL ID:     (intermediary roll film) fsa 8a27273

OTHER NUMBER:        D 6447

CARD #:     fsa1997027238/PP




View the MARC Record for this item.


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TITLE: Thanksgiving festivities at Fort Pulaski, Georgia, Thursday, Nov. 27 / from a sketch by our
special artist, W.T. Crane.

CALL NUMBER:       Illus. in AP2.L52 Case Y [P&P]

REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-98001 (b&w film copy neg.)
No known restrictions on publication.

SUMMARY:      Composite of eight scenes of games and dancing.

MEDIUM:     1 print : wood engraving.

CREATED/PUBLISHED:          1863.

CREATOR:Crane, W. T., artist.

NOTES: Illus. in: Frank Leslie's illustrated newspaper, 1863 Jan. 3, p. 237.

SUBJECTS:Thanksgiving Day--1860-1870.
Celebrations--Georgia--1860-1870.
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Social aspects.

FORMAT:Periodical illustrations 1860-1870.
Wood engravings 1860-1870.

DIGITAL ID:     (b&w film copy neg.) cph 3b44090 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3b44090

VIDEO FRAME ID:       LCPP003B-44090

CARD #:     89714605
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TITLE:    Birds. Turkey (gobbler)

CALL NUMBER:       LC-H813- B04-032 <P&P>[P&P]

REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-H813-B04-032 (b&w film neg.)
Publication may be restricted. For information see "Horydczak Collection"
(http://lcweb.loc.gov/rr/print/res/100_hory.html)

MEDIUM:      1 negative : safety ; 4 x 5 in.

CREATED/PUBLISHED:          ca. 1920-ca. 1950.

CREATOR: Horydczak, Theodor, ca. 1890-1971, photographer.

NOTES: Old negative number: 1993-4.

SUBJECTS: Turkeys.
United States.

FORMAT: Acetate negatives.

PART OF:     Theodor Horydczak Collection (Library of Congress) Horydczak, Theodor, ca. 1890-
1971.

REPOSITORY:       Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

DIGITAL ID:     (intermediary roll film) thc 5a35892 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/thc.5a35892

CARD #:     thc1995010325/PP
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TITLE:    Castle Garden--their first Thanksgiving dinner / Harper.

CALL NUMBER:       Illus. in AP2.H32 Case Y [P&P]

REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-99401 (b&w film copy neg.)
No known restrictions on publication.

SUMMARY:      Man, woman, and boy (probably immigrants), eating on a picnic bench, New York
City.

MEDIUM:      1 print : wood engraving.

CREATED/PUBLISHED:          1884.

CREATOR: Harper, William St. John, 1851-1910 artist.

NOTES: Illus. in: Harper's weekly, 1884 Nov. 29, p. 783.

SUBJECTS: Thanksgiving Day--1880-1890.
Families--New York (State)--New York--1880-1890.
Immigrants--New York (State)--New York--1880-1890.
Eating & drinking--New York (State)--New York--1880-1890.

FORMAT: Periodical illustrations 1880-1890.
Wood engravings 1880-1890.

DIGITAL ID:     (b&w film copy neg.) cph 3b45443 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3b45443

VIDEO FRAME ID:       LCPP003B-45443

CARD #:     90707729
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TITLE:    The first Thanksgiving 1621 / J.L.G. Ferris.

CALL NUMBER: LOT 4579 [item] [P&P]
  Check for an online group record (may link to related items)

REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZC4-4961 (color film copy transparency)
LC-USZ62-15195 (b&w film copy neg.)
No known restrictions on publication. No renewal in Copyright office, 11/91.

SUMMARY:       Pilgrims and Natives gather to share meal.

MEDIUM:      1 photomechanical print : halftone, color.

CREATED/PUBLISHED:          Cleveland, Ohio : The Foundation Press, Inc., c1932.

CREATOR:Ferris, Jean Leon Gerome, 1863-1930, artist.

NOTES: K17395 U.S. Copyright Office. Reproduction of oil painting from series: The Pageant of a
Nation. No. 6. Copyright by The Foundation Press, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio.

SUBJECTS:Thanksgiving Day--1620-1630.
Pilgrims (New Plymouth Colony)--1620-1630.
Indians of North America--Massachusetts--1620-1630.
Eating & drinking--1620-1630.

FORMAT:Oil paintings Reproductions 1930-1940.
Halftone photomechanical prints Color 1930-1940.

REPOSITORY:       Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

DIGITAL ID: (color film copy transparency) cph 3g04961 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3g04961
(b&w film copy neg.) cph 3a17442 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3a17442

CARD #:     2001699850
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TITLE:      Thanksgiving in camp sketched Thursday 28th 1861

CALL NUMBER:          DRWG/US - Waud, no. 327 (A size) [P&P]

REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-USZ62-14105 (b&w film copy neg.) LC-USZ62-6929 (b&w film
copy neg.)LC-USZ62-6976 (b&w film copy neg.)No known restrictions on publication.

MEDIUM:       1 drawing on tan paper : pencil and Chinese white ; 24.7 x 35.1 cm. (sheet).

CREATED/PUBLISHED:            1861 [November] 28.

CREATOR:Waud, Alfred R. (Alfred Rudolph), 1828-1891, artist.

NOTES: Frederic Ray tentatively identifies this as the camp of General Louis Blenker. Signed lower
right: Alf R. Waud. Title inscribed below image. Gift, J.P. Morgan, 1919 (DLC/PP-1919:R1.2.327)
Reference print available in the Civil War Drawings file -- D. Reference print available in Ray, Plate
13 (p. 87) Forms part of: Civil War drawing collection.

SUBJECTS:Military cookery--1860-1870.
Military camps--Union--1860-1870.
Military officers--Union--1860-1870.
Celebrations--1860-1870.
Soldiers--Union--1860-1870.
Eating & drinking--1860-1870.
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Military life--Union.
United States

FORMAT:Drawings American 1860-1870.

PART OF:      Civil War drawing collection

REPOSITORY:         Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

DIGITAL     ID:    (color film copy transparency) cph 3g04237 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3g04237
(b&w film   copy   neg.) cph 3a16384 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3a16384
(b&w film   copy   neg.) cph 3a09594 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3a09594
(b&w film   copy   neg.) cph 3a09637 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3a09637
#7


Home >> ALABAMA




     Poarch Creek Indians
     Originally held as a homecoming for tribal members in 1971, the
     Poarch Creek Indian Pow Wow has evolved into a cultural festival
     attracting approximately 10,000 visitors yearly. The Poarch Creek
     Indians decided on Thanksgiving Day as the annual date to hold their
     Pow Wow and also to include visitors from other tribes and from
     among the public, giving rise to the Pow Wow's current official title:
     Poarch Creek Indian Thanksgiving Homecoming and Inter-tribal Pow
     Wow. During the 1980s, the Pow Wow was extended to a two-day
     festival and now encompasses the Friday after Thanksgiving. The
                                                                                Michael Hipa, Poarch Creek Indian
     present site of the gathering is on land originally inhabited by this
                                                                              tribal descendant, enters the arena in
     Native American tribe for thousands of years.                             the Grand Entry, 1988 Photo: Daniel
                                                                                            McGhee
     Performances of ancestral dancers in authentic dress are at the core
     of the festival. American Indian music and dance shows continue throughout the two days. These
     exhibition dances help visitors understand the meaning of the dances, and the significance of the
     dancers' costumes and accessories. Competition dancing in four age categories, each with a male
     and female division, is also a large part of the Pow Wow.

     During the Pow Wow, a Poarch Creek Indian Princess is crowned. Collectors can find a variety of
     handmade Indian crafts, including beadwork, basketry, quilts and silverwork for purchase. The
     crowd delights in the old-fashioned greased pig event and turkey shoot. Other events vary from year
     to year, but have included a petting zoo and pony rides. Food offerings include corn and barbecue
     roasted over oak wood fires, Indian tacos and fry bread, and traditional turkey and dressing, ham
     and fried chicken dinners provided by local churches.

     As the only Federally recognized tribe in Alabama, receiving this status in 1985, the Poarch Creek
     Indians feel the responsibility of representing their state and themselves as a living, growing culture.

     Project is documented with text, 18 8 x 10 color photographs, newspaper clippings and magazine
     articles, a packet with an overview of the tribe, a postcard from the 1995 Pow Wow, a promotional
     brochure, a program from the 1998 Pow Wow, and a map showing the location of the Poarch Creek
     tribe in Alabama.

     Originally submitted by: Jeff Sessions, Senator.
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The Abraham Lincoln Papers at the Library of Congress


Sarah J. Hale to Abraham Lincoln, Monday, September 28, 1863
(Thanksgiving)




Abraham Lincoln Papers at the Library of Congress. Transcribed and Annotated
by the Lincoln Studies Center, Knox College. Galesburg, Illinois.

Sarah J. Hale to Abraham Lincoln, Monday, September 28, 1863 (Thanksgiving)

From Sarah J. Hale to Abraham Lincoln1, September 28, 1863

Private

Philadelphia, Sept. 28th 1863.

Sir.--

Permit me, as Editress of the "Lady's Book", to request a few minutes of your precious time, while
laying before you a subject of deep interest to myself and -- as I trust -- even to the President of our
Republic, of some importance. This subject is to have the day of our annual Thanksgiving made a
National and fixed Union Festival.

You may have observed that, for some years past, there has been an increasing interest felt in our
land to have the Thanksgiving held on the same day, in all the States; it now needs National
recognition and authoritive fixation, only, to become permanently, an American custom and
institution.

Enclosed are three papers (being printed these are easily read) which will make the idea and its
progress clear and show also the popularity of the plan.

For the last fifteen years I have set forth this idea in the "Lady's Book", and placed the papers before
the Governors of all the States and Territories -- also I have sent these to our Ministers abroad, and
our Missionaries to the heathen -- and commanders in the Navy. From the recipients I have
received, uniformly the most kind approval. Two of these letters, one from Governor (now General)
Banks and one from Governor Morgan2 are enclosed; both gentlemen as you will see, have nobly
aided to bring about the desired Thanksgiving Union.

But I find there are obstacles not possible to be overcome without legislative aid -- that each State
should, by statute, make it obligatory on the Governor to appoint the last Thursday of November,
annually, as Thanksgiving Day; -- or, as this way would require years to be realized, it has ocurred
to me that a proclamation from the President of the United States would be the best, surest and
most fitting method of National appointment.

I have written to my friend, Hon. Wm. H. Seward, and requested him to confer with President
Lincoln on this subject As the President of the United States has the power of appointments for the
District of Columbia and the Territories; also for the Army and Navy and all American citizens abroad
who claim protection from the U. S. Flag -- could he not, with right as well as duty, issue his
proclamation for a Day of National Thanksgiving for all the above classes of persons? And would it
not be fitting and patriotic for him to appeal to the Governors of all the States, inviting and
commending these to unite in issuing proclamations for the last Thursday in November as the Day of
Thanksgiving for the people of each State? Thus the great Union Festival of America would be
established.

Now the purpose of this letter is to entreat President Lincoln to put forth his Proclamation,
appointing the last Thursday in November (which falls this year on the 26th) as the National
Thanksgiving for all those classes of people who are under the National Government particularly, and
commending this Union Thanksgiving to each State Executive: thus, by the noble example and
action of the President of the United States, the permanency and unity of our Great American
Festival of Thanksgiving would be forever secured.

An immediate proclamation would be necessary, so as to reach all the States in season for State
appointments, also to anticipate the early appointments by Governors.3

Excuse the liberty I have taken

With profound respect

Yrs truly

Sarah Josepha Hale,

Editress of the "Ladys Book"

[Note 1 ID: Sarah J. Hale, a poet and novelist, became editor of the Ladies' Magazine in 1828. In
1837 the Ladies' Magazine was sold and became known as the Lady's Book. Hale served as editor of
the Lady's Book until 1877. During her tenure as editor, Hale made the magazine the most
recognized and influential periodical for women. Hale was involved in numerous philanthropic
pursuits and used her position as editor to advocate the education of women.]

[Note 2 Nathaniel P. Banks and Edwin D. Morgan]

[Note 3 On October 3, Lincoln issued a proclamation that urged Americans to observe the last
Thursday in November as a day of thanksgiving. See Collected Works, VI, 496-97.]




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America from the Great Depression to World War II: Photographs from the FSA-OWI,
1935-1945




Pumpkin pies and Thanksgiving dinner at the home of Mr. Timothy Levy Crouch, a

Delano, Jack, photographer.

CREATED/PUBLISHED 1940 Nov.

NOTES Title and other information from caption card. Transfer; United States. Office of War
Information. Overseas Picture Division.

SUBJECTS
Safety film negatives.
United States--Connecticut--New London County--Ledyard.

MEDIUM1 negative : safety ; 3 1/4 x 3 1/4 inches or smaller.

CALL NUMBERLC-USF34- 042712-D

REPRODUCTION NUMBERLC-USF34-T01-042712-D DLC (b&w film dup. neg.)

PART OFFarm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection

REPOSITORYLibrary of Congress Prints & Photographs Division Washington, DC 20540

DIGITAL ID
(intermediary roll film) fsa 8c04161


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#10


Home >> OREGON




   Portland's Homowo Festival
   This harvest celebration of welcoming and thanksgiving originated
   among the Ga people of Ghana, West Africa. ( Homowo is a Ghanian
   metaphor for mocking hunger.)

   As a month-long event in August, the Portland festival begins with
   children's days camps, where they learn African culture through the
   arts. The festival finale is a two-day celebration that is held in
   downtown Portland. More than 8,000 Portland residents and visitors
   attend this community event, which features Ghanaian, other African,
                                                                              Dancers Tanya Nicholson and Otu
   and Caribbean music and dance presentations, storytelling, a               Amoo dancing Bawa onstage at the
   children's activity area, a folk arts demonstration area, and other        Homowo Festival, August 21, 1998
   workshops.                                                                        Photo: Julie Keefe

   The festival was founded in 1989 by the Homowo Arts and Cultures organization to share the
   traditions of Africa and to pass this heritage to new generations. This festival brings people of all
   ethnic and cultural backgrounds together in a setting of celebration and harmony.

   Among musical presentations are marimba music from Zimbabwe, steel drums from Trinidad, and
   the highlife music of West Africa. Ethic foods from Ghana, Ethiopia, Somalia and Jamaica are
   offered. Merchants' stands display crafts, clothing, artwork, jewelry, and other items from African
   cultures.

   During the last day of the festival, a procession is lead by Obo Addy, Homowo artistic director and a
   master percussionist, and members of his traditional Ghanaian music and dance troupe, followed by
   volunteers who portray the Ga King and Queen of the Warriors, the royal families of the Ashanti and
   the Dagomba, and the Ewe high priest. After the procession, traditional Ghanaian songs and dances
   from different cultural groups are performed.

   Documentation includes a text report, a slide, 10 photographs, a newspaper article, programs,
   brochures, and a poster.

   Originally submitted by: Ron Wyden,Senator.
#11
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Pioneering the Upper Midwest: Books from Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin, ca. 1820-
1910


The frontier holiday; being a collection of writings by Minnesota
pioneers who recorded their divers ways of observing Christmas,
Thanksgiving and New Year's

Proclaiming a Day of Thanks

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Page 39 { page image }

Thanksgiving crowded Christmas when Alexander Ramsey, governor of the Territory of Minnesota,
proclaimed, at the behest of a group of clergymen, Minnesota's first official day of thanks for
December 26, 1850. The holiday was observed the day after Christmas for fourteen years until 1864
when President Lincoln set the last Thursday of November as the national Thanksgiving. The first
territorial thanks day was marked by ringing bells at sunrise and sunset of the twenty-sixth. Special
morning services were held in the churches. In the evening a "magnificent ball" was held in St. Paul
at Mazourka Hall which a short time before had been equipped with "transparencies, paintings,
pictures, and chandeliers in a style of superb elegance."

Our first Thanksgiving found a sparsely settled territory including all of what is now the State of
Minnesota plus the Dakotas as far west as the Missouri River. The nine counties of the territory
counted only a few more than 6,000 people. St. Paul was a frontier village with about 225 dwellings,
while St. Anthony boasted only 115.



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Pioneering the Upper Midwest: Books from Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin, ca. 1820-
1910



Click here to see the full text of this document.
Click here to view the images of this document using the page image viewer.

The frontier holiday; being a collection of writings by Minnesota pioneers who recorded their
divers ways of observing Christmas, Thanksgiving, and New Year's. Ed. and illus. by Glenn
Hanson.

Hanson, Glenn, ed.

CREATED/PUBLISHED
St. Paul, North Central Pub. Co., 1948.

SUMMARY
This collection of brief first-person descriptions and anecdotes chronicles how Christmas, New Year's,
and Thanksgiving were celebrated in nineteenth-century Minnesota. The materials are drawn from
documents at the Minnesota Historical Society, and many have appeared before in print. They range
from Zebulon Pike's journal entries for December 25, 1805 and January 1, 1806 (which mention
extra rations and presents for members of his expedition) to translated excerpts from the Swedish
writer's Hugo Nisbeth's travel narrative, Two Years in America (1872-1874). Most of these accounts
date from the middle of the century. Topics include a community Christmas celebrated in the
schoolhouse; New Year's open houses; Christmas in early Minneapolis, Winona, and Fort Snelling;
Christmas customs adapted by Native Americans; and a Thanksgiving feast.

NOTES
"Reprinted from newspapers and manuscripts in the [Minnesota] Historical Society's collections."

SUBJECTS
Frontier and pioneer life--Minnesota.
Holidays--Minnesota.

CALL NUMBER
F606 .H25

DIGITAL ID
lhbum 48053


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                      List of Sources Used in this Activity
                     Workshop 3 Life in a Box: Thanksgiving

Crane, W. T. (1863). Thanksgiving festivities at Fort Pulaski, Georgia, Thursday,
      Nov. 27 / from a sketch by our special artist, W.T. Crane. Library of
      Congress Prints and Photographs Division, Miscellaneous Items in High
      Demand. cph 3b44090.

Delano, J. (1940). Pumpkin pies and Thanksgiving dinner at the home of Mr.
      Timothy Levy Crouch, a Rogerine Quaker living in Ledyard, Connecticut.
      Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division, American Memory,
      America from the Great Depression to World War II: Photographs from the
      FSA-OWI, 1935-1945. fsa 8c04161.

Ferris, J. L. G. (1932). he first Thanksgiving 1621 / J.L.G. Ferris. Library of
        Congress Prints and Photographs Division, Miscellaneous Items in High
        Demand. cph 3g04961.

Hale, S. J. (1863). Sarah J. Hale to Abraham Lincoln, Monday, September 28,
       1863 (Thanksgiving). American Memory, The Abraham Lincoln Papers at
       the Library of Congress. 266/2669900/001.

Hanson, G. (1948). The frontier holiday; being a collection of writings by
     Minnesota pioneers who recorded their divers ways of observing
     Christmas, Thanksgiving, and New Year's. Ed. and illus. by Glenn
     Hanson. American Memory, Pioneering the Upper Midwest: Books from
     Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin, ca. 1820-1910. lhbum 48053.

Harper, W. J. (1884). Castle Garden--their first Thanksgiving dinner / Harper.
      Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, Miscellaneous Items
      in High Demand. cph 3b45443.

Horydczak, T. (1920). Birds. Turkey (gobbler). Library of Congress Prints and
      Photographs Division, horydczac Collection. thc 5a35892.

Keefe, J. (1998). Dancers Tanya Nicholson and Otu Amoo dancing Bawa
      onstage at the Homowo Festival, August 21, 1998. Library of Congress,
      Local Legacies, Portland's Homowo Festival. 200002932

Lee, R. (1939). Pumpkins near Berlin, Connecticut. Library of Congress Prints
      and Photographs Division, Miscellaneous Items in High Demand. fsa
      8a27273.

McGhee, D. (1988). Michael Hipa, Poarch Creek Indian tribal descendant, enters
     the arena in the Grand Entry, 1988. Library of Congress, Local Legacies,
     Poarch Creek Indians. 200002663
Waud, A. R. (1861). Thanksgiving in camp sketched Thursday 28th 1861. Library
     of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, Miscellaneous Items in High
     Demand. cph 3g04237.

				
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