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					http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/family-child-visiting.html 1/5/2005 Curriculum: Promoting Placement Stability and Permanency through Caseworker/Child Visits http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/webcasts/index.html 1/5/2005 Family Group Conferencing: Bringing the Family into Family-Centered Practice and Children’s Services 1/5/2005 Bridging Refugee Youthhttp://www.brycs.org http://www.cwla.org/conferences/conferences.htm 1/5/2005 Teleconference Series on Child Trauma http://www.nicwa.org/services/training/institutes/index.asp 1/5/2005 Indian Child Welfare Training Institute http://nccanch.acf.hhs.gov/profess/workforce 1/12/2005 Child Welfare Workforce and Training Resources http://www.youthtransitions.org/ 1/12/2005 Youth Transitions Funders Group http://www.cwla.org/conferences/ 1/12/2005 CWLA National Conference http://www.about.chapinhall.org/conferences/NovATA/presentations.html 1/12/2005 Audio and Power Point Slides from "Adolescence and the Transition to Adulthood" http://aecf.org/kidscount/pocket_guides/index.htm 1/12/2005 City and Rural KIDS COUNT Pocket Guides http://www.aboutourkids.org/aboutour/letter/ 1/12/2005 Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Youth: Facing Challenges, Building Resilience http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/indian-child-welfare.html 1/19/2005 The Indian Child Welfare Act: A Family's Guide
1/19/2005 Call for Presenters 1/19/2005 1/19/2005 1/19/2005 1/19/2005 1/26/2005 1/26/2005 1/26/2005 1/26/2005 1/26/2005 1/26/2005 2/2/2005 2/2/2005 2/2/2005 2/2/2005 2/2/2005 2/2/2005 2/9/2005 2/9/2005 2/9/2005 2/9/2005 2/9/2005 2/9/2005 2/16/2005 2/16/2005 2/16/2005 2/16/2005 2/16/2005 2/16/2005 2/23/2005 2/23/2005

http://www.ojjdp.ncjrs.org/publications/PubAbstract.asp?pubi=11936 1/5/2005 Screening and Assessing Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders Among Youth in the Juvenile Justice S

http://www.nrcys.ou.edu/nrcyd/npta05/npta05call.htm Congressional Foster Youth Internship Program http://www.ccainstitute.org/youth_internship.php AFCARS Report http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/dis/afcars/publications/afcars.htm New and Revised Child Abuse and Neglect User Manuals http://nccanch.acf.hhs.gov/profess/tools/usermanual.cfm System Capacity for Adolescent Health: Public Health Improvement Tool http://www.amchp.org/syscap/index.php Estimating Financial Support for Kinship Caregivers http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=311126 FAQs on Foster Family http://www.turbotax.com/articles/FAQonFosterFamilyTaxes.html Taxes Year 2004 Tax Benefits for Parents of Children with Learning Disabilities http://www.schwablearning.org/articles.asp?r=773 Adoption Clubhouse http://www.adoptionclubhouse.org/ Mentoring as a Family Strengthening Strategy http://www.nassembly.org/fspc/practice/practices.html NNAAP Announces Six $15,000 Mini-Grants http://www.nnaap-ococ.org/new.htm The Children's Bureau Training and Technical Assistance Network http://naic.acf.hhs.gov/pubs/reslist/cbttan/index.cfm Visitation/Family Access Guidelines http://egov3.olmstedcounty.com/olmsted/index.php?loc=196 Resources for Working http://www.yale.edu/21c/imresources.html with Immigrant Families Child Welfare Spendinghttp://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=411124 during a Time of Fiscal Stress Community Youth-Led Research http://www.civicyouth.org/index.htm 15th National Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect http://nccanch.acf.hhs.gov/profess/conferences/cbconference/index.cfm Training System Assessment Guide for Child Welfare Agencies http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/helpkids/pubstext/Trainingassess.htm Online Parent Leadership Network http://www.parentleadershipnetwork.org/ Supporting Evidence-Informed Practice with Children and Families www.rip.org.uk/aboutus/whatson/services.asp NFPA Post-High School www.nfpainc.org/awards/youthscholarships.cfm?page=6 Scholarships for Foster Youth Making the Case for Preventing Child Abuse and Neglect http://www.friendsnrc.org/ Conference on Family Group Decision Making http://www.fgdm.org State Policies on Fosterhttp://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/state-policies.html Parent In-Service Training Webcast on Foster Care Month: Save the Date! Children’s Monitor Online http://www.cwla.org/advocacy/monitoronline.htm Youth Law News http://www.youthlaw.org/YLN.htm Listening to Parents: Overcoming Barriers to the Adoption of Children From Foster Care http://www.ksg.harvard.edu/socpol/publications_main.html Miracle’s Boys http://www.the-n.com/ntv/shows/index.php?id=491 State Fact Sheets on Child Welfare Funding http://www.childrensdefense.org/childwelfare/financing/factsheets/default.aspx Tax Tips for Grandparents Raising Grandchildren http://www.aarp.org/life/grandparents/helpraising/Articles/a2004-09-07-grandparents-taxt

http://www.ncjrs.org/ 2/23/2005 Family Dependency Treatment Courts: Addressing Child Abuse and Neglect Cases Using the Drug Court Mod http://nccanch.acf.hhs.gov/topics/prevention/index.cfm 2/23/2005 Prevention 2005: Safe Children and Healthy Families Are a Shared Responsibility www.friendsnrc.org/resources/fact_sheets.asp 2/23/2005 Cultural Competence Training
2/23/2005 ThinkCollege.net

http://www.thinkcollege.net/

3/2/2005 Foster Care Month 2005 Webcast http://event.netbriefings.com/event/nrcfcpp/Live/hunternrcfcppp6/ 3/2/2005 Guardianship Resourceshttp://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/guardianship.html

http://www.chapinhall.org/article_abstract_new.asp?ar=1382&L2=61&L3=130 3/2/2005 Improving Public Child Welfare Agency Performance in the Context of the CFSRs http://womenandchildren.treatment.org 3/2/2005 Substance Abuse Treatment – Women and Children http://www.ncjrs.org/pdffiles1/ojjdp/204607.pdf 3/2/2005 State Ombudsman Programs http://www.nfpn.org/fatherhood/ 3/2/2005 Fatherhood Training Curriculum http://www.fostercaremonth.org 3/9/2005 National Foster Care Month 2005 Resources http://naic.acf.hhs.gov/ 3/9/2005 Understanding Adoption Subsidies: An Analysis of AFCARS Data http://www.zerotothree.org/policy/ 3/9/2005 Assuring the Safety, Permanence and Well-Being of Infants and Toddlers in the Child Welfare System http://www.financeprojectinfo.org/publications/developingandsupportingIN.pdf 3/9/2005 Developing and Supporting a Continuum of Child Welfare Services http://www.esi-conference.info./teens/index.htm 3/9/2005 Conference on Sexual Exploitation of Teens http://event.netbriefings.com/event/nrcfcpp/Live/hunternrcfcppp6/ 3/16/2005 Foster Care Month Webcast http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/cwrp/geninfo/tech_bulletin_one.htm 3/16/2005 Child and Family Service Review Technical Bulletin #1 http://www.aphsa.org 3/16/2005 Report From the 2004 Child Welfare Workforce Study: State Agency Findings http://www.about.chapinhall.org/conferences/NovATA/Conference_Summary_Final.pdf 3/16/2005 Adolescence and the Transition to Adulthood - Conference Summary http://cwla.org/conferences/2005newenglandrfp.htm 3/16/2005 Call For Presentations: Child Welfare League Of America Conference http://www.chapinhall.org/article_abstract_new.asp?ar=1384&L2=61&L3=130 3/23/2005 Youth Who Run from Out-of-Home Care http://oas.samhsa.gov/2k5/FosterCare/FosterCare.cfm 3/23/2005 Substance Use and Need for Treatment Among Youths Who Have Been in Foster Care for Determining a ―Compelling Reason‖ Not to File a 3/23/2005 Criteria and Procedureshttp://www.cssp.org/uploadFiles/compellingReasons.pdfTPR Toward Children in Foster Care: A Reference Manual 3/23/2005 Georgia's Responsibilityhttp://childwelfare.net/resources/FCResponsibility/index.html http://www.usc.edu/schools/college/crcc/publications/ 3/23/2005 Faith-Based Adoptive/Foster Services: Faith Communities' Roles in Child Welfare http://www.abanet.org/child/rclji/education/ab490.html 3/30/2005 Ensuring Educational Rights and Stability for Foster Youth http://www.fyi3.com/fyi3/Involved/YB/pdfs/educationStatement.pdf 3/30/2005 Promoting Educational Success for Young People in Foster Care http://www.chapinhall.org/article_abstract_new.asp?ar=1383&L2=61&L3=130 3/30/2005 Adoption Dynamics: An Update on the Impact of the Adoption and Safe Families Act http://www.natl-fostercare.org/ 3/30/2005 Support Network for Former Foster Youth Serving in the Military http://www.ssw.upenn.edu/cwconference/ 3/30/2005 Multidisciplinary Conference on Child Welfare http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/webcasts/index.html 4/6/2005 Change a Lifetime: National Foster Care Month 2005 http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/publications/cmreports.htm 4/6/2005 Child Maltreatment 2003 http://www.cppp.org/privatization_pb.pdf 4/6/2005 Privatization of Child Protective Services http://www.afscme.org/pol-leg/flchild.pdf 4/6/2005 Florida's Experiment with Privatizing Child Welfare Services http://www.iarstl.org/ 4/6/2005 An Evaluation of the Minnesota SDM Family Risk Assessment http://www.casacolumbia.org/supportcasa/item.asp?cID=12&PID=136 4/6/2005 Family Matters: Substance Abuse and the American Family http://www.cwla.org/ndas.htm 4/13/2005 National Data Analysis System Update Alumni Study 4/13/2005 Northwest Foster Care http://www.casey.org/Resources/Publications/NorthwestAlumniStudy.htm and Evaluate Strategies to Reduce Disproportionate Minority Contact 4/13/2005 Seven Steps to Develophttp://www.jrsa.org/jjec/about/dmc_guidebook.html

3/9/2005 Webcast on Children Missing From Out-of-Home Care https://compx08.eventcenterlive.com/cfmx/ec/register/reg.cfm?BID=1&RegID=4130B589

http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/recruitment-and-retention.htm 3/16/2005 Relationship Between Public Child Welfare Workers, Resource Families and Birth Families: Preventing the Tr

Justice and Child Welfare System Coordination and Integration: Framework for Imp 3/23/2005 Guidebook for Juvenile http://www.cwla.org/programs/juvenilejustice/jjguidebook.htm

http://www.vcu.edu/partnership/maltreatment/ 3/30/2005 Abuse and Neglect of Children and Adults with Developmental Disabilities: A Problem of National Significan

http://www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-05-290 4/13/2005 Indian Child Welfare Act: Existing Information on Implementation Issues Could Be Used to Target Guidanc

http://www.advocatesforchildren.org/ 4/13/2005 Project Achieve: A Model Project Providing Education Advocacy for Children in the Child Welfare System http://www.nccd-crc.org/crc/pubs/racerisk.pdf 4/13/2005 Research-Based Risk Assessment: Adding Equity to CPS Decision Making http://www.practicenotes.org/vol10_no2.htm 4/20/2005 Meth and Family-Centered Child Welfare Practice http://www.aifs.gov.au/nch/sheets/rs9.html 4/20/2005 Social Costs: The Effects of Child Maltreatment http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/default.htm 4/20/2005 Web Seminar: The Relationship of Adverse Childhood Experiences to Adult Health and Well-Being http://www.casey.org/Resources/Publications/RoadMapForLearning.htm 4/20/2005 A Road Map for Learning: Improving Educational Outcomes in Foster Care http://www.adoptuskids.org 4/20/2005 New Round of Mini-Grants http://www.fostercaremonth.org 4/27/2005 May is National Foster Care Month http://socrates.berkeley.edu/~aiarc/publications/monographs.html 4/27/2005 From the Child’s Perspective: A Qualitative Analysis of Kinship Care Placements http://www.Adopte1.org 4/27/2005 Campana para la Conciencia de Adopcion
4/27/2005 FirstStep 4/27/2005 4/27/2005 5/4/2005 5/4/2005 5/4/2005 5/4/2005 5/4/2005 5/4/2005 5/11/2005 5/11/2005 5/11/2005 5/11/2005 5/11/2005 5/11/2005 5/18/2005 5/18/2005 5/18/2005 5/18/2005 5/18/2005 5/18/2005 5/25/2005 5/25/2005 5/25/2005 5/25/2005 5/25/2005 5/25/2005 6/2/2005 6/2/2005 6/2/2005 6/2/2005 6/2/2005 6/2/2005

Alcohol and Other Drug Issues in the States' Child and Family Services Reviews and 4/20/2005 A Preliminary Review ofhttp://www.ncsacw.samhsa.gov/products.asp

http://www.cms.hhs.gov/Medicaid/homeless/firststep/index.html Teleconference: Improving the Service Array in Child Welfare - A Strategy for Rural Jurisdictions http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/helpkids/tele.htm Measuring Strengths-Based Practice http://www.rtc.pdx.edu/pgFeaturedDiscussions.php It’s My Life: Employment Guide for Child Welfare Professionals Working with Transitioning Youth http://www.casey.org/Resources/Publications/ItsMyLifeEmployment.htm Racial Inequality in Child Welfare http://www.cssp.org/major_initiatives/racialEquity.html Strategic Approaches to Improving the Well-Being of Children in Foster Care http://voicesforamericaschildren.org/Content/ContentGroups/Publications-Voices/Child_W Network on Transitions http://www.transad.pop.upenn.edu/news/briefs.htm to Adulthood Adoption Assistance by http://naic.acf.hhs.gov/parents/prospective/funding/adopt_assistance/ State Toolkit for Parents on Early Development http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/actearly/ Trainer Handbook: Casehttp://pcwta.sdsu.edu/Trainer%20Handbook/CasePlanning&Mgmt.htm Planning and Management Process Case Planning and Management in Child Welfare Services http://sswnt7.sowo.unc.edu/fcrp/case_planning.htm Adoption Safe Families http://olav.usi.louisville.edu/nrc/training/ASFA/ASFAhome.htm Act Curriculum Some Questions to Guide Permanency Hearings http://www.abanet.org/child/rclji/online.html Improving Permanency Hearings: Sample Court Reports and Orders http://www.abanet.org/child/courtimp.html Babies, Toddlers, Foster Care, and the Courts http://www.zerotothree.org/policy/childwelfare.html Webcast: Lighting the Fire of Urgency -Reunification of Families in America's Child Welfare System http://event.netbriefings.com/event/nrcfcpp/Live/hunternrcfcppp7/ Promoting Permanency Through Worker/Parent Visits http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/family-child-visiting.html Capitol Hill briefing on Youth Aging out of Foster Care http://www.aphsa.org/home/news.asp 18 And Out: Life After http://www.mspcc.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=Page.viewPage&pageID=315 Foster Care in Massachusetts FosterLinks http://www.fosterlinks.org/ Pennsylvania Child Welfare Training Program Resources http://www.pacwcbt.pitt.edu/ Reminder: Webcast on Locating Relatives and Others Permanency Resources http://event.netbriefings.com/event/nrcfcpp/Live/hunternrcfcppp7/ Resources on Racial Disproportionality in Child Welfare http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/children-of-color.html Child Welfare Reform http://www.cwla.org/newsevents/cqresearcher050422.htm Midwest Evaluation of the Adult Functioning of Former Foster Youth: Outcomes at age 19 http://www.chapinhall.org/article_abstract_new.asp?ar=1387&L2=61&L3=130 "Aging Out" PBS Documentary Airs May 26 http://www.jimcaseyyouth.org/specialtopics/agingout/index.htm Hearing on Protections for Foster Children Enrolled in Clinical Trials http://waysandmeans.house.gov/hearings.asp?formmode=detail&hearing=409 Facilitating Permanencyhttp://www.cwla.org/pubs/pubdetails.asp?PUBID=10048 for Youth Searching for Relativeshttp://event.netbriefings.com/event/nrcfcpp/Live/hunternrcfcppp7/ Understanding Foster Parenting: Using Administrative Data to Explore Retention http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/05/foster-parenting/ Asking the Right Questions: A Judicial Checklist to Ensure That the Educational Needs of Children and You http://www.ncjfcj.org/content/view/340/322/ Strategic Planning Process: Steps in Developing Strategic Plans http://www.gse.harvard.edu/hfrp/pubs/onlinepubs/rrb/strategic.html Study on the Children of Incarcerated Mothers http://www.waisman.wisc.edu/index.html

www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/publications/family_assessment/index.htm 6/8/2005 Comprehensive Family Assessment Guidelines for Child Welfare http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/state-policies.html 6/8/2005 Firearms in Foster Homes http://www.ncsl.org/programs/cyf/cfsr.htm 6/8/2005 Child and Family Services Reviews and State Legislatures www.bestadoptva.org/index.xhtml 6/8/2005 Evidence-Based Practices in Adoption http://www.ncsacw.samhsa.gov/products.asp 6/8/2005 Understanding Substance Abuse and Facilitating Recovery: A Guide for Child Welfare Workers http://event.netbriefings.com/event/nrcfcpp/Live/hunternrcfcppp7/ 6/8/2005 June 14 Webcast – Be Sure to Register!
6/15/2005 Weekly Update Archives ttp://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/newsletters.html h 6/15/2005 Foster Care Month Proclamations Wanted! http://www.fostercaremonth.org/News/Proclamations/ 6/15/2005 Chafee Frequently Asked Questions III http://www.natl-fostercare.org/ 6/15/2005 Birth Parents and the Reunification Process: A Study of the Mendocino County Model http://cssr.berkeley.edu/childwelfare/pdfs/Promising/Mendocino_Full_Report.pdf 6/15/2005 Child Safety Articles 6/15/2005 6/22/2005 6/22/2005 6/22/2005 6/22/2005 6/22/2005 6/22/2005 7/6/2005 7/6/2005 7/6/2005 7/6/2005 7/6/2005 7/6/2005

7/13/2005 7/13/2005 7/13/2005 7/13/2005 7/13/2005 7/13/2005 7/20/2005 7/20/2005 7/20/2005 7/20/2005 7/20/2005 7/20/2005
7/27/2005 7/27/2005 7/27/2005 7/27/2005 7/27/2005 7/27/2005 8/3/2005 8/3/2005

http://www.actionchildprotection.org/cs_articles.htm Nominations for Adoption Excellence Awards http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/initiatives/aeawards.htm Curriculum: Legal Resource Manual for Foster Parents http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/other-issues-in-child-welfare.h Manual: Legal Resource http://www.nfpainc.org/training/nfpaTraining.cfm?page=4 Manual for Foster Parents New at the National Data Analysis System http://ndas.cwla.org/whatsnew/060305.asp First Star State Profiles http://www.firststar.org/research/default.asp Untapped Anchor http://www.buildabridge.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=blogsection&id=9&Item Overrepresentation of Children of Color in Foster Care in 2000 http://www.racemattersconsortium.org/whopapers.htm NRCFCPPP Multimedia Archives http://www.nrcfcppp.org State Child Welfare Legislation http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/other-issues-in-child-welfare.h DVD: Fostering the Future http://pewfostercare.org National Curriculum forhttp://jeritt.msu.edu/whatsnew.asp Dependency Cases Involving Foster Care Caseflow Management in Juvenile Improving Quality of Care for the Most Vulnerable Children, Youth, and Families: Finding Consensus http://www.cwla.org/programs/bhd/qualityofcare.htm From the Child's Perspective: A Qualitative Analysis of Kinship Care Placements http://aia.berkeley.edu/information_resources/kinship_care.html Foster Home Licensing http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/state-policies.html The Methamphetamine Epidemic http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4726336 Intensive Family Preservation Services with Adoptive Families http://www.nfpn.org/news/2005/07_1.php Enhancing State Child Welfare Services for Migrating Children – BRYCS http://www.brycs.org/brycs_resources.htm#NEW_OCAN_REPORT Conference Papers Available http://www.brookings.edu/es/research/projects/wrb/events/200507nscaw.htm Web Cast: Sustaining Your Child and Family Services Organization in Lean Times http://aia.berkeley.edu/training/sustainability.html Youth Permanency - PowerPoint Presentation http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/youth-permanency.html AFCARS Report #10 http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/dis/afcars/publications/afcars.htm Better Data and Evaluations Could Improve Processes and Programs for Adopting Children with Special Nee http://www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-05-292 Guide for Child Welfare Administrators on Evidence Based Practice http://www.aphsa.org/home/news.asp Foster Youth Mentorship Training for Program Managers http://www.emt.org/publications.html Immigration and Language Guidelines for Child Welfare Staff http://www.nyc.gov/html/acs/html/whatwedo/reformindex.html State and Local Efforts to Mitigate Disproportionality in the Child Welfare System http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/children-of-color.html Institute of Applied Research http://www.iarstl.org/ Review of Turnover in Milwaukee County Private Agency Child Welfare Ongoing Case Management Staff http://www.uky.edu/SocialWork/cswe/documents/turnoverstudy.pdf Mediation in Child Protection Cases: An Evaluation of the Washington, D.C. Family Court Child Protection Me http://www.ncjfcj.org/content/view/341/170/ Posttraumatic Stress Disorder http://www.practicenotes.org/vol10_no3.htm Juvenile Firesetting: A Research Overview http://www.ojjdp.ncjrs.org/publications/PubAbstract.asp?pubi=12133 Permanency Planning Today: Summer 2005 http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/newsletters.html#pptoday Performance Measures for Courts: The Next Step in Foster Care Reform http://www.adoptioncouncil.org/documents/Adoption_Advocate_Vol_No_1_06_05.pdf

http://www.cwla.org/programs/housing/agingout.htm 8/3/2005 Ensuring Safe, Stable and Affordable Housing for Young People Aging Out of Foster Care http://www.ifapa.org/resources/publications.asp 8/3/2005 Raising relative's children http://www.ncjfcj.org/content/blogcategory/346/411/ 8/3/2005 Juvenile Delinquency Guidelines: Improving Court Practice in Juvenile Delinquency Cases
8/3/2005 KIDS COUNT 8/10/2005 8/10/2005 8/10/2005 8/10/2005 8/10/2005 8/10/2005 8/17/2005 8/17/2005 8/17/2005 8/17/2005 8/17/2005 8/17/2005 8/24/2005 8/24/2005 8/24/2005 8/24/2005 8/24/2005 8/31/2005 8/31/2005 8/31/2005 8/31/2005 8/31/2005 8/31/2005 9/7/2005 9/7/2005 9/7/2005 9/7/2005 9/7/2005 9/7/2005 9/14/2005 9/14/2005 9/14/2005 9/14/2005 9/14/2005 9/14/2005 9/21/2005 9/21/2005 9/21/2005 9/21/2005 9/21/2005

http://www.aecf.org/kidscount/sld/databook.jsp State Resources on Family Group Decision Making http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/family-group-conferencing.htm Supervisor's Guide to Implementing Family Centered Practice http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/family-centered-practice.html Family Group Decision-Making: Preliminary Evaluation http://www.casey.org/Resources/Publications/FosterCareFocus.htm Child Welfare League of America - National Data Analysis System http://ndas.cwla.org/ Meth Science, Not Stigma: An Open Letter to the Media http://www.jointogether.org/sa/news/features/reader/0,1854,577769,00.html New Report on Key National Indicators of Children’s Well-Being http://www.childstats.gov Concurrent Planning: What the Evidence Shows http://nccanch.acf.hhs.gov/pubs/issue_briefs/concurrent_evidence/index.cfm Foster Parents Considering Adoption: A Factsheet for Families http://naic.acf.hhs.gov/pubs/f_fospar.cfm Service Array in Child Welfare http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/helpkids/servicearray.htm We Care: Recommendedhttp://www.doh.wa.gov/ehp/ts/pubs-cdl.htm#drug-endangered-children Best Practices Addressing the Needs of Drug Endangered Children Investigating Child Fatalities http://www.ncjrs.org/pdffiles1/ojjdp/209764.pdf Kinship Care Legal Handbook http://www.flkin.usf.edu/pages/Legal000001.asp Reconnecting Torn Families http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/12438896.htm Funding of Child and Family Services Reviews Program Improvement Plans http://www.ncsl.org/programs/cyf/fundingcfsr.htm Celebrating Families: An Innovative Approach for Working with Substance Abusing Families http://ist-socrates.berkeley.edu/~aiarc/media/pdf/source_vol14_no1.pdf Drug Courts: An Effective Strategy for Communities Facing Methamphetamine http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/BJA/pdf/MethDrugCourts.pdf Youth Transitioning Outhttp://preview.nga.org/Files/pdf/0505YOUTHROUNDTABLE.PDF of Foster Care Initiative - National Experts Roundtable Child Welfare Matters: http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/helpkids/ Stakeholder Involvement in Child Welfare Clearinghouse Website Searches http://basis1.calib.com/BASIS/chdocs/docs/naicweb/SF Homeless in Minnesota: http://www.wilder.org/272.0.html?tx_ttnews[tt_news]=1798 A Closer Look Methamphetamine Resources http://www.ncsacw.samhsa.gov/MethamphetamineList.htm Smoking Banned in Foster Homes http://www.timesargus.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050819/NEWS/508190345/100 Beyond Punishment: Restorative Community Service http://www.realjustice.org/library/restcommserv.html Hurricane Katrina Relief Efforts and Child Welfare http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/disaster_relief.html Individuals Interested in Foster Care and Adoption http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/disaster_relief.html Alabama Department ofhttp://www.dhr.state.al.us/page.asp?pageid=750 Human Resources Louisiana Department of Social Services http://www.dss.state.la.us/ Mississippi Department http://www.mdhs.state.ms.us/ of Human Services Texas Department of Family and Protective Services http://www.dfps.state.tx.us/about/Releases_and_Newsletter/2005/2005-09-02_DFPS_oth Katrina Relief Resources http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/disaster_relief.html Child Welfare Responsehttp://www.govbenefits.gov/govbenefits/index.jhtml to Hurricane Katrina Medicaid Spending on Foster Children http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=311221 Meth: What We Know, What We're Learning, What We Do Next http://www.cwla.org/conferences/2005teleconference-cocfall.htm Breakthrough Series Collaborative: Recruitment and Retention of Resource Families http://www.casey.org/Resources/Publications/BSCRecruitmentRetention.htm Marriage and Child Wellbeing http://www.futureofchildren.org Children Still Missing After Katrina http://www.missingkids.com/ Help in Legal and Judicial System Responses to Children and Families Affected by Hurricane Katrina http://www.abanet.org/child/katrina/home.html Impact of Methamphetamines on the Child Welfare System http://nccanch.acf.hhs.gov/topics/issues/meth.cfm My Child Welfare Librarian http://naic.acf.hhs.gov/admin/subscribe.cfm Social Care Access to Research Evidence Research Briefing http://www.scie.org.uk/publications/briefings/index.asp

http://www.nationaladoptionday.org/2005/index.asp 9/21/2005 National Adoption Day is November 15, 2005 http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/teleconferences/ 9/28/2005 Racial Disproportionality in Child Welfare: Tools and Strategies for Change http://www.cwla.org/programs/culture/disproportionate.htm 9/28/2005 Race/Ethnicity and Child Welfare http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/disaster_relief.html#agencies 9/28/2005 SAMHSA Resources for Agencies Working with Families Impacted by Hurricane Disasters http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/116/3/787 9/28/2005 Psychosocial Implications of Disaster or Terrorism on Children: A Guide for the Pediatrician Child Welfare 9/28/2005 Promising Approaches in http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/cwrp/promise/index.htm http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/publications/cwo.htm 10/5/2005 Child Welfare Outcomes 2002: Annual Report to Congress http://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/ 10/5/2005 Children’s Bureau Express http://www.acf.hhs.gov/news/press/2005/adoption_incentives.htm 10/5/2005 $14.5 Million Awarded to States for Increasing Adoptions http://www.firststar.org/research/legal.asp 10/5/2005 Legal Research on State Child Welfare Systems http://www.scie.org.uk/publications/briefings/index.asp 10/5/2005 Deliberate Self-Harm among Children and Adolescents http://www.nrcys.ou.edu/nrcyd/publications.shtml 10/12/2005 Adolescent Heart & Soul: Achieving Spiritual Competence in Youth-Serving Agencies http://www.abanet.org/child/rclji/online.html 10/12/2005 Court-Agency Cooperation in Child and Family Services Reviews http://edocs.dhs.state.mn.us/lfserver/Legacy/DHS-4575-ENG 10/12/2005 Minnesota: African American Comparative Case Review Study Report http://cfrcwww.social.uiuc.edu/newsroom1.htm 10/12/2005 Illinois: Reports on Foster Care Response 10/12/2005 California: Differential http://www.cwda.org/improvinglives.cfm http://www.psychiatrictimes.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleId=171201534 10/12/2005 Evidence-Based Therapies in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/state-policies.html 10/19/2005 Liability Insurance/Damage Claims for Foster Parents
10/19/2005 Casey Connects 10/19/2005 10/19/2005 10/19/2005 10/26/2005 10/26/2005 10/26/2005 10/26/2005 10/26/2005 10/26/2005 11/2/2005 11/2/2005 11/2/2005 11/2/2005 11/2/2005 11/2/2005 11/9/2005 11/9/2005 11/9/2005 11/9/2005 11/9/2005 11/9/2005 11/16/2005

Tips for Children Displaced in Natural Disasters and Their Caregivers 9/28/2005 Know the Rules: Safety http://www.missingkids.com/missingkids/servlet/ResourceServlet?LanguageCountry=en_

http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/abuse_neglect/nscaw/index.html 10/5/2005 National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW) CPS Sample Component Wave 1 Data Analysis

http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/teleconferences/index.html 10/19/2005 Enhancing the Emotional Well-Being of Children and Youth in Foster Care and their Families: Promising Pract

http://www.aecf.org/publications/connects_fall05.htm Intervention with Traumatized Children http://www.skillmancenter.wayne.edu/OP2000-1.pdf New Briefs from the Family Strengthening Policy Center http://www.nassembly.org/fspc/practice/practices.html Breaking the Silence: Children’s Stories  http://www.cptv.org/pdf/BTS_pressrelease.pdf ACF Information Memorandum: Title IV-E and Hurricane Katrina http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/laws/im/im0506.htm Compassion Fatigue http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/513615 Behavior Problems and Educational Disruptions Among Children in Out-of-Home Care in Chicago http://www.chapinhall.org/article_abstract.aspx?ar=1415 Helping Your Child Series http://www.ed.gov/parents/academic/help/hyc.html Factors Influencing Retention of Child Welfare Staff: A Systematic Review of Research http://www.charityadvantage.com/iaswr/IASWRHOME.asp Helpful Hints for Leading Change http://hosting.bronto.com/4852-2962faf5/20051001/article01.htm Relative Search Best Practice Guide http://www.dhs.state.mn.us/main/groups/publications/documents/pub/DHS_id_052669.pd Defining Reunification for Consistent Performance Measurement http://ndas.cwla.org/research_info/publications/ New California Laws Aim to Help Youth Aging out of the State System http://www.legislature.ca.gov/port-bilinfo.html National Court Improvement Progress Report and Catalog http://www.abanet.org/child/cipcatalog/home.html The Implementation of http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/grouphomes04/imp05/ Maternity Group Home Programs: Serving Pregnant and Parenting Teens in a Residen Maternal Methamphetamine Use During Pregnancy and Child Outcome: What Do We Know? http://www.nzma.org.nz/journal/117-1206/1180/ Invitation to Comment on Proposed Data Composites and Potential Performance Areas and Measures for the http://a257.g.akamaitech.net/7/257/2422/01jan20051800/edocket.access.gpo.gov/2005/0 Integrating Caregiver Protective Capacities into Case Plans http://www.actionchildprotection.org/archive/article1105.htm Trauma and Children: An Introduction for Foster Parents http://ssw.unc.edu/fcrp/fp/fp_v10n1/trauma.htm National Child Traumatic Stress Network Empirically Supported Treatments and Promising Practices http://www.nctsnet.org/nccts/nav.do?pid=ctr_tool_prom Case Study of Child Welfare Interventions with Refugee Families in Texas http://www.brycs.org/#WN1 The Judges’ Page – Child Development Issues and the Dependency Court http://www.nationalcasa.org/JudgesPage/ Best Practice Guidelines: Children Missing from Care http://www.cwla.org/pubs/default.htm

http://www.aecf.org/initiatives/familytofamily/ 11/16/2005 A Family for Every Child: Strategies to Achieve Permanence for Older Foster Children and Youth http://www.pccyfs.org/resources.htm#Foster%20Care 11/16/2005 Supporting Foster Youth to Achieve Employment and Economic Self-Sufficiency http://aia.berkeley.edu/publications/monographs/fccp_monograph.html 11/16/2005 Guide to Future Care and Custody Planning for Children http://www.tpronline.org/printerfriendly.cfm?articleID=150 11/16/2005 Resiliency-Based Research and Adolescent Health Behaviors http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4984113 11/16/2005 Raising Grandchildren in Communities of Color the United States 11/23/2005 Foster Care Adoption inhttp://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=411254 http://www.ncsacw.samhsa.gov/tutorials/ 11/23/2005 Online Tutorial with Free CEUs for Child Welfare Professionals http://www.nationaldec.org/ 11/23/2005 National Alliance for Drug Endangered Children http://www.fosterclub.com/neighborhoodscount/ 11/23/2005 Neighbors Count Recruitment Campaign
11/23/2005 New Directions for North http://www.preventchildabusenc.org/taskforce/ Carolina’s Child Maltreatment Prevention Efforts

http://www.gih.org/ 11/23/2005 In Harm's Way: Aiding Children Exposed to Trauma Web Page 11/30/2005 Children’s Bureau CFSR http://www.acf.dhhs.gov/programs/cb/cwmonitoring/index.htm#cfsr http://www.nrcys.ou.edu/nrcyd/publications/yd_update.shtml 11/30/2005 Youth Development Update http://ndas.cwla.org/whatsnew/112105.asp 11/30/2005 National Data Analysis System http://www.nashp.org/ 11/30/2005 State Efforts to Promote Children’s Healthy Mental Development http://www.envisionjournal.com/application/main.aspx?MainFormOption=0 11/30/2005 Children with Disabilities Involved with the Child and Family Services System: Understanding the Context http://www.envisionjournal.com/application/main.aspx?MainFormOption=2 11/30/2005 Successfully Raising Resilient Foster Children Who Have Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: What Works? http://www.coanet.org/Files/RoundtableLuncheon.pdf 12/7/2005 Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina
12/7/2005 Just for Youth 12/7/2005 12/7/2005 12/7/2005 12/7/2005 12/7/2005 12/14/2005 12/14/2005 12/14/2005 12/14/2005 12/14/2005 12/14/2005 12/21/2005 12/21/2005 12/21/2005 12/21/2005 12/21/2005 12/21/2005 12/28/2005 12/28/2005 12/28/2005 12/28/2005 12/28/2005

http://www.justforyouth.utah.gov Helping Foster Children Achieve Educational Stability and Success: A Field Guide for Information Sharing Helping Foster Childrenhttp://www.wa-schoolcounselor.org/documents/Field_Guide_DRAFT__rev%5b1%5d._.pd Achieve Educational Stability and Success: A Field Guide for Information Sharing Children Missing From Care: How Should Agencies Respond? http://www.cwla.org/voice/0509children.htm It's My Life: Housing http://www.casey.org/Resources/Publications/ItsMyLifeHousing.htm Children’s Bureau Website http://www.acf.dhhs.gov/programs/cb/ National PSA Campaign to Provide Mental Health Services to Hurricane Survivors http://www.mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/disasterrelief/ Post-Adoption Services http://naic.acf.hhs.gov/pubs/h_postlegal/index.cfm for Children with Special Needs and Their Families 7th Annual Home for the Holidays TV Special http://www.davethomasfoundationforadoption.org/html/home/index.asp Kidsdata http://www.kidsdata.org/ Finance Project Promising Practices Catalog http://www.financeproject.org/irc/promising.asp Community Partnershipshttp://www.chapinhall.org/article_abstract.aspx?ar=1420&L2=61&L3=129 for Protecting Children: Phase II Outcome Evaluation Education Issues Webpage http://www.abanet.org/child/rclji/education/home.html Higher Education Opportunities for Foster Youth: A Primer for Policy Makers http://www.ihep.org/Pubs/PDF/fosteryouth.pdf Conservation of Sibling http://cfrcwww.social.uiuc.edu/pubreports/PubsBriefs.htm Bonds Update A Study of New York City's Family Assessment Program http://www.vera.org/publications/publications_5.asp?publication_id=323 Positive Youth Development: State Strategies http://www.forumfyi.org/Files/strengtheningyouthpolicy.pdf Three Issue Briefs from the Workforce Initiative http://www.iaswresearch.org/ Health Care Issues for http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/socwork/nrcfcpp/info_services/child-and-adolescent-health-c Children in Kinship Care Federal Programs to Assist Transition-Age Youth with Serious Mental Health Conditions http://www.bazelon.org/publications/movingon/ Expanding Perspectives:http://www.nichq.org/nichq Improving Cultural Competency in Children's Health Care Enhancing Child Development Services in Medicaid Managed Care http://www.chcs.org/publications3960/publications_show.htm?doc_id=300749 State Approaches to Promoting Young Children's Healthy Mental Development http://www.cmwf.org/publications/publications_show.htm?doc_id=325120

Through the Child and Family Service Review process, it was found that there is a significant positive relationship betwe Our latest webcast is now available for viewing in our archives, along with handouts for downloading. Segments include K BRYCS is a national technical assistance project working to broaden the scope of information and collaboration among se Presents information on instruments that can be used to screen and assess youth for mental health- and substance use-r A series of five teleconferences from January to May 2005 will be focused on child trauma -- the developmental impact Register for four workshops to be held January 24-28 in Nashville, Tennessee. Topics are: ICWA Expert Witness and P Looking for tools and information to build and strengthen the child welfare workforce? Visit this new section of the Na The Youth Transition Funders Group was formed in 1995 by advocates from foundations dedicated to improving the lives Please plan to attend the CWLA national conference, Children 2005: Crossing the Cultural Divide in Washington, DC, fro Now available from Chapin Hall Center for Children, the audio portion of a conference held November 2004. Full audio r These KIDS COUNT Pocket Guides are designed to give advocates and policymakers a better understanding of condition The current issue of the NYU Child Study Center Letter attempts to provide clarification about the developmental and This brochure from the National Indian Child Welfare Association provides answers to questions frequently asked by fa There is still time to submit your presentation for Pathways to Adulthood Conference in Atlanta, Georgia, May 18-20, 20 Tell your youth about this internship opportunity, which provides former foster youths, who are enrolled in college or gr The Children’s Bureau has published its Preliminary FY 2002 Estimates data of foster care and adoption statistics. The The Children's Bureau has released three new publications: The Role of Educators in Preventing and Responding to Child This set of tools is designed to assist states in assessing six areas of capacity to support effective adolescent health pr This brief from the Urban Institute examines government payments that children in kinship care are eligible to receive. Tax tips for foster families for the 2004 tax year from TurboTax. An overview of the tax code regarding children with disabilities from Schwab Learning. Important information for those The National Adoption Center in Philadelphia has launched this new website for children ages 8 to 12. This site designed The National Assembly's Family Strengthening Policy Center has released this policy brief. Findings suggest youth ment The National Network for Adoption Advocacy has announced six $15,000 mini-grants to support the application, use and This publication, which can be downloaded as a PDF, provides information on the 11 National Resource Centers (NRCs) fu Olmstead County, Minnesota has created this guide to family visiting as part of its Child and Family Service Review Prog The School of the 21st Century has developed a web site devoted to resources for immigrant families with young childre The Urban Institute’s Child Welfare Research Program brief series was recently inaugurated with this piece. The series The Center for Information & Research on Civic Learning & Engagement has announced a new grant competition for rese ―Supporting Promising Practices and Positive Outcomes: A Shared Responsibility" will be held in Boston, Massachusetts, The purpose of this Guide from the National Child Welfare Resource Center for Organizational Improvement is to provi The Parent Leadership Network is an online community for parents to connect with one another to develop and expand t Research in Practice, a UK-based project, promotes positive outcomes for children and families through the use of rese The National Foster Parent Association offers scholarships for foster youth who wish to further their education beyon FRIENDS, the National Resource Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention Programs (CBCAP) has published American Humane’s 2005 Conference and Skills Building Institutes on FGDM, ―One Family, One Community, Many Voices… States have a variety of policies regarding in-service training for foster parents. We have assembled those we were abl The NRCFCPPP will be hosting a webcast on the 2005 Foster Care Month campaign, Change a Lifetime on Thursday, Marc The February 14 issue of this Child Welfare League of American publication provides a concise rundown of how child wel Youth Law News is the newsletter of the National Center for Youth Law. The December 2004 issue contains the fifth in This study was designed to explore the question of why, despite an increasing demand for children to adopt and active a If you have access to the N cable channel, tune in Friday night, February 18 at 9:00 p.m. EST for this new teen drama c These new state fact sheets from Children’s Defense Fund describe the context for child welfare spending by providing AARP offers this summary of tax information that may affect grandparents and other relatives raising children.

This monograph from the Bureau of Justice Assistance describes the history, mission, and goals of family dependency tr In preparation for Child Abuse Prevention Month in April, the Prevention website has been updated with a new communit A new family support resource on cultural competence has been made available by the National Resource Center for Com Youth with intellectual disabilities have not had many chances to go to college. This is changing as individuals across the

Register now for our March 17 webcast, Change a Lifetime: Foster Care Month 2005. Presenters will be: Gerald P. Mallo The NRCRCPPP is in the process of reviewing and updating all of our website materials. One of our newest additions is a Following the passage of the Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Servic This portion of the Treatment Improvement Exchange website contains information of interest to those working with su This new Juvenile Justice Bulletin describes the role of an ombudsman and examines how Tennessee, Connecticut, and Ge The National Family Preservation has released an Advanced Fatherhood Training Curriculum (AFTC) package. The curric The first phase of the 2005 National Foster Care Month campaign website is now available. Please visit to download traditional

Register for the March 17th webcast at 3:00 EST, in which presenters will discuss the scope of the problem, the reason The relationship between adoption subsidies and adoption outcomes was the focus of a study recently released by the U The impact of child abuse and neglect is greatest among very young children, who are extremely vulnerable to the effec Policymakers and researchers have begun to emphasize the importance of developing a continuum of services to reach al The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is holding a national conference on issues related to protecting teen In this paper written for the NRCFCPPP, consultant Lorrie L. Lutz, M.P.P., discusses lessons learned in facilitated dialogu

Tune in to Change a Lifetime: National Foster Care Month 2005, a webcast sponsored by the NRCFCPPP on March 16 at 1:00 p.m. EST

DHHS/ACF has issued this nine-page bulletin, which provides important information concerning the process ACF will use High staff turnover continues to be a major issue in the child welfare profession, according this national survey of child The transition from adolescence to adulthood is often a tumultuous time for a young person, but it is especially difficult The New England Region Training Conference & National Child Care and Development Conference intends to spark a rena This study from Chapin Hall Center for Children at the University of Chicago indicates that the likelihood of youth runn This report from the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration looks at the need for and receipt of subst This Guidebook from Child Welfare League of America will help state and local jurisdictions achieve greater system coo This discussion paper from the Center for the Study of Social Policy was prepared as a guide for the District of Columb Details about how the state must fulfill its responsibility to children in foster care are enumerated in a complex combin This publication offers a global scan of the historical involvement of faith communities in child welfare services. It desc California’s Assembly Bill 490 has been cited as a model for addressing the educational needs of foster youth, ensuring This position paper from the National Foster Youth Advisory Council describes key components of success and recomme This report on children admitted to foster care in seven states from 1990 to 2002 examines what effect, if any, the fe The National Foster Care Coalition is partnering with the USO to develop a support network for former foster youth se The Field Center for Children's Policy, Practice and Research at the University of Pennsylvania will host "One Child, Man The Partnership for People with Disabilities at Virginia Commonwealth University created this Web course, Written for If you were unable to tune in to our March 17 webcast on this year’s National Foster Care Month campaign, you can down This is the ninth annual report showing state-by-state data on child abuse and neglect from the National Child Ab The Center for Public Policy Priorities has issued this policy brief on the practical questions and concerns involved in pri his report from the American Federation of State County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), AFL-CIO looks at Florida This final report from the Institute of Applied Research looks at Minnesota’s Structured Decision Making (SDM) Family Risk As This report from the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse focuses on substance abuse within U.S. families NDAS is a part of the Child Welfare League of America's National Center for Research, Data and Technology. Now avai A study by Casey Family Programs, Harvard Medical School, the State of Washington Office of Children’s Administratio This guidebook from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention’s Juvenile Justice Evaluation Center disc In the 1960s and 1970s, American Indian children were about six times more likely to be placed in foster care than othe

This report from Advocates for Children of New York documents an extraordinary success rate in removing barriers to In this 1999 report, the Children's Research Center (CRC) reviewed data from agencies using actuarial risk assessments More and more states are experiencing a rise in child welfare cases related to the production and/or use of methamphe This document provides a summary and analysis of CFSRs and PIPs highlighting the substance abuse issues included in th This Resource Sheet from the Australian Institute of Family Studies provides and overview of research on the connecti To register, send an e-mail to webseminar@cdc.gov by April 22, 2005. Space is limited and will be filled on a first come This guide from Casey Family Programs is for everyone working towards successful educational outcomes for youth in fo AdoptUSKids is now accepting applications for the next round of mini-grants to parent groups. Adoptive parent, foster p Many states and local jurisdictions are planning special events in May to provide an opportunity for people to get involved This study from the National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center was designed to provide a qualitative analy El sitio web Adopte1.org es la version en espanol de AdoptUSKids.org. Este sitio web es solamente una parte de una colabora FirstStep is an easy-to-use, interactive tool for case managers, outreach workers, and others working with people who a The National Child Welfare Resource Center for Organizational Improvement is holding the first of its 2005 teleconfer A growing number of human services programs claim to be using a strengths-based approach in their work. While these a Expanding on the ―It’s My Life‖ transition framework, this handbook from Casey Family Programs is intended for child w This project of the Center for the Study of Social Policy works to develop tools and frameworks to unravel the complex Children in foster care are at increased risk for poor outcomes and need high quality programs to ensure their physical Policy Briefs on this site, funded by the MacArthur Foundation, include ―Youth Aging out of Foster Care‖ and ‖Challenge The National Adoption Information Clearinghouse web site now provides the Adoption Assistance by State database. Inf The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilitie This is an outline of a training module on the case planning process from the Public Child Welfare Training Academy, whi In North Carolina, the Family and Children's Resource Program offers training to state workers. This four-day compete This curriculum from the National Resource Center in Child Welfare Training & Evaluation includes a module on case plan The National Child Welfare Resource Center on Legal and Judicial Issues has published this list of questions for judges Also from the NRC on Legal and Judicial Issues, this document outlines the ―nuts and bolts‖ of effective permanency he Three important resources from Zero to Three: ―Court Teams for Maltreated Infants and Toddlers" is a fact sheet des Register for our June 14 web cast, which will provide participants with information and tools to quickly identify and enga This new one day competency-based curriculum from NRCFCPPP helps workers structure their visits with family to prom The American Public Human Services Association and the National Governors Association will hold a forum on Capitol Hil The Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (MSPCC), in collaboration with several legislators a This website, funded by a grant from the Freddie Mac Foundation, provides information about getting involved in the lif This collaborative effort of the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare, University of Pittsburgh School of Social W Our June 14 web cast will provide participants with information and tools to quickly identify and engage relatives for chi We have added a number of resources on the subject of racial disparities in child welfare to our website: links to studie A new analysis of the child welfare system by CQ Researcher is now available on CWLA's website. CQ Researcher is a br From Chapin Hall Center for Children at the University of Chicago, this is the second report from the Midwest Evaluatio This new PBS documentary tells the intimate stories of three young people who "age out" of the foster care system and are now On May 18, the House Ways and Means Subcommittee on Human Resources held a hearing to explore issues surrounding This book is the third in a series of Child Welfare League of America ―Toolboxes for Permanency.‖ Written by NRCFCP There’s still time to register for our June 14 webcast, ―Lighting the Fire of Urgency: Reunification of Families in Americ A new report from the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), U.S. Department of Healt This Technical Assistance Brief from the Permanency Planning for Children Department of the National Council of Juvenile The steps involved in developing a strategic plan are described in this document from the Harvard Family Research Proj A new study finds that, when mothers of young children are imprisoned, children placed in a stable home environment fa

Comprehensive family assessments take into account not only presenting symptoms but also underlying causes for behavi

This new document from the NRCFCPPP gives an overview of state policies on firearm safety in foster homes. For a current news arti

Three reports from the National Conference of State Legislatures highlight the role of state legislators in the CFSRs a The Virginia-based Adoption Professionals' Resource website focuses primarily on the adoption of children from foster To help child welfare workers recognize the impact of substance abuse on families, the National Center on Substance Ab Join us at 1:00 pm EST on Tuesday, June 14 to learn about tools and techniques that can help you quickly identify and en Looking for an item from a past Weekly Update? We have provided searchable databases containing information from pa Each year, the majority of governors and numerous other officials join their constituents in recognizing and honoring the work o The National Foster Care Coalition, with the support of Casey Family Programs, has revised its popular FAQ with specifi In Mendocino County, California all families whose children have been removed are referred by the court to a local Fami ACTION for Child Protection provides consultation, training, and technical assistance to child welfare agencies and also The Adoption Excellence Awards are designed to recognize excellence in achieving the goals of safety, permanency, and This four-module curriculum was prepared by Regina Deihl, J.D., Legal Advocates for Permanent Parenting, Cecilia Fierm This manual provides information on the subjects of Permanency, Foster Parents and the Law, Dependency Court and Rem NDAS is a part of the Child Welfare League of America's National Center for Research, Data and Technology. Now avai First Star provides State profiles on child abuse and neglect and on the results of a survey on the ways state court syst This monograph is the research report of a project conducted in 2004 by Dr. Vivian Nix-Early and Paul DiLorenzo to dis This working paper from the Race Matters Consortium provides a descriptive analysis of the degree of overrepresentat The NRCFCPPP has been expanding our use of technology by using both webcasts and teleconferences to share informat The National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) has produced a report describing significant State legislation re Too many children are spending more time than necessary in foster care, due in part to delays, limited information and p This curriculum, developed by a partnership of national judicial organizations, is aimed at improving the court system’s a Vulnerable families and communities are often the most in need of multiple services and community supports to address The National Abandoned Infants Resource Center has released this report, which details a qualitative study in which chi This new NRCFCPPP document provides links, where available, to online state regulations and policies regarding foster ho This National Public Radio site provides information about the growing crisis caused by methamphetamine, which is being face The National Family Preservation Network has released a study on the use of Intensive Family Preservation Services (IF A report on the roundtable discussion held in April 2005 at the 15th National Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect. L The Annie E. Casey Foundation, Brookings Institution, and Chapin Hall are sponsoring a conference, ―Child Protection: Us The National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center will sponsor a Webcast on August 5 that focuses on helpin Judge Leonard Edwards of the Santa Clara County, California Juvenile Court made this presentation at the Fourth Natio Preliminary estimates of foster care and adoption statistics for fiscal year 2003 are now available. Compared to 2002, t This report from the Government Accountability Office identifies the major challenges to placing and keeping special ne This document, a collaborative effort between the National Association of Public Child Welfare Administrators (NAPCW This training curriculum is aimed at mentor program managers in the state of California who serve or who wish to serve The New York City (NYC) Administration for Children’s Services developed this pamphlet to help child welfare staff und This bibliography was compiled by the National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect and National Adoption Information C The Institute of Applied Research (IAR) is an independent research and consulting organization specializing in providing The review of turnover of ongoing case managers in the private agencies providing foster care and safety services for t This report from the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges presents evaluation results of case outcomes Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) represents a special threat to children involved with the child welfare system. The June i To better address juvenile firesetting, professionals must develop a fuller understanding of the critical issues—the how The latest edition of the newsletter of the National Resource Center for Family-Centered Practice and Permanency Plan This monograph from the National Council for Adoption examines how well juvenile and family courts work with public ch

This statement of the National Foster Youth Advisory Council gives ten recommendations for ensuring every youth aging The Iowa Foster and Adoptive Parents Association (IFAPA) seeks to support kinship caregivers in a variety of ways. IFA These guidelines are a cooperative effort of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ) and the The 16th annual KIDS COUNT Data Book is now available. The state-by-state data contained in the 2005 Data Book are Our web page on family group decision-making now has several State tools for implementing this practice in its various f Another new tool from Mississippi is this supervisory guide, developed to support supervisors in the process of developin Texas began Family Group Decision-Making in multiple sites across the state in December 2003. In 37 counties at the ti The NDAS website has been updated to include the new 2003 National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS Medical and psychological researchers, treatment providers and specialists with many years of experience studying addi The Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics has released its latest annual report, America's Children: This issue brief includes a review and synthesis of research on concurrent planning and presents successful examples of This factsheet from the National Adoption Information Clearinghouse explores the differences between foster parenti The National Resource Center for Organizational Improvement offers a process and a set of guides child welfare agenc This publication from the Washington State Department of Health outlines the state's assessment and response and inc This guide from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention provides concise, practical information to law This handbook from the University of South Florida School of Social Work’s Florida Kinship Center is an example of an e We don’t usually point you to newspaper articles that may be online for only a short time. This one, however, features th Although most states are implementing their PIPs without major changes in resources, some states have provided new fu This article from The Source, the newsletter of the National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center, profiles a This Bureau of Justice Assistance Bulletin finds drug courts to be the primary tool for fighting methamphetamine addiction and The National Governor’s Association Center for Best Practices convened this meeting to identify key elements and strat The need for stakeholder involvement is a constant topic of discussion at child welfare meetings across the country. The Looking for information that’s not on the NRCFCPPP website? The Clearinghouse, a federally funded information service This survey of homeless youth and young adults from the Amherst H. Wilder Foundation reveals some very harsh life ex This National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare site provides methamphetamine resources, including a good Concerns about children's health has led a number of states to ban smoking in foster homes. Arkansas, Arizona, Maine, O The Community Service Foundation (CSF) runs a court-ordered community service program for youth as part of the in-h Watching the continuing news coverage of families displaced by this disaster, being shuttled from place to place carryin We, like many other child welfare organizations, are receiving requests from individuals interested in providing foster c A list of important phone numbers, email addresses and other information that may be helpful to those recovering from Hotline for information: 1 (888) LAHELPU or 1 (888) 524-3578 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Information on: * Food Stamp Bene If you are a displaced Mississippi foster or adoptive family with children currently in your care, please call 1-800-821-9 DFPS is working in cooperation with other Texas Health and Human Services agencies and Louisiana Social Services to c The NRCFCPPP has been adding resources to its Disaster Relief page daily. Please visit often for the latest information Many victims of the hurricane no longer have the records or legal documents to help prove their eligibility for benefits This policy brief from the Urban Institute presents the first national analysis of Medicaid spending on children in foste The Child Welfare League of America is sponsoring this 5-part teleconference series focusing on the impacts that meth In a breakthrough series collaborative (BSC), teams from state, county, and tribally administered child welfare agencies The Brookings Institution and the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University have jointly published this issue of th As Hurricane Rita builds in the Gulf of Mexico, there are still over 2,000 children separated from their families by Hur The National Child Welfare Resource Center of Legal and Judicial Issues, working with their partners the National Cou Methamphetamine use is a growing problem for children and families across the country. The National Clearinghouse on Keeping up to date with the latest information on child welfare, adoption, prevention, and administration can be difficult New briefings on Preventing Teenage Pregnancy in Looked After Children and Terminal Care in Care Homes, as well as ot

Each year on the Saturday before Thanksgiving, professionals and community members come together for the adoption On July 26 the NRCFCPPP and the Child Welfare League of America hosted Part II of a teleconference series on racial The Congressional Research Service (CRS) prepared this a report outlining the problem of overrepresentation of Africa Questions and answers on helping families impacted by hurricane disasters from the Substance Abuse and Mental Healt Many children caught up in a natural disaster have not only been separated from their families but find themselves in a n During and after disasters, pediatricians can assist parents and community leaders not only by accommodating the unique The Child Welfare Review Project assists the Children's Bureau in compiling promising approaches that reflect innovativ Now in its fifth year, this report provides data on the performance of States in meeting the needs of children and fami The October 2005 issue of Children’s Bureau Express includes articles on Hurricane Impact and Response for Children a This report provides a snapshot of the functioning and the potential service needs of children and families soon after a The Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, announced it would First Star has reviewed and compiled statutes relating to the representation of children in dependency courts, public ac This briefing from the Social Care Institute for Excellence examines available literature on self-harm, with attention to This report from the National Resource Center for Youth Services and the New England Network for Child, Youth & Fam The National Child Welfare Resource Center on Legal and Judicial Issues has provided a sample Memorandum of Unders This case review study in four Minnesota counties was conducted to take a close look at case practice and service delive The Children and Family Research Center, School of Social Work, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has release In 2001, the California Legislature enacted the Child Welfare Outcomes and Accountability System, which recognized th There is a growing concern to identify empirically based interventions in child and adolescent mental health. This review Foster parents are placed in a vulnerable position when they choose to foster if they do not have liability insurance to pr On September 20 the NRCFCPPP and the Child Welfare League of America hosted Part I of a teleconference series for The Fall 2005 edition of the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s newsletter is a special electronic issue designed to chronicle ev This publication from the Skillman Center for Children at Wayne State University describes a trauma response kit deve Practice-driven policy briefs highlight emerging, promising, and proven practices in the field of family strengthening. Th This new PBS documentary chronicles the impact of domestic violence on children and the justice system’s response to d This Information Memorandum reminds States of flexibility in the title IV-E program that may help them serve vulnera Disasters such as Hurricane Katrina take a heavy emotional and physical toll not only on their primary victims, but also o This study from Chapin Hall explores the intersection of placement in foster care and the emotional disturbance (ED) cl The Helping Your Child publication series aims to provide parents with the tools and information necessary to help their The Institute for the Advancement of Social Work Research launched its Child Welfare Workforce Initiative, in Januar This essay on change comes from the world of education, but is a perfect fit for change in child welfare. The author off The Minnesota Department of Human Services created this guide to assist social service agencies in performing relative This bulletin from the National Data Analysis System at the Child Welfare League of America summarizes results from Three new laws (AB1633, AB519 and AB824) address the challenges of foster youth in transitioning out of the system a Each year the National Child Welfare Resource Center on Legal and Judicial Issues reviews reports from the State Cou This study from Mathematica Research examines maternity group home programs in seven states, including some which s This article from the New Zealand Medical Journal examines what evidence could be found regarding the effects of ma The Administration for Children and Families plans to replace the six national data measures used for the CFSR with six This article from Action for Child Protection discusses integrating safety considerations into case plans by addressing t This article from Fostering Perspectives, the newsletter for foster and adoptive parents from the North Carolina Divisi The documents linked from this page describe some of the clinical-treatment and trauma-informed service approaches i This study, commissioned by Bridging Refugee Youth & Children Services (BRYCS), takes an ―on the ground‖ look in Hous The October issue of this newsletter from National CASA highlights the importance of early identification of the developmental n This new publication from the Child Welfare League of America provides direction to child placement agencies responsib

New from the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Family to Family Initiative. This tool is organized into four major sections: Se This paper highlights the unique characteristics of the young people who age out of the foster care system each year. T Parents facing life-threatening or debilitating health conditions, or other events that can affect family stability (e.g. dr This paper from The Prevention Researcher discusses research on protective factors and resiliency that can lead youth Listen to this National Public Radio broadcast from November 1, which features interviews with Donna Butts, Executive This report from the Urban Institute provides a national look at the state of adoption recruitment by describing: levels The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) offers ―Understanding Substance Use Dis This organization is comprised of individuals and organizations concerned about children endangered by caregivers who m Neighborhoods Count is a comprehensive foster parent recruitment campaign. The Campaign allows users to download an North Carolina has developed a state blueprint for child maltreatment prevention. This report from a statewide task fo This report from Grantmakers for Health discusses the role of philanthropy in meeting the needs of children exposed t The Children’s Bureau has revamped its website. While we suggest that you take some time to explore the whole site, we The National Child Welfare Resource Center for Youth Development publishes this newsletter twice a year in print and t The NDAS website has been updated to include the 2003 Adoption and Foster Care Analysis System (AFCARS) data and On October 14, the National Academy for State Health Policy (NASHP) hosted a Web conference co-sponsored by the The number of children involved with mandated child welfare agencies with complex medical, physical and developmental This article from the April 2004 issue of Envision describes the author's examination of the factors that contribute to In the wake of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, many child welfare agencies have begun to review their own disaster prepar Kudos to the State of Utah for creating this website, in English and Spanish, for young people in the state. It includes s bility and Success: A Field Guide for Information Sharing This Guide from the Washington Department of Social and Health Services, Office of the Superintendent of Public Ins States are addressing the issue of runaway children and other children missing from child welfare custody in a variety o This book from Casey Family Programs provides useful information for child welfare professionals and others who work Visit the new Children's Bureau website for better access to information on promoting the safety, permanency, and well HHS' Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and the Ad Council have created a series While most adoptions have positive outcomes for the children and their families, many adoptive families need supportive This year’s A Home for the Holidays television special on adoption will be aired on CBS on Wednesday, Dec. 21 (8:00-9:0 Two counties in California are using advanced information technology to provide information about foster care and other This compendium of programs, practices, and initiatives intended to improve the futures of children, families and commu Chapin Hall's evaluation of a popular child welfare reform designed to broaden responsibility for child protection to all c The Child Welfare Resource Center on Legal and Judicial Issues offers this page dedicated to the topic of educational n This Institute for Higher Education Policy report argues that foster youth are the most disadvantaged group when it co This brief from the Children and Family Research Center looks at the placement of siblings in foster care in Illinois, upd When families are struggling to communicate, trying to control the behavior of an unruly child, or experiencing a crisis, t A growing body of research shows that kids who feel safe, valued and connected to caring adults are more likely to be p The Institute for the Advancement of Social Work Research has published three briefs from its Child Welfare Workfo This new NRCFCPPP Information Packet reviews current information available on this topic. The Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law published a collection of fact sheets on the federal programs that address t The National Initiative for Children's Healthcare Quality (NICHQ) has released this publication offering practical stra This Best Clinical and Administrative Practices Toolkit, produced by the Center for Health Care Strategies, Inc., highlig A Survey of Medicaid, and Maternal and Child Health, and Mental Health presents information on how states are addres

nt positive relationship between caseworker visits with children and a number of other indicators for safety, permanency and well-be wnloading. Segments include Karin Gunderson speaking about family group conferencing, Deanna Grace on FGC in the African-American on and collaboration among service providers - in order to strengthen services to refugee youth, children and their families. The Pub al health- and substance use-related disorders at various stages of the juvenile justice process. The Guide includes profiles of more a -- the developmental impact of child trauma, how knowledge of child trauma can enhance child welfare practice in various settings s ICWA Expert Witness and Procedures; Cross-Cultural Skills for the Non-Indian; Positive Indian Parenting Train the Trainers; and E sit this new section of the National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information website. Along with up-to-date research, r dicated to improving the lives of our nation’s most vulnerable young people. Foundations involved in the YTFG are committed to achie Divide in Washington, DC, from March 9-11, 2005. Workshops and general sessions will address advocacy and public policy at the nati November 2004. Full audio recordings of sessions on the transition to adulthood, health/mental health, vulnerable populations, youth er understanding of conditions faced by the families living in large cities and rural areas in their states. Based on data from the 200 about the developmental and social issues that confront GLB youth. It discusses myths and misconceptions, the specific development stions frequently asked by families about ICWA. tlanta, Georgia, May 18-20, 2005. Pathways to Adulthood is sponsored by the USDHHS Administration for Children and Families, Ch o are enrolled in college or graduate school, an opportunity to intern in congressional offices for the summer. The program is a paid i and adoption statistics. The number of children in foster care continues to fall, reaching 532,000 as of 9/30/02. The number of tho nting and Responding to Child Abuse and Neglect, Child Protection in Families Experiencing Domestic Violence, and Supervising Child P ffective adolescent health programs. The System Capacity project and tools are a collaborative effort of the Association of Matern p care are eligible to receive. The authors find that children's receipt of financial assistance is still low given their eligibility. Many,

portant information for those paying out-of-pocket for transportation, special schools, etc. es 8 to 12. This site designed for children whose lives have been touched by adoption and their parents includes: Speak Out, children Findings suggest youth mentoring that involves parents or caregivers hold significant promise for strengthening disadvantaged famil pport the application, use and maintenance of the One Church One Child concept in the recruitment of adoptive parents for children l Resource Centers (NRCs) funded by the Children's Bureau. Each NRC provides onsite training and technical assistance to States, Tr d Family Service Review Program Improvement Plan. The Guidelines are an opportunity for social workers to enhance their practice w ant families with young children and the professionals serving them. ed with this piece. The series will monitor how child welfare policy becomes practice, identify emerging issues in child welfare resear ew grant competition for research on civic engagement that is conducted by youth. Teams that include youth researchers are encoura ld in Boston, Massachusetts, April 18 - 23, 2005. The conference theme promotes interagency collaboration, as well as collaboration ional Improvement is to provide performance principles, related indicators and tools that a child welfare agency can use to assess th ther to develop and expand their leadership skills and opportunities. This e-mail group is also an important resource for others who w milies through the use of research evidence. The group achieves its mission by identifying effective methods of understanding and us urther their education beyond high school, including college or university studies, vocational and job training, and correspondence cou grams (CBCAP) has published this technical assistance report, an overview of cost effective child abuse and neglect prevention strate One Community, Many Voices…Rediscover the Village‖ will be held in Long Beach, CA, June 8-11, 2005. The early-bird deadline is May assembled those we were able to locate here. Note that this is not a comprehensive list of all policies. Areas covered are: mandatory a Lifetime on Thursday, March 20 from 1:00 to 2:30 p.m., EST. Look for information about registration in future issues of Weekly U cise rundown of how child welfare spending may be affected by the proposed federal Fiscal Year 2006 budget. 04 issue contains the fifth in a series of articles analyzing the results of the Child and Family Service Reviews, this one on the ment children to adopt and active adoptive family recruitment efforts, few ―general applicants‖ (those who were not the children’s relative ST for this new teen drama centered around three orphaned brothers coming of age in Harlem, NY. The half-hour, character-driven welfare spending by providing data on abused and neglected children, children in foster care, children who have left foster care and atives raising children.

goals of family dependency treatment courts (FDTCs) and how they fit into the criminal justice system. It documents the growth of updated with a new community resource packet. The website and packet feature factsheets and a poster in both English and Spanish onal Resource Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention (FRIENDS).This training tool, "Introduction to Cultural Competen ging as individuals across the country begin to create opportunities for these youth to reap the benefits of postsecondary education.

enters will be: Gerald P. Mallon, Executive Director, NRCFCPPP; Virginia Pryor, Casey Family Programs; Karen Jorgenson, National Fos of our newest additions is a page on Guardianship resources, including two PowerPoint presentations used in a recent teleconference of Health and Human Services has been evaluating state child welfare systems using specific outcome measures. In response, states erest to those working with substance-abusing mothers of children in the child welfare system. ennessee, Connecticut, and Georgia have designed diverse ombudsman programs to serve the needs of children and youth. Also provid m (AFTC) package. The curriculum focuses on best practice and the actual skills needed to engage fathers. The AFTC is intended for ase visit to download traditional and ribbon campaign toolkit materials as well as to order pins, ribbons, and posters. To learn more about the

pe of the problem, the reasons children are missing, the risks facing these children, and what the research suggests about effective dy recently released by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Eval emely vulnerable to the effects of maltreatment. If not properly addressed, the emotional, developmental, and physical health compl tinuum of services to reach all the children and families in need of support in the child welfare system. This continuum of care would ues related to protecting teens from sexual exploitation by older partners. The conference will take place on March 23-24, 2005 in A s learned in facilitated dialogues around the country with birth families, resource families, and child welfare workers. Insights from e

PPP on March 16 at 1:00 p.m. EST. Learn how you can plan a successful campaign to raise awareness about the needs of children and youth in foster

ning the process ACF will use to schedule the second round of CFSRs and the time-frames and procedures that States and ACF will u g this national survey of child welfare agencies conducted by the American Public Human Services Association (APHSA) in collaborati n, but it is especially difficult for vulnerable youth - those in foster care, those with health or mental health issues, and those in the rence intends to spark a renaissance in thinking about the continuum of care and service delivery to children, youth, and families thr t the likelihood of youth running away from care in Illinois increased significantly starting in the mid- 1990s, more than doubling betw need for and receipt of substance abuse treatment among youths who have been in foster care. Youths who have ever been in foster s achieve greater system coordination and integration. The population of so many of our nation's youth and families who have been vic de for the District of Columbia's Child and Family Services Agency (CFSA), Office of the Attorney General, and the Family Court of merated in a complex combination of state and federal statutes, court decisions, state regulations, agency policies, and local practice hild welfare services. It describes recent trends and leadership programs, and concludes with recommendations. ds of foster youth, ensuring that foster youth have stable school placements, placement in the least restrictive educational placeme ents of success and recommendations for improving educational outcomes. es what effect, if any, the federal Adoption and Safe Families Act has had on the proportion of children admitted to foster care tha k for former foster youth serving in the military in Iraq and Afghanistan. Currently they are outreach to identify young people who ania will host "One Child, Many Hands‖ on June 2 and 3, 2005 in Philadelphia. The conference will convene professionals representing his Web course, Written for health professionals, it is also appropriate for other professionals and students serving people with dev Month campaign, you can download the materials and view the archived webcast by visiting our website. from the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data Systems. s and concerns involved in privatizing case management, as is currently being considered in the state of Texas. ME), AFL-CIO looks at Florida’s efforts at child welfare privatizations and several evaluations which have been previously published. Making (SDM) Family Risk Assessment instrument, which is used by Child Protection Services with families that have been reported for chil nce abuse within U.S. families. The report also has strong juvenile justice interests, and notes that "the most effective place to curb ata and Technology. Now available are (1) 2002 Urban Institute Fiscal Data – updated tables for all child welfare-related expenditur ce of Children’s Administration Research, and the State of Oregon Department of Human Services. Few studies have examined how c Justice Evaluation Center discusses disproportionate minority contact (DMC) in the context of a seven-step evaluation approach, focu aced in foster care than other children and many were placed in non-American Indian homes or institutions. In 1978, the Congress en

s rate in removing barriers to education for children in foster care. Project Achieve employs three key strategies: providing individua ng actuarial risk assessments to determine if these systems have resulted in a greater level of disparity in substantiation of maltrea ion and/or use of methamphetamine. This issue of Children’s Service Practice Notes from the North Carolina Division of Social Servi ce abuse issues included in the States' reports. 50 state reports, in addition to reports from Washington, DC and Puerto Rico and 32 w of research on the connection between child maltreatment and a wide range of immediate and long-term negative outcomes. d will be filled on a first come, first serve basis. The presenter will be Vincent Felitti, M.D. onal outcomes for youth in foster care or out-of-home care. The book provides a modular framework for achieving collaboration acro ups. Adoptive parent, foster parent or kinship groups are eligible to apply but they must include parents who adopted through the ch nity for people to get involved, whether as foster parents, volunteers, mentors, employers or in other ways. It is also an opportunity to provide a qualitative analysis of children in kinship care. An attempt was made to record the knowledge, feelings, and understandi ente una parte de una colaboracion desarrollada para reclutar familias para ninos estadunidenses en espera a la adopcion. (AdoptUSKids ha ers working with people who are homeless. The information on this web site will help you assist your clients to access benefits from F e first of its 2005 teleconferences on April 26. Information and handouts for the teleconference are now available. h in their work. While these agencies and programs certainly ―talk the talk‖ of strengths-based practice, it is unclear whether the se ograms is intended for child welfare professionals and others responsible for helping young people prepare for transition to adulthoo works to unravel the complexities of racial disproportionality and disparity in child welfare. The project features a national partners ams to ensure their physical and emotional well-being. A recent issue brief from Voices for America's Children highlights these criti f Foster Care‖ and ‖Challenges in the Transition to Adulthood for Youth in Foster Care, Juvenile Justice, and Special Education.‖ stance by State database. Information is provided by the Association of Administrators of the Interstate Compact on Adoption and and Developmental Disabilities have produced a toolkit to help parents learn about the milestones in their children's growth, from bir elfare Training Academy, which provides a comprehensive, competency based in-service training program for the public child welfare rkers. This four-day competency-based curriculum focuses on the skills and knowledge needed to achieve successful outcomes with f ncludes a module on case planning. All training materials are available to download. s list of questions for judges to ask. It could easily guide a worker in (1) thinking about the case plan and (2) developing a court repo ‖ of effective permanency hearings, including the issues to be addressed in each hearing and forms that provide a record of the agen Toddlers" is a fact sheet describing a new effort supported by the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges. ―Ensuring t ls to quickly identify and engage relatives for children and youth in America's child welfare system. The results, strengths and challe heir visits with family to promote safety, well being and permanency. It provides a review of what has been learned from the CFSR ab ill hold a forum on Capitol Hill about youth aging out of foster care, on Thursday, May 19, at 2 p.m. EST, to provide an opportunity fo ation with several legislators and more than 30 organizations, recently released this policy paper with recommendations to address th out getting involved in the life of a child in foster care and includes a gallery of art and writing created by young people in care. Pittsburgh School of Social Work, and Pennsylvania Child and Youth Administrators, provides the trainer’s guides, handouts and over y and engage relatives for children and youth in America's child welfare system. Viewers will learn that families are typically larger i to our website: links to studies conducted in Minnesota and Washington, as well as a method for calculating disproportionality under R ebsite. CQ Researcher is a briefing paper, published by Congressional Quarterly, on specific policy and legislative issues and widely u t from the Midwest Evaluation of the Adult Functioning of Former Foster Youth, a longitudinal study of youth aging out of foster ca foster care system and are now surviving on their own. Created by award-winning producers and directors Roger Weisberg and Vanessa Ro to explore issues surrounding the placement of foster children in clinical drug trials, including under what conditions participation is p anency.‖ Written by NRCFCPPP Executive Director Gerald P. Mallon, it focuses on promising practices and approaches shown to prom fication of Families in America's Child Welfare System.‖ Learn about information and tools to quickly identify and engage relatives f E), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, uses data from three States to explore the relationships among foster parent c he National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Justices provides a field-tested checklist that judges can use to make inquiries regard Harvard Family Research Project. Although this process appears systematic and rational, it is often iterative and evolves substantially a stable home environment fare far better than those bounced from one home to another. The study is published in the May/June 20

underlying causes for behaviors and conditions affecting children. They are distinct from traditional assessments that have a more

r homes. For a current news article about the tragic shooting death of a child in foster care in Missouri – and the online discussion generated by it

ate legislators in the CFSRs and how the reviews can help state agencies work with their legislatures. ption of children from foster care. Resources include links for innovative practices and publications. tional Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare has released this new publication. The brief discusses the relationship of alcoho elp you quickly identify and engage relatives for children and youth in America's child welfare system. ontaining information from past issues on our website. nizing and honoring the work of caring foster parents by signing proclamations. In 2004, 40 states and the District of Columbia recognized M its popular FAQ with specific, user-friendly questions and answers for implementing the Chafee Foster Care Independence Program d by the court to a local Family Center, where they are offered weekly groups, parenting classes, and visitation services. Participatio hild welfare agencies and also operates the National Resource Center for Child Protective Services. One highlight of the ACTION we s of safety, permanency, and well-being of children in out-of-home care. The Department of Health and Human Services invites you t anent Parenting, Cecilia Fiermonte, J.D., American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law, and Dianne Kocer and Karen Jorge aw, Dependency Court and Removal of Children, Court Participation by Foster Parents, and Allegations of Maltreatment. The curriculu ata and Technology. Now available are several new tables from the 2003 CWLA State Agency Survey Data, including the new topic ―C y on the ways state court systems work for children. arly and Paul DiLorenzo to discover attitudes and interests of spirituality among foster care youth. Funded by Philadelphia’s Departm he degree of overrepresentation of African Americans, Latinos and Native Americans in out-of-home placements for the 50 states fo onferences to share information and promising practices on a range of issues important to States and Tribes. Visit our archive sites t gnificant State legislation related to child welfare issues enacted in 2004. It includes citations and summaries of specific child-welf ays, limited information and poor communication in the nation's juvenile and family courts. A new DVD released by the Pew Commissio mproving the court system’s ability to oversee the movement of foster care cases in order to shorten the time needed for children to mmunity supports to address their behavioral health needs. These needs are often exacerbated by larger social conditions such as po qualitative study in which children in kinship care were interviewed regarding their experiences in this setting. Preliminary data and d policies regarding foster home licensing requirements. In addition, we provide some basic information regarding licensing agency, ty phetamine, which is being faced by both law enforcement and child welfare in many states. In addition, it links to a study from the National A mily Preservation Services (IFPS), or services modeled after IFPS, with adoptive families. An in-depth look at two states, Missouri an on Child Abuse and Neglect. Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service (LIRS) and the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) ference, ―Child Protection: Using Research to Improve Policy and Practice," on July 21-22 that will feature papers that use data from gust 5 that focuses on helping organizations plan strategically and access diversified financial support to grow and sustain their prog sentation at the Fourth National Youth Permanency Convening this April in San Francisco. It presents an overview of the role of the vailable. Compared to 2002, there were fewer children in foster care at the end of the year and fewer children were waiting to be a placing and keeping special needs children in adoptive homes, examines what states and HHS have done to facilitate special needs ad fare Administrators (NAPCWA) and the Chadwick Center for Children, provides a common language and framework for understandin o serve or who wish to serve youth in foster care. Children who have been removed from their families typically face multiple risk fa o help child welfare staff understand immigration status and the immigration issues that affect children in child protective services National Adoption Information Clearinghouse in April 2005. For newer titles added to the Clearinghouse database, click: http://basis1.calib.co ation specializing in providing research and technical assistance services to state governments and agencies and other public service are and safety services for the Bureau of Milwaukee Child Welfare revealed that turnover of staff remains problematic, impacts neg tion results of case outcomes for child abuse and neglect cases that were randomly assigned to mediation and a comparison group of hild welfare system. The June issue of "Children's Services Practice Notes" explores ways child welfare practitioners can recognize PTSD an f the critical issues—the hows and whys—surrounding the problem. The May 2005 bulletin from Office of Juvenile Justice and Delin Practice and Permanency Planning is now available on our website. Articles include: What is Family-Centered Practice? Family-Cente ily courts work with public child welfare agencies to place children in foster care with safe, stable families. Legislative and judicial o

or ensuring every youth aging out of foster care has a place to call home, and can serve as a framework for action for agencies seek vers in a variety of ways. IFAPA created this packet of information for kinship families and those that serve them. urt Judges (NCJFCJ) and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) to identify comprehensive and effecti ed in the 2005 Data Book are now part of an interactive database. This year's essay, "Helping Our Most Vulnerable Families Overcom g this practice in its various forms. New listings include materials from California, Iowa and Mississippi. We hope to keep adding state rs in the process of developing and supporting staff to be family centered in their work. It should serve as a support to helping work 2003. In 37 counties at the time of this evaluation, it continues to expand. As a voluntary program, it is available following removal an glect Data System (NCANDS) data as well as several new related internet links. The updated NCANDS data appears on tables that a s of experience studying addictions and addiction treatment have written a letter to the media to request that policies addressing pr al report, America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being 2005. It includes the latest available data on 25 key indicators r sents successful examples of concurrent planning from the field that demonstrate evidence-based practice. Information from the fi ences between foster parenting and adopting and presents considerations for foster parents who are thinking about adopting their f of guides child welfare agencies can use, in conjunction with community collaboratives, to assess and enhance their service array. The essment and response and includes procedures for the law enforcement, child welfare, medical and legal systems. e, practical information to law enforcement officers investigating child fatalities in which abuse or neglect may have caused or contr p Center is an example of an effort to provide information about legal issues and services available to people who are caring for the c his one, however, features the work of one of our consultants, Kevin Campbell, who is a pioneer in the effort to reconnect youth in ou e states have provided new funding and others have reallocated existing resources in creative ways to support the achievement of PI ce Resource Center, profiles a new approach to bringing reunification to families separated due to parental substance abuse accompan ethamphetamine addiction and trafficking. Drug courts offer longer treatment periods, an emphasis on addressing co-occurring mental health entify key elements and strategies in a comprehensive state system that assists older foster youth in successfully transitioning to ad etings across the country. The general consensus among child welfare professionals is that ongoing, active collaboration with a variety y funded information service of the Children’s Bureau, provides a wide range of print and online information on child abuse, child wel veals some very harsh life experiences. Seven out of 10 of these young people spent time as children in a foster home, group home, o e resources, including a good sampling of state and local protocols. s. Arkansas, Arizona, Maine, Oregon, and Washington all have some sort of smoking ban in place for foster homes. Vermont is curren for youth as part of the in-home supervision and foster-care programs that is truly restorative. The youths perform tasks in the co d from place to place carrying their belongings (if they have any left) in plastic bags, I am struck by their similarities with children i erested in providing foster care or adopting children affected by Hurricane Katrina. The NRCFCPPP is responding to these questions pful to those recovering from Hurricane Katrina. Please use these phone numbers for information regarding relief efforts only. Infor mation on: * Food Stamp Benefits, including Disaster Food Stamp Benefits * Medicaid or WIC * Mental Health Counseling* Addictive care, please call 1-800-821-9157. Similar foster or adoptive families from Louisiana should call 1-800-259-3428. If you are a custod Louisiana Social Services to come to the aid of Hurricane Katrina victims. Visit the website for information. Of special interest: * Lo en for the latest information on aiding children and families, particularly those involved with child welfare, affected by Hurricane Kat their eligibility for benefits from various government programs. The President has granted special ―evacuee‖ status to individuals af spending on children in foster care and children adopted from foster care. The authors document the types of services most commo sing on the impacts that methamphetamine manufacture and use are having on the child welfare system and the creative responses of stered child welfare agencies come together to conduct small-scale practice changes that are rapidly tested and disseminated, and t ntly published this issue of the journal, The Future of Children. This issue features eight articles on marriage and its effects on chil ed from their families by Hurricane Katrina. The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children continues to reconnect families. Th eir partners the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges and the National Center for State Courts, is planning to aid in l he National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information has developed a list of resources on a variety of topics to help chi dministration can be difficult. Beginning in October 2005, the National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information and th e in Care Homes, as well as others, are available on the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) website.

me together for the adoption of thousands of children around the country. For more information and event planning materials, please leconference series on racial disproportionality for state program managers in foster care and adoption. Audio files of that tel overrepresentation of African American children in foster care and giving an overview and some of the possible reasons offered to e ance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Includes information for providers and counselors, parents and caregivers, a lies but find themselves in a new state, school, and living environment. Often they must receive help and care from people they do no by accommodating the unique needs of children but also by being cognizant of the psychological responses of children to reduce the oaches that reflect innovative efforts by the States in meeting the needs of children and families. The 41 new promising approaches he needs of children and families who come into contact with the child welfare system. Two Federal data reporting systems are used t and Response for Children and Families, resources for responding to methamphetamine abuse, Spanish language resources on the N ren and families soon after a child protective services investigation has taken place. Whether or not the investigation results in an op Services, announced it would release $14.5 million dollars in Adoption Incentive funds to 24 states, the District of Columbia, and Pu dependency courts, public access to child abuse and neglect proceedings, and public access dependency court records for all 50 stat n self-harm, with attention to risk factors. Self-harm is defined as ―a non fatal act in which an individual deliberately causes self inju etwork for Child, Youth & Family Services describes how spirituality programs - both secular and religious - look in agencies that do mple Memorandum of Understanding on court-agency cooperation in the CFSR process. This should be helpful to states as they enter se practice and service delivery for African American families in comparison to Caucasian American families by examining the level, ty Urbana-Champaign has released two reports on children in out-of-home care in Illinois. ―Conditions of Children in or at Risk of Foster y System, which recognized the need for a broader community effort to help families in crisis. Differential response is one of a numb nt mental health. This review from Psychiatric Times outlines interventions with the best research support. t have liability insurance to protect themselves financially from any harm or damage that children in their care may incur or inflict. M f a teleconference series for state program managers in foster care and adoption. Audio files of that teleconference, along with han ssue designed to chronicle evolving responses from their network of grantees and partners to the devastation wrought by Hurricane es a trauma response kit developed in response to Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome (PTSD) in children and adolescents. Exposure via d of family strengthening. The newest available briefs concern Supporting Families with Incarcerated Parents and Family-Centered C justice system’s response to domestic violence in custody cases. It premieres on October 20, 2005. Check your local PBS listings for may help them serve vulnerable children and families who have been affected by Hurricane Katrina. It discusses: Children at risk of eir primary victims, but also on the overworked professionals and volunteers who rush in to help in the aftermath. This interview with emotional disturbance (ED) classification. It suggests that it is critical that both the education and child welfare systems work to id mation necessary to help their children succeed in school and life. These booklets feature practical lessons and activities to help thei Workforce Initiative, in January 2004 with support from the Human Services Workforce Initiative of the Annie E. Casey Foundation a child welfare. The author offers practical strategies for leaders proposing change. gencies in performing relative searches when a child is removed from the home. Benefits of relative placement, cultural consideration ica summarizes results from a National Working Group survey on reunification, illustrating differences in state policies and reportin nsitioning out of the system at age 18. Respectively, they give the maximum amount from Social Security and Supplemental Security s reports from the State Court Improvement Programs and prepares this report. You can review reports by category or by state, as states, including some which serve primarily young women in the foster care system. regarding the effects of maternal meth use on the developing fetus. It suggests that while there are likely to be adverse developme es used for the CFSR with six data composites addressing the child welfare domains of maltreatment recurrence, maltreatment in fo nto case plans by addressing the enhancement of diminished caregiver protective capacities. rom the North Carolina Division of Social Services, provides a clear and concise introduction to trauma issues for foster parents nformed service approaches implemented by National Child Traumatic Stress Network grant sites to reduce the impact of exposure n ―on the ground‖ look in Houston, Dallas-Ft. Worth, and Austin, Texas, regarding the interaction of refugee and immigrant population tification of the developmental needs of the child, whether an infant or a teen. It includes a description of the Zero to Three Family Drug Trea placement agencies responsible for children in out-of-home care on the issue of children who go missing from care. It discusses prev

d into four major sections: Section I presents the characteristics of older children and youth in care for two years or more. Section ster care system each year. The framework for examining this population is being done within the context of Guideposts for Success ffect family stability (e.g. drug treatment and military deployment), must make choices about the care of their children. The parent resiliency that can lead youth to choose positive health behaviors and reduce their risk for negative outcomes. with Donna Butts, Executive Director of Generations United, and Dorothy Jenkins, who raised three of her grandchildren ruitment by describing: levels of interest in adoption, who takes steps toward adopting, and how interest might be channeled toward rstanding Substance Use Disorders, Treatment and Family Recovery: A Guide for Child Welfare Professionals.‖ The course is approv dangered by caregivers who manufacture, deal, or use drugs. They support a nationwide network of professionals serving drug endan n allows users to download and customize advertising materials, track effectiveness of materials, strategies, and efforts. The Campa port from a statewide task force provides a set of principles to guide the development of a statewide system for child maltreatment e needs of children exposed to trauma. It examines the extent of childhood exposure to trauma, the effects of this exposure, and p to explore the whole site, we would like to point out the new Child and Family Services Review page, which now contains Final Reports ter twice a year in print and twice a year electronically to provide information on promising practices in the areas of positive youth d is System (AFCARS) data and an updated Children of Color section. ference co-sponsored by the Commonwealth Fund with representatives from the five states participating in the Assuring Better Child al, physical and developmental needs has increased dramatically in the past decade. The capacity of the child welfare system to respo he factors that contribute to successful foster home placement for children with FASD though a study conducted with long-term fo ew their own disaster preparedness plans. Carmen Weisner, former Assistant Secretary of the Louisiana Department of Social Serv ople in the state. It includes sections for youth in foster care and alumni and for foster parents.

Superintendent of Public Instruction and Casey Family Programs was designed to improve communication between school staff and pe welfare custody in a variety of creative ways, according to a recent article in Children's Voice, from the Child Welfare League of Am ssionals and others who work with youth transitioning to adulthood and independent living. It provides an abundance of Web links to o safety, permanency, and well-being of children. Users are now able to search the entire site by topic, locate Children's Bureau-spons Council have created a series of public service advertisements in English and Spanish, designed to encourage adults, parents and car ptive families need supportive services at some time during the life of the adoption. In recognition of this need, in 1998, the Children Wednesday, Dec. 21 (8:00-9:00 ET/PT). The special is presented in association with the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption and th n about foster care and other issues involving child health and wellbeing through the Kidsdata.org web site. San Mateo and Santa Cla children, families and communities profiles 945 promising practices. ty for child protection to all community agencies and residents found that the effort improved child welfare practice but had no con d to the topic of educational needs of vulnerable children, including those in foster care or homeless. You can search by type of docu sadvantaged group when it comes to opportunities for higher learning. Out of the 150,000 who have graduated from high school and s in foster care in Illinois, updating a report from 2003. As in the past, sibling groups of varying sizes are more likely to be placed tog hild, or experiencing a crisis, they often look for outside help and support. For many families in New York, the place to turn is the sta adults are more likely to be positive about life, engaged in school and emotionally healthy; they also are less likely to participate in de om its Child Welfare Workforce Initiative report.  Brief 1, ―Retaining Competent Child Welfare Workers,‖ provides an overview of 2

eral programs that address the wide range of needs of youth with serious mental health conditions who are transitioning into adultho cation offering practical strategies health care organizations - primary care practices in particular - can use to become better at car Care Strategies, Inc., highlights strategies used to improve the delivery of early childhood development services, including early ide tion on how states are addressing the healthy social emotional development of children from birth to age 3. The report, produced by

for safety, permanency and well-being. This curriculum was developed by the NRCFCPPP in response to that clear indication that the ce on FGC in the African-American Community, and Pattie Elofson on FCG with Native American families. hildren and their families. The Publications section of its website contains several useful titles regarding foster care, family-centere he Guide includes profiles of more than 50 instruments, guidelines for selecting instruments, and best practice recommendations for elfare practice in various settings such as schools and residential treatment centers, and understanding evidence-based child trauma arenting Train the Trainers; and Enhancing Cultural Competency in Human Services Settings. Save $50 if you register by January 7. . Along with up-to-date research, reports and literature on current workforce issues such as turnover, worker safety, and worker co the YTFG are committed to achieving a common mission – ensuring that this nation’s young people are successfully connected by age vocacy and public policy at the national, state, and local levels; behavioral health, family-centered practice, and juvenile justice, as we ealth, vulnerable populations, youth development/civic engagement, juvenile justice, education, workforce development, and public pol tates. Based on data from the 2000 Census the City KIDS COUNT Pocket Guide provides detailed, objective data needed to track th ceptions, the specific developmental challenges for GLB youth in establishing their own identity, as well as risk factors affecting the

ation for Children and Families, Children's Bureau and Family and Youth Services Bureau. This annual training conference is coordinat he summer. The program is a paid internship and, as a result, transportation costs to Washington DC, housing during the program and as of 9/30/02. The number of those children waiting to be adopted remains the same as the previous year. See the report for dem tic Violence, and Supervising Child Protective Services Caseworkers. These manuals offer a foundation for understanding child maltre ffort of the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs and the State Adolescent Health Coordinators Network (SAHCN), w ill low given their eligibility. Many, if not most, families that could be eligible for the most generous payment, a foster payment, do no

rents includes: Speak Out, children writing about their own experiences; Adoption Talk, a staffed message board where children can strengthening disadvantaged families with children. Lessons learned and policy recommendations as well as useful resources are inclu t of adoptive parents for children overrepresented in the foster care system, as defined by the Children’s Bureau. Applications must d technical assistance to States, Tribes, and public child welfare agencies in the preparation and implementation of the Child and Fam workers to enhance their practice with children and families and include a job aid to help in the documentation of visits, family access

rging issues in child welfare research, and summarize findings to help inform the public policy debate. ude youth researchers are encouraged to apply to investigate a community issue of their choice. Proposals are due March 31, 2005. laboration, as well as collaboration across disciplines, in order to maximize resources and provide more effective services to protect elfare agency can use to assess the extent to which its training system contains integrated components necessary to positively impac mportant resource for others who work with or are interested in working with Parent Leaders in shared leadership such as staff, com e methods of understanding and using research and by providing services to a collaborative network of committed agencies. Their wo ob training, and correspondence courses (including the GED). Birth and adopted youth in foster homes are also eligible for scholarship buse and neglect prevention strategies. This document demonstrates the critical importance of prevention in comparison to more cos 05. The early-bird deadline is May 6, 2005. cies. Areas covered are: mandatory annual training requirements; acceptable source of training (provider, modality); content of traini ration in future issues of Weekly Update. 2006 budget. rvice Reviews, this one on the mental health needs of children in foster care. Also in this issue, an article on efforts advocates are m who were not the children’s relatives or foster parents) adopt children from foster care. It makes a number of recommendations in t Y. The half-hour, character-driven series revolves around three half-Puerto Rican, half-African-American, orphaned teenagers and th ren who have left foster care and children living with kin; identify the proportion of child welfare funding that comes from federal,

ystem. It documents the growth of the strategy as well as the planning and implementation experiences of four cities where FDTCs h poster in both English and Spanish that emphasize the theme of shared responsibility for preventing abuse and neglect and protecti "Introduction to Cultural Competence," includes a facilitator's guide, PowerPoint presentation, and list of resources. nefits of postsecondary education. ThinkCollege.net website features a searchable database of postsecondary education programs th

ams; Karen Jorgenson, National Foster Parent Association; and Roy Block, President, Texas Foster Family Association. ns used in a recent teleconference in which State foster care and adoption managers were updated with the latest information on th come measures. In response, states have started to adapt their processes for monitoring outcomes at the local level. This paper desc

s of children and youth. Also provides information on establishing an ombudsman office. fathers. The AFTC is intended for use following training on NFPN's basic Fatherhood Training Curriculum. A reduced price is availab nd posters. To learn more about the campaign – Change a Lifetime…Share Your Heart, Hope Your Home, and Give Hope – tune in to the N

research suggests about effective policies and practices for addressing the needs of children missing from care. On the panel will be ant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE). Using data from the Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System (AFC pmental, and physical health complications that result from abuse and neglect of infants and toddlers can have lifelong implications. T tem. This continuum of care would focus not only on the immediate needs of the families, but long-term services as well. The benefit ke place on March 23-24, 2005 in Alexandria, VA. The goals for the conference include: providing a forum in which government offici d welfare workers. Insights from each of these partners in the care of children in the child welfare system reveal why agencies stru

needs of children and youth in foster care and honor the foster parents, child welfare professionals, and others who work with them. Use the mate

ocedures that States and ACF will use to determine if a State has met its goals with regard to the data indicators in its approved Pro Association (APHSA) in collaboration with Fostering Results and the Institute for the Advancement of Social Work Research. The s ntal health issues, and those in the juvenile justice or adult correctional systems. The social institutions that support these young ad to children, youth, and families through four themes: advocacy/messaging; best practice and effective program models; leveraging re id- 1990s, more than doubling between 1998 and 2003. Most of the increase is a result of youth who run more than once from the ch uths who have ever been in foster care had higher rates of need for substance abuse treatment than youths who have never been in outh and families who have been victims of maltreatment subsequently enter the juvenile justice system and require multisystem inte y General, and the Family Court of the Superior Court of the District of Columbia as they work together to develop and reach agree s, agency policies, and local practice. This manual from the Barton Child Law & Policy Clinic of Emory University integrates informatio ommendations. ast restrictive educational placement, access to the same opportunities to meet academic achievement standards to which all student

hildren admitted to foster care that were later adopted, and on the time needed to complete those adoption. The analysis, using data each to identify young people who are stationed in these countries. In 2005, NFCC will implement a program providing letters from h onvene professionals representing the numerous disciplines involved with the child welfare system.  nd students serving people with developmental disabilities. The 13 self-guided modules include video interviews, graphics, interactive

te of Texas. ch have been previously published. milies that have been reported for child abuse and neglect. The report describes research assessing the validity, reliability, and racial and ethn t "the most effective place to curb substance abuse in America is not in courtrooms, but in living rooms and dining rooms." ll child welfare-related expenditures and funding for 2002; (2) 2003 CWLA State Agency Survey Data (Part 2) — several new tables s. Few studies have examined how children in foster care have fared as adults, and even fewer studies have identified what changes i even-step evaluation approach, focusing especially on the first two steps: identifying the problem and implementing an evidence-based stitutions. In 1978, the Congress enacted the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) to protect American Indian families and to give tribe

e key strategies: providing individual case assistance and advocacy to all clients of a child welfare agency with unmet education-relate sparity in substantiation of maltreatment cases between African Americans and Whites. This paper answers questions about the rela th Carolina Division of Social Services and the Family and Children’s Resource Program of Jordan Institute for Families and the Scho hington, DC and Puerto Rico and 32 PIPs were reviewed to compile this review. This version contains a new table that presents a nati ng-term negative outcomes.

ork for achieving collaboration across the federal, state, and local legal, educational, and child welfare systems. Emphasizing the need rents who adopted through the child welfare system. The deadline for applications is June 1. Grant announcements will be made in Au her ways. It is also an opportunity to show our appreciation for the dedication of the foster families who care for these children and nowledge, feelings, and understandings of youth to create a description of their experience. The report is a summary of this researc pera a la adopcion. (AdoptUSKids has launched a Spanish-language campaign. Please check out the Spanish version of their website!) r clients to access benefits from Federal mainstream benefit programs. First Step was developed through a partnership between the are now available. actice, it is unclear whether the services and supports they offer actually reflect a strengths orientation. A new measure has been d prepare for transition to adulthood and the workplace. It provides benchmarks for career exploration and techniques for job seekin roject features a national partnership to raise awareness of the problem and to take national, state and local action to improve polici ca's Children highlights these critical needs and provides information about some promising approaches in States and communities, in ustice, and Special Education.‖ terstate Compact on Adoption and Medical Assistance and the American Public Human Services Association. Users of this database m n their children's growth, from birth to age 5 years, as well as developmental delays and other disabilities. The "Learn the Signs. Ac ogram for the public child welfare staff of five Southern California counties (Imperial, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and San D achieve successful outcomes with families and children. There is a table of contents for the curriculum, along with contact informati

lan and (2) developing a court report that addresses those questions. s that provide a record of the agency’s recommendations and the court’s decisions. nd Family Court Judges. ―Ensuring the Healthy Development of Infants in Foster Care: A Guide for Judges, Advocates and Child Wel m. The results, strengths and challenges of replication projects in California, Illinois, and Washington will be discussed. Viewers will le has been learned from the CFSR about the relationship between worker/parent visits and placement stability and permanency and giv . EST, to provide an opportunity for state leaders and youth to educate congressional staffers on issues facing youth transitioning fr ith recommendations to address the significant challenges faced by teens exiting the foster care system. eated by young people in care. trainer’s guides, handouts and overheads for a variety of curricula used in the state. that families are typically larger in numbers of relatives and more diverse in their levels of stability and willingness to help than pre lculating disproportionality under Resources on Overrepresentation; two new annotated bibliographies; and five PowerPoint presentat y and legislative issues and widely used by Congress to provide background on key issues. The report focuses on the child welfare syst udy of youth aging out of foster care and transitioning to adulthood in Iowa, Wisconsin and Illinois. Results suggest that youth makin ors Roger Weisberg and Vanessa Roth, the film follows the young people as they face the many challenges of adulthood. Go to http://www.p er what conditions participation is permitted. Testimony of witnesses is available on this website. ices and approaches shown to promote permanency for youth. Contents include a current literature and research review; highlights o ckly identify and engage relatives for children and youth in America's child welfare system. elationships among foster parent characteristics, activity levels, and length of service. es can use to make inquiries regarding the educational needs of children and youth under their jurisdiction with the goal of positively n iterative and evolves substantially over time. Some strategic planning efforts may not include all the steps described. dy is published in the May/June 2005 issue of the journal Child Development. The author says that efforts to promote stability in c

onal assessments that have a more narrow focus on a specific topic, such as safety or development. These new guidelines outline a 10-

d the online discussion generated by it – see the June 3 Joplin Globe story at http://www.joplinglobe.com/story.php?story_id=190340&c=87

iscusses the relationship of alcohol and drugs to families in the child welfare system; provides information on the biological, psycholo

he District of Columbia recognized May as Foster Care Month with proclamations. This year the National Foster Care Month partnership has Foster Care Independence Program and the Chafee Educational and Training Voucher Program. and visitation services. Participation in Family Center services appeared to increase birth parents’ sense of control over their circums s. One highlight of the ACTION website is a series of monthly articles on child safety in the child protective services system. Past ar h and Human Services invites you to nominate candidates for these prestigious awards. All nominations must be received by Monday, and Dianne Kocer and Karen Jorgenson of the National Foster Parent Association, with the support of the National Resource Center ons of Maltreatment. The curriculum described above is based on this material. vey Data, including the new topic ―Child Welfare Health Services,‖ three new tables under ―Juvenile Justice and Child Welfare,‖ ―St

. Funded by Philadelphia’s Department of Human Resources, the report gives interesting and relevant information about how youth de me placements for the 50 states for which data on race and ethnicity were available for 2000. and Tribes. Visit our archive sites to view or listen to the topics you may have missed the first time around. Latest additions are the d summaries of specific child-welfare-related laws in each State. The report was produced for the Children's Bureau by the Technic VD released by the Pew Commission on Children in Foster Care portrays the causes and consequences of court-based delays and expl ten the time needed for children to reach permanency. It emphasizes the need for state courts and child welfare agencies to work t y larger social conditions such as poverty, racism, violence, and untreated trauma. The solution lies in an integrated response because this setting. Preliminary data and results are presented. ation regarding licensing agency, types of license, kinship care provisions, and dual (foster/adoptive) licensing. t links to a study from the National Association of Counties on the effects this drug’s manufacture and use is having on children. The New Yo epth look at two states, Missouri and Illinois, indicates that both IFPS and similar but less intensive in-home services are very effect rence of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), who have specialized in serving these children for over 25 years, convened this Roundtable to pro feature papers that use data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW). Most of the papers now are on li port to grow and sustain their programs. nts an overview of the role of the juvenile court in permanency proceedings and provides information about the family finding effort fewer children were waiting to be adopted, but fewer children were adopted from the public foster care system in 2003 than in 2002 done to facilitate special needs adoptions, and assesses how well the Adoption Assistance Program and the Adoption Incentives Prog e and framework for understanding the conditions, challenges, and opportunities of evidence based practice in child welfare. milies typically face multiple risk factors, including a lack of consistent guidance and support from adults. This means that foster yout hildren in child protective services investigations and who are awaiting foster care placements. database, click: http://basis1.calib.com/BASIS/chdocs/docs/canweb/SF agencies and other public service and community organizations. Visit their ―Papers and Reports‖ page for a number of reports that p ff remains problematic, impacts negatively the permanency outcomes of children in the system, and has high costs to the agencies an ediation and a comparison group of cases that were handled through the traditional hearing process. practitioners can recognize PTSD and respond in an appropriate, timely way when they encounter it. You'll also find a new issue of the news ffice of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention outlines existing research and theories related to juvenile firesetting and ident Centered Practice? Family-Centered Practice with Siblings Strengthening the Indian Child Welfare Act by Providing Resources fo families. Legislative and judicial officials can use the report as they evaluate and improve court performance.

ework for action for agencies seeking to improve outcomes for these young people. that serve them. dentify comprehensive and effective practices for juvenile delinquency courts. It includes a chapter and checklist on Post-Dispositio Most Vulnerable Families Overcome Barriers to Work and Achieve Financial Success," examines four employment barriers that polic sippi. We hope to keep adding state tools in this area as well as others in which jurisdictions prepare documents aimed at helping wor serve as a support to helping workers integrate family centered practice in all aspects of assessment, service planning and service d it is available following removal and for youth who are preparing for adult living. It is anticipated that, in the future, families at vari NDS data appears on tables that are located under the Child Abuse and Neglect, Child Abuse and Neglect Fatalities and Agency Adm request that policies addressing prenatal exposure to methamphetamines and media coverage of this issue be based on science, not p vailable data on 25 key indicators related to children's economic security, health, behavior and social environment. It also includes k d practice. Information from the first round of Child and Family Services Reviews relating to how States use concurrent planning is a are thinking about adopting their foster children. Characteristics of successful adoptive families are discussed, and the benefits of f nd enhance their service array. The documents provide an overview description of the process, and include the actual methods used t d legal systems. r neglect may have caused or contributed to a child's death. It includes a brief discussion of the role of child protective services, wh e to people who are caring for the children of relatives. The sections provide insight into legal procedures, the child protective syste the effort to reconnect youth in out of home care with families they thought were lost to them. This article describes the work bein s to support the achievement of PIP goals. These new and reallocated resources primarily are being used in two ways: to increase an parental substance abuse accompanied by neglect, domestic violence, or abuse. This education/support group model was developed fo ddressing co-occurring mental health disorders, and intensive community supervision and monitoring. They also help children who are expos h in successfully transitioning to adulthood. The experts hailed from many areas that connect to youth aging out of the foster care s , active collaboration with a variety of stakeholders is critical because public child welfare agencies cannot hope to meet the complex formation on child abuse, child welfare, and adoption, representing a full continuum of child welfare issues ranging from prevention t ren in a foster home, group home, or other residential facility. Nearly half have been abused either physically or sexually. Four in 10

r foster homes. Vermont is currently considering regulation that would require foster parents to ensure that children not be expose The youths perform tasks in the community, from visiting nursing homes to planting trees, but with a difference. Restorative practice by their similarities with children in foster care. All of these people need our assistance right now, and will for a long time to come. W PP is responding to these questions with the following statement, and directing them to the child welfare agency in their state: ―Child regarding relief efforts only. Information is provided on: Food Assistance and Child Support as well as the following toll-free number ental Health Counseling* Addictive Disorders * Developmental Disorders * Social Security Benefits or Social Security Disability Ben 00-259-3428. If you are a custodial parent from Mississippi and need DHS to redirect your child support payment, please call 1-866 ormation. Of special interest: * Louisiana foster families should call 1-800-259-3428 to notify Louisiana Social Services of their loca welfare, affected by Hurricane Katrina. State agencies can find minutes of teleconferences sponsored by the Children’s Bureau to di l ―evacuee‖ status to individuals affected by Katrina. As part of this streamlining process, states will be given the flexibility to enrol the types of services most commonly received by foster children and the amount states expended on these services. It also highligh stem and the creative responses of states and communities all across the country, beginning with the first call on September 22. Ea idly tested and disseminated, and that can lead to dramatic system-wide improvements in a short time. Pioneered in the health care a on marriage and its effects on children, presenting evidence that stable marriages can improve children's emotional, intellectual, and continues to reconnect families. Their website contains photos as well as a list of children missing or looking for their parents. Hotlin State Courts, is planning to aid in legal and judicial system responses to the needs of children and families affected by the Katrina d es on a variety of topics to help child welfare workers understand what methamphetamine is and how it affects users. se and Neglect Information and the National Adoption Information Clearinghouse will offer a new service to practitioners to help th

nd event planning materials, please visit the National Adoption Day web site. adoption. Audio files of that teleconference, along with handouts, are now available for download on our website. f the possible reasons offered to explain the disproportion of minorities in the foster care system. unselors, parents and caregivers, and youth. lp and care from people they do not know. The trauma they experience may not be readily discernible. These tips are designed to hel esponses of children to reduce the possibility of long-term psychological morbidity. The effects of disaster on children are mediated s. The 41 new promising approaches highlighted on the Web site are organized into descriptions that include the title of the approach al data reporting systems are used to gather data on seven outcomes. Additional information from the Child and Family Service Revie panish language resources on the National Adoption Month website, and much more. ot the investigation results in an open case, children in contact with the child welfare system are likely to have substantial developme s, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The fund was created by the Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997 and reauthorized dency court records for all 50 states and the District of Columbia. ividual deliberately causes self injury or ingests a substance more than the therapeutic dose.‖ religious - look in agencies that do them well. These 'spiritually competent' agencies recognize spirituality as an important component d be helpful to states as they enter the second round of reviews, in which the Administration for Children and Families will be promot n families by examining the level, type and delivery of services. The review found that, in most cases, there were no statistically sign of Children in or at Risk of Foster Care in Illinois‖ examines how well the state is doing on measures of safety, stability, continuity, p ferential response is one of a number of strategies that communities are undertaking to improve child safety and wellbeing througho

in their care may incur or inflict. Many studies identify liability insurance - subsidized or provided at no cost to foster parents - as a that teleconference, along with handouts, are now available for download on our website. devastation wrought by Hurricane Katrina. The ―Children in Care‖ section succinctly describes the situation in the child welfare and dren and adolescents. Exposure via drawing, trauma narrative, cognitive reframing, and education are the major interventions outlined ted Parents and Family-Centered Community Building. 5. Check your local PBS listings for time and date in your locality. na. It discusses: Children at risk of foster care placement; recruiting foster care providers; meeting children's needs in foster care the aftermath. This interview with Dr. Charles Figley, Director of the Florida State University Traumatology Institute and Presiden d child welfare systems work to identify problems early in a child’s educational career and that interventions must address not just t lessons and activities to help their school aged and preschool children master reading, understand the value of homework and develo of the Annie E. Casey Foundation and Fostering Results at the University of Illinois School of Social Work’s Child and Family Resear

ve placement, cultural considerations in identifying and finding relatives, and the supervisor's role in supporting relative search effor ences in state policies and reporting of data used in the federal outcome measure and the federal standard for reunification. Differ curity and Supplemental Security Income benefits and extend benefits to age 19 for youth seeking a high-school equivalency certifi eports by category or by state, as well as access a wealth of material from the CIP programs.

are likely to be adverse developmental effects for children exposed prenatally to methamphetamine, we as yet do not know specific ent recurrence, maltreatment in foster care, timeliness of adoptions, timeliness of reunifications, placement stability, and permanen

auma issues for foster parents to reduce the impact of exposure to traumatic events on children and adolescents. These materials were created at the request and f refugee and immigrant populations with public child welfare services in these three high-impact areas. the Zero to Three Family Drug Treatment Court in Omaha, Nebraska, an article on the effects of violence exposure on children, traumatized missing from care. It discusses prevention, response, and resolution of missing-from-care episodes, and was prepared in conjunction w

are for two years or more. Section II details the problems that keep older foster children and youth from living permanently with fa context of Guideposts for Success, developed by the National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth (NCWD/Youth) in care of their children. The parent’s decision-making and implementation process, known as voluntary permanency planning, is the subj ve outcomes. ree of her grandchildren terest might be channeled toward foster care adoption. rofessionals.‖ The course is approved by the National Association of Social Workers for four Continuing Education Units (CEUs). f professionals serving drug endangered children by providing referrals to experts, updated research on topics concerning drug enda strategies, and efforts. The Campaign provides tools and guidance to assist users in building a strategic plan and a strategy team, inc wide system for child maltreatment prevention and contains 37 recommendations to significantly improve prevention efforts in North he effects of this exposure, and proven and promising approaches for identifying and serving traumatized children. It is of interest e, which now contains Final Reports, Statewide Assessments, Program Improvement Plans, and Individual Key Findings for each of th ces in the areas of positive youth development, independent living, and permanency planning for adolescents. The December 2005 elec

ipating in the Assuring Better Child Health and Development II (ABCD II) initiative. This program helps states strengthen primary h f the child welfare system to respond to the service needs of this growing number of children has become strained, particularly in lig study conducted with long-term foster parents fostering through a First Nation child welfare agency in western Manitoba. It explor uisiana Department of Social Services Office of Community Services and current Executive Director of the Louisiana Chapter of the

cation between school staff and people who support the academic success of students in foster care. This booklet clarifies what info om the Child Welfare League of America (CWLA). The article discusses the increasing focus on missing children over the last few yea des an abundance of Web links to online resources, practical strategies to help young people find, get, and keep housing, and developm pic, locate Children's Bureau-sponsored conferences, and find details about the Children's Bureau's various Divisions. Other enhance encourage adults, parents and caregivers, and first responders to consider seeking mental health services if they are still showing s of this need, in 1998, the Children's Bureau awarded 15 three-year grants to increase permanency and well-being for children with s mas Foundation for Adoption and the Children’s Action Network. web site. San Mateo and Santa Clara counties are tracking 30 health topics and providing analysis about how children are faring in ea

ld welfare practice but had no consistent impacts on child abuse reports, service availability, or service quality. ss. You can search by type of document and/or by states. Recently added: the Maine School Transfer Policy and Practice for Childre ve graduated from high school and are college qualified, only some 30,000 are attending postsecondary education. The report recomm zes are more likely to be placed together when they are living with relatives than when they are in unrelated foster care; however, th w York, the place to turn is the status offender system. In December 2002, New York City's Department of Probation and the Admi o are less likely to participate in destructive or delinquent behavior. This research, although it seems based upon common sense, has Workers,‖ provides an overview of 25 studies included in the review. Brief 2, ―Professional Education for Child Welfare Practice,‖ det

s who are transitioning into adulthood. A total of 57 programs, run by 20 or more different agencies in nine departments of the fede r - can use to become better at caring for diverse populations. The publication includes measures for use by healthcare delivery orga opment services, including early identification of developmental disabilities, improving outreach to members, enhancing provider partn to age 3. The report, produced by the National Academy of State Health Policy with support from the Commonwealth Fund, summari

e to that clear indication that the importance of caseworker visits to children in foster care is positively correlated to outcomes for

garding foster care, family-centered, culturally relevant practice and permanency planning for refugee children. best practice recommendations for diverse settings and situations. It is intended as a basic tool for juvenile justice professionals wor nding evidence-based child trauma interventions that can be used to treat child sexual abuse. Presenters are all nationally recognized $50 if you register by January 7. over, worker safety, and worker competencies, the website offers a wealth of links to university degree programs, training organizat are successfully connected by age 25 to institutions and support systems that will enable them to succeed throughout adulthood. Th practice, and juvenile justice, as well as the traditional child welfare areas; organizational excellence; research and data, as the found kforce development, and public policy. Selected Power Point presentations from many sessions also available. , objective data needed to track the well-being of children in 71 large cities. The Rural KIDS COUNT Pocket Guide provides 2000 Ce s well as risk factors affecting their health, social and emotional adjustment. Also discussed are the ways in which parents, teachers

ual training conference is coordinated by The University of Oklahoma National Child Welfare Resource Center for Youth Developmen DC, housing during the program and a small living stipend are included with each position. Applications are due in their entirety by Feb vious year. See the report for demographic information about these children. tion for understanding child maltreatment and the roles and responsibilities of various practitioners in its prevention, identification, Coordinators Network (SAHCN), with support from the Annie E. Casey Foundation. The project Web site contains an overview, capac s payment, a foster payment, do not receive it. Children ineligible for foster care payments have surprisingly low levels of receipt fo

message board where children can talk to other children; Homework Help, suggestions for tackling those sometimes difficult assignm as well as useful resources are included in the brief. hildren’s Bureau. Applications must be received by 5:00pm, March 24, 2005. mplementation of the Child and Family Services Review (CFSR) process. cumentation of visits, family access, and parenting time.

roposals are due March 31, 2005. more effective services to protect children and strengthen families. nents necessary to positively impact children's safety, well-being, and permanency. The aim is for a strengths-based, participatory a ared leadership such as staff, community members, professionals, and policymakers. Parent Leaders are parents, grandparents, kinsh k of committed agencies. Their work, developed with and for their partners, includes the website, network exchange, change project mes are also eligible for scholarships. Interested youth must complete an application, provide two letters of recommendation, and sub revention in comparison to more costly intervention or treatment strategies. It is a helpful tool for state and local programs, legislat

ovider, modality); content of training; funding issues; source of requirement (statute, policy, etc.); and consequences of non-complian

article on efforts advocates are making to improve education for youth in care. a number of recommendations in the areas of screening vs recruitment of families, first contact, matching, training, use of a buddy merican, orphaned teenagers and their struggle to hold their family together. funding that comes from federal, state and local sources; describe the major federal funding streams that are used to support child

ences of four cities where FDTCs have become integral components of the justice process. ing abuse and neglect and protecting children’s safety and well-being. list of resources. stsecondary education programs that support youth with intellectual disabilities, designed to allow individuals to submit information

Family Association. d with the latest information on the use of subsidized guardianship as a permanency option. s at the local level. This paper describes the approach used in New York State to build a robust set of outcomes, corresponding meas

riculum. A reduced price is available with purchase of both training curricula. me, and Give Hope – tune in to the NRCFCPPP webcast on March 17th at 1:00 EST. Register online at http://event.netbriefings.com/event/

sing from care. On the panel will be Mark Courtney, Director of Chapin Hall Center for Children at the University of Chicago, Caren K nalysis and Reporting System (AFCARS) for Fiscal Years 1999 to 2001, the authors examined how States used adoption subsidies to ers can have lifelong implications. This concern is compounded by the fact that infants are the fastest growing category of children -term services as well. The benefits and components involved in providing a continuum of care are the subject of this Issue Note from a forum in which government officials, national youth-focused organizations and service providers can engage in multi-disciplinary dis re system reveal why agencies struggle with the process of building relationships among these three sets of people so important in t

hers who work with them. Use the materials at www.fostercaremonth.org to make your campaign planning easy.

data indicators in its approved Program Improvement Plan (PIP). nt of Social Work Research. The survey also found that low salaries and high workloads affect the agencies’ ability to recruit and re utions that support these young adults change considerably. Their support networks of family and kin may be severely strained, or th ctive program models; leveraging resources; and leadership/management issues. Workshop proposals are due by March 25. The confe ho run more than once from the child welfare system. The study also revealed that moves from one placement to another in the child han youths who have never been in foster care. Youths aged 12 to 17 who were in need of substance abuse treatment in the past yea ystem and require multisystem interventions. The Guidebook addresses the plethora of issues that affect improved provision of serv gether to develop and reach agreement on criteria for determining a compelling reason not to file a termination of parental rights pe y University integrates information from all these sources into one reference document that provides a clear approach to examining

ment standards to which all students are held, and access to the same academic resources, services and extracurricular and enrichme

e adoption. The analysis, using data from Chapin Hall's Center for State Foster Care and Adoption Data, shows that there was no slo a program providing letters from home and care packages to the many soldiers who may not have family or other people to offer supp

eo interviews, graphics, interactive content, and self-study questions. CEUs are available.

validity, reliability, and racial and ethnic bias of the instrument as well as its relationship to services offered to families. For more on SDM, se rooms and dining rooms." Data (Part 2) — several new tables are available, including new tables on annual staff training requirements, states with level of care dies have identified what changes in foster care services could improve their lives. This study provides new information in both areas and implementing an evidence-based intervention. The approach has applicability to child welfare, as well. an Indian families and to give tribes a role in making child welfare decisions for children subject to ICWA. ICWA requires that (1) tr

gency with unmet education-related needs; building the capacity of agency service staff, caseworkers and supervisors to help them i r answers questions about the relationships between risk, race, and recurrence of abuse and neglect. It presents the actual experien Institute for Families and the School of Social Work at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is devoted to information abo ns a new table that presents a national summary of the percent of cases with substance use disorders that were cited as the primary

fare systems. Emphasizing the needs of K-12 students, it contains resources for parents, caregivers, teachers, and child welfare prof t announcements will be made in August with funding to begin after October 1. Look for the ―Parent Resources‖ corner of their hom ies who care for these children and youth and the social workers who support them. Check the Events section of the website to find eport is a summary of this research and a preliminary review of the data collected. Spanish version of their website!) through a partnership between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban D

entation. A new measure has been developed to assess the extent to which providers ―walk the talk‖ of strengths-based practice. Th ation and techniques for job seeking. It breaks out the benchmarks by age group and lets young people describe their successes in th te and local action to improve policies and practices to reduce, and eventually eliminate, this problem. One resource available is a fact aches in States and communities, including programs aimed at: enhancing well-being while in care, helping children recuperate, and pre

sociation. Users of this database may select a specific state and view answers to thirteen adoption assistance-related questions, or a sabilities. The "Learn the Signs. Act Early" campaign and toolkit are designed to help parents recognize any delays so that their child iverside, San Bernardino and San Diego). culum, along with contact information for out-of-state staff to learn more.

r Judges, Advocates and Child Welfare Professionals‖ is a working tool for those involved in the court process to understand the que on will be discussed. Viewers will learn that families are typically larger in numbers of relatives and more diverse in their levels of st nt stability and permanency and gives workers seven developmental checklists and questions to assess safety and well being. Workers issues facing youth transitioning from foster care to adulthood. The event will be webcast live.

ity and willingness to help than previously thought. As a result of breakthrough technology and practice frameworks emphasizing eng hies; and five PowerPoint presentations. rt focuses on the child welfare system and includes a point-counterpoint between CWLA President/CEO Shay Bilchik and HHS Assist . Results suggest that youth making the transition from foster care to young adulthood face a number of significant challenges, inclu ges of adulthood. Go to http://www.pbs.org to check local broadcast listings.

e and research review; highlights of promising strategies, partnerships, and innovative public policies; case review prototypes; strateg

sdiction with the goal of positively impacting their educational outcomes and preparing them for adulthood. the steps described. t efforts to promote stability in caregiving situations for young children and the families of incarcerated mothers, especially in the

. These new guidelines outline a 10-step process for comprehensive family assessment, which is illustrated through an extensive case

ry.php?story_id=190340&c=87

ormation on the biological, psychological, and social processes of alcohol and drug addiction to help staff recognize when substance a

l Foster Care Month partnership has received confirmation of 20 gubernatorial proclamations. If your governor has issued a proclamation tha

sense of control over their circumstances. The findings of this study suggest that the Family Center service model holds promise as protective services system. Past articles, available through the "article archive," cover such diverse topics as child safety and the le tions must be received by Monday, August 15, 2005. rt of the National Resource Center for Family-Centered Practice and Permanency Planning. We provide both instructor’s guides, whic

e Justice and Child Welfare,‖ ―States' Use of TANF for Child Care for Children in the Child Welfare System‖ and ―Kinship Care Pol

ant information about how youth define spirituality, and the important role of the arts.

e around. Latest additions are the June 24 webcast on Reunification of Families in America’s Child Welfare System and the May 24 s e Children's Bureau by the Technical Assistance to State Legislators on the Child and Family Services Reviews Project, managed by J ces of court-based delays and explains how the Commission's recommendations can improve the ability of courts to move children qui nd child welfare agencies to work together to improve outcomes for children and is designed to foster collaboration between these t in an integrated response because no one child- or family-serving system has the resources to address person-specific issues and th

se is having on children. The New York Times also published an article on this subject on July 11: http://www.nytimes.com/2005/07/11/nation ve in-home services are very effective with post-adoptive families and that families are highly satisfied with the services provided. rs, convened this Roundtable to provide an opportunity for regional, state and other child welfare providers to share their experienc ). Most of the papers now are on line. They include examinations of a variety of child welfare issues.

ion about the family finding efforts being undertaken in Santa Clara County. It also highlights the exciting work being done in locatin r care system in 2003 than in 2002. m and the Adoption Incentives Program have worked to facilitate special needs adoptions. d practice in child welfare. adults. This means that foster youth represent a population that could benefit greatly from mentoring and that they also can be very

age for a number of reports that provide evaluation on projects in child welfare, including structured decision-making, differential re d has high costs to the agencies and the system.

u'll also find a new issue of the newsletter "Training Matters" at http://www.trainingmatters-nc.org. This edition offers resources for child wel ed to juvenile firesetting and identifies some of the limitations of existing research. The authors recommend several strategies for fare Act by Providing Resources for Families, Tribes and States Subsidized Guardianship: What Does it Have to do with Family-Cent erformance.

er and checklist on Post-Disposition Review of a youth placed out of the home by juvenile delinquency court order. our employment barriers that policymakers and others consider among the most difficult to overcome: substance abuse, domestic vio re documents aimed at helping workers put family-centered practices into effect. ment, service planning and service delivery. that, in the future, families at various stages of CPS involvement may be offered the opportunity for participation. Neglect Fatalities and Agency Administration subtopics. his issue be based on science, not presumption or prejudice. The letter condemns the usage of such terms as ―ice babies‖ or ―meth ba cial environment. It also includes key indicators related to children’s education plus nine background measures related to population a States use concurrent planning is also presented. The brief was developed in partnership with the Child Welfare League of America R re discussed, and the benefits of foster parent adoption are described. include the actual methods used to assess the service array, report the results, and prepare a resource development plan.

ole of child protective services, while concentrating on the law enforcement function. cedures, the child protective system, visitation rights, social services, education, and legal representation. Most of the information is his article describes the work being done in Santa Clara County, California. ng used in two ways: to increase and stabilize the front-line child welfare workforce and to enhance states' quality assurance efforts port group model was developed for use in the Santa Clara County, California, Family Drug Treatment Court. Early research results h hey also help children who are exposed to meth use by providing them with health care, educational, and child protective services. This is on outh aging out of the foster care system, including child welfare, juvenile justice, health and mental health, education, employment, h es cannot hope to meet the complex needs of children and families alone. The Fall 2005 issue of this newsletter from the National Ch e issues ranging from prevention to permanency. Visit the link above to search their collection of more than 40,000 selected reports r physically or sexually. Four in 10 have serious mental health problems. They may have become visible to the community because they

ensure that children not be exposed to secondhand smoke in their homes or vehicles. h a difference. Restorative practices - the combination of support and accountability that is the cornerstone of every CSF program , and will for a long time to come. We would like to direct your attention to the links on our webpage devoted to disaster relief effor welfare agency in their state: ―Children without parents due to natural disasters have always brought out the best in the American pe ll as the following toll-free numbers for displaced children in foster care and foster parents from other states: Mississippi: 1-800-8 ts or Social Security Disability Benefits * Child Support* Foster Care Program* DHH Optional State Supplement Checks * Louisiana support payment, please call 1-866-388-2836 uisiana Social Services of their location and situation. * Texans inquiring about becoming foster parents should be directed to the fos ored by the Children’s Bureau to discuss issues involving children in out of home care under the heading ―Help for Agencies and Staff will be given the flexibility to enroll evacuees without requiring documents such as tax returns or proof of residency. Evacuees who h d on these services. It also highlights variation in spending across states; among children of different genders, ages, and races; and a the first call on September 22. Each teleconference is an hour and half in length (2:00-3:30 p.m. Eastern time), and the only equipme time. Pioneered in the health care arena, the BSC methodology is new to the field of child welfare but shows significant promise for ldren's emotional, intellectual, and economic well-being, and that some well-designed marriage-promotion initiatives may benefit child or looking for their parents. Hotline: 1-888-544-5475. families affected by the Katrina disaster. This site will be updated regularly with relevant information. ow it affects users. service to practitioners to help them stay current in their field. This free service, My Child Welfare Librarian, allows users to regis

ownload on our website.

ble. These tips are designed to help child victims of natural disasters acclimate to a new environment and caregivers provide the bes f disaster on children are mediated by many factors including personal experience, parental reaction, developmental competency, gen at include the title of the approach, categories in which the approach is classified, the sponsoring agency, contact information, a brie m the Child and Family Service Reviews (CFSRs) provides context for the results observed in each State.

ikely to have substantial developmental disadvantages. The consistency of low levels of performance on assessments of physical, cogn lies Act of 1997 and reauthorized by the Adoption Promotion Act of 2003. ACF awards a state $4,000 for every foster child placed

ituality as an important component of a holistic therapeutic approach, and deliver their spiritual programs in conformance with widel Children and Families will be promoting the involvement of the courts. es, there were no statistically significant differences between African American and Caucasian children for case services and case o es of safety, stability, continuity, permanence and well-being. ―The Illinois Child Well-Being Study‖ presents the results of round one child safety and wellbeing throughout the state. It expands the ability of child welfare agencies to respond to reports of child abuse

at no cost to foster parents - as a key to retaining qualified foster parents. This paper provides state-specific information on arran

e situation in the child welfare and juvenile justice systems in the affected states. re the major interventions outlined. As an assessment tool, the clinically based model identifies current reactions to trauma and prov

ng children's needs in foster care maintenance payments; providing the match for Federal funds; case review requirements; judicial d aumatology Institute and President and Founder of the Green Cross Foundation, discusses the frequently overlooked trauma and str terventions must address not just the problematic behaviors, but also the core problems underlying children’s behavioral issues. d the value of homework and develop the skills and values necessary to achieve and grow. cial Work’s Child and Family Research Center.  IASWR has released t his study, undertaken in collaboration with the University of M

in supporting relative search efforts are discussed. Examples of how different agencies in the United States have developed system standard for reunification. Differences include disparate definitions for discharge date, trial home visits, and parties included as "r g a high-school equivalency certificate; allow emancipated youth to maintain their legal connections to birth families (and rights to in

ine, we as yet do not know specifically what those effects will be. , placement stability, and permanency for children. The public is invited to comment on proposed data composites and potential perfo

ls were created at the request and under the direction of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration to inform

ce exposure on children, traumatized teens and post-traumatic stress disorder, street law for vulnerable families, and a comprehensive listin and was prepared in conjunction with guidelines for law enforcement agencies on children missing from care. Order online at the link

uth from living permanently with families. Section III describes an emerging youth permanency philosophy. Section IV makes recomm ability for Youth (NCWD/Youth) in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP). ry permanency planning, is the subject of this monograph from the National AIA Resource Center. It explores a number of different

inuing Education Units (CEUs). rch on topics concerning drug endangered children, and best practice information. They recently formed three working groups, one o tegic plan and a strategy team, including foster parents, youth, caseworkers, community partners, media, volunteers, and others in or mprove prevention efforts in North Carolina. matized children. It is of interest to organizations interested in expanding their efforts to address children's mental health and am ividual Key Findings for each of the states as well as a wealth of other information. olescents. The December 2005 electronic version has just been posted.

helps states strengthen primary health care services and systems that support the healthy mental development of young children. T become strained, particularly in light of the unique needs of children with disabilities and their families. The purpose of this article i ncy in western Manitoba. It explores the experiences of foster parents raising children with FASD, paying particular attention to so tor of the Louisiana Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers, as well as a long-time social worker in Louisiana, is able t

are. This booklet clarifies what information can be shared and with whom. It provides basic information on the information sharing la ssing children over the last few years and notes how States have responded get, and keep housing, and developmentally appropriate strategies for adolescents to young adults 's various Divisions. Other enhancements include: new sections, such as Training and Technical Assistance, Frequently Requested Inf services if they are still showing signs that they have been psychologically impacted by recent hurricanes. Be sure to view ‖ What's G y and well-being for children with special needs by preventing adoption disruption, dissolution, or out-of-home placement. This paper

about how children are faring in each topic area.

ervice quality. fer Policy and Practice for Children in Care, which will provide child welfare caseworkers with guidelines and strategies that support dary education. The report recommends several key policy changes to address such obstacles as low educational expectations, frequ unrelated foster care; however, the proportion placed together has remained level or declined for kinship care while it has improved artment of Probation and the Administration of Children's Services (ACS)—the two agencies primarily responsible for administering ms based upon common sense, has led to a dramatic shift in thinking about youth policy--from viewing some youth based on their risk n for Child Welfare Practice,‖ details the findings and implications of seven studies that specifically looked at the impact of Title IV

es in nine departments of the federal government were identified and a detailed assessment of each are available in these fact shee or use by healthcare delivery organizations to track progress towards the goal of culturally competent care. members, enhancing provider partnerships, improving reimbursement and referral practices, and recognizing potential returns on inve m the Commonwealth Fund, summarizes responses to a February 2005 survey of state agency representatives in all 50 states and the

sitively correlated to outcomes for children and families. This one day curriculum is intended to be part of either pre-service or ong

ugee children. r juvenile justice professionals working toward the goal of early, accurate identification of youth with mental disorders. Once identi enters are all nationally recognized experts and members of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, which is committed to im

degree programs, training organizations and curricula for caseworkers, supervisors, parents, and other professionals. Visitors are enc succeed throughout adulthood. The YTFG is focusing explicitly on young people ages 14-24 likely to be disconnected from positive pe ce; research and data, as the foundation for evidence-based practice; and youth services/positive youth development. Visit the link a

NT Pocket Guide provides 2000 Census data on the well being of children in the rural portion of each state. he ways in which parents, teachers and other adults may be supportive and specific resources are listed.

urce Center for Youth Development, a service of the USDHHS Children's Bureau. They are seeking professionals who have the abilit ons are due in their entirety by February 18th, 2005 and must include two essays on specific topics, a resume and two references.

rs in its prevention, identification, investigation, and treatment. eb site contains an overview, capacity assessment tools and instructions, action planning guidance, and an online evaluation of Web res urprisingly low levels of receipt for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families child-only benefits, often their only source of financia

those sometimes difficult assignments such as ―Family Tree‖; Clubhouse Library, reviews of books and movies. NAC is seeking ongoin

a strengths-based, participatory assessment process, with broad involvement of internal and external stakeholders. rs are parents, grandparents, kinship care providers, foster parents or anyone in a parenting role who takes action to accomplish goa network exchange, change projects, learning events, and publications. etters of recommendation, and submit a 300-500 word essay on why they want to further their education and why they should be co r state and local programs, legislators and other policy makers, program planners, community volunteers working with prevention prog and consequences of non-compliance.

matching, training, use of a buddy system, and listening to prospective parents.

eams that are used to support child welfare and what proportion of child welfare funding comes from each of these sources; and hig

w individuals to submit information about additional postsecondary education programs; a discussion board designed by students -- for

t of outcomes, corresponding measures, and monitoring reports used the state’s Office of Children and Family Services to monitor lo

http://event.netbriefings.com/event/nrcfcpp/Live/hunternrcfcppp6/

the University of Chicago, Caren Kaplan, Director, Child and Family Protection and Co-Director of the Children Missing from Care Pr States used adoption subsidies to achieve goals of permanency and well-being for children. The study focused on patterns of subsid test growing category of children entering foster care in the United States. The Zero to Three Policy Center recently released a fa he subject of this Issue Note from the Finance Project. The author notes that the benefits of such services include more than just can engage in multi-disciplinary discussions about protecting teens from exploitive relationships with older partners; gaining a better ee sets of people so important in the life of a child. Yet challenging or not, if a child is to be well served, it is the responsibility of pu

e agencies’ ability to recruit and retain a child welfare workforce. The loss of staff contributes to high financial costs to agencies, bu kin may be severely strained, or their health or mental health may create barriers to a smooth transition. This summary from Chapin ls are due by March 25. The conference takes place September 28-30 in Providence, R.I. ne placement to another in the child welfare system significantly increased the risk that a youth would run. Where a youth lived while ce abuse treatment in the past year were more likely to have received treatment if they have ever been in foster care. t affect improved provision of services and programs across multiple youth-serving systems for those children, youth, and families, a a termination of parental rights petition (TPR) for children in CFSA custody for 15 of the last 22 months. The paper addresses thre ides a clear approach to examining foster care requirements and an opportunity to examine gaps in practice.

s and extracurricular and enrichment activities as their peers. The National Child Welfare Resource Center on Legal and Judicial Iss

Data, shows that there was no slowdown in the average time required to complete adoptions - a key concern of the federal law - and amily or other people to offer support to them while they are away. They will be organizing letter writing volunteers and care packag

ed to families. For more on SDM, see The Children’s Research Center materials under CPS at http://www.nccd-crc.org/crc/c_pubs_main.htm

irements, states with level of care systems, and services to youth over 21; a revised family preservation section and a revised juvenil vides new information in both areas.

o ICWA. ICWA requires that (1) tribes be notified and given an opportunity to intervene when the state places a child subject to IC

kers and supervisors to help them identify and solve routine school-related issues; and empowering and educating parents and, young ct. It presents the actual experiences of states using actuarial risk assessment and clarifies how equity issues should be evaluated. l Hill is devoted to information about meth and responding to its challenges in an effective, family-centered way. ders that were cited as the primary reason that a child came to the attention of the child welfare system.

rs, teachers, and child welfare professionals. nt Resources‖ corner of their home page. ents section of the website to find out what is happening in your state, and submit your event if it isn’t listed. If your governor is sign

Department of Housing and Urban Development.

k‖ of strengths-based practice. The Research & Training Center on Family Support and Children’s Mental Health is hosting a discussio ople describe their successes in their own words. It also provides a wealth of links to online tools and assessments and many suggesti m. One resource available is a fact sheet that indicates the statistical overrepresentation of African-American children and black-w elping children recuperate, and preparing children for a permanent home.

n assistance-related questions, or a specific question may be selected in order to view the answer from each state. gnize any delays so that their children can be screened and receive early treatment, if necessary. Available in both English and Spanis

urt process to understand the questions to ask and the resources that can address the special needs of infants in foster care and th d more diverse in their levels of stability and willingness to help than previously thought. As a result of breakthrough technology and ess safety and well being. Workers learn how to use a four step process to organize their visitation with family.

actice frameworks emphasizing engagement, participation and action, which may have previously not been used by child welfare profes

/CEO Shay Bilchik and HHS Assistant Secretary for Children and Families Wade Horn on "Should States Be Allowed to Convert Fede mber of significant challenges, including educational deficits, mental health problems, economic insecurity, victimization, and early chi

es; case review prototypes; strategies for including the adolescent in the service planning process; definitions of outcomes for adole

cerated mothers, especially in the initial period following mothers' imprisonment, may go far in improving their life prospects and avo

strated through an extensive case study. Administrative supports for comprehensive assessment also are discussed, including policie

staff recognize when substance abuse is a risk factor in their cases; describes strategies to facilitate and support alcohol and drug

vernor has issued a proclamation that is not on the list, please send a copy, or an Internet link, for either the proclamation itself or a news rel

er service model holds promise as a supportive intervention for birth parents. se topics as child safety and the legal process, supervising the safety intervention, and unexplained injuries.

vide both instructor’s guides, which include all handouts, and PowerPoint presentations to be used in presenting the modules

fare System‖ and ―Kinship Care Policies.‖ In addition, State Data Trends for each state have been updated to include the year 2002.

Welfare System and the May 24 state program manager’s teleconference on Racial Disproportionality in Child Welfare. Use the ban ices Reviews Project, managed by Johnson, Bassin & Shaw (JBS),Inc. Reports for previous years from NCSL are also available – our p ility of courts to move children quickly out of the legal limbo of foster care and into safe, permanent homes. ster collaboration between these two key entities. dress person-specific issues and the larger social conditions that affect them. From June 2003 to March 2004, CWLA and the Rober

www.nytimes.com/2005/07/11/national/11meth.html? sfied with the services provided. providers to share their experiences and expertise. In addition to discussing the issues and challenges most systems are experiencin

exciting work being done in locating relatives and providing connectedness for young people

ring and that they also can be very difficult to serve.

red decision-making, differential response, and some child welfare waiver demonstration projects.

edition offers resources for child welfare agencies wishing to learn more about trauma and PTSD. Practice Notes and Training Matters are s recommend several strategies for curbing juvenile firesetting Does it Have to do with Family-Centered Practice?

ncy court order. ome: substance abuse, domestic violence, a history of incarceration, and depression.

for participation.

h terms as ―ice babies‖ or ―meth babies‖ as pejorative and stigmatizing labels used in the popular media. This is a timely caution for a nd measures related to population and family characteristics. This year the report presents three special features on children with a Child Welfare League of America Research to Practice Initiative, under subcontract to the National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse an

source development plan.

ntation. Most of the information is specific to Florida.

e states' quality assurance efforts. The findings of this report from the National Conference of State Legislatures are based on a r ent Court. Early research results have shown a significant increase in the rate of family reunification and a shortened stay in foster d child protective services. This is one of many resources featured on a new Federal site devoted to meth issues: http://www.methresources al health, education, employment, housing, independent living, and other research and advocacy areas. The document contains their T is newsletter from the National Child Welfare Resource Center for Organizational Improvement provides some specific ideas and ex more than 40,000 selected reports, journal articles, videos, and other publications ible to the community because they are homeless, but many will need more than housing to get their lives on a better track.

ornerstone of every CSF program - informs every aspect of the community service program as well. ge devoted to disaster relief efforts. We are focused primarily on the needs of families and children who are involved with the child ht out the best in the American people. The National Resource Center for Family-Centered Practice and Permanency Planning (NRCFC other states: Mississippi: 1-800-821-9157 Louisiana: 1-800-259-3428 ate Supplement Checks * Louisiana Rehabilitation Services * Unemployment Benefits and Disaster Unemployment Benefits Displaced D

rents should be directed to the foster/adopt inquiry line at 1-800-233-3405. ading ―Help for Agencies and Staff.‖ proof of residency. Evacuees who have lost all identification and records should be able to give their address or other simple form of ent genders, ages, and races; and among children receiving and not receiving capitated health care services. Eastern time), and the only equipment that you need is a telephone. The individual registration fee for each session is $100 for CWLA but shows significant promise for bridging the gaps between best practices and actual practice. This 2005 report illustrates the use motion initiatives may benefit children and families.

are Librarian, allows users to register to receive monthly lists of library materials in specific categories chosen by the user, such as

ent and caregivers provide the best assistance possible. From the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children. on, developmental competency, gender, and the stage of disaster response. Pediatricians can be effective advocates for the child and agency, contact information, a brief summary of the approach, and the estimated length of time in which the approach has been in ex

ce on assessments of physical, cognitive, emotional, and skill-based measures suggests that the minimal interventions that many recei ,000 for every foster child placed above its previous annual best. States also receive additional bonuses for older foster children, d

rograms in conformance with widely accepted standards of clinical care and the principles of youth development.

ildren for case services and case outcomes at assessment, case management in the home and reunification services. However, it found presents the results of round one of the Illinois Child Well-Being Study, in which groups of children were compared for significant respond to reports of child abuse and neglect by including a broader set of responses for working with families at the first signs of

state-specific information on arrangements under which various states are addressing the issue of liability and damage claims for fos

rrent reactions to trauma and provides a baseline to which to compare final outcomes.

case review requirements; judicial determinations; and Federal oversight. quently overlooked trauma and stress experienced by those in rescue and help operations. You must register on Medscape to access g children’s behavioral issues.

aboration with the University of Maryland School of Social Work, examining the personal and organizational conditions and strategie

ted States have developed systems to successfully identify and locate relatives are provided. me visits, and parties included as "reunified". The bulletin discusses implications and provides recommendations to improve definition s to birth families (and rights to inheritance and other survivor benefits); and provide, for teens about to emancipate, the option to

ata composites and potential performance areas and measures for the Federal Child and Family Services Review (CFSR). The commen

h Services Administration to inform 2005 grant applicants to the National Child Traumatic Stress Initiative. The approaches appeari

families, and a comprehensive listing of web resources on child development put together by the editor of Brevity on the Net, a wonderful ne from care. Order online at the link above.

losophy. Section IV makes recommendations, describes action steps for change, and suggests concrete ways to achieve permanence f ability Employment Policy (ODEP). These Guideposts identify a range of opportunities, supports, and services that all foster youth, in It explores a number of different approaches to planning, ranging from private documentation to the more public judicial processes

formed three working groups, one of which will be addressing child welfare issues. Their website provides a wealth of useful informat media, volunteers, and others in order to achieve the ultimate goal of increasing awareness and expanding the network of foster par

ss children's mental health and ameliorate the effects of childhood trauma

al development of young children. The webcast of the event is now available. milies. The purpose of this article is to explore the historical and current factors with regard to disabilities and the child welfare sy D, paying particular attention to some of the specific problems facing parents of adolescents. social worker in Louisiana, is able to speak firsthand about agency preparedness. As the invited keynote speaker at an October 2005

ation on the information sharing law in Washington State at the time of its writing (2004). A great model for other states seeking to

istance, Frequently Requested Information, Statistics and Research, and Federal and State Reporting Systems; Information Memor ricanes. Be sure to view ‖ What's Going on in The Mind of a Child Who's Lived Through a Hurricane?‖ ut-of-home placement. This paper synthesizes the final reports of those 15 projects.

delines and strategies that support positive educational outcomes for children in the custody of the state of Maine. It includes strat ow educational expectations, frequent disruptions and changes in school placements, underdeveloped independent living skills, and lack r kinship care while it has improved significantly in unrelated foster care. arily responsible for administering and funding the city's status offender system—collaborated to launch the Family Assessment Pro wing some youth based on their risk factors or deficits versus viewing all youth as having certain strengths, assets and protective fac lly looked at the impact of Title IV-E educational partnerships on retention in child welfare. Brief 3, ―Understanding Retention in Ch

ch are available in these fact sheets. Each fact sheet offers information about the program's purpose, services and funded activitie

ecognizing potential returns on investment. The toolkit is intended for use by health plans, states, and other stakeholders in gleaning esentatives in all 50 states and the District of Columbia and identifies many opportunities to improve screening, assessment and diagn

e part of either pre-service or ongoing training within a child welfare organization. It builds on the concepts of attachment, strength

with mental disorders. Once identified, these youth can receive the services required to improve their lives, reduce recidivism, and p Network, which is committed to improving access and increasing the standard of care for traumatized children and families. Registra

ther professionals. Visitors are encouraged to update or submit new information and materials for inclusion in the searchable databas o be disconnected from positive personal, family, community, and/or societal involvement because they dropped out of school; had a b youth development. Visit the link above for more information and to register online.

g professionals who have the ability to effectively share their expertise with peers on critical issues regarding children, youth, and f s, a resume and two references.

and an online evaluation of Web resources. often their only source of financial help.

s and movies. NAC is seeking ongoing submissions (poems, stories, photographs, drawings) from children.

rnal stakeholders. who takes action to accomplish goals that result in better outcomes for children, families and communities. Shared leadership is succ

ducation and why they should be considered for the scholarship. Applications are due on March 31, 2005, and decisions will be announ teers working with prevention programs, parents who want to advocate for prevention policies and programs, funders and the media.

rom each of these sources; and highlight expenditures and trends within the Title IV-E Foster Care Program, including expenditures

n board designed by students -- for students who are interested in sharing college experiences; a listserve; and a resource section th

n and Family Services to monitor local child welfare agencies.

the Children Missing from Care Project, Child Welfare League of America and Bryan Samuels, Director, Illinois Department of Child tudy focused on patterns of subsidy receipt, Federal support for subsidies, and the relationship between subsidies and the number an olicy Center recently released a factsheet containing nine policy recommendations regarding infants and toddlers in the child welfar ch services include more than just cost savings. By providing a continuum of care to at-risk children and families, States can help pre th older partners; gaining a better understanding from existing research about exploitive relationships between teens and their olde erved, it is the responsibility of public child welfare systems to find a way to build relationships between these three components an

high financial costs to agencies, but more important, the cost to children and families is staggering. Children and families are unable nsition. This summary from Chapin Hall's November 2004 conference, co-sponsored by the MacArthur Research Network on Transit

ould run. Where a youth lived while in care affected the risk of running as well. been in foster care. ose children, youth, and families, and provides a framework to strategically confront and overcome the barriers to multisystem coor months. The paper addresses three elements of the issue: 1) suggested criteria for determining a compelling reason not to file a TPR

ce Center on Legal and Judicial Issues has pulled together training materials to help educators, parents and caregivers, attorneys, he

ey concern of the federal law - and that the measure may have only added to the efforts already made by the states. writing volunteers and care package collection; if you would like to help, visit the link above for more information.

ww.nccd-crc.org/crc/c_pubs_main.html

vation section and a revised juvenile justice section.

state places a child subject to ICWA in foster care or seeks to terminate parental rights on behalf of such a child and (2) children

and educating parents and, young people, to navigate the New York City Department of Education (DOE), and other agencies providi equity issues should be evaluated. -centered way.

isn’t listed. If your governor is signing a proclamation in honor of Foster Care Month, please email us using the ―Contact Us‖ form to l

Mental Health is hosting a discussion board about this new measure. and assessments and many suggestions for taking advantage of community resources. ican-American children and black-white disparity among children in foster care in the 50 States for the year 2000.

from each state. Available in both English and Spanish, the toolkit includes an informational card on developmental milestones, a growth chart, and a se

eds of infants in foster care and their families. It was jointly published by the New York State Permanent Judicial Commission on Ju ult of breakthrough technology and practice frameworks emphasizing engagement, participation and action, which may have previously n with family.

t been used by child welfare professionals, family members can be quickly and extensively identified.

States Be Allowed to Convert Federal Foster Care Funds Into Capped Block Grants." ecurity, victimization, and early child-bearing. They fare worse than their same-age peers across a variety of domains and are much m

definitions of outcomes for adolescent permanency; and many other areas. This book will provide practitioners with the vision and th

roving their life prospects and avoiding family dissolution and distress. Children who fared poorly were those unable to settle into a

also are discussed, including policies, services, staff training, supervision, coordination with other agencies, and accountability and eva

litate and support alcohol and drug treatment and recovery; and explains the benefits of partnering with substance abuse treatment

the proclamation itself or a news release announcing it to the National Foster Parent Association, email info@nfpainc.org or fax to (253) 853

in presenting the modules updated to include the year 2002.

ality in Child Welfare. Use the banner on our home page to click through to the Webcast and Teleconference archives, where you wil rom NCSL are also available – our page (above) provides links.

March 2004, CWLA and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation convened a series of three summits. This is the first of two monograp

nges most systems are experiencing in providing care to these children, participants shared promising practices and recommendation

ice Notes and Training Matters are sponsored by the N.C. Division of Social Services and produced by the Family and Children's Resource P

media. This is a timely caution for all of us as we learn how to deal with the increasing problem of the effects of methamphetamine us special features on children with asthma, children with specified blood lead levels, and parental reports of emotional and behavioral d nal Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information.

State Legislatures are based on a review by NCSL of PIP-related documents and informal and voluntary telephone interviews with ke ion and a shortened stay in foster care for children. th issues: http://www.methresources.gov/ eas. The document contains their Top Elements of an Effective, Comprehensive, and Integrated State Approach to Serving Youth Ag rovides some specific ideas and examples of strategies for involving stakeholders in child welfare work.

ir lives on a better track.

ren who are involved with the child welfare system, but there are resources listed for the general population, as well. Information sp ce and Permanency Planning (NRCFCPPP) has heard from many families willing to open their homes and hearts to children who are sepa

Unemployment Benefits Displaced DSS employees may also call the number to report their whereabouts or inquire about their jobs

ir address or other simple form of attestation to be eligible. The special evacuee status will apply to the full range of federal benefi

for each session is $100 for CWLA members, $150 for nonmembers. Agencies registering for all five sessions will receive one sessi his 2005 report illustrates the use of the methodology and describes the successful strategies and lessons learned by the twenty-tw

gories chosen by the user, such as Safety, Permanency, Well-Being, Prevention, Workforce, and more. The monthly lists of library m

xploited Children. fective advocates for the child and family and at the community level and can affect national policy in support of families. In this rep n which the approach has been in existence. The promising approaches are listed by State and by category. The categories correspon

nimal interventions that many receive will not be sufficient to ameliorate the long-term risks they probably will face. NSCAW will con onuses for older foster children, defined as children older than age 9, and for the adoption of children with special needs.

h development.

fication services. However, it found differences in case and family characteristics during the assessment process. Furthermore, it fo ren were compared for significant well-being differences by gender, age, race, time in care, type of placement, and region. g with families at the first signs of trouble, including innovative partnerships with community based organizations that can help suppo

liability and damage claims for foster parents. We have assembled those policies we were able to locate. Note that this is not a com

st register on Medscape to access this article, but registration is free

nizational conditions and strategies, i.e. Title IV-E educational partnerships that impact retention.

mmendations to improve definitional consistency. about to emancipate, the option to extend transitional-housing up to age 24. In addition, SB436 and SB500 provide more support for

rvices Review (CFSR). The comment period is 30 days. Information about who to contact is provided in the announcement, which appe

Initiative. The approaches appearing in the Summary Table of NCTSN Empirically Supported Treatments and Promising Practices ha of Brevity on the Net, a wonderful newsletter from the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (http://www.ncjfcj.org/ ).

crete ways to achieve permanence for youth. nd services that all foster youth, including those with disabilities, need in order to transition from adolescence to productive adultho the more public judicial processes. These include such traditional choices as foster care, testamentary guardianships, powers of att

rovides a wealth of useful information. xpanding the network of foster parents. It was built through a partnership between the Annie E. Casey Foundation Family to Family I

disabilities and the child welfare system that will lead to a better understanding of the context in which children with disabilities inv

ynote speaker at an October 2005 meeting of the Council on Accreditation (COA), Ms. Weisner talked about issues that child welfar

t model for other states seeking to improve the educational stability, continuity, and success for children who are in foster care.

ting Systems; Information Memoranda and Program Instructions that can be sorted by topic or year (in the Laws and Policies section

e state of Maine. It includes strategies that guide the enrollment in and transfer between schools that ensure a smooth transition to ed independent living skills, and lack of access to mental health care and treatment.

launch the Family Assessment Program (FAP), an innovative approach to intake and assessment. FAP seeks to swiftly connect childre rengths, assets and protective factors to build upon. Policymakers across the country are responding to the research and increasing 3, ―Understanding Retention in Child Welfare,‖ provides specific recommendations and guidance for future research studies on recr

pose, services and funded activities, the administering federal agency, grantee and beneficiary eligibility and a brief assessment of t

and other stakeholders in gleaning ideas on how to systematically enhance the effectiveness of early childhood development screeni ve screening, assessment and diagnosis, and treatment and referral for young children and their mothers. Other topics include coord

concepts of attachment, strengths-based assessment and planning, child and youth development, effective interviewing and organizi

their lives, reduce recidivism, and promote community safety. Child welfare professionals may find much of this information useful as zed children and families. Registration fee.

inclusion in the searchable database as well as communicate directly with other professionals interested in child welfare training. they dropped out of school; had a baby before age 20 without being married; are deeply involved in the juvenile or adult criminal just

ues regarding children, youth, and families. Abstracts must be received by January 28, 2005.

munities. Shared leadership is successfully achieved when parents, staff and community members build effective partnerships and sh 2005, and decisions will be announced by May 31, 2005 programs, funders and the media.

e Program, including expenditures for foster care maintenance payments, administrative and child placement costs and training.

istserve; and a resource section that contains web-based resources with links to other sites and a bibliography listing related publica

ector, Illinois Department of Children and Family Services. etween subsidies and the number and timeliness of adoptions from foster care. The complete report, which was prepared by RTI Inte ts and toddlers in the child welfare system. Each recommendation discusses the relevant current research and offers a promising st en and families, States can help prevent child abuse and neglect, shorten foster care placements, and meet Federal child welfare stan ships between teens and their older sexual partners and to explore data and research gaps that, when improved, can lead to better p etween these three components and to preventing the triangulation of the triangle of support around the child.

g. Children and families are unable to form trusting relationships, and worker turnover compounds children’s feelings of neglect and thur Research Network on Transitions to Adulthood and Public Policy, synthesizes the research presented and the discussions on pro

e the barriers to multisystem coordination and integration and its impact on improved outcomes. compelling reason not to file a TPR; 2) suggested procedure(s) to identify and periodically review cases that meet the defined crite

rents and caregivers, attorneys, hearing officers, probation officers, social workers, and agency staff put AB 490 into practice.

made by the states. re information.

alf of such a child and (2) children be placed if possible with relatives or tribal families. This Government Accountability Office repo

(DOE), and other agencies providing educational services.

us using the ―Contact Us‖ form to let us know when and where.

or the year 2000.

milestones, a growth chart, and a series of factsheets on milestones and developmental and behavioral delays. These materials can be

rmanent Judicial Commission on Justice for Children. ―Questions Every Judge and Lawyer Should ask About Infants and Toddlers in d action, which may have previously not been used by child welfare professionals, family members can be quickly and extensively iden

variety of domains and are much more likely to have been involved with the criminal justice system. At the same time, many of the yo

practitioners with the vision and the practical guidance needed to facilitate and support permanency for youth and thus improve you

were those unable to settle into a stable home life with relatives or foster families. They often exhibited detachment, intense ambiv

agencies, and accountability and evaluation. The guidelines were developed through a coordinated effort of the Children's Bureau Tra

ng with substance abuse treatment and dependency court systems to improve outcomes for children of parents with substance use di

l info@nfpainc.org or fax to (253) 853-4001.

conference archives, where you will find downloadable materials from each event, as well.

s. This is the first of two monographs to be released to support a consensus agenda for systems-culture change. It addresses what w

sing practices and recommendations for the field.

he Family and Children's Resource Program, part of the Jordan Institute for Families at the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Social Work

he effects of methamphetamine use on child welfare systems. ports of emotional and behavioral difficulties in children. In addition, a special section highlights family structure and children's wel

ntary telephone interviews with key state contacts who are responsible for overseeing PIP design and implementation.

ate Approach to Serving Youth Aging Out of Foster Care

population, as well. Information specific to child welfare are listed below. Please share them with anyone who may need them. If you and hearts to children who are separated from or have lost their families due to Hurricane Katrina. Foster care and adoption of child

bouts or inquire about their jobs

to the full range of federal benefits administered by the states, including HHS programs that provide services through Medicaid, fa

five sessions will receive one session free (20% discount). d lessons learned by the twenty-two public child welfare agencies who participated in this Breakthrough Series Collaborative on Rec

ore. The monthly lists of library materials will be sent by email and will reflect items that have been added to the Clearinghouse libra

y in support of families. In this report, specific children's responses are delineated, risk factors for adverse reactions are discusse ategory. The categories correspond with the items reviewed in the child and family services reviews (CFSRs).

probably will face. NSCAW will continue to follow the life course of these children to gather data about services received during sub dren with special needs.

ssment process. Furthermore, it found that race interacts with other case characteristics in a way that is predictive of some case d f placement, and region. d organizations that can help support families that are in need. The County Welfare Directors Association of California has published

locate. Note that this is not a comprehensive list of all policies.

d SB500 provide more support for pregnant and parenting foster teens. To read the measures, visit the link above and search by bill

ed in the announcement, which appeared in the November 7 Federal Register.

atments and Promising Practices have each been used by at least one Network site for addressing the needs of traumatized children

dges (http://www.ncjfcj.org/ ).

adolescence to productive adulthood and citizenship. ntary guardianships, powers of attorney, custody and guardianship procedures and adoption as well as innovative tools such as standb

asey Foundation Family to Family Initiative, Oregon Department of Human Services and FosterClub.

which children with disabilities involved with child and family services agencies find themselves. From the October 2005 issue of Env

lked about issues that child welfare agencies should consider when developing their disaster plans

children who are in foster care.

ear (in the Laws and Policies section); Full text of all 52 Statewide Assessments, Child and Family Services Reviews, Key Findings Fro

that ensure a smooth transition to a new school that is sensitive to the individual needs of each child.

AP seeks to swiftly connect children and families to appropriate services in the community, reduce the city's reliance on family court ing to the research and increasing public awareness of what is necessary to change the odds for youth. This issue brief from the Na or future research studies on recruitment and retention

gibility and a brief assessment of the program's impact

arly childhood development screening and services. mothers. Other topics include coordination of services, quality assurance, provider education, and system capacity. Priority issues and

effective interviewing and organizing contacts. It allows caseworkers to practice some of the skills through role plays and preparato

much of this information useful as well.

rested in child welfare training. n the juvenile or adult criminal justice system, and/or dropped out or ―aged out‖ of the foster care system. Visit this website to lea

build effective partnerships and share responsibility, expertise and leadership in areas that affect families and communities. If you

placement costs and training.

bibliography listing related publications.

rt, which was prepared by RTI International under contract to ASPE, can be ordered from the National Adoption Information Cleari research and offers a promising strategy to address the issue. The factsheet notes that the early years present an excellent opport and meet Federal child welfare standards. when improved, can lead to better prevention and protective interventions; discussing current programs and laws designed to protect und the child.

children’s feelings of neglect and abandonment. States have made significant strides to address the problems by implementing creat resented and the discussions on program and policy implications of this research. Topics include education, workforce development, c

cases that meet the defined criteria; and 3) review of compelling reason determinations by the Family Court as part of the Court's r

taff put AB 490 into practice.

rnment Accountability Office report describes (1) the factors that influence placement decisions for children subject to ICWA; (2)

oral delays. These materials can be downloaded from the website or ordered in bulk.

ask About Infants and Toddlers in the Child Welfare System‖ is a technical assistance brief from the National Council of Juvenile an can be quickly and extensively identified. This web cast will illuminate these breakthrough technologies for viewers as novel means of

m. At the same time, many of the young adults continue to have strong ties to family and perceive relatively high levels of social suppo

ncy for youth and thus improve youth chances for safety, permanency, and well-being.

xhibited detachment, intense ambivalence, violence and disorganization in the way they felt and thought about relationships.

ffort of the Children's Bureau Training and Technical Assistance Network.

en of parents with substance use disorders.

ulture change. It addresses what we know and what we are learning to improve the quality of care for our most vulnerable children, y

el Hill School of Social Work

family structure and children's well-being

and implementation.

anyone who may need them. If you become aware of other sources of information or assistance for child welfare-involved children a a. Foster care and adoption of children is regulated by state public child welfare agencies, which are responsible for ensuring the saf

ovide services through Medicaid, family assistance through TANF, child care support, foster care assistance, mental health services

hrough Series Collaborative on Recruitment and Retention, which was sponsored by Casey Family Programs.

en added to the Clearinghouse library and are available to users.

for adverse reactions are discussed, and advice is given for pediatricians to ameliorate the effects of disaster on children. From the ws (CFSRs).

about services received during subsequent periods, measures of child well-being, and longer-term results for the study population.

y that is predictive of some case dispositions.

ociation of California has published several documents on this systems improvement effort

it the link above and search by bill number.

the needs of traumatized children and adolescents.

l as innovative tools such as standby guardianship, standby adoption, joint guardianship, short-term guardianship or short-term trans

rom the October 2005 issue of Envision, The Manitoba Journal of Child Welfare.

Services Reviews, Key Findings From the Child and Family Services Reviews, and Program Improvement Plans that can be searched and

the city's reliance on family court in Persons in Need of Supervision (PINS) cases, and decrease the number of out-of-home placeme outh. This issue brief from the National Conference of State Legislatures shares supporting research and examples from states tha

ystem capacity. Priority issues and a conclusion are also provided.

s through role plays and preparatory activities. The seven developmental checklists are tools for caseworkers to use as they begin to

e system. Visit this website to learn more; check out their collection of papers and reports.

t families and communities. If you are a staff member or other professional interested in working with Parent Leaders, the Parent Le

tional Adoption Information Clearinghouse. Use the Clearinghouse search option at the upper right corner. y years present an excellent opportunity to effectively intervene with at-risk children. These early intervention strategies can lead t

rams and laws designed to protect teens, including reporting sexual assault and sexual exploitation of teens and management of these

he problems by implementing creative and innovative strategies that they have found to be effective, e.g., increased and improved in ucation, workforce development, civic engagement, and specific issues facing several at-risk populations.

amily Court as part of the Court's review of a child's permanency goal and plan. After reviewing federal laws, the policies and practic

for children subject to ICWA; (2) the extent to which, if any, placements for children subject to ICWA have been delayed; and (3) f

the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges. ogies for viewers as novel means of reunifying children and youth with families. Presenters: Kevin Campbell, Vice President of Strateg

relatively high levels of social support. Results also suggest that allowing foster youth to remain in care beyond their 18th birthday m

ought about relationships.

for our most vulnerable children, youth and families.

r child welfare-involved children and families, please share it with us by sending an email to weeklyupdate@doughertyconsultants.com re responsible for ensuring the safety, permanency, and well-being of children in foster and adoptive homes. ―It is expected that any

assistance, mental health services and substance abuse treatment services. State enrollment teams are already set up in many shelte

s of disaster on children. From the Journal Pediatrics.

results for the study population.

m guardianship or short-term transfer of custody, and voluntary foster care.

ment Plans that can be searched and downloaded (in the Child Welfare Monitoring section); and Links to specific research funded by t

he number of out-of-home placements for PINS youth. Commissioned by Probation and ACS, this report from Vera Institute of Just arch and examples from states that are tackling these challenges and succeeding.

aseworkers to use as they begin to more intentionally structure their visits to focus on safety, permanence, and well being.

with Parent Leaders, the Parent Leadership Network is a resource for you to obtain input and learn shared leadership strategies dir

y intervention strategies can lead to significant cost savings over time through reductions in child abuse and neglect, welfare depende

of teens and management of these cases; and building collaboration and communication among law enforcement, health, education an

ive, e.g., increased and improved in-service training, increased educational opportunities, and improved human resource capacity-build

deral laws, the policies and practices of a group of states and recommendations of relevant professional groups, this paper makes pre

ICWA have been delayed; and (3) federal oversight of states’ implementation of ICWA.

Campbell, Vice President of Strategic Planning and Service Innovation, EMQ Children and Family Services, and Beverly Dekker-Davids

care beyond their 18th birthday may confer some advantages during the transition to adulthood.

yupdate@doughertyconsultants.com; we will continue to add new resources to this page as we receive them ve homes. ―It is expected that any unaccompanied children will be reunited with nuclear and extended family members as soon as pos

ms are already set up in many shelters, and many have 1-800 numbers people can call. Any evacuee can go to the nearest state or local

ks to specific research funded by the Children's Bureau

eport from Vera Institute of Justice assesses the progress FAP has made in its first two-and-a-half years, finding that the city is a

rmanence, and well being.

rn shared leadership strategies directly from Parent Leader

abuse and neglect, welfare dependence, and substance abu enforcement, health, education and social services provi

oved human resource capacity-building strategies.

sional groups, this paper makes preliminary recommendat

ervices, and Beverly Dekker-Davidson, Adole

ded family members as soon as possible. Only if family is

can go to the nearest state or local benefits offic

half years, finding that the city is already reaping significant ben


				
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