The Life Of Herbert Hoover

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					The Life Of Herbert Hoover

 The Life of Herbert Hoover book was written by George H. Nash. It is a
book that was published by W. W Norton in 1996. The book analyses the
Life of Herbert Hoover who became a great Mining Engineer. He also became
the 31st President of the United States from 1929 to 1933. According to
George Nash, Herbert Hoover was born on August 10, 1874 in Iowa’s West
Branch. His parents were both Quakers. His father, Jesse Hoover was of
German origin with German-Swiss (Huber, Burkhart) decent. Hoover’s
mother, Hulda (Minthorn) was a Canadian of English and Irish decent (Nash
3). Herbert was left a total orphan at the age of nine when his father
and mother died in 1980 and 1984 respectively. In the late 1885, he went
to live with his uncle John Minthorn in Newberg, Oregon. The report will
explore the Life of Herbert Hoover from birth to death. It will further
analyze the writings of George Nash and give opinions.
In 1891, Herbert joined Stanford University as a first year. At Stanford
University, Herbert became the student manager of both baseball and
football teams. After playing one of the games in 1894, since Herbert was
the baseball team manager, he found out that the receipts were short. He
therefore went looking for the person who had not paid the twenty-five
cents and this was former President Benjamin Harrison. Later on, in his
life as a politician, he called this encounter with the former president
as "his first time with greatness". In 1895 Herbert graduated with a
degree in geology. In 1897, Herbert went to Australia to work with a
London based mining company called Bewick, Moreing & Co. He served in the
company as a geologist and mining engineer. At the same time, he was
searching to invest at the Western Australian goldfields. He was
appointed as mine manager at the age of 23. He brought about a major
expansion program for Gwalia gold mine sons at Gwalia, Western Australia.
He also brought many Italian immigrants to counter the union militancy
and cut costs of the Australian miners.
In 1899, Herbert married Lou Henry, his Stanford University sweetheart
who was the only geology major female student at Stanford. The Hoovers
had two sons. Herbert Clark Jr. (1903–1969) was the first born and Allan
Henry (1907–1993) the second born (Nash 29). Herbert went to China with
his wife where he worked as a leading engineer for a private corporation.
They both learned Mandarin Chinese and Herbert used the language during
his White House tenure when they desired to foil eavesdroppers. The
Hoovers were trapped by the Boxer Rebellion in Tianjin in June 1900.
During the battle, Herbert guided U.S Marines around Tianjin using his
wide knowledge of the Tianjin terrain. In 1901, Herbert was made a
partner in Bewick, Moreing & Co. and he assumed the responsibility for
various operations in Australia.
According to George Nash, Herbert Hoover joined a political world when he
went back to his U. S home in 1919. Leaders of Democratic Party looked on
him as a potential Presidential candidate. President Wilson who was the
then sitting President, privately preferred Herbert as his successor.
Herbert considered being a Democrat, but he still believed that 1920
would be a year of the Republican Party. He also confessed publicly that
he could not run for Democratic Party because its only member in his
boyhood home was referred to as the town drunk. Herbert rejected
Democratic Party overtures in 1920. He declared himself a Republican, and
later a Presidential candidate. His name was placed on the ballot in the
California state primary, but he came close to beating popular Senator
Hiram Johnson. Having lost in his home state, Herbert was not considered
a very serious contender at the convention. Warren G. Harding became
President and appointed Hoover the Secretary of Commerce.
In 1927, The Great Mississippi Flood occurred breaking the banks and
levees of the lower Mississippi River. This resulted in flooding millions
of acres and leaving more than one million people displaced from their
homes. Although this disaster did not fall under Herbert’s duties as
Secretary of Commerce, the six governors along the Mississippi
specifically asked for Herbert in the emergency. The then President,
Calvin Coolidge sent Herbert to mobilize militia, state and local
authorities, army engineers, the American Red Cross, and the Coast Guard.
With an aid from the Rockefeller Foundation, Herbert set up Health units
which worked in the area for one year. Diseases like malaria, typhoid
fever, and pellagra were stamped out (Nash 59). This work during the
flood made Herbert gain new accolades as humanitarian because it was
brought to the front pages of newspapers almost everywhere.
In the same year, 1927, Herbert Hoover became the leading Republican
candidate for the election of 1928. He received favorable press coverage
in months that were leading up to the convention. Herbert’s experience,
reputation, and popularity enabled him to be given the nomination on the
first ballot. Senator Charles Curtis was named as his running mate. For
efficiency and prosperity, Herbert campaigned against Democratic
candidate Alfred Smith. Herbert Hoover took office as the 31st President
of the United States in 1929. He displayed optimism and promised a "New
Day" to the U.S.
President Herbert declined to use a government spokesman. He instead
asked reporters to quote him directly. He gave them handouts with
statements he had made ahead of time. In his first 120 days as president,
he held more regular press conferences than any other President before.
While Herbert was President, he mentioned civil rights many times. He
believed that the African-Americans and other races in the United States
would improve themselves with education. He therefore wanted the races to
be assimilated into white culture. Herbert's stance on the economy was
largely based on voluntarism. He believed that public-private cooperation
was the only way to achieve long-term growth. Herbert considered
individuality and self reliance which he considered important in the
American values. He therefore had a fear that, intervention or coercion
by the government would destroy these values. The arrival of the Great
Depression which spread across the globe in 1932 put his ideals and the
economy at test. Herbert agreed to roll back taxes that had been cut by
his Administration on upper incomes. As a result, this could pay for
government programs and make up for revenue lost due to the Depression.
Though Hoover contested for presidency in 1932, he lost to Roosevelt.
Though his years had advanced, he continued to work full time both on his
writing as well as managing the Hoover Institution at Stanford
University. Among his literary works was The Ordeal of Woodrow Wilson
which was a bestseller. In 1960, he attended a final Republican National
Convention (Nash 189). Although Hoover lived to see the 1964 Convention,
He did not attend because of his illness. He later died at the age of 90
in New York City on October 20, 1964. The death occurred 31 years and
seven months after leaving office. He was buried at the Herbert Hoover
Presidential Library and Museum in West Branch, Iowa.
Herbert Hoover can be taken as an example of vitality and importance in
the political history of America. The Author reminds us that the actions,
beliefs and personalities of leaders have great effect in the society.
Herbert Hoover joined a political world when he went back to his U. S
home in 1919. Leaders of Democratic Party looked on him as a potential
Presidential candidate. President Wilson who was the then sitting
President, privately preferred Herbert as his successor. Herbert
considered being a Democrat, but he still believed that 1920 would be a
year of the Republican Party. He also confessed publicly that he could
not run for Democratic Party because its only member in his boyhood home
was referred to as the town drunk. Herbert rejected Democratic Party
overtures in 1920. He declared himself a Republican, and later a
Presidential candidate. Instead, Warren G. Harding became President and
appointed Hoover the Secretary of Commerce.
Although the book gives an elaborate Biography, the consistency in the
Washington office by Hoover could otherwise be seen as devolving into
rigidity and dogma. The tragedy that befell Hoover was not that he was
wrong, but he also refused to see it. Hoover left Washington in March
1933 with bitterness and disappointment that he had been unappreciated by
voters for his best efforts. The Hoovers went to New York City, where
they stayed shortly and later returned to California to live at their
home. In 1936, Herbert Hoover entertained hopes of being the Republican
presidential nominee again, thus facing Roosevelt in a rematch. Roosevelt
won again in another landslide.
Herbert Hoover would have satisfied anyone who believed a great
businessman would make an ideal President in the United States. In his
outstanding addition to the American President series, George Nash
explains that Herbert Hoover was a real promoter and financier. This is
in addition to what other authors have written describing Hoover as a
mining Engineer. He also traveled the world and made a great fortune.
Hoover vaulted to fame after he brilliantly organized relief for the
Belgian famine during World War I. When Hoover was appointed secretary of
commerce in 1920, he operated in a dictatorial manner that infuriated
many colleagues. Despite his dictatorship, his dynamism and popularity
made him triumph for the Republican nomination in 1928. His political
position offended Congress and discouraged his supporters even before the
economic crash in 1929 when he was President. Many supporters were still
annoyed even after he backed imaginative programs to stimulate the fallen
economy. He also insisted that reliefs were socialistic and that local
governments were progressing when they were not. This made Herbert a
widely hated figure.

				
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