9913 Demonstrate knowledge of the New Zealand boating industry

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Demonstrate knowledge of the New Zealand boating industry
Level Credits Purpose 1 2 People credited with this unit standard are able to: identify the purpose and interrelationships of the boating industry's sectors; explain the geographic spread of boating industry activity in New Zealand; identify the boating industry's domestic and export markets; identify trends affecting the future of the boating industry; identify features of boats and their operation; and identify career opportunities within the boating industry. This unit standard is for people who are entering, or wishing to enter, the boating industry, and provides a context for further learning. Subfield Domain Status Status date Date version published Planned review date Entry information Accreditation Standard setting body (SSB) Boating Industries Marine Sales and Services Registered 7 May 1997 17 October 2008 31 December 2010 Open. Evaluation of documentation by NZQA and industry. Boating Industry Training Organisation 0136

Accreditation and Moderation Action Plan (AMAP) reference

This AMAP can be accessed at http://www.nzqa.govt.nz/framework/search/index.do. Special notes 1 2 This unit standard can be assessed off job. The reference text for this unit standard is Scanlan, Mike. Safety in Small Craft. (Auckland: New Zealand Coastguard Federation, 2002), pages 11-28. It is available from major booksellers. Legislation applying to this unit standard includes the Maritime Transport Act 1994 and subsequent amendments.

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 New Zealand Qualifications Authority 2009

9913 version 4 Page 2 of 4

Elements and performance criteria
Element 1 Identify the purpose and interrelationships of the boating industry's sectors. Range sectors – naval architecture and design, boatbuilding, mast and spar making, sail making, surface applications, electrotechnology, motive power, marine safety services, product sales, boat sales and brokerage, marine surveying, storage and marinas.

Performance criteria 1.1 The purpose and inter-relationships of boating industry sectors are explained in terms of the life cycle of a boat. Range design, build, fit out, transport, launch, repair, maintain, restore, alter, survey, berth, store, sell.

1.2

Skills shared with other industries and between boating industry sectors are identified in terms of fields, subfields, and domains of the National Qualifications Framework. Range skills – architecture and design, carpentry, furniture making, furniture finishing, composites, engineering fabrication, metal surface finishing, welding, selling skills, painting and decorating, automotive electrical and electronics, electrical trades, electrical engineering, management, marketing.

Element 2 Explain the geographic spread of boating industry activity in New Zealand. Performance criteria 2.1 Explanation identifies the geographic spread of boating industry sector activity in terms of volume and type. Range 2.2 type – recreational and commercial, fresh and salt water.

Explanation describes the geographic spread of boating industry activity in terms of resource availability, local market demand, and trends.

 New Zealand Qualifications Authority 2009

9913 version 4 Page 3 of 4 Element 3 Identify the boating industry's domestic and export markets. Performance criteria 3.1 New Zealand’s domestic and export markets are identified by volume, value, boat size, and boat type. Range boat type – commercial, military, recreational, sail boats, powered boats.

3.2

Work done on international boats brought to New Zealand for servicing is identified by its type, the skills required, and the types of boats involved. Range types of work – repairs and maintenance, refit, repainting; types of boats – sail craft, motor yachts, and launches.

3.3

Boating activities that promote the industry internationally are identified and explained in terms of the benefits to the boating industry as a whole. Range activities – boat shows, America’s Cup racing, Volvo Ocean Yacht Racing, power boat and jet boat racing.

Element 4 Identify trends affecting the future of the boating industry. Performance criteria 4.1 Trends in the characteristics of boats being built are identified in terms of boat size and type, materials used, and growth in self-contained boat systems. Trends in boating activity are identified in terms of increasing regulation of boating activities and increasing quality management requirements. Range 4.3 boating activity – boatbuilding, selling, racing, import, export.

4.2

Trends within the boating industry’s external environment are identified in terms of boat storage systems, growth in market size, impact of environmental concerns, and requirements for energy conservation.

Element 5 Identify features of boats and their operation. Range boat features – shape of a boat, parts of a boat, sailing dinghies, yachts’ rigging, directions within a boat, hull types, motors, sails and sailing rigs.

Performance criteria 5.1 Boat features are identified from actual items and/or pictures and/or diagrams.

 New Zealand Qualifications Authority 2009

9913 version 4 Page 4 of 4 5.2 Boat features are identified using terminology in accordance with the reference text. The requirements of boating industry personnel in relation to the physical operation of boats within New Zealand waters are described in terms of the Maritime Transport Act 1994. Range responsibility, look-out, speed, collision control, use of channels, separation, movement in relation to other vessels, conduct of vessels in restricted waterways, sound and light signals.

5.3

Element 6 Identify career opportunities within the boating industry. Performance criteria 6.1 Entry points to the boating industry are identified in terms of the learner’s own experience, interests, and geographic location. Range entry points – apprenticeship, traineeship, unskilled labour, entry from other industries.

6.2

Possible career paths are identified in terms of the learner’s own interests and expectations.

Please note Providers must be accredited by NZQA, or an inter-institutional body with delegated authority for quality assurance, before they can report credits from assessment against unit standards or deliver courses of study leading to that assessment. Industry Training Organisations must be accredited by NZQA before they can register credits from assessment against unit standards. Accredited providers and Industry Training Organisations assessing against unit standards must engage with the moderation system that applies to those standards. Accreditation requirements and an outline of the moderation system that applies to this standard are outlined in the Accreditation and Moderation Action Plan (AMAP). The AMAP also includes useful information about special requirements for organisations wishing to develop education and training programmes, such as minimum qualifications for tutors and assessors, and special resource requirements. Comments on this unit standard Please contact the Boating Industry Training Organisation training@bia.org.nz if you wish to suggest changes to the content of this unit standard.

 New Zealand Qualifications Authority 2009


				
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