U02931 1960s by Dz3p552O

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									School of History and Classics
Subject Area: History
Proposer: Dr. Pertti Ahonen
Introduction of new Honours 4MA Course:

The Revolutionary Decade? Europe in the 1960s

A.Rationale
This course will provide in-dept coverage of Europe’s political, social, and cultural history during
the ‘long 1960s’ – a period of change and upheaval that stretched from the late 1950s to the early
1970s. The approach will be thematic and comparative, with attention given to both western and
eastern Europe. The proposed course will from part of the offerings of the History Subject Area. It
will add enhanced contemporary and comparative dimensions to the Subject Area’s already rich
range of course offerings in modern European history.

B. Aims, Objectives, Intended Learning Outcomes
Students who take this course will develop an advanced understanding of key political, social, and
cultural developments in Europe between the late 1950s and early 1970s. They will engage
critically with the relevant historiography and with a range of textual and non-textual primary
sources, including photographs, film, and music. They will also develop further a range of
transferable skills that they have begun to acquire during their first three years of university study,
including the ability to argue effectively about intellectual issues, both orally and in writing; to
write informed and cogent essays; to take responsibility for seminar presentations in which they
elaborate and defend intellectual positions before other members of the group; and to work
effectively with others in small group settings.

C. Student Intake
The course will be open to fourth-year students on the single and joint honours degree programmes
in history. The number of students will be limited according to the requirements of the School of
History and Classics. However, because this is a year-long course based on seminars, the number
of students on the course needs to be limited and should not exceed 18.

D. Course Content
The course will analyse key political, social, and cultural developments in Europe during the
1960s. Although its primary focus will lie on western Europe, the eastern half of the continent will
also receive extensive attention. The course will be organised in a thematic, trans-national fashion,
and students will be encouraged to draw links and comparisons across national boundaries,
including across the East-West divide in the Cold War. The main themes to be covered will
include: breaks and continuities between the 1950s and the 1960s, generational tensions, changing
attitudes towards the recent past, particularly the Second World War and its legacies, changing
social mores, developments in gender roles, cultural innovations, new political movements and
their implications, and the legacies of the 1960s.

E. Organisation of Teaching
The course organiser is Dr. Pertti Ahonen. The course will be taught by means of weekly,
thematically organised two-hour seminars over both semesters. Students will be expected to give
presentations and to help lead discussion. They will also be expected to read extensively in
preparation for the seminars, drawing on both primary and secondary materials.
F. Student Assessment and Guidance
Students will be expected to attend the seminars, to participate actively in discussions and debates,
and to make presentations. All students must also submit one 3000-word essay per semester. The
two essays together will form one third of overall assessment. The other two thirds will derive
from two two-hour examinations that the students will take during the examination diet at the end
of the academic year.

G. Feedback and Evaluation
Students will be able to give informal feedback on the course during seminar sessions and
meetings with the course organiser. At the end of the year students will also be able to assess the
course more formally by means of a questionnaire. Student performance will be monitored
through marked essays and examinations as well as through feedback from the external examiner.
The course organiser will draw on all these sources when drafting the course’s annual report, in
keeping with the University’s annual QA procedures.

H. Resource Requirements
The course will be taught by Dr. Pertti Ahonen, a permanent, full-time member of the History
Subject area. Additional tutors will not be needed. The library’s holdings in this topic area are
probably sufficient. However, if special funds for new courses are available, some additional book
purchases could be made. In any case, the course organiser will need to continue to purchase
relevant books for the library through normal channels.

I. Documentation
The course organiser will produce a course handbook and a reading list, which will be available to
students, members of staff, and external examiners. The relevant subject area documentation will
be amended to take account of this course. The course will be advertised with the other honours
offerings of the School of History and Classics.

Indicative Bibliography

Yonah Alexander and Kenneth A. Myers, eds., Terrorism in Europe (1982)
Raymond Aron, The Elusive Revolution: Anatomy of a Student Revolt (1969)
Paul Bearman, A Tale of Two Utopias: The Political Journey of the Generation of 1968 (1997)
Jillian Becker, Hitler’s Children: The Story of the Baader-Meinhof Terrorist Gang (3rd ed., 1989)
Jack Bielasiak, “Social Confrontation and Contrived Crisis: March 1968 in Poland”, East
        European Quarterly1988 22 (1): 81-105.
Maud Bracke, “The 1968 Czechoslovak Crisis: Reconsidering Its History and Politics”,
        Contemporary European History 2003 12 (3): 373-383.
Susan Bridge, “Why Czechoslovakia? And Why 1968?”, Studies in Comparative Communism
        1975 8 (4): 413-444.
Ian Buruma, Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan (1994)
Paul Byrne, The Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (1988)
Raimondo Catanzaro, ed., The Red Brigades and Left-Wing Terrorism in Italy (1991)
David Caute, Sixty-Eight: The Year of the Barricades (1988)
Daniel Cohn-Bendit, Obsolete Communism: The Left-Wing Alternative (Penguin, 1969)
Peter Collier and David Horowitz, Second Thoughts: Former Radicals Look Back at the Sixties
        (1989)
Margaret Cruikshank, The Gay and Lesbian Liberation Movement (1992)
E.J. Czerwinski, ed., The Soviet Invasion of Czechoslovakia: Its Effects on Eastern Europe
       (1972)
Robert V. Daniels, Year of the Heroic Guerrilla: World Revolution and Counterrevolution in
       1968 (1996)
Belinda Davis, “Activism from Starbuck to Starbucks and Terror: What’s in a Name?”, Radical
       History Review 2003 (85): 37-57.
Peter Deli, “Esprit and the Soviet Invasions of Hungary and Czechoslovakia”, Contemporary
       European History 2000 (9): 39-58.
Robin Denselow, When the Music’s Over: The Story of Political Pop (1989)
Carmelo DiGiovanni, ed., Light from behind Bars: Letters from the Red Brigades and Other
       Former Italian Terrorists (1990)
Richard Drake, The Revolutionary Mystique and Terrorism in Contemporary Italy (1989)
Alexander Dubcek (with Andras Sugar), Dubcek Speaks (1990)
Fred Eidlin, “Czechoslovakia: The Phony Occupation. Normalization in the Wake of the 1968
       Intervention”, Bohemia 1988 29 (2): 262-279.
Robert K. Evanston, “Regime and Working Class in Czechoslovakia, 1948-1968”, Soviet
       Studies 37, nr. 2 (Apr. 1985): 248-68.
Andrew Feenberg, When Poetry Ruled the Streets: The French May Events of 1968 (2001)
Carole Fink, Philip Gassert and Detlev Junker (eds.), 1968: The World Transformed (1998)
Ronald Fraser et al. 1968: A Student Generation in Revolt (1988)
Andrzej Frizske and Dawid Walendowski, “The March 1968 Protest Movement in Light of
       Ministry of Interior Reports to the Party Leadership”, Intermarium1997 1 (1)
       <http://www.columbia.edu/cu/sipa/REGIONAL/ECE/newintermar.html>
Simon Frith, ed. Facing the Music: Essays on Pop, Rock , and Culture (1990)
Mavis Gallant, “Paris Diaries, 1968, 1996”, Queen’s Quarterly 2003 110 (4): 490-503.
Robert Gildea, France since 1945 (1996)
Paul Ginsborg, A History of Contemporary Italy: Society and Politics, 1943-1988 (1990)
Todd Gitlin, The Sixties: Years of Hope, Days of Rage (NY/London: 1993, rev. ed.)
Galia Golan, Reform Rule in Czechoslovakia: The Dubcek Era, 1968-1969 (1973)
Jonathon Green, Days in the Life: Voices from the English Underground, 1961-1971 (2nd ed., 1998
Kurt Groenewold, “The German Federal Republic’s Response and Civil Liberties”, Terrorism and
         Political Violence 1992 4 (4): 136-150.
D. L. Hanley and A.P. Kerr (ed.), May 1968: Coming of Age (Reading U. ,1989)
Chris Harman, The Fire Last Time: 1968 and after (1988)
Jeffrey Herf, Divided Memory: The Nazi Past in the Two Germanys (1997)
Robert Hewison, Too Much: Art and Society in the Sixties, 1960-1975 (1986)
Christopher Hilton, The Wall; The People’s Story (2001)
Hans Josef Horchem, “The Decline of the Red Army Faction”, Terrorism and Political Violence
                 1991 3 (2): 61-74
-----. “The Lost Revolution of West Germany’s Terrorists”, Terrorism and Political Violence 1989
                 1 (3): 353-360
Gerd-Rainer Horn and Padraic Kenney, eds., Transnational Moments of Change: Europe 1945,
                 1968, 1989 (2004)
Ronald Inglehart, “The Silent Revolution in Europe: Intergenerational Change in Post-Industrial
                 Societies”, American Political Science Review 1971 65 (4): 991-1017.
Alison Jamieson, “Identity and Morality in the Italian Red Brigades”, Terrorism and Political
                 Violence 1990 4 (2): 508-520
------. “Entry, Discipline and Exit in the Italian Red Brigades”, Terrorism and Political Violence
                  1990 2 (1): 1-20
Robert Rhodes James, The Czechoslovak Crisis 1968 (1968)
A.J. Jongman, “Trends in International and Domestic Terrorism in Western Europe, 1968-1988”,
          Terrorism and Political Violence 1992 4 (4): 26-76.
Jakub Karpinski, The Polish Upheavals of 1956, 1968, 1970, 1976, 1980.. (1982)
Dorothy Kaufmann-McCall, “Politics of Difference: The Women’s Movement in France from
          May 1968 to Mitterrand”, Signs 1983 9 (2): 282-293.
Krystyna Kersten, “The Mass protests in People’s Poland: A Continuous Process or Single
          Events”, Acta Poloniae Historica 2001 (83): 165-192.
Heda Margolius Kovaly, Under a Cruel Star: A Life in Prague, 1941-1968 (1986)
Rob Kroes, Robert W. Rydell and Doeko F. J. Bosscher, Cultural Transmission and Perception:
          American Mass Culture in Europe (1993)
Miklos Kun and Hajnal Csatorday, Prague Spring – Prague Fall: Blank Sport of 1968 (1999)
Mark Kurlansky, 1968: The Year that Rocked the World (2003)
Pieter Lagrou, The Legacy of Nazi Occupation: Patriotic Memory and National Recovery in
          Western Europe, 1945-1965 (1999)
Maurice Larkin, France since the Popular Front: Government and People, 1936-1986 (1988)
Melvin J. Lasky, “The Ideas of ’68: A Retrospective on the 20th Anniversary Celebrations of the
          ‘Student Revolt’”, Encounter 1988 71 (4): 3-18
Claude Lefort, “1968 Revisited: A French View. Not Revolution but Creative Disorder”, Dissent
          1988 35 (3): 341-346
Jozef Lewandowski, “A New Account of the ‘March Events’”, Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry
          1998, 11: 319-326
Robert Lumley, States of Emergency: Cultures of Revolt in Italy, 1968-1978 (1990)
Alf Ludtke, “Coming to Terms with the Past: Illusions of Remebering, Ways of Forgetting Nazism
          in West Germany”, Journal of Modern History, 65, 1993.
Ian MacDonald, Revolution in the Head: The Beatles’ Records and the Sixties (1994)
Heda Margolius, I Do Not Want to Remember: Auschwitz 1941-Prague 1968 (1973)
Arthur Marwick, The Sixties: Cultural Revolution in Britain, France, Italy and the United
          States (1999)
Wilfried Mausbach, “Historicising ‘1968’:”, Contemporary European History 2002 (11) 1: 177-
          187.
John McCormick, The Global Environmental Movement: Reclaiming Paradise (1992)
John McGinn, “The Politics of Collective Inaction: NATO’s Response to the Prague Spring”,
          Journal of Cold War Studies 1999 1 (3): 111-138.
Angela McRobbie, Feminism and Youth Culture: From ‘Jackie’ to ‘Just Seventeen’ (1991)
Robert C. Meade, The Red Brigades: The Story of Italian Terrorism (1989)
David Alan Mellor and Laurent Gervereau, The Sixties, Britain and France, 1962-1973: The
          Utopian Years (1997)
Henri Mendras and Alistair Cole, Social Change in Modern France: Towards a Cultural
          Anthropology of the Fifth Republic (1991)
Browman H. Miller, “Terrorism and Language: A Text-Based Analysis of West Germany’s
          Terrorists”, Terrorism1987 9 (4): 373-407
Robert G. Moeller, War Stories: The Search for a Usable Past in the Federal Republic of
          Germany (U. of California Press, 2001 [943.087 M]
-------. ‘War Stories: The Search for a Usable Past in the Federal Republic of Germany’,
          American Historical Review 101 (1996), 1008-48
-------. ‘Sinking Ships, the lost Heimat and Broken Taboos: Gunter Grass and the Politics of
          Memory in Contemporary Germany’, Contemporary European History 12:2 (2003)
Toril Moi, ed. French Feminist Thought: A Reader (1987)
Bart Moore-Gilbert and John Seed, eds. Cultural Revolution? The Challenge of the Arts in the
          1960s (1992)
Robert P. Morgan, Twentieth-Century Music: A History of Musical Style in Modern Europe and
          America (1991)
Diana Mosley, A European Diary: Notes from the 1950s and 1960s (1990)
Charles S. Murray, Croostown Traffic: Jimi Hendrix and Post-War Pop (1989)
Jadomir Navratil, ed. The Prague Spring 1968: A National Security Archive Reader (1998)
Colin Nettelbeck, “Getting the Story Straight: Narrative of World War II in post-1968 France”,
          Journal of European Studies 1985 15 (58): 77-116.
Bill Osgerry, Youth in Britain since 1945 (1997)
Georges Perec, Things: A Story of the Sixties (1991)
David Pike, “Georg Lukacs on Stalinism and Democracy: Before and after Prague 1968”,
          Eastern European Politics and Societies 1988 2 (2): 241-279.
Ute Poiger, Jazz, Rock and Rebels: Cold War Politics and American Culture in a Divided
          Germany (2000)
Alex Pravda, Reform and Change in the Czechoslovak Political System, January – August 1968
          (1975)
Vilem Precan, “The People – the Public – and Civil Society: Protagonists in the Prague Spring
          1968”, Czechoslovak and Central European Journal 1989 8 (1-2): 1-22.
Julian Preece, “Between Identification and Documentation. ‘Autofiction’ and ‘Biopic’: The
          Lives of the RAF”, German Life and Letters 2003 56 (4): 363-376.
Keith Reader, The May 1968 Events in France: Reproductions and Interpretations (1993)
------. Intellectuals and the Left in France since 1968 (1987)
March Rohan, Paris ’68: Graffiti, Newspapers, Posters and Poems of the Events of May 1968
          (1988)
Wlodzimierz Rosenbaum, “The Anti-Zionist Campaign in Poland of 1967-1968: Documents”,
          Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry 2003, 16: 491-504.
Kristin Ross, May 1968 and Its Afterlives (2002)
Henry Rousso, The Vichy Syndrome: History and Memory in France since 1944 (1991)
Daniela Salvioni and Anders Stephanson, “Reflections on the Red Brigades”, Orbis 1985 29 (3):
          489-506
Hanna Schissler, ed., The Miracle Years: A Cultural History of West Germany, 1949-1968
          (2001)
John Schmeidel, “My Enemy’s Enemy: Twenty Years of Co-Operation between Germany’s Red
          Army Faction and the GDR Ministry of State Security”, Intelligence and National
          Security 1993 8 (4): 59-72.
Harry Schwartz, Prague’s 200 Days: The Struggle for Democracy in Czechoslovakia (1969)
Patrick Seale and Maureen McConville, French Revolution, 1968 (1968)
Michael M. Seidman, The Imaginary Revolution: Parisian Students and Workers in 1968 (2004)
------. “The Pre-May 1968 Sexual Revolution”, Contemporary French Civilization 2001 25 (1):
          20-41
------. “Revolutionary Collectivism: Parisian Poster Art in 1968”, Contemporary French
          Civilization 1996 20 (1): 145-167
------. “Workers in a Repressive Society of Seductions: Parisian Metallurgists in May – June
          1968”, French Historical Studies 1993 18 (1): 255-278.
Alan Shadrake, The Yellow Pimpernels: Escape Stories of the Berlin Wall (1974)
William Shawcross, Dubcek: Dubcek and Czechoslovakia, 1968-1990 (1990)
H. Gordon Skilling, Czechoslovakia’s Interrupted Revolution (1976)
------. “Journey to Czechoslovakia: Spring 1968”, Czechoslovak and Central European Journal
         1992 11 (1): 27-42.
Vlad Sobell, “Czechoslovakia: The Legacy of Normalization”, Eastern European Politics and
         Societies 1988 2 (1): 35-68
Pierre Sorlin, European Cinemas, European Societies, 1939-1990(1991)
Tyler Stovall, France since the Second World War (2001)
Jeremi Suri, Power and Protest: Global Revolution and the Rise of Détente (2003)
Nick Thomas, Protest Movements in 1960s West Germany: A Social History of Dissent and
         Democracy (2003)
Pavel Tigrid, Why Dubcek Fell (1971)
Aviezer Tucker, The Philosophy and Politics of Czech Dissidence from Patocka to Havel (2000)
Tom Vague, Televisionaries; The Red Army Faction Story, 1963-1993 (1994)
Jiri Valenta, “Revolutionary Change, Soviet Intervention and ‘Normalization’ in East-Central
         Europe”, Comparative Politics 16, nr. 2 (Jan. 1984): 127-151.
Jeremy Varon, Bringing the War Home; The Weather Undrground, the Red Army Faction and
         the Revolutionary Violence in the Sixties and Seventies (2004)
Victor Weerarante, Springs of Freedom in Czechoslovakia (1970)
Gunther M. Weil, Ralph Metzner, and Timothy Leary, eds. The Psychedelic Reader (1993)
Kurt Weisskopf, The Agony of Czechoslovakia, 1938/1968 (1968)
Bernard Wheaton and Zdenek Kavan, The Velvet Revolution: Czechoslovakia, 1968-1991 (1992)
Kieran Williams, The Prague Spring and Its Aftermath: Czechoslovak Politics, 1968-1970 (1997)
------. “New Sources on Soviet Decision-Making during the 1968 Czechoslovak Crisis”,
         Europe-Asia Studies 1996 48 (3): 457-470.
------. “Czechoslovakia 1968”, Slavonic and East European Review 1996 74 (1): 79-89.
Philip Winds, Czechoslovakia 1968: Reform, Repression and Resistance (1969)
Joanne Wright, Terrorist Propaganda: The Red Army Faction and the Provisional IRA (1991)
Marcin Zaremba, “The Poor Poles of ’68: Polish Society in Relation to the Events of March 1968”,
         Zeitgeschichte (Austria) 1998 25 (9-10): 295-309.
Course Code ?

Course Name The Revolutionary Decade? Europe in the 1960s

‘Owning’ School School of History and Classics
College College of Humanities and Social Sciences

School Acronym Prefix HCL
Normal Year Taken 4 – Year 4 Undergraduate
School Acronym Suffix ERA
School Acronym for Course HCL-4-ERA
Sessions Course Operational with effect from2005/2006

Course Level Undergraduate

Honours Yes

Visiting Students (Part-Year) Only? No

Available for Visiting Students? Yes

Credit Points 40

Credit Scheme Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework
Credit Level 10 – SCQF Level 10

‘Home’ Subject Area Code Description Sched Code School
61 History E History & Classics

Course Organiser ? Dr Pertti Ahonen

Course Secretary T1498 Mrs Gloria Ketchin

Contact Teaching 2 hrs 0 mins per week, 22 weeks

Other Required Attendance No

Pre-Requisite Requirements A pass in a third level historical course or equivalent

Co-requisite Requirements ?

Prohibited Combination Requirements ?

Short Description
The course will analyse key political, social, and cultural developments in Europe during the
1960s. Although its primary focus will lie on western Europe, the eastern half of the continent will
also receive extensive attention. The course will be organised in a thematic, trans-national fashion,
and students will be encouraged to draw links and comparisons across national boundaries,
including across the East-West divide in the Cold War. The main themes to be covered will
include: breaks and continuities between the 1950s and the 1960s, generational tensions, changing
attitudes towards the recent past, particularly the Second World War and its legacies, changing
social mores,developments in gender roles, cultural innovations, new political movements and
their implications, and the legacies of the 1960s.

Summary of Intended Learning Outcomes
Students who take this course will develop an advanced understanding of key political, social, and
cultural developments in Europe between the late 1950s and early 1970s. They will engage
critically with the relevant historiography and with a range of textual and non-textual primary
sources, including photographs, film, and music. They will also develop further a range of
transferable skills that they have begun to acquire during their first three years of university study,
including the ability to argue effectively about intellectual issues, both orally and in writing; to
write informed and cogent essays; to take responsibility for seminar presentations in which they
elaborate and defend intellectual positions before other members of the group; and to work
effectively with others in small group settings.

Default Course Mode of Study CE – Classes and Assessment (including centrally arranged
examinations)

Default Delivery Period Y – Full Year (Blocks 1-4)

Class Sessions Day Start – End Time Type Zone Elective Groups ?
Th 0900 – 1050 Lect Central ?

Components of Assessment Two essays of about 3000 words each (one third of overall
assessment); two two-hour examination papers (two-thirds of overall assessment).

Summative Exams Diet Diet Month Paper Code Paper Name Duration ?
Hrs/Min Stat’y ?
Req Comments ?

Convenor of BoE 1450 Dr Richard Mackenney ?

Common Marking Scheme VERS2 – Version 2 (from 1996/1997, excluding Vet Med and
pre-merger Education)

								
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