Enrollment & Matching Participant�s Guide

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					        Enrollment & Matching Participant’s Guide

                 Table of Contents                                Page(s)
            (Lessons in BOLD from BBBSA)
◘   Orientation to Nationwide vision, mission and goals              1-2
◘   Orientation to agency goals, organization structure       Agency Placeholder
◘   Orientation to the Board                                  Agency Placeholder
◘   Orientation to the Job – Job Description                  Agency Placeholder
◘   HR policies of the agency                                 Agency Placeholder
◘   Work Schedule                                             Agency Placeholder
◘   Orientation to the Service Delivery Model and forms               8
◘   Standards of Practice                                     Agency Placeholder
◘   Agency Program Manual / Policies and Procedures re: to    Agency Placeholder
    assigned job functions
◘   Online Training – Take SDM for Enrollment                         11
◘   Performance metrics / objectives for the position         Agency Placeholder
◘   Overview of phone capabilities, on hold messages, etc.    Agency Placeholder
◘   Overview of program options – community and site          Agency Placeholder
    based
◘   Overview of fund development activities – timelines and   Agency Placeholder
    responsibilities if any
◘   Orientation to BNT                                              16-19
◘   Asset Development and the role of the Big                       20-22
◘   How to establish a schedule for CR to set interviews      Agency Placeholder
◘   Interviewing and Assessment Pitfalls                            24-26
◘   How to conduct an effective volunteer interview                 27-50
◘   Your role in risk management                                      51
◘   Key indicators for gathering more information                   52-66
◘   How to assess a volunteer’s eligibility, matchability,          67-69
    coachability
◘   How to assess home environment and determine                     70
    need for home visit
◘   Observe 3 volunteer interviews and assess                        71
◘   Conduct 3 volunteer interviews, while being                      72
    observed, and assess
◘   How to document an interview                                    73-75
◘   Document assessment of 3 interviews                             76-77
◘   How to conduct an effective parent/youth interview              78-82
◘   Rationales for a Parent/Youth Interview                         83-84
◘   Observe & Assess 2 Parent/Youth interviews                       85
◘   Conduct, Observe and Assess 2 Parent/Youth                       86
◘   How to conduct a volunteer orientation and safety
    training
◘ Observe orientation and safety training for 3 volunteers
◘ Conduct an orientation and safety training for
  volunteer, while being observed.
◘ How to conduct a parent / child orientation and safety
  training
◘ Observe orientation and safety training for 3 parents/
  children
◘ Conduct an orientation and safety training for parents/
  children while being observed.
◘ Observe 2 match introductions                              Agency Placeholder
◘ Conduct 1 match introduction, while being observed         Agency Placeholder
◘ Data management system use                                 Agency Placeholder
◘ Information that should be handed off to Match Support     Agency Placeholder
◘ Proper maintenance and confidentiality of files / data     Agency Placeholder
◘ How to request background checks                           Agency Placeholder
◘ Process for reviewing metrics and feedback                 Agency Placeholder
◘ How to make a match                                        Agency Placeholder
◘ Using Customer Satisfaction Surveys                             101-103
◘ Creating your development / cross-training plan            Agency Placeholder
Enrollment – Participant’s Guide




Orientation to Nationwide vision, mission and goals




Guiding Principles
      One mission: professionally supported one-to-one matches
      Our vision: a Big for every child who needs and wants one
      Our Goals:
           o Societal impact on the children, schools, and communities
           o Growth and quality
           o Diversity and Inclusion
           o Performance-oriented
           o Complete transformation of the way we do business
      A learning organization
      Capacity investments:
           o The strength of our people, beginning with Leadership at all levels
           o The strength of our nationwide organization, our Linkage internally across
              BBBS and externally with our supporters
           o A more efficient and effective way of doing business, creating Leverage
              through a powerful brand, strong partnerships and a strong agency
              operating model.

A BBBS Match is defined as a one to one relationship between a volunteer and a child
with the expectation that they will meet regularly for a significant amount of time in
order to reach positive youth development outcomes.

There are two Core BBBS Programs:
   1. Community-based Big Brothers Big Sisters (community-based mentoring)
      In the community-based program, Big Brother and Big Sister volunteers provide
      children and youth – our “Littles” - individualized time and attention on a regular
      basis, typically 2 – 4 times a month, for two to three hours. During unstructured
      weekly or bi-weekly outings, filled with conversations and shared activities, they
      develop a relationship that helps youth manage the every day challenges that are
      part of “growing up.” During the time with their Big, children gain new skills,
      explore new interests and test behaviors that expand their experience base beyond
      their family or neighborhood.

   2. Big Brothers Big Sisters in Schools (school-based mentoring)


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       Through Big Brothers Big Sisters in Schools, a core BBBS program initiated in
       the 1990s, volunteers offer children and youth individualized time and attention
       on a consistent basis, with the venue being the child’s school rather than the
       community. Teachers identify those children who can most benefit from an extra
       caring adult in their lives. Volunteers and children meet regularly during the
       school year – typically each week, utilizing the resources available within the
       school: computer labs, the library, the gym, a classroom, or the schoolyard.

There are also several Program Variations in which community-based or school-based
programs address specific categories of children, volunteers or partners and their
particular needs or the opportunities they present. Variations may occur in location
(where meetings take place), frequency (how often volunteers and youth meet), duration
(how long their relationship continues) and activities (what they do together when the
meet).

Program variations include:
    Amachi BBBS (Faith-based Mentoring)
    AARP Big Brothers and Big Sisters (Senior Mentoring)
    Alpha Phi Alpha BBBS
    Club-based Big Brothers and Big Sisters
    Corporate Mentoring
    High School Bigs




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Agency Place-holder:

Your Agency’s mission, goals and organization structure




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Agency Place-holder:

Orientation to your agency’s Board




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Agency Place-holder:

Orientation to the Job-Job Description




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Agency Place-holder:

Your agency HR policies




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Agency Place-holder:

Work Schedule




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Orientation to the Service Delivery Model and forms
The Service Delivery Model and all of the appropriate forms can be found on the
agencies only website. Your supervisor will show you how to access the website.
www.agencyconnection.bbbs.org

Your agency may keep copies of the forms in specific locations.

Use this checklist to track the forms that you have reviewed.

                                                                   Reviewed
    The Service Delivery Manual                                   _____
Enrollment & Matching Specific Forms
    Volunteer Application                                         _____
    Parent/Youth Pre-Interview
    Volunteer Pre-Interview Questionnaire                         _____
    Volunteer Assessment and Match Support                        _____
    Volunteer In-Person Interview                                 _____
    Parent/Youth Enrollment and Interview                         _____
    Match Introduction                                            _____
    Parent Satisfaction Survey (post enrollment)                  _____
    Transmission of Information Enrollment to Support             _____

The forms listed below are not specific to the Enrollment function. Your supervisor will
determine which forms you need to review.

      Volunteer Telephone Inquiry Guide
      Volunteer Inquiry Record
      Parent/Youth Inquiry Record
      Sample Script for Telephone Reference Checks
      Telephone Reference Checks form
      Sample Match Support Contact Record
      Match Closure and Re-engagement Assessment
      Volunteer Re-assessment
      Volunteer Questionnaire (Post Enrollment)
      Volunteer Satisfaction Questionnaire
      Match Closure Codes
      POE Forms:
          o Volunteer Report on the                 o Parent Report on the Match
              Match                                 o Teacher Report on the Match

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Agency Place-holder:

Standards of Practice – specifically standards 13 – 22




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Agency Place-holder:

Read agency Program Manual / Policies and Procedures
related to assigned job functions




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Online training - SDM for Enrollment
To get an overview of the Enrollment function you will need to take the online course A
Service Delivery Model for Enrollment. You can access this training and the Online
Learning Packet at http://agencies.bbbsa.org/programs/training.asp. The Online Learning
Packet is on the right hand side of the page under the heading The Latest On…Training.
Print the packet.

Your supervisor will explain the general information about the SDM online training and
which training modules you will need to complete.

To log on to the online training:
1. Go to agencies.bbbsa.org and sign in with your agency login and password.
2. Click on the Program tab and select Training.
3. Select Online learning from the left navigation bar.
4. You should see two links in the middle of the page: BBBS Online Training and
   Online Training Reports
5. Take all courses and modules prescribed by your supervisor.
6. Make notes about anything that is unclear as you go, so you can clarify with your
   supervisor.
7. When you have achieved a mastery score of 80% on all lessons, print a certificate for
   your personnel file.




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Agency Place-holder:

Performance metrics / objectives for the position




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Agency Place-holder:
Overview of phone capabilities, on hold messages, etc.
Protocol for answering the phone, transferring callers




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Agency Place-holder:

Overview of program options - community and site
based




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Agency Place-holder:

Overview of fund development activities – timelines and
responsibilities if any




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Brand New Thinking
    "In our lives, each of us was touched by someone -- other than our parents -- who
             broadened our horizons and brought a little magic into our lives.

 By becoming a Big Brother or Big Sister, you can do the same for a child. And you will
                     both be forever changed by the experience."




Brand New Thinking is a platform by which BBBS will bring more volunteers through
its doors. Research findings indicated that potential volunteers need to:

      Feel that becoming a BIG to a child will be a gratifying experience for both
       parties.
      Envision themselves in a role other than a "fill in" mother or father.
           o A role that…
                    implies reasonable emotional and practical boundaries
                    they can feel worthy of
                    they instinctively know how to do
                    inspires and uplifts them

Brand New Thinking is a perspective on Big Brothers Big Sisters. The focus should be
on:
 A caring adult (or teen) friend who is a volunteer or Big, rather than mentor, teacher,
   tutor
 Positive, shared experiences that broaden a Little’s horizon
 Matches brought back to the fun, “magic” moments that they’ve shared (especially
   when experiencing challenging times, we focus our attention on the “magic moment”
   while working on the issues)
 Developing assets, rather than fixing or changing
 The positive aspects of the kids in the program, rather than using terms like “at
   risk”, needy, or challenged

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 What the Big gets out of the relationship, as well as what the Little does
 How BBBS supports the Big and the Little throughout the match, working on
   creating a relationship from which they both benefit and derive enjoyment
The following paragraphs have been developed from a Brand New Thinking (BNT)
perspective and are offered as reference points.

BNT Overview Statement
Big Brothers Big Sisters has been the nation's preeminent youth-service organization
for nearly a century. Our service is based on our volunteers. We have proven success in
creating and nurturing positive relationships that benefit everyone involved, including the
volunteer, the child, families, and the community.

Using BNT Language When Speaking about Bigs
(Appropriate for Recruitment/Volunteer/Family Audiences)
“Little Moments. Big Magic.”
Big Brothers and Big Sisters are, foremost, friends to children: They share everyday
activities—exploring new horizons, and experiencing the joy that simple moments of
friendship can bring. Within those little moments lie the big magic that a Big Brother or
Big Sister brings to the life of a young person.

Being a Big Brother or Big Sister is something that you can do. The only
requirements are a willingness to make a new friend and a desire to share some fun with a
young person. Our volunteers consistently say that being a Big is even more enjoyable
and fulfilling for them than it is for their Little.

The best way to understand what it means to be a Big is to think back on your own
childhood. Growing up, who was that special someone who just brought a little joy into
your life, through the simplest actions or activities? As a Big you can be that person for a
child, and create wonderful memories for you and your Little.

Using BNT Language When Speaking about BBBS Service
(Appropriate for supporters, donors, and partners, et al)
“An Organization You Trust.”
Youth development experts agree that, in addition to their parents, children need
additional supportive, caring adults in their lives. BBBS works closely with parents to
match every child with the right Big Brother or Big Sister. Each potential Big is screened,
trained, and supervised to help ensure that the relationship will be safe and rewarding for
everyone involved.

Today, Big Brothers Big Sisters serves hundreds of thousands of children in 5,000
communities across the country. And we are continually growing: Our goal is to provide
Bigs to 400,000 children by 2004, the year of our 100th anniversary, and to one million
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children by 2010.

Professionals in youth development support these individual, responsible
relationships. And national research has shown that the shared experiences between Bigs
and Littles have a direct and lasting impact on children’s lives. A Big can help a child
discover a world of possibilities and opportunities simply by being a genuine friend.
No other organization is doing the quality of work that Big Brothers Big Sisters
does, or has the proven results we have. That is why America counts on Big Brothers Big
Sisters.

Characteristics of Effective Mentors:
   Maintain a steady presence
   Respect the youth’s viewpoint
   Pay attention to kids’ need for “fun”
   Get to know their Littles’ families, but not too involved
   Seek & use the help and advice of staff

                          When portraying the brand to volunteers...
The Brand is NOT                                                The Brand IS
Intimidating                                                    Approachable
Self-righteous                                                  Human
Gloom and doom                                                  Sincere
Tear-jerking                                                    Fun
Heavy                                                           Spirited
Somber                                                          Bright
Elitist                                                         Attainable
Exclusive                                                       Inclusive
Holier-than-thou                                                Purity of purpose
Single-parent-home focused                                      Volunteer-focused
Lofty                                                           Aspiring
Cutesy                                                          Youthful
Urban                                                           Diverse
Out-dated                                                       Modern
Waiting-list driven                                             Volunteer-driven
Hope                                                            Delight
Silly                                                           Playful
Frivolous                                                       Joyful
Pastel                                                          Vivid
Pretentious                                                     Honest
The weight of the world                                         The joy of the moment

                    When portraying the relationship to volunteers...
The Relationship is NOT                                         The Relationship IS
Clinical                                                        Magic
Social-service                                                  Mutually rewarding
Saving                                                          Gratifying
Fixing                                                          Emotionally fulfilling

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Parental/surrogate parent                                           Being a friend
Rescue                                                              Reciprocal
Results-focused                                                     Experience-focused
Single burden                                                       Community Supported
Inner-city                                                          W/O socio-econ. associations
Limited                                                             Universal
"Earth-shattering"                                                  Impactful
Staid                                                               Energetic
Life-long commitment                                                Rich in immediate experience
Economically driven                                                 Experience-sharing
Overcoming obstacles                                                Enabling transformation

                            When portraying the Littles to volunteers...
Littles are NOT                                                     Littles ARE
Worthy                                                              Energizing
Deserving                                                           Responsive
Needy                                                               Resourceful
At-risk                                                             Promising
Victims                                                             Responsible


"Earth-shattering"                                                  Impactful
Staid                                                               Energetic
Life-long commitment                                                Rich in immediate experience
Economically driven                                                 Experience-sharing
Overcoming obstacles                                                Enabling transformation

                            When portraying the Littles to volunteers...
Littles are NOT                                                     Littles ARE
Worthy                                                              Energizing
Deserving                                                           Responsive
Needy                                                               Resourceful
At-risk                                                             Promising
Victims                                                             Responsible


Brand New Thinking materials and information can be found on the agency web site at:

www.agencyconnection.bbbs.org




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Asset Development and the Role of the Big
Asset development is a concept BBBS borrowed from the Search Institute. The Search
Institute identifies approximately forty assets for positive youth development. BBBS
selected twenty-one of those assets that most closely apply to the work that we do:

            BBBS 21 ASSETS for POSITIVE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT
            ASSET-                                DEFINITIONS
        CONFIDENCE
 1. Self confidence           A sense of being able to do or accomplish something.
 2. Able to express feelings Is able to reveal, talk about, or discuss feelings.
 3. Can make decisions       Thinks before acting and is aware of consequences of
                             behavior.
 4. Has interests or hobbies Pursues activities such as reading, sports, music,
                             computers, etc.
 5. Personal hygiene,        Dresses appropriately and keeps self neat and clean.
     appearance
 6. Sense of the future      Knows about educational and career opportunities.
            ASSET-                                DEFINITIONS
       COMPETENCE
 7. Uses community           Partakes in service activities, libraries, recreation, and
     resources               church/other faith-based activities.
 8. Uses school resources    Uses the library, guidance counselors, tutorial centers.
 9. Academic performance     Makes good grades or improves grades.
 10. Attitude toward school  Is positive about going to school and about what can
                             be learned
 11. School preparedness     Completes homework and other assignments.
 12. Classroom participation Actively takes part in learning; responds to questions.
 13. Classroom behavior      Pays attention in class; isn’t disruptive.
 14. Able to avoid           Refrains from behaviors that are illegal for person of
     delinquency             his or her age.
 15. Able to avoid substance Doesn't use illegal or harmful substances (e.g., drugs,
     abuse                   alcohol, tobacco).
 16. Able to avoid early     Doesn't engage in sexual behavior likely to result in
     parenting               early parenting.
           ASSET –                                DEFINITIONS
           CARING
 17. Shows trust toward you  Isn't reluctant to confide in you, to accept your
                             suggestions.
 18. Respects other cultures Doesn't stereotype or put down other ethnic, racial,
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                                   language, or national groups.
    19. Relationship with family   Interacts well with other family members.
    20. Relationship with peers    Interacts well with persons of own age.
    21. Relationship with other    Has good interactions with other adults who are not
        adults                     family members.

BBBS helps volunteers plan conversations, opportunities and activities (C.O.A. s) that
can build “assets” and promote positive youth development.

During the time with their Big, children gain new skills, explore new interests and test
behaviors that expand their experience base beyond their family or neighborhood.
Over the course of time, children gain confidence, acquire new skills and competencies,
and develop an enhanced capacity to care for others – all tasks that are a part of
developing healthy maturity. Volunteers experience a sense of discovery and enjoyment
as they see the world of possibility open up through the child’s eyes.

According to the Search Institute and the Public Private Venture’s study Effective
Practice: Building strong relationships in mentoring programs essential program
practices are identified that contribute to the development of close and supportive
relationships between a mentor and youth. Staff can facilitate strong mentor-youth
relationships by implementing these specific practices in school-based and community-
based programs. Below is an example of one of the essential program practices:

     Encourage mentors to spend time engaging in social as well as academic
      activities.

Study findings:
 The extent to which youth and mentors engage in social activities (such as going to
   events together, having lunch, just talking) is the critical factor in developing positive
   relationships.

     Engaging in academic activities also has a positive effect on forming strong
      relationships.

Giving youth a voice in deciding activities, and then making these decisions together,
fosters a stronger relationship.

The study outcomes report that Mentors who were given ample training and support from
program staff, engaged in social as well as academic activities with their youth, and were
matched with a youth with common interests reported having closer, more supportive
relationships with youth than mentors who were not.


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Additional resources, books and activities around Asset Development can be found on
the Search Institute’s website at www.search-institute.org




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Agency Placeholder:
How to Establish a Schedule for Customer Relations to
Set Interviews




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Interviewing and Assessment Pitfalls
In interviewing, there are 'pitfalls' that can lead to ineffective, even biased
interviews. Here are the most common pitfalls to watch out for:

National Enquirer – This is simply a curiosity and desire to know things about the
volunteer that may not be an important part of the decision-making about the volunteer’s
acceptance in the program. Finding out during the home assessment that the volunteer
has a couple of hockey sticks and asking who their favorite hockey player is and why.

Leading Questions – Leading questions contain their own answers, or they contain body
language that leads the interviewee into the “right” answer. The interviewee hears in the
question the answer that you want to hear and tells you exactly that. “You don’t have any
other volunteer experience with children, do you?” is an example of a leading question.

Priming the Pump – If you give too much away too much information at the front end
of the interview, you “prime the pump”. This means that you OVER-EXPLAIN the
purpose of the interview, or of a particular question or set of questions. Like leading
questions, priming the pump gives the interviewee clues to the “right” answer or answers,
and taints the interview. There is a fine line between doing a good orientation and
answering appropriate questions regarding the agency and the process, and giving so
much information that the interviewee can then tell you what you want to hear.

First Impression – Most us formulate an impression of someone within 30 seconds.
While a first impression can be useful, it is not based upon complete information and
must be set aside until further information is obtained. This is equally true whether the
first impression is positive or negative. Staying invested in either impression will leave
us vulnerable to not getting or “hearing” information that might be contradictory to hat
impression, or be useful in our assessment. Can be very similar to Gut Reaction.

Note: These first 4 pitfalls tend to be exercised in the interviewing process

Gut Reaction – A lot of people (especially in our field) put a great deal of emphasis on
gut reactions. In many cases, volunteers are approved or not approved, or matches are
closed or not closed based upon the gut reaction of someone on staff. What many people
fail to understand is that so-called gut reactions are just as likely to be based upon values
and/or life experiences (both positive and negative) as they are to be based upon some
innate ability to judge another. Gut reactions should be used as a basis for getting more
information as to their cause, not as a basis for sound decision-making.

Just Like Me – Almost everyone is more comfortable with or around people who are
like them—similar values, similar beliefs, similar likes or dislikes, similar opinions,
similar experiences (and, sometimes, similar cultural, age or racial backgrounds). This
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pitfall occurs when the interviewer finds a strong point of similarity with the volunteer or
match participant, and then suspends critical thinking (often unconsciously) because of
his/her comfort level with that person.

Halo Effect – This pitfall usually occurs when the interviewer discovers that the
volunteer (or other match participant) has done something considered especially
wonderful. It can vary from feeding the homeless once a month to being a local
celebrity/politician/wealthy contributor. The halo effect tends to blind the interviewer to
other aspects of the interviewee’s life or character, and critical thinking once again is
suspended

What happens when we unconsciously apply these pitfalls?
   We infer a lot about people from very limited first impressions.
   We often act on our inferences, but believe we are acting on facts.

Inferences are often based upon seeing things through our own filters / values.
The process of making accurate observations and astute inferences comes with practice.

Inferences
           What I KNOW…




           What I INFER…




Values
           VALUES are very personal, and we all have strong feelings about what we
           believe in and what we hold dear.

           Our LIFE EXPERIENCES often play a significant role in what we believe
           and in the values we choose, as well. If we experienced it, we tend toward
           generalizing that it must be true in all cases, for all people.

           The combination of values and life experiences usually leads us to “BIAS,”
           both conscious and sub-conscious.
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Identifying our life experiences, and values that influence our assessment of other people
is a “key” to understanding how we make decisions regarding appropriateness of
volunteers.




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Conducting an Effective Volunteer Interview
The Volunteer Interview is based structured information needed for assessing the
appropriateness and safety of a prospective volunteer. The questions in the interview
should be asked in the order they are written. Follow up and clarifying questions may be
asked as appropriate at anytime during the interview.

There are two types of interviews:

Clinical
A clinical interview is used by therapists to create what is known as a “psycho-social
history”, and usually contains information that far exceeds what BBBS needs to know to
ascertain a volunteer’s appropriateness as a Big.

Informational
An informational interview - seeks to gather enough basic information to make a
determination of appropriateness for the role the volunteer is going to play.

BBBS services require only the informational interview.




                        The SDM Volunteer Interview
                        VOLUNTEER IN-PERSON INTERVIEW

Volunteer’s Name:                               Interviewer’s Name: ________________

Date of Interview:                              Date of Write-Up:

Instructions: The instructional and rationale portion of the interview form should NOT be
eliminated as they contain important information for conducting the interview and possible
follow-up.

Prior to asking the interview questions, do the following:

       Begin by sharing program information as part of the individualized orientation.

       Explain the purpose of the interview, namely, that you’re trying to learn information
        about the person so the most appropriate matching decision can be made.

       Further explain that anytime during the interview, the volunteer can ask questions.




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       Briefly outline the process used with parents and children, that we interview them and
        provide both parents and children training and materials relating to child abuse
        prevention and other safety related issues.

       Take a few moments to review the responses to the pre-interview questions. Questions 3-
        10 of that form are Yes/No questions that may require follow-up. Follow-up questions,
        where indicated on the form, should be asked first before going into the questions on this
        form.

       Also tell the volunteer that what we collect is confidential and will not be released
        without his or her written permission or as possibly required by local, state, or federal
        laws. Some personal information will be shared with the parent of a prospective Little
        prior to a match.

       Group Question #7 asks the volunteer to describe and name any involvement as either
        volunteer or paid staff with youth (e.g., Little League, Boys & Girls Club, other BBBS
        agency). Volunteer must be asked to provide contact information, and an attempt to
        contact an appropriate selection of organizations should be made and documented in the
        case notes.

Each question group consists of lead-off questions or statements and then one or more additional
questions. Each set of questions provides assessment rationale and Key Indicators (KI) or red
flags so that the interviewer will better understand the types of assessment information the
questions are intended to elicit. Note that the Key Indicators listed in each section are those that
could POSSIBLY show up in the volunteer’s answers to the questions in that group, and the
questions were designed to elicit the indicator if it is present.


Question Group 1 – Occupational Information:
Rationale:
     Provides a safe and neutral start to the interview.
     Gives a sense of the volunteer’s work history and career stability.
     KI: Thinking Errors; Extreme self-centeredness/self-absorption; Lack of empathy for
        others; Sporadic employment history; Ability to handle stress/conflict; Extensive work
        history with youth (references?) ; Major life changes: Boundaries

I see that you work with __________________________________________.

        a. What do you do for them?

        b. What do you currently find most rewarding in your job there?

        c. Have you always been in this line of work? (Follow up, as appropriate, where, what
           else/when)



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Note: If the individual is retired, modify wording to past tense (e.g. where did you last work,
what did you do for them). Also modify for high school/college students (e.g., I see you
attend_______. When do you plan to graduate, what do you plan to do after graduation, and what
are your summer plans?)

Question Group 2 – Family Relationships:
Rationale:
     Provides a better general understanding of the volunteer’s past.
     Identifies any substantial emotional issues from the volunteer’s past and can help
        determine resolution of those issues.
     Provides insight into current relationships e.g., stability.
     KI: Thinking errors; Lack of empathy for others; Extreme self-centeredness/self-
        absorption; Ability to handle stress/conflict; Attitudes indicate extreme
        homophobia/sexism; Limited or no contact with family members; Boundaries

What can you tell me about your memories and experiences as a young person growing up in
your family?

        a. Tell me about your current relationship with family members?


Question Group 3 – Current Relationships:
Rationale:
     Provides information on the volunteer’s current relationships.
     Provides information on how supportive the volunteer’s significant other will be.
     KI: Thinking errors; Lack of empathy for others; Extreme self-centeredness/self-
        absorption; Handling of stress, conflict, sadness; Attitudes/values indicating extreme
        sexism or homophobia; Support network; Peer (age-appropriate) friendships; Social
        interactions and/or social skills; Ability to form close, age-appropriate relationships;
        Support from spouse/partner/significant other; Boundaries

Who are the most significant people in your life right now?

        a. How long have these individuals been part of your life?

        b. In what ways do you feel they have played a significant role in your life?

        c. How have they responded, if at all, to you wanting to be a Big Brother or Big Sister?

(Optional: Tell me about these individuals; what activities and interests you share, how you
resolve conflict?)

Question Group 4 - Friends:
Rationale:
     Determines whether the volunteer has stable and age-appropriate relationships.
     Provides an understanding of the volunteer’s social skills.

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     Helps explore the volunteer’s problem-solving skills when relationship tensions and
      problems arise.
     KI: Thinking errors; Lack of empathy for others; Extreme self-centeredness/self-
      absorption; Handling of stress, conflict, sadness; Attitudes/values indicating extreme
      sexism or homophobia; Support network; Peer (age-appropriate) friendships; Social
      interactions and/or social skills; Ability to form close, age-appropriate relationships;
      Support from spouse/partner/significant other; Boundaries; Over-involvement with
      children; Childlike behavior/interests; Childhood physical abuse (men)

Outside of the people you just mentioned, who make up your current circle of friends?

        a. How long have you had these friendships?

        b. How did you build these friendships? What do you do to maintain them currently?

        c. When there are tensions and/or problems between you and your friends, how do you
           typically resolve them?

        d. Did you or anyone you know (friends or family) experience physical, emotional, or
           sexual abuse?


(Optional: What type of activities do you share?)

Question Group 5 – Leisure Time/Drug & Alcohol Use:
Rationale:
     Provides insight into interests and other activity pursuits volunteer has.
     Assesses age-appropriate issues in the volunteer’s lifestyle.
     Opens and facilitates frank discussion about alcohol and drug use.
     KI: Thinking errors; Lack of empathy for others; Extreme self-centeredness/self-
        absorption; Handling of stress, conflict, sadness; Support network; Peer (age-appropriate)
        friendships; Social interactions and/or social skills; Boundaries

How do you currently spend your leisure time?

        a. Over the past few years, have there been any changes in how you spend your leisure
           time? Why do you think that is?

        b. Have you ever or do you currently use alcohol, drugs, or tobacco? If so, how have
           they played a part in your leisure time?

(Optional: How often do you use alcohol or drugs and how much? And is there any history of
drug or alcohol abuse in your family?)



Question Group 6 – Home Assessment:
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Rationale:
     Provides a general assessment of the volunteer’s home.
     Assesses whether volunteer is safety conscious.
     KI: Thinking errors; Extreme self-centeredness/self-absorption; Lack of empathy for
        others; Childlike behavior/interests; Over-involvement with children; Home environment
        is created around children’s enjoyment or interests (context?); Privacy not available for
        changing or overnights (if allowed); Reference indicate extreme messiness or extreme
        (obsessive-compulsive) cleanliness

When you are matched, it means you may be spending some of your time together at your home.
Can you just generally describe your home environment to me?

        a. Who else lives with you? (what is their relationship to you?)

        b. What are some of the things you have in your home in the way of games, sports
           equipment, or other items that youth generally enjoy being around?

        c. What are some of the things you can imagine doing with your Little at your home?

        d. Both in and around your home, what do you think are some of the safety
           considerations both you and a youth will have to take into account ? (see #6 on pre-
           interview form)

Question Group 7 – Experience with Children:
Rationale:
     The general experience the volunteer has had with youth. Helps inform and define
        individualized training and future match support – prescriptive vs. developmental.
     Helps staff make matching recommendations.
     Allows staff to assess whether volunteer has real versus unrealistic expectations about
        youth and their attributes.
     KI: Thinking errors; Extreme self-centeredness/self-absorption; Lack of empathy for
        others; Extensive volunteer and/or work history with youth; Over eagerness to be
        matched or re-matched; Childlike behavior/interests; Peer (age-appropriate) friendships;
        Social interactions and/or social skills; Stated preferences for Little are narrow and
        specific; A lot of physical contact is desired; Tendency to overly indulge or be overly
        disciplining of children; Unexplained changes in or termination of activities with
        children; Over-involvement with children

Would you describe and name any involvement you’ve had with children and youth as either a
volunteer or paid staff person with, for example, a youth organization? Obtain contact
information for any youth organization’s mentioned. Follow up to obtain references.

        a. What were the ages of the youth you worked with?

        b. How long, and in what capacity was that work?

        c. Tell me about that/those experience(s).
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        d. What qualities do you admire most in youth?

        e. Are there any particular qualities you do not desire in youth?

        f.   Overall, what do you feel is important for us to consider in matching you. For
             example, any age, interests, or personality trait factors?

        g. What attracted you to BBBS as a way of becoming involved in working with youth?

Question Group 8 – Match Relationship:
Rationale:
     Begins to explore the volunteer’s own youth and what type of experiences he or she
        brings.
     Assesses the volunteer’s expectations and when they are on prescriptive vs.
        developmental continuum.
     Assesses the volunteer’s motivation, e.g., does the volunteer want to save a child?
     Provides an opportunity to share with the volunteer what being a mentor is really about.
     KI: Thinking errors; Extreme self-centeredness/self-absorption; Lack of empathy for
        others; Extensive volunteer and/or work history with youth; Over eagerness to be
        matched or re-matched; Childlike behavior/interests; Peer (age-appropriate) friendships;
        Social interactions and/or social skills; Stated preferences for Little are narrow and
        specific; A lot of physical contact is desired; Tendency to overly indulge or be overly
        disciplining of children; Over-involvement with children

Think about a person other than your parents that, when you were a child, provided you with
friendship, guidance and support. What was that person like?

        a. When you become matched, what are some of the things you might do to create that
           same type of friendship and support?

        b. In a few years from now, if you were to reflect back on the time you were matched,
           what would have had to occur for you to consider the experience fun and
           worthwhile?

Question Group 9 – Potential Challenges in a Match:
Rationale:
     Helps established individualized support needs for recurring contacts with the volunteer.
     Assesses whether the volunteer may feel he or she is too self-reliant.
     Assesses volunteer’s expectations about what may happen or not.
     KI: Thinking errors; Extreme self-centeredness/self-absorption; Lack of empathy for
        others; Extensive volunteer and/or work history with youth; Over eagerness to be
        matched or re-matched; Childlike behavior/interests; Peer (age-appropriate) friendships;
        Social interactions and/or social skills; Stated preferences for Little are narrow and
        specific; Little must comply with certain level of expectations; Childlike
        behavior/interests; A lot of physical contact is desired; Tendency to overly indulge or be

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       overly disciplining of children; Abrupt changes in or termination of activities if
       expectations not met; Over-involvement with children

To help you have a meaningful and worthwhile experience as a Big, what do you feel will be
some of the initial challenges you might face in trying to form a friendship with a child?

       a. What might be your reaction if, after meeting with a Little a few times, either the
          overall experience or the child did not meet your expectations?

       b. What are some of the ways that we might be able to support you in a match?


Match Preferences
To help us make the best possible match, we would like to take a little more time and ask some
more detailed questions around the traits of a child with whom you would feel most comfortable.
We would like to have you imagine with us some things about your Little and your time together.

       a. What is the youngest and oldest age you see yourself working best with?

       b. Do you imagine your Little to be very active? What are some of the activities you
          see yourself doing together?

       c. Do you imagine yourself with a talkative child, or someone more on the quiet side?

       d. Do you imagine yourself with a child who asks for your advice, or who prefers to
          work things out on their own?

       e. Which of the following words describe the Little you see yourself most comfortable
          working with (circle):

            introspective   reflective      contemplative      loud   social   acts before thinking

       f.   How do you envision meeting your Little for the first time?

       g. What kind of personality traits might be challenging for you?


Explain to the volunteer that parents of youth often state their preferences around who
they want their child to be matched with. Also explain that our policies focus on parental
choice and that some parents express specific preferences around a volunteer’s
characteristics. As such, we need the following information to assure we respect the
rights of parents and the preferences they may have. NONE of the answers will
disqualify the volunteer.

1.     What is your religious preference?

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2.      What is your sexual orientation?

Now explain that, to the extent we have to honor preferences stated by parents, the volunteer may
have some preferences also. Since we want to provide the volunteer with a fun and rewarding
experience, his or her preferences are equally important.

     1. Would you be willing to be matched with a child coming from a home with a history of
        substance abuse?

     2. Would you be willing to be matched with a child who had been physically, emotionally,
        or sexually abused?

     3. Can you think of any other traits or qualities about a youth or his or her family
        that would be difficult for you to interact with?


     4. If not previously answered, ask the volunteer if he or she has any preferences
        around age, race, ADD/ADHD, etc.


     5. Is there anything else about yourself that we didn’t get a chance to discuss and
        that you’d like to share now?

Training, Support & Guidance Needs:


     1. Are there any topics around youth development and/or being a Big that you could use
        more information about? For example, building a relationship or suggested activities for
        particular age groups?




     2. We can provide both training and further information before a match or after you’ve had
        some experience. We can also offer training in a group or provide information in a one-
        on-one setting? Do you have any preferences?




With all of these questions completed, make certain to ask the volunteer if he or she has any
questions. Also explain that the results of this interview, along with references and background
check results are all used in making the most appropriate matching recommendation.

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SUMMARY OBSERVATIONS
Based on the overall interview and the responses to all questions, the interviewer now completes
interview summary observations noting additional comments as necessary.

This volunteer demonstrated good communication skills.                   Yes     No


Responses to questions were thoughtful and provided useful
information about this volunteer.
                                                                         Yes     No


The volunteer has a good understanding of what it means
to be a Big.
                                                                         Yes     No


This volunteer appears able and willing to form
a safe and meaningful relationship with a young person                   Yes     No
and for the program time period expected.



What specific training, information, or support needs might this volunteer initially have?
(Examples: Will this volunteer need guidance in forming a friendship first before
expecting to “change” a Little? Does this volunteer have limited experience with children
and might need help identifying age-appropriate activities to share? )




ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:




Enrollment Staff                                                 Date

                            Volunteer Interview Role Play

                        VOLUNTEER IN-PERSON INTERVIEW
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VOLUNTEER INSTRUCTIONS:
           The answers are marked in bold red (as in question 1, some of the answers will
            actually be placed on the Interviewer’s form).
           Volunteer is a 30 year old female who works for the school district

Question Group 1 – Occupational Information:
Rationale:
     Provides a safe and neutral start to the interview.
     Gives a sense of the volunteer’s work history and career stability.
     KI: Thinking Errors; Extreme self-centeredness/self-absorption; Lack of empathy for
        others; Sporadic employment history; Ability to handle stress/conflict; Extensive work
        history with youth (references?) ; Major life changes: Boundaries

I see that you work with the local school district.

        d. What do you do for them?

             I am the attendance coordinator and am responsible for compiling all the
             attendance data for the district.

        e. What do you currently find most rewarding in your job there?

             Attendance data is used to determine federal funding for each district and
             I’ve developed and now manage a system that allows the Superintendent to
             know where we stand at any time. I really love to solve problems like this. I
             can spend hours on the computer.

        f. Have you always been in this line of work? (Follow up, as appropriate, where,
           what else/when)

             I’ve worked for the District for about the past 3 years.


Note: If the individual is retired, modify wording to past tense (e.g. where did you last work,
what did you do for them). Also modify for high school/college students (e.g., I see you
attend_______. When do you plan to graduate, what do you plan to do after graduation, and what
are your summer plans?)

Question Group 2 – Family Relationships:
Rationale:
     Provides a better general understanding of the volunteer’s past.
     Identifies any substantial emotional issues from the volunteer’s past and can help
        determine resolution of those issues.
     Provides insight into current relationships e.g., stability.


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     KI: Thinking errors; Lack of empathy for others; Extreme self-centeredness/self-
      absorption; Ability to handle stress/conflict; Attitudes indicate extreme
      homophobia/sexism; Limited or no contact with family members; Boundaries

What can you tell me about your memories and experiences as a young person growing up in
your family?

        My family had its challenges. My dad and mom didn’t get along really well,
        and it seemed like my mom used to eat to be happy. Sometimes, she would wake
        me up in the middle of the night to come down and eat with her. I have an
        older sister who used to blame things on me, so my folks would usually get on
        me for everything.

        b. Tell me about your current relationship with family members?

        My dad died about 10 years ago. I wouldn’t want to live too near my mom
        because she drives me nuts, but I talk to her about once a month. My sister
        lives across country, too, and we talk a few times a year but aren’t particularly
        close.

Question Group 3 – Current Relationships:
Rationale:
     Provides information on the volunteer’s current relationships.
     Provides information on how supportive the volunteer’s significant other will be.
     KI: Thinking errors; Lack of empathy for others; Extreme self-centeredness/self-
        absorption; Handling of stress, conflict, sadness; Attitudes/values indicating extreme
        sexism or homophobia; Support network; Peer (age-appropriate) friendships; Social
        interactions and/or social skills; Ability to form close, age-appropriate relationships;
        Support from spouse/partner/significant other; Boundaries

Who are the most significant people in your life right now?

        I guess the person I’m engaged to is pretty much the most important person in
        my life right now. I have some friends from work that I really enjoy, but I don’t
        know if I’d consider them significant.

        d. How long have these individuals been part of your life?

        I’ve known my fiancé for just over two years.



        e. In what ways do you feel they have played a significant role in your life?



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        Being with my fiancé(e) has allowed me to make changes in my life that
        enhance the relationship. I feel like the relationship has really helped my
        communication skills and I’m more willing to talk things through than I
        expected I would be.

        f.   How have they responded, if at all, to you wanting to be a Big Brother or Big Sister?

        My fiancé thinks it’s great that I’m doing something with my spare time,
        especially since he travels for his job and I often have time on my hands when
        he is gone.

(Optional: Tell me about these individuals; what activities and interests you share, how you
resolve conflict?)


Question Group 4 - Friends:
Rationale:
     Determines whether the volunteer has stable and age-appropriate relationships.
     Provides an understanding of the volunteer’s social skills.
     Helps explore the volunteer’s problem-solving skills when relationship tensions and
        problems arise.
     KI: Thinking errors; Lack of empathy for others; Extreme self-centeredness/self-
        absorption; Handling of stress, conflict, sadness; Attitudes/values indicating extreme
        sexism or homophobia; Support network; Peer (age-appropriate) friendships; Social
        interactions and/or social skills; Ability to form close, age-appropriate relationships;
        Support from spouse/partner/significant other; Boundaries; Over-involvement with
        children; Childlike behavior/interests; Childhood physical abuse (men)

Outside of the people you just mentioned, who make up your current circle of friends?

        I don’t have a lot of what I’d call close friends, but there are four folks from
        work that I’ve been close to and my oldest friend from high school and I still
        keep in touch. My fiancé is my best friend and I spend most of my time with
        him.

        e. How long have you had these friendships?

        I’ve known the four folks that I hang out with from work since I started there. I
        think we met in the cafeteria my first day.




        f.   How did you build these friendships? What do you do to maintain them currently?


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        I was actually introduced to my fiancé by someone at work and once we started
        dating, we’ve been pretty inseparable. He was making a sales call at the District
        and Sherry brought him by my office since his company sells software to school
        districts. Everyone still kids me about that. I keep up with my office friends
        during breaks and we go out after work to play pool and get a beer or have
        dinner occasionally.

        g. When there are tensions and/or problems between you and your friends, how do you
           typically resolve them?

        I usually don’t have a lot of tension or problems with my friends. I typically
        handle things like that by being pretty straightforward or making jokes about
        things until the tension eases. When people pressure me to do things I’m not
        interested in I try to back out gracefully. My fiancé and I try to talk things out
        when we get into problems. We’ve gotten better at it as we’ve gone along. We
        still have fights sometimes, but we get over them a lot more quickly and they
        don’t happen as easily as they used to.

        h. Did you or anyone you know (friends or family) experience physical, emotional, or
           sexual abuse?

        No sexual abuse against me, but I’ve had friends who told me they were. I
        don’t really think my dad’s occasional swats with the belt were physically
        abusive. Both my mom and dad were what I’d consider emotionally abusive,
        though.

(Optional: What type of activities do you share?)



Question Group 5 – Leisure Time/Drug & Alcohol Use:
Rationale:
     Provides insight into interests and other activity pursuits volunteer has.
     Assesses age-appropriate issues in the volunteer’s lifestyle.
     Opens and facilitates frank discussion about alcohol and drug use.
     KI: Thinking errors; Lack of empathy for others; Extreme self-centeredness/self-
        absorption; Handling of stress, conflict, sadness; Support network; Peer (age-appropriate)
        friendships; Social interactions and/or social skills; Boundaries




How do you currently spend your leisure time?



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        Most of the time, I spend time at home with my fiancé. As I mentioned,
        I\occasionally go out with some friends, usually when my fiancé has other plans
        or is out of town. My fiancé and I enjoy going out to dinner and to movies, or
        renting movies. I also do some studying as my field is really technical and I
        need to keep up with the latest developments.

        c. Over the past few years, have there been any changes in how you spend your leisure
           time? Why do you think that is?

        Probably the biggest change came after I got engaged. Before we met, I spent
        time a lot more time doing things out (going out to dinner more, to a club or a
        local casino a night or two a week) and I don’t do that much anymore.

        d. Have you ever or do you currently use alcohol, drugs, or tobacco? If so, how have
           they played a part in your leisure time?

        Yes. I used to smoke but stopped a couple of years ago. I enjoy a couple of
        beers after a hard day. I usually have them at home or at a bar that’s close to
        the office where they have great pool tables. Like most young people, I smoked
        pot on occasion when I was younger, but haven’t done that in several years.

(Optional: How often do you use alcohol or drugs and how much? And is there any history of
drug or alcohol abuse in your family?)


Question Group 6 – Home Assessment:
Rationale:
     Provides a general assessment of the volunteer’s home.
     Assesses whether volunteer is safety conscious.
     KI: Thinking errors; Extreme self-centeredness/self-absorption; Lack of empathy for
        others; Childlike behavior/interests; Over-involvement with children; Home environment
        is created around children’s enjoyment or interests (context?); Privacy not available for
        changing or overnights (if allowed); Reference indicate extreme messiness or extreme
        (obsessive-compulsive) cleanliness

When you are matched, it means you may be spending some of your time together at your home.
Can you just generally describe your home environment to me?

        e. Who else lives with you? (what is their relationship to you?)




        f.   What are some of the things you have in your home in the way of games, sports
             equipment, or other items that youth generally enjoy being around?

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        Probably just the cat! The complex has a pool and tennis court, as well as a
        fitness room. Other than that, not too much, I’m afraid.

        g. What are some of the things you can imagine doing with your Little at your home?

        We could hang out and watch TV or use the pool. Maybe do some computer
        games or surfing. I guess I never really thought about that.

        h. Both in and around your home, what do you think are some of the safety
           considerations both you and a youth will have to take into account ? (see #6 on pre-
           interview form)

        Not much. There’d be some consideration if we used the pool or fitness room.
        Our complex is pretty new so things like smoke detectors all work. Our cat
        loves people so would only be a problem if the child were allergic to cats. I
        really don’t think we’d spend much time at the apartment since there’s not
        much to do there.


Question Group 7 – Experience with Children:
Rationale:
     The general experience the volunteer has had with youth. Helps inform and define
        individualized training and future match support – prescriptive vs. developmental.
     Helps staff make matching recommendations.
     Allows staff to assess whether volunteer has real versus unrealistic expectations about
        youth and their attributes.
     KI: Thinking errors; Extreme self-centeredness/self-absorption; Lack of empathy for
        others; Extensive volunteer and/or work history with youth; Over eagerness to be
        matched or re-matched; Childlike behavior/interests; Peer (age-appropriate) friendships;
        Social interactions and/or social skills; Stated preferences for Little are narrow and
        specific; A lot of physical contact is desired; Tendency to overly indulge or be overly
        disciplining of children; Unexplained changes in or termination of activities with
        children; Over-involvement with children

Would you describe and name any involvement you’ve had with children and youth as either a
volunteer or paid staff person with, for example, a youth organization? Obtain contact
information for any youth organization’s mentioned. Follow up to obtain references.

        I have a niece and nephew but I have only seen them twice and the year before
        last I taught some computer classes at the Boys and Girls Club.


        h. What were the ages of the youth you worked with?


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       12 to 14 year olds.

       i.   How long, and in what capacity was that work?

       I just taught one semester last year.

       j.   Tell me about that/those experience(s).

       It was a lot of fun. The kids really liked learning more about computers-I
       enjoyed it.

       k. What qualities do you admire most in youth?

       Pause…..That’s hard to answer. I don’t think that I’ve ever met a child that I
       didn’t like, but then I really haven’t met that many. Pause…I liked that the kids
       in my computer class really wanted to learn and they made me feel appreciated

       l.   Are there any particular qualities you do not desire in youth?

       This is a little easier to answer. I don’t like children who are uncontrollable in
       public.

       m. Overall, what do you feel is important for us to consider in matching you. For
          example, any age, interests, or personality trait factors?

       Age isn’t all that important, but I would prefer that they be outgoing. It would
       be great if they liked puzzles and computers.

       n. What attracted you to BBBS as a way of becoming involved in working with youth?

       One of my friends at work is a Big Brother and he suggested that I get in touch
       with you guys last week when we were talking about whether or not to have
       children. He said that that was part of the reason that he had decided to be a big
       brother and that volunteering here was a great way to get a feel for what
       parenthood might be like. Since I’ve never had the chance to spend much time
       with a child alone, I thought that this would be a great way to find out if I am
       someone who is comfortable with kids and if we should plan on having a
       family.




Question Group 8 – Match Relationship:
Rationale:

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     Begins to explore the volunteer’s own youth and what type of experiences he or she
      brings.
     Assesses the volunteer’s expectations and when they are on prescriptive vs.
      developmental continuum.
     Assesses the volunteer’s motivation, e.g., does the volunteer want to save a child?
     Provides an opportunity to share with the volunteer what being a mentor is really about.
     KI: Thinking errors; Extreme self-centeredness/self-absorption; Lack of empathy for
      others; Extensive volunteer and/or work history with youth; Over eagerness to be
      matched or re-matched; Childlike behavior/interests; Peer (age-appropriate) friendships;
      Social interactions and/or social skills; Stated preferences for Little are narrow and
      specific; A lot of physical contact is desired; Tendency to overly indulge or be overly
      disciplining of children; Over-involvement with children

Think about a person other than your parents that, when you were a child, provided you with
friendship, guidance and support. What was that person like?

        I had a couple of teachers in middle school and high school that were really
        supportive of me. I also had some people who were pretty critical, I guess. But
        these two teachers were great at helping me believe that I could do anything I
        wanted if I really worked at it and tried my best. They always made me feel like
        I was special, even when there were a bunch of other kids around. I think they
        had a way of making all of us kids feel really special, no matter how good we
        were at the subject.


        c. When you become matched, what are some of the things you might do to create that
           same type of friendship and support?

        Well, I really haven’t thought about volunteering from that perspective. I guess
        I’d need some suggestions about that. Will the agency be able to help me with
        ideas?

        d. In a few years from now, if you were to reflect back on the time you were matched,
           what would have had to occur for you to consider the experience fun and
           worthwhile?

        Gosh, I don’t know. I guess it would be nice if my Little felt it had been
        worthwhile for her. If she didn’t seem to really care if I was around or didn’t
        seem interested in being with me that would make it harder. Mostly, I hope we
        have a lot of good fun.



Question Group 9 – Potential Challenges in a Match:
Rationale:

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      Helps established individualized support needs for recurring contacts with the volunteer.
      Assesses whether the volunteer may feel he or she is too self-reliant.
      Assesses volunteer’s expectations about what may happen or not.
      KI: Thinking errors; Extreme self-centeredness/self-absorption; Lack of empathy for
       others; Extensive volunteer and/or work history with youth; Over eagerness to be
       matched or re-matched; Childlike behavior/interests; Peer (age-appropriate) friendships;
       Social interactions and/or social skills; Stated preferences for Little are narrow and
       specific; Little must comply with certain level of expectations; Childlike
       behavior/interests; A lot of physical contact is desired; Tendency to overly indulge or be
       overly disciplining of children; Abrupt changes in or termination of activities if
       expectations not met; Over-involvement with children

To help you have a meaningful and worthwhile experience as a Big, what do you feel
will be some of the initial challenges you might face in trying to form a friendship with a
child?
        I guess I thought maybe a kid would be a little resentful at first, or maybe a
        little shy. I don’t really know why the kids are in your program. Are they
        forced to be here by the courts or something?? (NOTE: Answer the question
        and move on.)

       It would be a challenge if they didn’t like me or didn’t like to do the things I like
       to do. It would also be hard if s/he wanted me to spend a lot of money, because
       I don’t have a lot of extra right now.

       c. What might be your reaction if, after meeting with a Little a few times, either the
          overall experience or the child did not meet your expectations?

       I don’t know, I never really thought about it not working out.

       d. What are some of the ways that we might be able to support you in a match?

       Well, I don’t have a ton of money, so it would be nice if you guys had some
       things we could do together. You know, like suggestions for cheap activities.
       And it would be good to have someone to talk to if there’s a problem.

Match Preferences
To help us make the best possible match, we would like to take a little more time and ask some
more detailed questions around the traits of a child with whom you would feel most comfortable.
We would like to have you imagine with us some things about your Little and your time together.



       a. What is the youngest and oldest age you see yourself working best with?

       Probably 9 or so as the youngest and maybe 14 as the oldest.
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       b. Do you imagine your Little to be very active? What are some of the activities you
          see yourself doing together?

       It depends on what you mean as very active. I wouldn’t want to play sports all
       the time or anything. I could see going to the movies or playing computer
       games.

       c. Do you imagine yourself with a talkative child, or someone more on the quiet side?

       A more talkative child.

       d. Do you imagine yourself with a child who asks for your advice, or who prefers to
          work things out on their own?

       It would depend on what kind of advice they were asking for-I don’t have a lot
       of experience with children.

       e. Which of the following words describe the Little you see yourself most comfortable
          working with (circle):

            introspective   reflective   contemplative       loud   social   acts before thinking

       f.   How do you envision meeting your Little for the first time?

       I could see us meeting first with the BBBS staff and the child’s parent.

       g. What kind of personality traits might be challenging for you?

       A child who acts out in public-I would need to know what to do in that kind of
       situation.



Explain to the volunteer that parents of youth often state their preferences around who
they want their child to be matched with. Also explain that our policies focus on parental
choice and that some parents express specific preferences around a volunteer’s
characteristics. As such, we need the following information to assure we respect the
rights of parents and the preferences they may have. NONE of the answers will
disqualify the volunteer.

   1. What is your religious preference?



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    Lutheran

    2. What is your sexual orientation?

    Heterosexual

Now explain that, to the extent we have to honor preferences stated by parents, the volunteer may
have some preferences also. Since we want to provide the volunteer with a fun and rewarding
experience, his or her preferences are equally important.

    1. Would you be willing to be matched with a child coming from a home with a history of
       substance abuse?
    Yes.

    2. Would you be willing to be matched with a child who had been physically, emotionally,
        or sexually abused?

    I’d be a little uncomfortable with that.

    3. Can you think of any other traits or qualities about a youth or his or her family
       that would be difficult for you to interact with?

    Not really.

    4. If not previously answered, ask the volunteer if he or she has any preferences
       around age, race, ADD/ADHD, etc.


    5. Is there anything else about yourself that we didn’t get a chance to discuss and
       that you’d like to share now?

    Not that I can think of right now.


Training, Support & Guidance Needs:


    1. Are there any topics around youth development and/or being a Big that you could use
       more information about? For example, building a relationship or suggested activities for
       particular age groups?
    Yes, suggested activities would be great-I would need ideas that weren’t too costly.
    2. We can provide both training and further information before a match or after you’ve had
       some experience. We can also offer training in a group or provide information in a one-
       on-one setting? Do you have any preferences?
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    I would like a group setting so I could get ideas from other Bigs.


With all of these questions completed, make certain to ask the volunteer if he or she has any
questions. Also explain that the results of this interview, along with references and background
check results are all used in making the most appropriate matching recommendation.



SUMMARY OBSERVATIONS
Based on the overall interview and the responses to all questions, the interviewer now completes
interview summary observations noting additional comments as necessary.

This volunteer demonstrated good communication skills.                   Yes     No


Responses to questions were thoughtful and provided useful
information about this volunteer.
                                                                         Yes     No


The volunteer has a good understanding of what it means
to be a Big.
                                                                         Yes     No


This volunteer appears able and willing to form
a safe and meaningful relationship with a young person                   Yes     No
and for the program time period expected.



What specific training, information, or support needs might this volunteer initially have?
(Examples: Will this volunteer need guidance in forming a friendship first before
expecting to “change” a Little? Does this volunteer have limited experience with children
and might need help identifying age-appropriate activities to share? )




ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:


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Interview review
   Were all the rationales met in the information given?




   What techniques / tools would you use to get the required information?




   When should other questions be asked and how, in a BNT, customer-friendly
    manner?




   What pitfalls do you need to watch out for personally?




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   Take Aways for Interviewing:
      Know the rationale for accepting / matching or rejecting

      Know when and how to use all the tools available to make a sound assessment

      Practice till you can be flexible moving through the questionnaire and make
       decisions quickly

      Hone your ability to ask questions in a customer friendly way




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Your Role in Risk Management
The Standards of Practice and your agency policies address eligibility criteria. It is
important to be familiar with these documents. Standard 12(a) requires that every
agency has policies stating eligibility criteria for volunteers and youth.

Using the SDM interviewing and assessment tools (includes: SDM Volunteer Interview,
background checks, reference checks) allows you to apply BBBS's best practice for risk
management in the area of identifying the occasional volunteer that may not be
appropriate for the program. However, there is never a 100% guarantee that we can
prevent all unsafe situations.

If concerns are present you need to discuss them with your supervisor.




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     The Volunteer Interview and Key Indicators
     As you move through the interview you're listening for positive indicators that the volunteer is eligible and
     able to become an effective Big. In contrast, you're also listening for indicators that the volunteer may be
     inappropriate to work with children and youth.

     Indicators that the volunteer may be inappropriate, unsafe or outside the parameters for likelihood of a
     successful BBBS match are called "key indicators". Listen for and make note of any volunteer information
     or behaviors that would illustrate the following indicators or combinations/ patterns of indicators. They
     will likely lead you to gathering more information to aid your assessment process. These indicators are
     rarely black and white. For that reason, to provide the highest quality assessment you should include your
     supervisor in determining the appropriateness of candidates that present under these conditions.

                    Key Indicator                                              Description/Example
An inability to recognize appropriate adult/child           An adult, who primarily interacts with children, views them
relationships                                               as their best friends and allows them to behave against normal
                                                            rules (like having an alcoholic beverage). In addition they see
                                                            nothing wrong with their behavior.
Unsafe behavior with children                               Can range from reckless driving without using a seat belt to
                                                            allowing a child to drink beer with them and watch R-rated
                                                            movies on TV.
Professional staff have an unexplainable sense or           Generally referred to as “listening to your gut instincts”. Talk
feeling that something is not right                         with your supervisor about potential biases that may be
                                                            leading you to this reaction, but never ignore these instincts.
An inability to understand their thinking is problematic     Candidate demonstrates that their self-serving thinking
                                                            process or actions are okay, and easily justify their behaviors
                                                            this way (e.g. justifies spanking, rule-breaking, inappropriate
                                                            touch or discipline).
An inability to follow rules                                Will not adhere to employment rules and guidelines or does
                                                            not believe rules apply to them. They are consistently unable
                                                            to adapt to basic rules and regulations.
Poor decision making                                        History of poor relationships or someone who continually
                                                            chooses to put themselves in negative situations. May clearly
                                                            know guidelines but choose to ignore them. May have history
                                                            of DUIs/speeding tickets.
Unrealistic expectations that can’t be changed              A person who thinks they can “change” a Little or that their
                                                            role is to “save” a Little. Cannot comprehend the real goal of
                                                            being a Big.
Demonstrated poor conflict/stress management                Has a lot of conflict in their life with family or work
                                                            relationships or both. A history of fighting/struggling with
                                                            relationships. May be receiving therapy for a personal crisis.
Extensive involvement with youth-exclusively                Work/volunteer history is centered only on youth. May be a
                                                            former Big, Boy Scout Leader and a day care provider.

Lack of empathy for others                                  Cannot see things from anyone else’s point of view.
Extreme self-centeredness                                   A person who is more concerned with how things/situations
                                                            affect them than anyone else. Constantly refers back to their
                                                            situation and feelings.
Reference information and self-report information are       Candidate sees him/herself much differently than references
conflicting                                                 see them (lack of self-awareness).

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The Volunteer Interview with Key Indicators

       VOLUNTEER PRE-INTERVIEW QUESTIONNAIRE

                                                 NOTE
 This form can be completed by the volunteer prior to the in-person interview. It provides
 information that can be used to assess the volunteer and determine with whom the volunteer
 might be matched. It is also possible to add these questions to the in-person interview if the
 interview is not in the agency and the volunteer does not have ‘waiting time’ before the
 interview to complete it. Also, any demographic information about the volunteer not
 captured elsewhere can be included on this form.


Prior to your in-person interview, we would like you to answer the questions below. Parents of
youth in our programs will often ask us questions about someone with whom their child will be
matched. We will only release information to a parent with your expressed permission. The
information you give will also help us make a better match for you and assure we can support you
during your involvement with our programs.


Your Name:                      Anthony Volunteer          Date:


1. Which do you enjoy more?

         Indoor Activities               X Outdoor Activities           No preference

2. Would you describe yourself as a person who enjoys:

         Watching events or activities           Actively participating in activities   X
Both

3. Do you have any guns or ammunition in your house?

X No                    Yes (If yes, we will discuss what safety precautions are necessary )


4. Would you be able to secure or otherwise make unavailable any youth inappropriate viewing
materials in your home? This would include television channels and Internet access?

X Yes                   No (If not, we will have you discuss during the in-person interview)


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5. Do you have any pets?

         No            X Yes (If yes, we will discuss with you what safety precautions are
                        necessary around youth)

6.Are you experiencing any physical or mental health problems?

X No                    Yes (If yes, we will have you discuss during the in-person interview)


7. Have you ever been arrested, charged, or convicted of a crime?

 X No                   Yes (If yes, we will have you discuss during the in-person interview)

8. Have you had any driving citations and/or moving violations in the past 5 years?

X No                    Yes (If yes, we will have you discuss during the in-person interview)

9. How long have you lived in the area?    __all of my life_______

10. Do you anticipate any significant life changes over the next year or have you had any in the
past year?

    X No                Yes (If yes, we will have you discuss during the in-person interview)


11. Do you speak any foreign languages?  Yes _________________ X  No

12. Before we continue with some additional questions about your personal
background and life, is there anything else you’d like to tell us about yourself or any
questions you may have of me?

Not right now.



Signature                                                         Date




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                         VOLUNTEER IN-PERSON INTERVIEW

Volunteer’s Name:                                Interviewer’s Name:                _______

Date of Interview:                               Date of Write-Up:

Instructions: The instructional and rationale portion of the interview form should NOT be
eliminated as they contain important information for conducting the interview and possible
follow-up.

Prior to asking the interview questions, do the following:

     Begin by sharing program information as part of the individualized orientation.
     Explain the purpose of the interview, namely, that you’re trying to learn information
      about the person so the most appropriate matching decision can be made.
     Further explain that anytime during the interview, the volunteer can ask questions.
     Briefly outline the process used with parents and children, that we interview them and
      provide both parents and children training and materials relating to child abuse
      prevention and other safety related issues.
     Take a few moments to review the responses to the pre-interview questions. Questions 3-
      10 of that form are Yes/No questions that may require follow-up. Follow-up questions,
      where indicated on the form, should be asked first before going into the questions on this
      form.
     Also tell the volunteer that what we collect is confidential and will not be released
      without his or her written permission or as possibly required by local, state, or federal
      laws. Some personal information will be shared with the parent of a prospective Little
      prior to a match.
     Group Question #7 asks the volunteer to describe and name any involvement as either
      volunteer or paid staff with youth (e.g., Little League, Boys & Girls Club, other BBBS
      agency). Volunteer must be asked to provide contact information, and an attempt to
      contact an appropriate selection of organizations should be made and documented in the
      case notes.

Each question group consists of a lead-off question or statement and then one or more additional
questions. Each set of questions provides assessment rationale and Key Indicators (KI) or red
flags so that the interviewer will better understand the types of assessment information the
questions are intended to elicit. Note that the Key Indicators listed in each section are those that
could POSSIBLY show up in the volunteer’s answers to the questions in that group, and the
questions were designed to elicit the indicator if it is present.


Question Group 1 – Occupational Information:
Rationale:
     Provides a safe and neutral start to the interview.
     Gives a sense of the volunteer’s work history and career stability.


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     KI: Thinking Errors; Extreme self-centeredness/self-absorption; Lack of empathy for
      others; Sporadic employment history; Ability to handle stress/conflict; Extensive work
      history with youth (references?) ; Major life changes: Boundaries

I see that you work with the Pennsylvania Highway Department

        g. What do you do for them?

        I’m a foreman

        h. What do you currently find most rewarding in your job there?
        I enjoy the challenges of highway construction and the sense of finishing
        something when a project is complete.
        i.   Have you always been in this line of work? (Follow up, as appropriate, where, what
             else/when)

        I’ve been in some type of construction since I finished high school.



Note: If the individual is retired, modify wording to past tense (e.g. where did you last work,
what did you do for them). Also modify for high school/college students (e.g., I see you
attend_______. When do you plan to graduate, what do you plan to do after graduation, and what
are your summer plans?)

Question Group 2 – Family Relationships:
Rationale:
     Provides a better general understanding of the volunteer’s past.
     Identifies any substantial emotional issues from the volunteer’s past and can help
        determine resolution of those issues.
     Provides insight into current relationships e.g., stability.
     KI: Thinking errors; Lack of empathy for others; Extreme self-centeredness/self-
        absorption; Ability to handle stress/conflict; Attitudes indicate extreme
        homophobia/sexism; Limited or no contact with family members; Boundaries

What can you tell me about your memories and experiences as a young person growing up in
your family?

I am the oldest of 2-I have a younger sister. We were just a normal family-things were
pretty common.




        c. Tell me about your current relationship with family members?

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        My younger sister lives here in Pittsburgh and both of my parents live in
        Philadelphia. My parents are great and we get along fine. I don’t really see my
        sister too much-we don’t really get a long.

Question Group 3 – Current Relationships:
Rationale:
     Provides information on the volunteer’s current relationships.
     Provides information on how supportive the volunteer’s significant other will be.
     KI: Thinking errors; Lack of empathy for others; Extreme self-centeredness/self-
        absorption; Handling of stress, conflict, sadness; Attitudes/values indicating extreme
        sexism or homophobia; Support network; Peer (age-appropriate) friendships; Social
        interactions and/or social skills; Ability to form close, age-appropriate relationships;
        Support from spouse/partner/significant other; Boundaries

Who are the most significant people in your life right now?

I guess I would have to say my buddies at work. We hang out a lot after work-it’s
pretty tiring doing the highway work-and I just enjoy hanging out with the guys.


        g. How long have these individuals been part of your life?

        I’ve worked with most of these guys for about 8 years now.

        h. In what ways do you feel they have played a significant role in your life?

        We do the same things-it is easy to understand each other.

        i.   How have they responded, if at all, to you wanting to be a Big Brother or Big Sister?

        I haven’t really mentioned it to them.


(Optional: Tell me about these individuals; what activities and interests you share, how you
resolve conflict?)

Question Group 4 - Friends:
Rationale:
     Determines whether the volunteer has stable and age-appropriate relationships.
     Provides an understanding of the volunteer’s social skills.
     Helps explore the volunteer’s problem-solving skills when relationship tensions and
        problems arise.
     KI: Thinking errors; Lack of empathy for others; Extreme self-centeredness/self-
        absorption; Handling of stress, conflict, sadness; Attitudes/values indicating extreme
        sexism or homophobia; Support network; Peer (age-appropriate) friendships; Social
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        interactions and/or social skills; Ability to form close, age-appropriate relationships;
        Support from spouse/partner/significant other; Boundaries; Over-involvement with
        children; Childlike behavior/interests; Childhood physical abuse (men)

Outside of the people you just mentioned, who make up your current circle of friends?

That’s about it. My buddies and I go to the bar after work for a few beers. I’ve been
divorced for about 4 years now. I don’t date anymore-I’m too exhausted from work
and I really didn’t like being married.
Sometimes though I like to spend time with the kids in my neighborhood, the 10 and
11-year olds-I have a basketball hoop in my driveway and a lot of the boys come over to
shoot hoops. I like to watch them practice and try to beat me.

        i.   How long have you had these friendships?

        Like I said for about 8 years

        j.   How did you build these friendships? What do you do to maintain them currently?

        Just by being honest and acting like myself.

        k. When there are tensions and/or problems between you and your friends, how do you
           typically resolve them?

        I don’t really like to talk about things-I just wait for things to pass over-or I just
        don’t do anything.

        l.   Did you or anyone you know (friends or family) experience physical, emotional, or
             sexual abuse?

        When my sister was a teenager she accused my Dad of sexually molesting her-I
        have never talked to her about it-it has put a strain on our relationship. I would
        rather not talk about it at all to be honest.


(Optional: What type of activities do you share?)


Question Group 5 – Leisure Time/Drug & Alcohol Use:
Rationale:
     Provides insight into interests and other activity pursuits volunteer has.
     Assesses age-appropriate issues in the volunteer’s lifestyle.
     Opens and facilitates frank discussion about alcohol and drug use.



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     KI: Thinking errors; Lack of empathy for others; Extreme self-centeredness/self-
      absorption; Handling of stress, conflict, sadness; Support network; Peer (age-appropriate)
      friendships; Social interactions and/or social skills; Boundaries

How do you currently spend your leisure time?

I like to play and watch baseball and basketball on TV. I hang at the bar with work
friends. I also rent a lot of movies and play video games.
.
        e. Over the past few years, have there been any changes in how you spend your leisure
           time? Why do you think that is?

        No just after my divorce I went out more trying to date-but I quit doing that. It
        got too hard.

        f.   Have you ever or do you currently use alcohol, drugs, or tobacco? If so, how have
             they played a part in your leisure time?

        I don’t smoke and I have never used any drugs. I drink beer – that’s about it.

(Optional: How often do you use alcohol or drugs and how much? And is there any history of
drug or alcohol abuse in your family?)

Question Group 6 – Home Assessment:
Rationale:
     Provides a general assessment of the volunteer’s home.
     Assesses whether volunteer is safety conscious.
     KI: Thinking errors; Extreme self-centeredness/self-absorption; Lack of empathy for
        others; Childlike behavior/interests; Over-involvement with children; Home environment
        is created around children’s enjoyment or interests (context?); Privacy not available for
        changing or overnights (if allowed); Reference indicate extreme messiness or extreme
        (obsessive-compulsive) cleanliness

When you are matched, it means you may be spending some of your time together at your home.
Can you just generally describe your home environment to me?

Sure-I live alone in a 3-bedroom ranch house-in a good neighborhood. I’m pretty neat
for a single guy. I do have a 16-year-old cat that can get kind of grumpy.

        i.   Who else lives with you? (what is their relationship to you?)

        I live alone.




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        j.   What are some of the things you have in your home in the way of games, sports
             equipment, or other items that youth generally enjoy being around?

        I have the basketball hoop and a large screen TV. I don’t have a computer yet-
        but I keep thinking about getting one.

        k. What are some of the things you can imagine doing with your Little at your home?

         I think it would be good to introduce him to the kids in my neighborhood-the
        ones who play basketball.

        l.   Both in and around your home, what do you think are some of the safety
             considerations both you and a youth will have to take into account? (see #6 on pre-
             interview form)

        I can’t think of any.

Question Group 7 – Experience with Children:
Rationale:
     The general experience the volunteer has had with youth. Helps inform and define
        individualized training and future match support – prescriptive vs. developmental.
     Helps staff make matching recommendations.
     Allows staff to assess whether volunteer has real versus unrealistic expectations about
        youth and their attributes.
     KI: Thinking errors; Extreme self-centeredness/self-absorption; Lack of empathy for
        others; Extensive volunteer and/or work history with youth; Over eagerness to be
        matched or re-matched; Childlike behavior/interests; Peer (age-appropriate) friendships;
        Social interactions and/or social skills; Stated preferences for Little are narrow and
        specific; A lot of physical contact is desired; Tendency to overly indulge or be overly
        disciplining of children; Unexplained changes in or termination of activities with
        children; Over-involvement with children

Would you describe and name any involvement you’ve had with children and youth as either a
volunteer or paid staff person with, for example, a youth organization? Obtain contact
information for any youth organization’s mentioned. Follow up to obtain references.

I’ve volunteered in the past before I got married with Life Skills, an organization that
worked with mentally retarded adults. I helped take them out to the store and to the
doctor-things like that. Even though I don’t get a long with my sister-I love her kids-I
take my nephews out a lot and once I was their baseball coach.

        o. What were the ages of the youth you worked with?

        My nephews are 11 and 13.
        p. How long, and in what capacity was that work?

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        Just for one basketball season.

        q. Tell me about that/those experience(s).

        They are a lot of fun-really good at sports.

        r.   What qualities do you admire most in youth?

        I like how open kids are to try new things.

        s. Are there any particular qualities you do not desire in youth?

        Not that I can think of now.

        t.   Overall, what do you feel is important for us to consider in matching you. For
             example, any age, interests, or personality trait factors?

        I think I’d do well with a boy around 10 or 11, who is good at sports and is good
        at meeting other people-a friendly outgoing kid. I think it would be fun to have
        a kid that age around the house.

        u. What attracted you to BBBS as a way of becoming involved in working with youth?

        I would like to help a boy who needs a positive male figure in his life. I also
        think that this experience might help me communicate with women better-I
        might even get to know the boys Mom in a good way & that would help me feel
        better about women in general.

Question Group 8 – Match Relationship:
Rationale:
     Begins to explore the volunteer’s own youth and what type of experiences he or she
        brings.
     Assesses the volunteer’s expectations and when they are on prescriptive vs.
        developmental continuum.
     Assesses the volunteer’s motivation, e.g., does the volunteer want to save a child?
     Provides an opportunity to share with the volunteer what being a mentor is really about.
     KI: Thinking errors; Extreme self-centeredness/self-absorption; Lack of empathy for
        others; Extensive volunteer and/or work history with youth; Over eagerness to be
        matched or re-matched; Childlike behavior/interests; Peer (age-appropriate) friendships;
        Social interactions and/or social skills; Stated preferences for Little are narrow and
        specific; A lot of physical contact is desired; Tendency to overly indulge or be overly
        disciplining of children; Over-involvement with children

Think about a person other than your parents that, when you were a child, provided you with
friendship, guidance and support. What was that person like?

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Open and friendly.

        e. When you become matched, what are some of the things you might do to create that
           same type of friendship and support?

        I’m not sure.

        f.   In a few years from now, if you were to reflect back on the time you were matched,
             what would have had to occur for you to consider the experience fun and
             worthwhile?

        I’m not sure.

Question Group 9 – Potential Challenges in a Match:
Rationale:
     Helps established individualized support needs for recurring contacts with the volunteer.
     Assesses whether the volunteer may feel he or she is too self-reliant.
     Assesses volunteer’s expectations about what may happen or not.
     KI: Thinking errors; Extreme self-centeredness/self-absorption; Lack of empathy for
        others; Extensive volunteer and/or work history with youth; Over eagerness to be
        matched or re-matched; Childlike behavior/interests; Peer (age-appropriate) friendships;
        Social interactions and/or social skills; Stated preferences for Little are narrow and
        specific; Little must comply with certain level of expectations; Childlike
        behavior/interests; A lot of physical contact is desired; Tendency to overly indulge or be
        overly disciplining of children; Abrupt changes in or termination of activities if
        expectations not met; Over-involvement with children

To help you have a meaningful and worthwhile experience as a Big, what do you feel will be
some of the initial challenges you might face in trying to form a friendship with a child?

I would be afraid that the boy didn’t like me and I wouldn’t know what to do.

        e. What might be your reaction if, after meeting with a Little a few times, either the
           overall experience or the child did not meet your expectations?

        I’d ask for a different child.




        f.   What are some of the ways that we might be able to support you in a match?



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       I really don’t know.

Match Preferences
To help us make the best possible match, we would like to take a little more time and ask some
more detailed questions around the traits of a child with whom you would feel most comfortable.
We would like to have you imagine with us some things about your Little and your time together.

       h. What is the youngest and oldest age you see yourself working best with?

       I really want to work with a 10 or 11 year old.

       i.   Do you imagine your Little to be very active? What are some of the activities you
            see yourself doing together?

       Yes, I want a child that really enjoys playing sports.

       j.   Do you imagine yourself with a talkative child, or someone more on the quiet side?

       More on the quiet side.

       k. Do you imagine yourself with a child who asks for your advice, or who prefers to
          work things out on their own?

       I’d be happy to offer advice to a child.

       l.   Which of the following words describe the Little you see yourself most comfortable
            working with (circle):

            introspective   reflective      contemplative      loud   social   acts before thinking

       m. How do you envision meeting your Little for the first time?

       With the BBBS staff involved.

       n. What kind of personality traits might be challenging for you?

       A child who always questions what we’re doing.

Explain to the volunteer that parents of youth often state their preferences around who
they want their child to be matched with. Also explain that our policies focus on parental
choice and that some parents express specific preferences around a volunteer’s
characteristics. As such, we need the following information to assure we respect the
rights of parents and the preferences they may have. NONE of the answers will
disqualify the volunteer.


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    1. What is your religious preference?

    Catholic

    2. What is your sexual orientation?

    Heterosexual

Now explain that, to the extent we have to honor preferences stated by parents, the volunteer may
have some preferences also. Since we want to provide the volunteer with a fun and rewarding
experience, his or her preferences are equally important.

    6. Would you be willing to be matched with a child coming from a home with a history of
       substance abuse?

    Yes

    7. Would you be willing to be matched with a child who had been physically, emotionally,
          or sexually abused?
    Yes

    8. Can you think of any other traits or qualities about a youth or his or her family
       that would be difficult for you to interact with?
    No

    9. If not previously answered, ask the volunteer if he or she has any preferences
       around age, race, ADD/ADHD, etc.
    No

    10. Is there anything else about yourself that we didn’t get a chance to discuss and
        that you’d like to share now?
    No
Training, Support & Guidance Needs:


    1. Are there any topics around youth development and/or being a Big that you could use
       more information about? For example, building a relationship or suggested activities for
       particular age groups?
    Not really
    2. We can provide both training and further information before a match or after you’ve had
       some experience. We can also offer training in a group or provide information in a one-
       on-one setting? Do you have any preferences?
    One on one.
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With all of these questions completed, make certain to ask the volunteer if he or she has any
questions. Also explain that the results of this interview, along with references and background
check results are all used in making the most appropriate matching recommendation.



SUMMARY OBSERVATIONS
Based on the overall interview and the responses to all questions, the interviewer now completes
interview summary observations noting additional comments as necessary.

This volunteer demonstrated good communication skills.                   Yes     No


Responses to questions were thoughtful and provided useful
information about this volunteer.
                                                                         Yes     No


The volunteer has a good understanding of what it means
to be a Big.
                                                                         Yes     No


This volunteer appears able and willing to form
a safe and meaningful relationship with a young person                   Yes     No
and for the program time period expected.



What specific training, information, or support needs might this volunteer initially have?
(Examples: Will this volunteer need guidance in forming a friendship first before
expecting to “change” a Little? Does this volunteer have limited experience with children
and might need help identifying age-appropriate activities to share? )




ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:




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Enrollment Staff                                                 Date




Interview review
Below List any key indicators from the interview with Anthony.

                                      Key Indicators




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Assessing the Volunteer
When assessing volunteer information, we want indications that the volunteer who has:
   a willingness and ability to establish and maintain a friendship with a child within
      the BBBS program structure
   a reasonable tolerance level for typical child behavior
   an ability to make safe and appropriate decisions that are in a child's best interest
   an ability to help a child develop assets
   a willingness to seek and use help and advice of BBBS staff

Once the interview has been completed Enrollment & Matching staff will assess their
appropriateness for BBBS program participation in three critical areas: Eligibility,
Matchability, and Coachability. Having an orderly collection and sorting process will aid
you in your decision-making regarding eligibility, because consistency in decision
making is critical to this process.

Eligibility
Are any concerns/issues or deficits severe enough to keep this volunteer from being a
Big?

      Stability regarding occupation, relationships, emotions
      Ability to provide a safe environment for a child

Matchability
Can any concerns/issues or deficits be worked around by making the appropriate match?

      Motivation
      Experience - are they experienced with youth? what age levels?
      Expectations:
          o are they too narrow and specific?
          o do they expect to “fix” a child, or just have fun?
      Tolerance for differences / child's behavior

Coachability
Can any concerns/issues or deficits be worked around by providing the proper coaching,
training or other support?

      Patience and good problem-solving ability
      Willing to take direction and follow ground rules

You should also be working with Match Support staff to determine whether matchability
issues occur more frequently than they should in your program. Looking at things like
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closure statistics will help you determine that, and give you a starting point for discussing
how to minimize those issues.
You are the person who determines ELIGIBILITY and MATCHABILITY in your
program. It is also your responsibility to provide Match Support staff with insight into
COACHABILITY issues that might crop up with a particular volunteer, or in a particular
match.




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Assessing the Information
My assessment of this volunteer’s:


       Eligibility—




       Matchability—




       Coachability—




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How to Assess the Home Environment
The home assessment questions are found on both the pre-interview questionnaire and in
the interview. The Home Assessment is a documented review and assessment of
information provided during the interview that explores potential risks in the residence of
the volunteer that may pose safety hazards.

The occasional home visit is done when necessary information about the volunteer
can only be gathered through an on-site inspection. The Home Visit is a documented in-
person visit to the residence of the volunteer or child that allows inspection of possible
safety hazards and additional insight into their personal life situations, including others
residing in the home.

Home visits are targeted to focus on situations that suggest more information is needed to
understand the volunteer and the volunteer’s way of life. By targeting home visits, staff
resources are best used in a planned way.

Staff must work with their supervisors to discern when a home visit is necessary and
what information, exactly; they will get from being in the volunteer's home. In-
person home visits may be used when:

      There is an identifiable, specific, justifiable reason
      The customer requests that the interview take place in the home
      The customer requests an on-site inspection prior to approving a match

In-person home visits should not be used to:

      Justify a "hunch" staff may have - you must be able to articulate the question or
       concern you have and how an on-site inspection, versus asking follow-up
       questions, will provide the answer.
      Obtain an answer to a question that could be asked directly to the customer.
      Satisfy an acceptance or non-acceptance decision that can be made through the
       information gathered in the pre-interview, interview, references, or background
       checks.




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Observe 3 Volunteer Interviews
Observe three volunteer interviews. Assess for the following in each observation.

   1. Were all the rationales met in the information given?

   2. What techniques / tools were used to get the required information?

   3. What follow up questions were asked?

   4. Were the follow up questions asked in a BNT, customer-friendly manner?

   5. What pitfalls if any, did you observe?




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Conduct 3 Volunteer Interviews
Demonstrate:

   _____Conducting the interview completely and in correct order.

   _____Asking follow up and clarifying questions appropriately to get the required
   information.

   _____Applying appropriate techniques / tools to get the required information.

   _____Asking appropriate follow up questions in a BNT, customer-friendly manner.

   _____Avoiding interviewing pitfalls (if any).

   _____Identifying other information that would be needed from references, other
   sources, or follow up calls. Home visit needed? Why?




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How to Document an Assessment of the Interview
Documenting requires all key criteria to be summarized and easy to reference (especially
for those who may acquire the match later).

Interview assessments include an assessment summary, match recommendations and
volunteer support training and needs. Interview assessments do not need to include the
detailed minutiae of the interview. They should include:
     Significant comments or quotes made by the volunteer
     Significant observations made of the volunteer by the interviewer
     The interviewer’s professional assessment of the eligibility criteria:
           o Background and reference checks
           o Agency eligibility requirements
           o Presence or absence of safety issues
           o Experience of the volunteer relevant to the matching task

In some agencies the original interview notes are included in the permanent file. There
are pros and cons to including the actual interview notes, along with the typed
assessment. Pros include the opportunity to see the answers to all the questions, not just
the highlights noted in the typed assessment. It would also be helpful in re-assessing the
volunteer for potential re-match. However, the original interview needs to be reviewed
so that all incomplete, ambiguous or vague notes are clarified.

In your agency all of the permanent files need to have the same format for
documentation, your supervisor will instruct you about your agency’s method for
documentation.

As part of your agency’s quality assurance oversight, files are routinely reviewed for
completeness and synchronization with the typed assessment to make sure that future
readers will not be confused or, worse, interpret the information in a way that could harm
the agency.

The following page shows an example of how to document an assessment of a volunteer.




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Volunteer Assessment

SAMPLE (note: this is an assessment of the volunteer in the role play on
pages 36-48)

Volunteer: __________________________________________________________________

Enrollment Staff: ____________________________________________________________

        References Checked
        Criminal Background Checked
        Youth organization involvement obtained & reviewed
        Pre-interview form reviewed


Approval Recommendation:                               X Accept                     Not Accept

Assessment Summary: (Briefly summarize suitability of the applicant based on reference checks,
criminal background checks, in-person interview, home assessment, and any other data provided by the
volunteer. Include primary reasons to accept the applicant or the concerns leading to non-acceptance.)

(Volunteer) is a responsible young woman as evidenced by what she shared about the challenges she faced
as a child growing up in her family, and how effectively she has overcome them. She also demonstrates a
stable employment history with a positive reference from her supervisor. She has a long-term circle of
friends, two of whom highly recommended her for the program and a fiancé who is very supportive of her
interest in volunteering. Though she has little experience with children or volunteering, she appears
friendly and caring and seemed as if she would be a fun and consistent Big Sister for the right child. All the
issues and concerns identified around experience and availability are manageable through match support
and training. Her criminal record and child abuse registry checks were clear and she has no problems
recorded on her driving record.

Matching Recommendations: (Your recommendation for the type of child based on volunteer preferences
and other information gathered in interview. This might include age range of child, geographic location,
child’s interests, or behaviors.)

(Volunteer) would work well with a Little Sister who is 10 years of age or older, who is outgoing, fairly
well behaved, and is available during the week for activities. A Little Sister who is interested in computers
and/or problem solving games, who wouldn’t expect a lot of physical activities would be ideal. The parent
would need to feel comfortable with the fact that the volunteer lives with her fiancé. As the volunteer has a
cat in her home, a little should not have cat allergies

Volunteer Support and Training Needs: (Based on skills &experience of volunteer, list projected
support/training needs.)

(Volunteer) will need information about a Little’s background and what activities she would enjoy. She
would also need the MSS available for advice and questions as she has very little experience working with
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children. She may need more on going training on what to expect from children of the age group her Little
is in at any time, how to set limits and what to do if a child acts out when they are together. Should the
volunteer decide to bring the child to their home for activities, a review of safety issues regarding the pool
should take place. Support during the first 3 to 6 months of the match needs to be enhanced to be sure that
the match gets off on the right foot. Match should be consistently informed about activities and other
opportunities available through BBBS and attention should be paid to the degree they may become
dependent on match activities for their interaction and whether or not they are actually developing a
relationship which will allow them to interact independently at some point.

___________________________                                                        ___________
Enrollment Specialist’s Signature                                                  Date




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Document Assessment of 3 Interviews
Use the sample documentation form on the next page to document your assessment of 3
volunteer interviews.
Include:
     Significant comments or quotes made by the volunteer
     Significant observations made of the volunteer by the interviewer
     The interviewer’s professional assessment of the core areas:
           o Background and reference checks
           o Agency eligibility requirements
           o Presence or absence of safety issues
           o Experience of the volunteer relevant to the matching task




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                     Documenting the Assessment
                       Quotes      Observations    Professional Judgment

  _____________________________________________________
               VOLUNTEER ASSESSMENT AND MATCH SUPPORT

Volunteer: _________________________________________________________________


Enrollment Staff:____________________________________________________________

      References Checked
      Criminal Background Checked
      Youth organization involvement obtained & reviewed
      Pre-interview form reviewed

Approval Recommendation:         Accept                  Not Accept

Assessment Summary: (Briefly summarize suitability of the applicant based on reference
checks, criminal background checks, in-person interview, home assessment, and any
other data provided by the volunteer. Include primary reasons to accept the applicant or
the concerns leading to non-acceptance.)




Match Recommendations: (Your recommendation for the type of child based on
volunteer preferences and other information gathered in interview. This might include
age range of child, geographic location, child’s interests, or behaviors.)




Volunteer Support and Training Needs: (Based on skills &experience of volunteer, list
projected support/training needs)




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How to Conduct an Effective Parent/Youth Interview
The parent and youth interviews are also designed to capture essential information about
the parent and youth and provide sufficient background information about the child so
that an effective match can be made.

Prior to asking the questions that follow, do the following:

   Begin by sharing program information as part of the individualized orientation.

   Explain the purpose of the interview, namely, that you’re trying to learn information
    about the person so the most appropriate matching decision can be made.

   Further explain that anytime during the interview, they can ask questions.

   Briefly outline the process used with parents and children, that we interview them and
    provide both parents and children training and materials relating to child abuse
    prevention and other safety related issues.

The parent and child interview forms do not state rationales.


PARENT/YOUTH PRE-INTERVIEW QUESTIONNAIRE

Parent/Guardian’s Name:                             Child’s Name:

Home Address:                  City:                  County:                State:      Zip:

Parent’s Place of Employment     Is Parent Receiving Income Assistance?  Yes            No

Home Phone:                      Work Phone:                        Email:
Cell Phone:
Best time to call:                Youth’s DOB:              Youth’s Gender       Youth’s Ethnicity:



    1. What is the primary reason for you wanting your child to have a Big Brother/Big
       Sister?

    2. What is your living situation?
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              Two parent household
          ____ One Parent: _____ Female _____ Male
          ____ Other relative of child (non-parent)
          ____ Foster Home
          ____ Group Home
          ____ Other:

    3. Does your child have any medical conditions that might affect him or her
       participating in activities with a Big Brother/Big Sister? _____ Yes ____ No

          If yes, please describe: _______________________________________________

    4. Is there a person who shares custody of this child? ______ Yes _____ No
       If yes, are they aware of the child’s enrollment in BBBS? _____ Yes _____ No

    5. Do you anticipate any significant life changes over the next year or have you had
       any in the past year?_____ Yes _____ No

    If yes, please explain:


(Optional question if the agency has a need for this information)

    6. We have a special program for children of incarcerated parents. Would this
       program apply to your child?______ Yes      ______ No


                              PARENT/YOUTH INTERVIEW

Parent:

1. Could you tell me a little about how your child spends his or her time?

       a. What do you feel your child enjoys more: indoor activities, outdoor activities, or a
combination of both?

       b. In thinking about the activities your child enjoys, does he/she prefer to watch activities
and events or participate in them actively?

2. If we asked you to describe your child to a potential Big Brother or Big Sister, what would you
say that could help them get to know your child better and start developing a friendship?




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3. Quite often, our volunteers want to know a little about the parent or parents of the youth they
will be matched with? How would you generally describe the relationship your child has with
you?

        a. Describe his/her relationship with other members of the family (and/or absent parent
           as appropriate):

        b. If applicable, how supportive do you think the absent parent will be towards your son
           or daughter’s match?

        c. Where is the absent parent now and how involved is s/he in your child’s life?


4. Does you son or daughter have any type of behavioral, emotional, or physical challenges that
may pose a special challenge to a volunteer? (Give examples as needed, e.g., general health, on
medication, undergoing counseling)

        a. Has your son or daughter been involved with the police or juvenile justice system?

5. Our volunteers will often ask something about the general home-life of the child they will be
matched with. How would you describe your home and family environment? Are there any
issues that a volunteer may want to know about? (Note: try to identify any issues around
substance abuse, history of domestic violence, etc)

        a. Who else lives in the household and what is your child’s relationship with them?

        b. What do they think about your child getting a Big Brother or Big Sister?


6. What is your general neighborhood like?

7. To the best of your knowledge has your son or daughter experienced any form of emotional,
physical, or sexual abuse in the past? If so when, and how do you feel it currently affects him or
her?

8. What school does your child attend?


9. How would you describe your child’s school performance and behavior?

        a. And how does he or she get along with his or her teachers?


10. How does your son or daughter get along with other kids his or her age?

11. What particular needs brought you here to BBBS?

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12. Overall, how do you think your child will benefit by having a Big Brother or Big Sister?

13. What would be your reaction if, after your child meets with their BB/BS a few times, either
the overall experience or the volunteer did not meet your expectations?

14. Do you see any major changes occurring in your or your son’s/daughter’s living situation in
the next several months, e.g., moving, a new job, etc?

15. Are there any constraints such as available time, activity restrictions, and prior commitments
that might affect your son or daughter getting together with a Big Brother or Big Sister?

16. Do you have any concerns or preferences regarding volunteers who (have yes responses
explained):

         Smoke:
         Drink:
         Own Pets:
         Have Firearms:

17. Do you have any concerns or preferences regarding a volunteer’s (have yes responses
explained):

         Race/Ethnicity:
         Religion/Faith:
         Sexual Orientation:
         Age:
         Any Other:


18. Are there any topics of conversation that you do not want the volunteer to discuss with your
child?

19. Are there any topics of discussion or areas of concern you specifically want the volunteer to
talk with your child about?

20. Overall, what would the ‘best’ Big Brother/Big Sister look like for your son or daughter?

            a. What are your expectations about what a Big Brother/Big Sister will do?


            a. What would indicate a successful match for your child?

            b. What do you see your role being with the match?


Youth:

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1. If you could do anything you wanted with your time, what would you enjoy doing the most?

2. Describe what you think a Big Brother or Big Sister is:

3. Do you want a Big Brother or Big Sister? Why? (or why not?)

4. Why does your mother (or father, foster parent, etc.) want you to have a BB or BS?

5. What do you think is going to be the best part about having a Big Brother or Big Sister?

6. Sometimes a Big Brother or Big Sister will ask us about the family of a Little they will be
matched with. What should we tell them about your family? And what would you want me to
tell them about you?

7. Is there anything that you wonder or worry about by having a Big Brother or Big Sister?

8. What kind of person would you want for your Big Brother or Big Sister?

9. What would you want to do with a Big Brother or Big Sister?

10. Who is your favorite adult, other than a parent, and what do you like about them?

11. Do they talk to you in school about such things as: (Note: Questions may have to be
expanded or slightly reworded for age appropriateness, e.g., a 15 year may need more on drug
avoidance than who to call if a fire.)

        Who to call if there’s a fire?
        What to do if a stranger approaches you?
        Not smoking and staying away from drugs or drinking alcohol?

12. What are some of the things you have learned about keeping yourself safe?



CHILD SAFETY: At this time, together with the parent, you should transition into more
detailed discussion and sharing of child safety information and materials.




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Rationales for Parent/Youth interview
The parent/youth interview is structured to gather information for determining the
appropriateness and eligibility of the youth for BBBS services and for making an
effective match. Having an orderly collection and sorting process will aid you in your
decision-making regarding eligibility, because consistency in decision making is critical
to this process. While gathering data you will also be determining issues of matchability
and coachability.

Eligibility
Are there concerns/issues or deficits severe enough to keep this child from participating
in the program? You’ll need to assess the:

      Child’s motivation to be matched
      Ability of child to establish relationship with others outside the home
      Parent’s willingness to support match and monitor safety.

Matchability
Can any concerns/issues or deficits be worked around by making the appropriate match?
Below are some typical matchability issues for families:

      Transportation / location
      Health / behavior issues
      Parental preferences

Coachability
Can any concerns/issues or deficits be worked around by providing the proper coaching,
training or other support? Below are some typical coachability issues for families.

      Role of the parent/guardian
      Appropriate expectations of Big
      Ability to work with the agency to resolve problems.




At the end of the parent/youth interview there is an area to record your assessment:
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Assessment: (Briefly summarize results of the parent/youth interview)




Match Recommendation: (Briefly outline a specific matching recommendations, limitations,
etc. Example: age of volunteer, geographic location, preferences of parent, interests to share)




Outcome Objectives for the Match: (List two or three areas that might be goals for building
assets or removing risks in the child’s life after the first several months when the relationship
between the Big and Little is first formed.)




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Observe and Assess 2 Parent/Youth Interviews
Observe three child/parent interviews.

      What techniques / tools were used to get the required information?

      What follow up questions were asked?

      Were the follow up questions asked in a BNT, customer-friendly manner?

      What pitfalls if any, did you observe?


Assess for the following in each observation:
    Eligibility
            Child’s motivation to be matched
            Ability of child to establish relationship with others outside the home
           o Parent’s willingness to support match and monitor safety

      Matchability
          o Transportation / location
          o Health / behavior issues
          o Parental preferences

      Coachability
          o Role of the parent/guardian
          o Appropriate expectations of Big
          o Ability to work with the agency to resolve problems




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Conduct & Assess 2 Parent/Youth Interviews (while
being observed)
Demonstrate:


   Applying appropriate techniques / tools to get the required information.        _____

   Stating appropriate follow up questions in a BNT, customer-friendly manner. _____

   Identifying your personal pitfalls (if any).                                    _____


Assess for:
    Eligibility
             Child’s motivation to be matched
             Ability of child to establish relationship with others outside the home
            o Parent’s willingness to support match and monitor safety

      Matchability
          o Transportation / location
          o Health / behavior issues
          o Parental preferences

      Coachability
          o Role of the parent/guardian
          o Appropriate expectations of Big
          o Ability to work with the agency to resolve problems




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Agency Place-holder:
How to Conduct a Volunteer Orientation & Safety
Training




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Agency Place-holder:
Observe Orientation & Safety Training for 3 Volunteers




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Agency Place-holder:
Conduct (while being observed) Orientation & Safety
Training for Volunteer




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Agency Place-holder:
How to Conduct a Parent/Child Orientation & Safety
Training




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Agency Place-holder:
Observe Orientation & Safety Training for 3
Parents/Children




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Agency Place-holder:
Conduct (while being observed) Orientation & Safety
Training for Parents/Children




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Agency Place-holder:
Observe 2 Match Introductions




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Agency Place-holder:
Conduct (while being observed) 1 Match Introduction




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Agency Place-holder:
Data Management System




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Agency Place-holder:
What Information to Hand-off to Match Support




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Agency Place-holder:
Maintenance & Confidentiality of Files/Data




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Agency Place-holder:
How to Request Background Checks




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Agency Place-holder:
Process for Metrics Review & Feedback




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Agency Place-holder:
How to Make a Match




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Using Customer Satisfaction Surveys
Customer satisfaction surveys are used to collect findings that indicate the extent to
which BBBS services have met the needs and expectations of our customers. A
volunteer satisfaction survey is completed following enrollment and at the conclusion of
their match

Volunteer satisfaction survey
This is the first formal opportunity for asking the volunteer his or her perceptions of our
customer service. A short questionnaire is given to the volunteer at the end of the
enrollment process. The responses are on a 1-5 agreement scale and must be continually
tracked for agencies to understand, from the volunteer’s perspective, how well the agency
is meeting their needs and expectations.


Parent Satisfaction Survey
A short questionnaire is given to the parent at the end of the enrollment process. The
responses are on a 1-5 agreement scale and must be continually tracked for agencies to
understand, from the parent’s perspective, how well the agency is meeting their needs
and expectations.




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                     VOLUNTEER SATISFACTION QUESTIONNAIRE
                                 (Post Enrollment)

Name:                                                                        Date:

Now that you have completed the enrollment process for becoming a Big, we would like
you to answer the questions that follow. Please feel free to provide any additional
comments in the space provided.


                                                      Strongly                           Strongly
                                                      Disagree                            Agree

 1 When I first contacted the agency, I was               1              2       3   4      5
   given enough information about what I was
   volunteering to do.

 2 Staff were always available to answer my               1              2       3   4      5
   questions.

 3 I felt that the time it took to go through the         1              2       3   4      5
   enrollment process was reasonable.

 4 I felt that the interview and other enrollment         1              2       3   4      5
   processes, such as reference checks, were
   appropriate and necessary.

 5 I have a good understanding of what my role            1              2       3   4      5
   will now be as a Big.

 6 Now that my match is starting, I will feel             1              2       3   4      5
   comfortable contacting the agency for
   support and direction.

 7 What suggestions do you have for how we might improve the enrollment process?




 8 Is there anything else you'd like to tell us?




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           PARENT SATISFACTION QUESTIONNAIRE
                                         (Post Enrollment)

Name:
Date:
Thank you for your time in meeting with Big Brothers Big Sisters staff. Your time and
input will be valuable in working towards making the right Big Brother or Big Sister
match for your child. We would appreciate any feedback on the service you’ve provided
throughout your enrollment process and would ask that you please take a moment to
complete the following questions. Please feel free to provide any additional comments in
the space provided.

                                                            Strongly           Strongly
                                                            Disagree           Agree
     1.   When I first contacted the agency, I was
                                                            1          2   3   4          5
          given enough information about the program
          and the benefits that my child would gain by
          having a volunteer in their life.
     2.   In scheduling my interview I felt the staff was
                                                            1          2   3   4          5
          accommodating and helpful in working with
          my schedule and needs.
     3.   Upon meeting BBBS staff, I was greeted in a
                                                            1          2   3   4          5
          friendly, professional manner.
     4.   I felt that the interview and other enrollment
                                                            1          2   3   4          5
          processes were appropriate and necessary.
     5.   I have a good understanding of what to expect
                                                            1          2   3   4          5
          from a Big Brother or Big Sister.
     6.   I have a good understanding of what my role
                                                            1          2   3   4          5
          will be now as a parent in this program.
     7.   Now that my child is enrolled, I will feel
                                                            1          2   3   4          5
          comfortable contacting the agency for any
          questions, assistance, and support.
     8.   My suggestions for improving the enrollment
          process are:
     9.   My other comments are:




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Agency Place-holder:
Creating Your Development/Cross-Training Plan




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