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					                                       CRITERION 1.0

                            THE PUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAM


Criterion 1.1.: The Program shall have a clearly formulated and publicly stated mission with
supporting goals and objectives. The Program shall foster the development of professional
public health values.

1.1a. A clear and concise mission statement for the program as a whole.

       The mission of the Southern Connecticut State University Public Health Program is to
       offer appropriate instruction, research and service so as to advance the broad mission of
       public health, defined by CEPH as “enhancing health in human populations, through
       organized community effort.”

1.1b. One or more goals statements for each major function by which the program
      intends to attain its mission, including instruction, research and service.

       The goals of the Program are characterized as instructional, research and service goals.
       Each set of goals demonstrates how the Program intends to fulfill its mission.

              1. Instructional Goals

                 The Program recognizes that the enhancement of health in human populations
                 is dependent, in part, on a competent, public health workforce. Therefore:

                 a. M.P.H. graduates will serve as productive members of the public health
                    workforce in advanced positions.

                 b. B.S. graduates will serve as productive members of the public health
                    workforce in entry-level positions.

                 c. M.P.H. graduates with specialized study in health education will serve
                    productively as health educators in advanced positions.

                 d. B.S. graduates with a concentration in health promotion will serve
                    productively as entry-level health educators.

                 e. B.S. graduates with a concentration in environmental health will serve
                    productively as entry-level local environmental health practitioners.

                 f. B.S. graduates with a minor in public health will exhibit professional
                    behavior that supports the mission and priorities of public health.

                                                1
              2. Research Goals

                 The Program recognizes that there is a professional obligation to advance the
                 mission of public health and the profession through scholarship. Therefore:

                 a. M.P.H. graduates will engage in independent research that is relevant to public
                    health.

                 b. Program faculty will engage in scholarly activities that are relevant to public
                    health.

              3. Service Goals

                 The Program recognizes that professional and community service are moral
                 and pragmatic imperatives. It is accepted that there is a responsibility to
                 provide the community with competent, ethical and appropriate services to
                 improve the human condition, in accordance with Healthy People 2010 and
                 Healthy Communities. Therefore:

                 a. M.P.H. graduates will perform health-related community service.

                 b. B.S. graduates will perform health-related community service.

                 c. The faculty will demonstrate civic and professional behavior that advances
                    the mission and profession of public health.

                 d. The faculty will demonstrate civic and professional behavior that
                    contributes to the elimination of health inequities in local communities and
                    the state.

                 e. The Program will offer professional-development services to improve the
                    capacity of local and State public health and health-care professionals.

1.1c. A set of measurable objectives relating to each major function through which the
      program intends to achieve its goals of instruction, research and service.

      The Program objectives are presented as instructional, research and service objectives.
      Each set of objectives is deduced from instructional, research and service goals.

      1. Instructional Objectives

         a.   M.P.H. students will demonstrate the capacity (knowledge, affect and skill) to
              contribute in advanced positions to the essential services of public health.


                                                2
   b.   B.S. students will demonstrate the capacity (knowledge, affect and skill) to
        contribute in entry-level positions to the essential services of public health.

   c.   M.P.H. students pursuing specialized study in health education will demonstrate
        the capacity (knowledge, affect and skill) to fulfill the responsibilities of a health
        educator at Levels II and III of the CHES certification standards.

   d.   B.S. students pursuing a concentration in health education will demonstrate the
        capacity (knowledge, affect and skill) to fulfill the responsibilities of a health
        educator at Level I of the CHES certification standards.

   e.   B.S. students pursuing a concentration in environmental health will demonstrate
        the capacity (knowledge, affect and skill) to fulfill the duties of an entry-level
        local environmental health practitioner.

   f.   B.S. students with a minor in public health will demonstrate a knowledge and
        affect that is favorable to professional displays of support for the mission and
        priorities of public health.

2. Research Objectives

   a.   M.P.H. students will conduct an independent thesis or special project that is
        relevant to the essential services of public health and/or responsibilities of a health
        educator.

   b.   Program faculty will conduct sponsored research and produce scholarly works that
        advance the mission of public health, and the science and art of public health
        practice.

3. Service Objectives

   a.   M.P.H. students will perform health-related internships at community-based
        agencies and organizations.

   b.   B.S students will perform health-related internships at community-based agencies
        and organizations.

   c.   Program faculty will provide volunteer and paid professional services to
        communities and/or professional organizations.

   d.   The Program will conduct a deliberate agenda of education and training to
        advance the health of minority, disadvantaged and underserved populations in
        local communities and the State.


                                           3
           e. The Program will conduct a deliberate agenda of education and training to promote the
              professional development of local and State public-health and health-care
              professionals.

               Appendix 1 contains a table presenting the relationship between Program mission,
               goals and objectives.

    1.1c.1. Student Competencies

           ►Core. The Association of Schools of Public Health has identified the core
            competencies for master-trained public health professionals1. The design of Southern’s
            M.P.H. program ensures that appropriate competencies are addressed in course work
            by the end of a student’s program of study. The competencies assigned to a course are
            listed on the course syllabus. See Criterion 2.6a. & b. and 2.6a.1. & b.1. for a
            composite picture of which competencies are assigned to individual courses in the
            M.P.H. and B.S. programs, respectively.

               Students will demonstrate the competencies identified by the Association of Schools of
               Public Health (ASPH) as fundamental to public health practice. The competencies are
               organized around core disciplinary and interdisciplinary, cross-cutting areas, including:

               Discipline-specific Core Competencies

               1.   Biostatistics
               2.   Environmental Health Sciences
               3.   Epidemiology
               4.   Health Policy and Management
               5.   Social and Behavioral Sciences

               Interdisciplinary/Cross-cutting Competencies

               1.   Communication and Informatics
               2.   Diversity and Culture
               3.   Leadership
               4.   Public Health Biology
               5.   Professionalism
               6.   Program Planning
               7.   Systems Thinking




____________________________________________________________________
1
    Master’s Degree in Public Health Core Competency Development Project, Version 2.3, May 2007.

                                                         4
         ►The National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. (NCHEC) has
          identified the competencies and sub-competencies for bachelor-, master- and doctoral-
          trained health educators1. The design of Southern’s M.P.H. and B.S. programs ensures
          that the appropriate NCHEC competencies are addressed in course work by the end of
          a student’s program of study for students with a specialization/concentration in
          community health education/health promotion. The competencies assigned to a course
          are listed on the course syllabus. See Criterion 2.6c. and 2.6c.1. for a composite picture
          of what competencies are assigned to what courses in the M.P.H. and B.S. programs,
          respectively.

            Students will demonstrate the competencies and sub-competencies identified by the
            NCHEC as fundamental to health education practice at the appropriate levels1. The
            competencies are organized around areas of responsibilities, including:

                 a.   assessing individual and community needs for health education.
                 b.   planning effective health education strategies, interventions and programs.
                 c.   implementing health education strategies, interventions and programs.
                 d.   conducting and evaluating research related to health education.
                 e.   administering health education strategies, interventions and programs.
                 f.   serving as a health education resource person.
                 g.   communicating health and advocating for health and health education.

         ►Competencies for the environmental health concentration in the B.S. program were
          established by an ad hoc committee of the Undergraduate Program Committee. The
          Committee was guided by positions taken by the National Environmental Health
          Association, the Environmental Health Science and Protection Accreditation Council,
          the Connecticut Department of Public Health and the Connecticut Department of
          Administrative Services (DAS); and by consultations with local and State
          environmental health professionals and directors of local health departments. The
          competencies are:

             a. assess conditions relevant to food hygiene; water supply and waste-water
                treatment; environmental hazards; and emergency preparedness.

             b. evaluate and report on conditions relevant to food hygiene; water supply and
                waste-water treatment; environmental hazards; and emergency preparedness.

             c. educate affected and concerned parties on matters relevant to food hygiene; water
                supply and waste-water treatment; environmental hazards; and emergency
                preparedness.

______________________________________________________________________________
 1
   National Commission for Health Educational Credentialing, Inc.: A Competency-Based Framework for Health
   Educators, 2006.


                                                     5
1.1d. A description of the manner in which mission, goals and objectives are developed,
      monitored and periodically revised and the manner in which they are made
      available to the public.

      ► Processes. The development, monitoring, and revision of the Program’s mission,
        goals, objectives, and competencies are conducted by the Department’s respective
        Graduate and Undergraduate Program Committees (GPC/UPC), the policy making
        bodies of the graduate and undergraduate programs. These Committees discharge their
        responsibilities under the direction of the Coordinators of Graduate and Undergraduate
        Studies, respectively, and under the auspices of the Department Chairperson. This is
        but one part of an open and very labor-intensive process of Program development and
        administration. Consistent with University policy, it begins with the charge given to
        the Department by the University.

         The shaping of the Program is largely guided by its assessment of the best practices of
         professional training in public health, community health education and environmental
         health; the forecasted demands for and on public health professionals; and the
         recommendations and requirements of professional, accrediting and credentialing
         bodies. Recommendations and expectations for training of public health professionals
         and community health educators, which have been most valuable to the original
         authors of the Program and later to the GPC and UPC in fashioning and updating the
         Programs, include those of: the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH), the
         Institute of Medicine (IOM), the Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH)
         Core Competencies Project, the Council on Linkages Between Academia and Public
         Health Practice (Core Competencies Project), the Society for Public Health Education
         (SOPHE), the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc.
         (NCHEC), the Association of State and Territorial Directors of Health Promotion and
         Public Health Education (ASTDHPPHE), the Coalition of National Health Education
         Organizations (CNHEO), the State of Connecticut Department of Public Health
         (CDPH), and the National Environmental Health Association (NEHA). Additional
         resources relied upon to shape the Program's form and content include: The Institute of
         Medicine's reports, The Future of the Public Health, Education for Public Health
         Professionals and The Future of Public’s Health in the 21st Century; the National
         Public Health Leadership Development Network (NLN) and its Leadership
         Competency Framework; and the Joint Council of Government Public Health
         Agencies Work Group on Human Resources Development.

         To assess the changing needs of public health practice, the Program relies on the
         recommendations of the Council of Accredited M.P.H. Programs (CAMP); input from
         the Department's Advisory Council, Public Health Alumni Association and internship
         preceptors; attendance at the Annual Meetings of SOPHE, AAHE, and APHA; review
         of relevant professional literature; and a review of the material produced by leading
         professional work groups such as the Competencies Update Advisory Committee, and
         the Office of Workforce Development-Public Health Practice Program Office of the

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           Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

           Since the fall of 1997, the Program has received intermittent guidance from the
           Department’s Advisory Council, which consists of community and State health
           officials and other health professionals. In 2006, the faculty approved a revision of the
           Council roles and responsibilities to provide consultation to the Program on matters of
           mission, goals and objectives as related to instruction, service, research and Program
           evaluation. Eighteen members typically comprise the Council (Appendix 2).

         ► Revisions. To ensure that the Program’s mission, goals and objectives remain
           professionally current, a bi-annual review is conducted by the GPC and UPC. Reviews
           result in changes to the Program's goals and objectives, intended to improve their
           relevancy to Program practices and articulation between these pathways to the
           Program's mission.

         ► Public Availability. The Program’s mission, goals and objectives are made available
           to the public through publication in the graduate catalog, student handbooks,
           Department Web site and application/admission materials.

1.1e.    A statement of values that guide the program, with a description of how the values
         are determined and operationalized.

         The Department has adopted the values of the University and profession of public health
         as articulated in the University’s Strategic Plan and the Code of Ethics for Public Health,
         respectively. The core values that guide the Program, their description and
         operationalization are presented in Table 1.1e.

                                                  Table 1.1e.

                   Program Core Values, Description and Operationalization

 Core Value                  Description                                         Operationalization
Excellence      The Program values exemplary and        The Program achieves excellence through comprehensive
                distinguished performance in all        program planning and evaluation, stringent admission and
                aspects of the Program by students      graduation criteria, and stringent performance objectives in the
                and faculty, especially in the areas    areas of instruction, research and service.
                of teaching, learning, scholarship,
                and service.
Access          The Program values its                  Access results from general and targeted marketing of the
                responsibility to provide               Program, a fair admission process, a Program fee that offers
                opportunities for individuals with      affordable part-time and full-time study options, and a structure
                potential and motivation to become      that permits long-range planning of personal, family and/or work
                productive members of the Program       obligations.
                and demonstrates that value by
                eliminating barriers that hinder full
                participation.


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                                              Table 1.1e., Cont’d

                   Program Core Values, Description and Operationalization

 Core Value                  Description                                         Operationalization
Diversity       The Program values an educational         Student and faculty diversity is a high priority for the University
                and work environment in which             and Department and is reflected in its admission and hiring
                individuals and cultures are              practices and processes.
                appreciated and respected for the
                unique talents, insights, and
                perspectives they contribute.
Student         The Program values all students,          Student success is among the Department’s highest priorities. The
success         believes in their potential to achieve,   Department supports its students by offering access to enrichment
                and commits to challenging,               and remedial services, excellent academic advisement, and highly
                supporting, and empowering them to        student-oriented faculty.
                be academically and professionally
                successful.
Life-long       The Program values the pursuit of         The Program provides a thoughtful and relevant educational
learning        knowledge and provides an                 experience for professional preparation and a continuing
                environment for all individuals to        education program for continued learning and professional
                intentionally learn and develop           development. In addition, class activities and culminating
                throughout the various phases of          experiences nurture independent study of the adult learner.
                their lives.
Community       The Program values community              The Program requires an internship program, with a no-waiver
involvement     service, civic engagement, and            policy, that offers a form of community service. In addition, all
                social responsibility by all students     M.P.H. students complete a thesis or special project that is almost
                and faculty and encourages the            exclusively community-based. Faculty members are required as
                integration of these principles in the    part of the University’s tenure, promotion and assessment
                learning experiences of students;         processes to be active members of their profession and provide
                invites community participation in        community service. The Department’s Health Equities Project
                the Program; and promotes local,          involves partnerships and collaborations with many community
                regional, national, and international     constituencies.
                collaborations.
Health          The Program values the process of         The Program adheres to the broad mission of public health, as
promotion and   enabling people to increase control       defined by CEPH, as “enhancing health in human populations,
disease         over, and to improve, their health.       through organized community effort.”
prevention
Human rights    The Program values the right of           The Program has maintained a students’ bill of rights and
and social      every individual and group to be          expectations since its inception, which is available to all students.
justice         treated fairly.                           In addition, the Departmental focus on health equities is a
                                                          cornerstone of its research and service efforts.
Democratic      The Program values input from each        Opportunities for constituent input is provided through an
process         of its constituencies in all aspects of   anonymous online feedback mechanism, mid-term and end-term
                program planning and evaluation.          course evaluations, internship evaluations, and participation in
                                                          internal and external Program reviews. The availability and
                                                          immediate accessibility of the Department Chairperson and
                                                          Coordinators provide a convenient opportunity for student input.
                                                          Alumni input is solicited through a comprehensive series of post-
                                                          graduation 1, 5 and 10 year surveys. Non-student constituents
                                                          provide input through an advisory council, preceptor evaluations,
                                                          and self-study reviews. M.P.H. students provide input through
                                                          cohort representation on the Graduate Program Committee and
                                                          attendance at the yearly all-cohorts meeting.


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                                              Table 1.1e., Cont’d

                   Program Core Values, Description and Operationalization

 Core Value                   Description                                         Operationalization
Professional     The Program values utilization of       The shaping of the Program is largely guided by its assessment of
best practices   the most efficient and effective        the state-of-the-art of professional training in public health,
                 ways of accomplishing tasks, based      community health education and environmental health;
                 on repeatable procedures that have      forecasted demands for and on public health professionals; and
                 proven themselves over time for         the recommendations and requirements of professional,
                 large numbers of people and an          accrediting and credentialing bodies.
                 approach based around continuous
                 learning and continual improvement.
Informed         The Program values providing its        The Program requires consideration of ethics in all courses and
consent of       constituents with all relevant          requires Human Research and Protection Proram approval for all
community        information as a moral and              research and study involving human participants.
                 pragmatic imperative.
Professional     The Program values pragmatic            The Program’s curriculum is strongly influenced by the positions
utility and      instruction that is grounded in the     taken by prestigious groups (e.g., IOM.; NCHEC; ASPH; NEHA)
instructional    desire to improve the practice of       on preferred current and future public health practices.
expediency       public health.
Cultural         The Program values self-awareness       The Program requires course syllabi to address the importance of
humility         and requires a respectful attitude      consideration for individual difference in public health practice.
                 toward diverse points of view by all    The M.P.H. program requires cultural humility training of
                 members of the Department               students during their first semester of study.
                 community.
Beneficence      The Program values the delicate         The Program provides for the participation of each of its
                 balance between protecting the          constituencies in program governance through a broad range of
                 rights of the individual and those of   input mechanisms. Program planning based on consensus is
                 the public.                             augmented by alternative program schedules for students who
                                                         require special accommodations. Faculty modify their posted
                                                         office hours to accommodate students who require optional hours.
                                                         Where feasible, options are expanded for required activities (e.g.,
                                                         writing assessment) to accommodate students’ differential
                                                         schedules.
Trust            The Program values faculty and          The Program through its participatory governance processes,
                 student interdependence to achieve a    openness, integrity, and consistency enhances the development of
                 common goal.                            open and honest relationships between students and faculty.
Professional     The Program values the use of           The Program ascribes to the Public Health Code of Ethics and
competence       appropriate standards, knowledge,       offers instruction in the latest knowledge, theories and skills for
                 theories, skills, and guidelines as     each of the core and cross-cutting public health areas of study and
                 criteria for carrying out one’s         those related to community health education and environmental
                 professional responsibilities.          health. In addition, the Program has developed it own Code of
                                                         Personal and Academic Integrity that defines the standards of
                                                         expected student behavior in all Program-related activities.
Collaboration    The Program values the contribution     Through community-based course projects, culminating
                 of collaboration to teaching,           experiences, and the new Health Equities Project, collaboration
                 learning, scholarship, and service as   promotes many of the Program’s values.
                 collaborative activities.




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1.1f.   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

        This Criterion is met.

        Strengths. The Program’s mission, goals, objectives and competencies reveal an
        unequivocal commitment to program development based on the recommendations and
        expectations of the leading professional, accrediting and credentialing bodies for the
        training of public health professionals, including community health educators and entry-
        level sanitarians.

        A further review of the Program’s mission, goals, objectives and competencies reveals a
        high level of external and internal consistency. Ongoing monitoring and scheduled
        periodic reviews by the Graduate and Undergraduate Program Committees, the
        Department Chairperson and the Department’s Advisory Council, ensure that the
        foundation upon which the Program rests remains current, relevant and consistent with
        the needs of the community, the field of public health and the profession.

        Assessment of this Criterion yields the conclusive finding that the Program is exemplary
        in the area of development with a clearly articulated mission and related goals, objectives
        and competencies.

        Weaknesses. The role of the Department’s Advisory Council has been the focus of
        concern in recent years and a newly constituted Council and charge is expected to serve
        the needs of the Program more effectively and efficiently.




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                                        CRITERION 1.2

                              EVALUATION AND PLANNING

Criterion 1.2.: The Program shall have an explicit process for evaluating and monitoring its
overall efforts against its mission, goals and objectives; for assessing the Program's
effectiveness in serving its various constituencies; and for planning to achieve its mission in the
future.

1.2a. Description of the evaluation procedures and planning processes used by the
      program, including an explanation of how constituent groups are involved in these
      processes.

       The Program, under the auspices of the Department Chairperson, the program
       Coordinators and Graduate and Undergraduate Program Committees (GPC/UPC), has
       established extensive and systematic data collection mechanisms to provide the
       information required for Program evaluation, management, and planning, including
       participation from its major constituent groups: Program faculty and administrators,
       external evaluators, and students. As a component of the Program, the graduate program’s
       level of sophistication in formal data collection methods exceeds those of the
       undergraduate program which, to date, has not been required to submit to external review.
       The UPC is committed to and in the process of formalizing and expanding its data
       collection to better prepare the undergraduate program to respond to external reviews and
       improve the overall performance of its program. Where appropriate, evaluation
       procedures and planning processes used by the undergraduate program will follow those
       of the graduate program. Table 1.2a. presents a summary of the evaluation procedures and
       processes used by the Program. These will be referenced throughout the Self-Study,
       including summary data. In addition, the Program conducts an extensive annual resource
       audit, discussed under Criterion 1.6m., that addresses faculty and staff, courses, space,
       faculty access to technology, library materials, students, student resources, community
       resources, professional support, and research and extramural funding.

1.2b. Description of how the results of the evaluation and planning are regularly used to
      enhance the quality of programs and activities.

       The Department conducts a yearly review of its goals and objectives and assigns them to
       the appropriate committees for implementation (Appendix 3). In addition, the Department
       Chairperson and Coordinators prepare independent annual resource audits used to
       determine the needs of the Program and the allocation of resources, accordingly. These
       audits appear under Criterion 1.6m. Data received from all sources are reviewed by the
       appropriate program Coordinator and Committee, Chairperson and Accreditation Sub-
       Committee (Criterion 1.2f.), and changes determined to be in the best interest of the
       Program prepared for implementation are identified. Where appropriate, the Advisory
       Council may be asked for its input.



                                                11
                                                          Table 1.2a.

                        Planning and Evaluation Procedures and Processes Summary Matrix

 Constituent               Procedures and                                                   Brief
  Groups                      Processes                                                  Description
  Faculty
                  Ad Hoc Committee on Department        Responsible for eliciting, refining and presenting the Departmental and
                          and Program Goals             Program mission, goals and objectives for faculty review and implementation.
                    Self- and Program Assessment        A 42 item faculty self and Program assessment conducted yearly.
                     Department Faculty Meetings        Held monthly to discuss relevant Program issues.
                 Evaluation of Department Chairperson   Yearly written evaluation of Chairperson’s performance by faculty.
                  Evaluation of Graduate Coordinator    Yearly written evaluation of Graduate Coordinator’s performance by faculty.
                     Evaluation of Undergraduate        Yearly written evaluation of Undergraduate Coordinator’s performance by
                              Coordinator               faculty.
                  Graduate Council Program Surveys      Fifteen item student and faculty assessment related to Program performance.
                     Graduate Program Committee         Held monthly to discuss issues germane to the conduct and performance of the
                               Meetings                 graduate public health program.
                         Department Meetings            Held monthly to discuss issues germane to graduate and undergraduate
                                                        programs.
                  Undergraduate Program Committee       Held monthly to discuss issues germane to the conduct and performance of the
                               Meetings                 undergraduate public health program.
                 Public Health Academic Program Plan    An assessment of the status of existing program development and potential for
                                Survey                  new program development in the Department.
  Program
Administrators
                   Annual Program Resource Audits       Comprehensive resource audits conducted yearly by the Coordinators and
                                                        Department Chairperson to assess resource needs of the Program.
                    Coordination Council Meetings       Monthly meetings to discuss the “state of the Program” and assure that
                                                        concerns of Coordinators are received and addressed.
                        Coordinators’ Meetings          Monthly meetings to discuss issues of common interest and concern.
                         Dean-Chair Meetings            Monthly meetings to discuss Program-related issues.
                 School of Health and Human Services    Bi-monthly meetings of the School Dean and Chairpersons that provide an
                          Leadership Council            executive panel for School decision-making.




                                          12
                                                     Table 1.2a., Cont’d

                     Planning and Evaluation Procedures and Processes Summary Matrix

Constituent        Procedures and Processes                                                Brief
 Groups                                                                                 Description
 External
Evaluators
                 Report to the Graduate Council        A written self-study, conducted every five years, presented to the Academic
                                                       Standards Committee of the University Graduate Council that assesses Program
                                                       integrity and quality. Undergraduate programs were assessed for the first time
                                                       in 2005.
                       CEPH Self-Study                 A self-study undertaken for the purpose of maintaining national accreditation of
                                                       the public health Program.
                 Report of Alumni Association          Accreditation Committee of the Department’s chapter of the University’s
                                                       Alumni Association conducts periodic surveys of Program graduates that
                                                       presents data on many dimensions of the Program.
                       Advisory Council                An 18-member Committee that meets semi-annually to assist the Department in
                                                       maintaining relevancy and quality of the Program.
              Forecasted Demands of the Profession     A periodic review of the trends in professional preparation through contact with
                                                       the literature and major public health organizations by the UPC and GPC.
                Internship Preceptor Evaluations       Evaluation of the performance of all public health interns by agency preceptors.
               Employer Satisfaction Assessment        A periodic survey of public health and related agencies in Connecticut to assess
                                                       the quality and preparation of Program graduates.
                 Targeted Employer Satisfaction        A three-year review to assess employer satisfaction with graduates’
                          Assessment                   performance.
 Students
                    Mid-Course Evaluations             Non-contractually required evaluations conducted for all graduate public health
                                                       core and specialization courses since 1989.
                   End-of-Course Evaluations           Contractually required evaluations conducted for all core and specialization
                                                       courses. Reviewed each semester by Department Chairperson. Must be
                                                       included in renewal, tenure, and promotion files.
                 Graduate All-Cohorts Meeting          Conducted each year to elicit feedback from student cohorts.
                    Graduate Focus Groups              Conducted yearly since 2004 to elicit feedback from senior students about
                                                       Program integrity and quality.



                                       13
                                                      Table 1.2a., Cont’d

                     Planning and Evaluation Procedures and Processes Summary Matrix

Constituent        Procedures and Processes                                                    Brief
 Groups                                                                                    Description
              Cohort Representation to the Graduate     Matriculated students who represent the interests and concerns of their
                  Program Committee (GPC)               respective cohorts to the Graduate Program Committee. Serve as a conduit
                                                        between the student body and faculty.
              Certified Health Education Specialist     Analysis of the institutional score on the CHES examination.
                          (CHES) Exam
               Graduate New Student Orientation         Yearly student satisfaction survey of New Student Orientation.
              Cultural Humility Training (CHT) for      Yearly student assessment of mandatory CHT program.
                        Graduate Students
              Academic Writing Workshop (AWW)           Yearly student assessment of mandatory AWW for students whose writing does
                      for Graduate Students             not meet Program standards.
               Academic and Career Advisement           A 23-item survey to assess student satisfaction with academic and career
                        Satisfaction Survey             advisement.
                     Evaluation of Internship           An end-of-internship written evaluation of the field placement and preceptor.
                       Program Exit Survey              A 20-item survey to assess student satisfaction with select aspects of the
                                                        Program.




                                        14
1.2c.   Identification of outcome measures that the program uses to monitor its
        effectiveness in meeting its mission, goals and objectives. Target levels should be set
        defined and data regarding the program’s performance must be provided for each
        of the last three years.

        A variety of qualitative and quantitative process objectives have been established to give
        evidence that the Program has in place explicit processes for: evaluating and monitoring
        the overall efforts of the Program against its mission, goals, and objectives; assessing the
        Programs’ effectiveness in serving their various constituencies; and planning to achieve
        its mission in the future. Outcome measures, which serve as the standards for Program
        evaluation, have been established for all Program objectives. No outcome measures are
        set for the Program goals. The Program uses goals as declarations to provide direction for
        the setting of enabling objectives, and express the Program’s aspirations for its graduates
        and faculty. Appendix 4 contains a table presenting the relationship between Program
        mission, goals, objectives, and outcome measures.

        All core and specialization courses in the Program are designed around ASPH and
        NCHEC competencies, respectively. The environmental health concentration in the B.S.
        program uses a competencies inferred from the positions and opinions of professional
        environmental health associations, state agencies, local health directors and
        environmental health practitioners. All course syllabi demonstrate a direct relationship
        between methods of assessment and student learning objectives. Thus, successful course
        completions, as outcome measures provide an assessment of students’ ability to
        demonstrate an acceptable level of proficiency of student learning objectives. Appendix 5
        contains a sample course syllabus that illustrates this relationship and that is reflective of
        all course syllabi in the Program. A complete set of syllabi is provided in a reference file.

        Post-graduation behaviors, whether related to the performance of professional duties,
        research and/or service, are affected by many variables. Most of the variables are beyond
        the control of the Program and, together, often will exert more powerful effects than the
        Program. As such, the Program does not use goal performance as a measure of its
        success. However, employment, research and service related data that are pertinent to the
        Program is collected as part of the Alumni Survey. Furthermore, the actual impact of any
        individual faculty member of the Program on the profession and/or community health is
        typically quantifiably indiscernible. However, articulated goals serve a useful purpose in
        providing direction for the Program’s objectives.

        Table 1.2c. presents outcome measures, targets and data used by the Program to monitor
        its effectiveness in meeting its mission, goals and objectives.




                                                  15
                                                                            Table 1.2c.

                                              Program Outcome Measures, Targets and Data for 2006-2008

                  Program Objectives                                                      Outcome Measure (Target)                                      Data
                                                                                                                                                 2006   2007   2008
                       Instruction
M.P.H. students will demonstrate the capacity to                100% of graduating M.P.H. students will have completed an internship with a      100%   100%   100%
contribute in advanced positions to the essential               grade of C+ or higher.
services of public health, as evidenced by:                     100% of graduating M.P.H. students will complete each required core course       100%   100%   100%
                                                                with a grade of C+ or higher.
B.S students will demonstrate the capacity to contribute        100% of graduating B.S. students will have completed an internship with a        100%   100%   100%
in entry positions to the essential services of public          grade of C or higher.
health, as evidenced by:                                        100% of graduating B.S. students will complete each required core course with    100%   100%   100%
                                                                a grade of C or higher.
M.P.H. students specializing in health education will           100% of graduating M.P.H. students will complete an internship in health         100%   100%   100%
demonstrate the capacity to fulfill the responsibilities of     education with a grade of C+ or higher.
a health educator at Levels II and III of the CHES              100% of graduating M.P.H. students will complete each required specialization    100%   100%   100%
certification standards as evidenced by:                        course with a grade of C+ or higher.
                                                                100% of graduating M.P.H. students specializing in health education will pass    100%   100%   100%
                                                                the health education credentialing exam.
B.S. students with a concentration in health promotion          100% of graduating B.S. students will complete an internship in health           100%   100%   100%
will demonstrate the capacity to fulfill the                    promotion with a grade of C or higher.
responsibilities of a health educator at Level I of the         100% of graduating B.S. students will complete each required concentration       100%   100%   100%
CHES certification standards, as evidenced by:                  course with a grade of C or higher.
B.S. students concentrating in environmental health             100% of graduating B.S. students concentrating in environmental health will      100%   100%   100%
will demonstrate the capacity to fulfill the                    have completed an internship in the concentration with a grade of C or higher.
responsibilities of a Sanitarian I, as evidenced by:            100% of graduating B.S. students concentrating in environmental health will      100%   100%   100%
                                                                have completed each required concentration course with a grade of C or higher.
B.S. students graduating with a minor in public health          100% of graduating B.S. students with a minor in public health will have         100%   100%   100%
will demonstrate a conceptual knowledge and affect              completed each required course in the minor with a grade of C or higher.
that is favorable to private and public displays of
support for the mission and priorities of public health,        100% of graduating B.S. students with a minor in public health will have         100%   100%   100%
as evidenced by:                                                completed each elective course in the minor with a grade of C or higher.


                                                           16
                                                                      Table 1.2c., Cont’d

                                              Program Outcome Measures, Targets and Data for 2006-2008

                  Program Objectives                                                   Outcome Measure (Target)                                     Data
                         Research                                                                                                            2006   2007   2008
M.P.H. students will conduct an independent thesis or         100% of graduating M.P.H. students will have completed a thesis or special     100%   100%   100%
special project that is relevant to the essential services    project with a grade of C+ or higher.
of public health and/or responsibilities of a health
educator, as evidenced by:
Program faculty will conduct sponsored research and           Each academic year, 100% of full-time Program faculty will provide evidence    100%   100%   100%
produce scholarly works that advance the mission of           of sponsored research and/or scholarly work.
public health, and the science and art of public health
practice, as evidenced by:
                           Service
M.P.H. students will perform health-related internships       100% of graduating M.P.H. students will have completed a health-related        100%   100%   100%
at community-based agencies and organizations, as             community-based internship with a grade of C+ or higher.
evidence by:
B.S. students will perform health-related internships at      100% of graduating B.S. students will have completed a health-related          100%   100%   100%
community-based agencies and organizations, as                community-based internship with a grade of C or higher.
evidence by:
Program faculty will provide volunteer and paid               100% of the Program’s full-time faculty will provide evidence (each academic   100%   100%   100%
professional services to communities and/or                   year) of service to the community and/or professional organizations.
professional organizations, as evidenced by:
The Program will conduct a deliberate agenda to               Each academic year the Health Equities Project will have at least one active   NA      5      5
advance the health of minority, disadvantaged and             initiative.
underserved populations in local communities and the
state, as evidenced by:
The Program will conduct a deliberate agenda to               Each academic year the Continuing Education Program will offer of co-sponsor    6      9      3
promote the professional development of local and             at least four professional development workshops.
State public health and health care professionals, as
evidenced by:




                                                         17
1.2d. An analytical self-study document that provides a qualitative and quantitative
      assessment of how the program achieves its mission, goals and objectives and meets
      all accreditation criteria, including a candid assessment of strengths and weaknesses
      in terms of the program’s performance against the accreditation criteria.

      The Department has prepared its Program Self-Study document in strict accordance with
      CEPH accreditation criteria. The Self-Study Document provides the Council with each
      item of expected documentation in narrative form and, where appropriate,
      supplementation by appropriate exhibits and tables, including all required CEPH
      templates. Appendices contain supportive material that provide the full text of selected
      referenced documentation. The Reference Files contain the full-text of larger references
      including handbooks, manuals, surveys, marketing and recruitment materials, brochures,
      pamphlets, University and governance documents, and other Program materials that
      support, supplement and amplify the expected documentation. Strengths and weaknesses
      of the Program are included at the end of each section of the Self-Study and in the
      Executive Summary, which appears at the beginning on the Self-Study.

1.2e An analysis of the program’s responses to recommendations in the last accreditation
     report (if any).

      The Department is presenting its B.S. degree in public health for accreditation for the first
      time, and, therefore, has no response to a previous accreditation report. The M.P.H.
      Program’s first re-accreditation in 2001, which resulted in a full 7-year award, is
      exemplified by the following quote from the former President of the CEPH Board, Dr.
      Kathleen Minor, who wrote upon receipt of notification of the outcome of the 2001 site-
      visit report:

              “The program at Southern Connecticut State University is organized, delivered,
              monitored, and evaluated in the exact way that CEPH envisioned for M.P.H.
              programs in Community Health Education. The program is highly respected by
              your students, administrators, alumni, community, CEPH site team members, and
              the Board of Councilors of CEPH. You should be extremely proud of what you
              have created. I suggest that you continue to do exactly what you are doing. Your
              seven-year accreditation is consistent with a near perfect program” (personal
              communication, December 10, 2001) [emphasis added].

       Ms. Patricia Evans, Executive Director of CEPH at the time of our last CEPH site visit
       for national accreditation, wrote:

              “Although I was not scheduled to visit Southern, I have heard so many good
              things about your program, that I decided that I would avail myself of the
              opportunity to join the site team” (personal communication, March 30, 2001).

       Despite such endorsements, the Department has always considered its Program a work in

                                                18
       progress that requires continuous monitoring and evaluation to meet the changing
       challenges of students, community, certification and accreditation bodies, and the
       profession. Accordingly, it pays careful attention to the feedback of its constituent groups,
       including CEPH, as it strives to increase Program quality, relevance and responsiveness.

       Table 1.2e contains the Department's responses to the recommendations contained in the
       2001 CEPH Site Team Report, representing the Program's second re-accreditation. The
       list of recommendations comprising Exhibit 1.2e. was generated from a line-by-line
       analysis of the Report. The Report can be found in Reference File 1.

       Table 1.2e.1. contains an analysis of the strengths and weakness of the B.S. public health
       program, including the M.P.H. program’s responses to the identified weaknesses.

                                              Table 1.2e.

                M.P.H. Program’s Responses to 2001 CEPH Site Team Report

Page   Para-                  Recommendations/                                         Program's
       graph                        Findings                                           Responses
 4       1      “More complaints are heard about                  All classrooms now assigned to the Department
                unavailability of classroom space, particularly   are integrated high tech classrooms or have high-
                that which allows faculty to use                  tech capability.
                technologically-advanced teaching methods.”
 6        2     …”none offer doctoral degrees inasmuch as         The University was approved to offer the Ed.D. in
                CSU institutions are defined as comprehensive     Educational Leadership beginning in Fall 2002. In
                teaching universities.”                           2008, The Dean of the SHHS has initiated
                                                                  discussions with the Department Chairperson
                                                                  about consideration of doctoral programs within
                                                                  the School. The University remains committed to
                                                                  teaching as its primary mission.
 7        3     "The teaching mission of the [U]university and    Despite heavy teaching load expectations, the
                the resulting teaching load expectations for      Department has continued to make steady progress
                faculty work against achievement of the           towards the development of a research agenda that
                program’s research mission…”                      complements its emphasis on excellence in
                                                                  teaching. New hires are offered unrestricted
                                                                  research funding and reduced teaching loads. The
                                                                  Department Chairperson has steadily achieved
                                                                  increased re-assigned time for program faculty.
 9        4     "Since its inception, the [Graduate Program       Student cohort representatives have had and
                Committee] GPC has invited participation of       continue to have full voting privileges as members
                graduate students from each cohort. Students      of the GPC. Each cohort is represented on the
                are neither required to attend nor do they have   GPC. Attendance, by students at GPC meetings is
                voting privileges…”                               expected; however, since most students work and
                                                                  must make special arrangements to attend GPC
                                                                  meetings, their participation cannot be required.



                                                   19
                                         Table 1.2e., Cont’d

               M.P.H. Program’s Responses to 2001 CEPH Site Team Report

Page   Para-                 Recommendations/                                         Program's
       graph                       Findings                                           Responses
 11      3     "While the current student-to-faculty ratio is   In 2002, the Department was granted permission
               reasonable, the larger pressure relates to       to hire a University Assistant for 19 hours/week to
               having only 1 secretary for a very active and    assist the Coordinator of Graduate Studies and
               far reaching [D]epartment."                      Internships. In 2007, as part of the University’s
                                                                Strategic Initiatives, the Department applied for
                                                                and was allocated funds to hire a second
                                                                University Assistant to assist the Coordinator of
                                                                Undergraduate Studies. Funds for this initiative
                                                                were not appropriated however.
 12      3     “There is however, no dedicated computer-        All faculty have access to high-tech classrooms,
               capable teaching facility available to faculty   upon request. In addition, computer facilities are
               on a consistent basis and over which they        now available for Biostatistics and for the
               maintain control.”                               Department-sponsored “Preparing for Statistics
                                                                Workshop.”
 13      1     (3) availability of graduate assistantships at   The Department offers 3 part-time assistantship
               desired levels of financial support.             positions and participates in the Graduate School’s
                                                                two University-wide assistantship programs: the
                                                                Graduate Research Fellowship ($8,000) and
                                                                Graduate School Graduate Assistantship ($16,000)
                                                                Programs. Graduate students in the Department
                                                                have been highly successful in obtaining Graduate
                                                                School-sponsored funding.
 21      1     "The next steps will occur when the research     Faculty presentations and publications have
               projects result in the generation of refereed    steadily increased. Obtaining external research
               articles and presentations at state, regional,   funding remains a challenge to a faculty with
               and national meetings."                          heavy teaching loads and a slowly evolving
                                                                University research support infrastructure. Some
                                                                external research funding has been achieved, but
                                                                the majority of the faculty research successes have
                                                                been in the area of small grants, contracts and
                                                                personal service agreements. A greater emphasis
                                                                on externally funded research is a priority of the
                                                                faculty and the School’s new dean.




                                                   20
                                           Table 1.2e., Cont’d

                   M.P.H. Program’s Responses to 2001 CEPH Site Team Report

Page    Para-                   Recommendations/                                       Program's
        graph                         Findings                                         Responses
 24       2       “Nevertheless both students and community       The Department aggressively has sought to recruit
                  groups interviewed during the site visit        minority and female faculty through national
                  identified faculty diversity as a weakness in   searches. Presently, of fifteen full-time faculty, ten
                  the [D]department.”                             are female. One faculty member is African-
                                                                  American and one is Asian-American. A second
                                                                  African-American faculty member resigned in
                                                                  2005 to take a position at CDC. In 2006, the
                                                                  Department offered positions to two applicants,
                                                                  one African-American and one Hispanic-
                                                                  American, with generous signing packages,
                                                                  including unrestricted research funding. Both
                                                                  candidates decided to remain at their current place
                                                                  of employment. Presently, there are two searches
                                                                  in progress in which 4 of 6 candidates invited for
                                                                  interviews are from underrepresented population
                                                                  groups. The Department remains firm in its
                                                                  commitment to recruitment of a diverse faculty.


                                               Table 1.2e.1.

                  Strengths and Weaknesses of the B.S. Public Health Program

           Strengths                            Weaknesses                  Program’s Responses to Weaknesses
Faculty (full-time and adjunct)      Lack adequate faculty               Recruitment of faculty member to lead
                                     representation in Environmental     Environmental Health Concentration in
                                     Health Concentration                progress
Structure of the internship          No option for students looking to   Third concentration to offer content-based
                                     pursue graduate education           courses to be implemented in fall 2008
International experience -           No Program Planning course in       PCH 363 Program Planning to be added to
Guatemala                            the core                            the core in fall 2008
Environmental Health Training        Environmental Health                Created new courses (PCH 445 Emergency
Program offered with the             Concentration courses require       Preparedness and PCH 446 Environmental
Connecticut Department of            revision                            Hazards) to be offered in AY 09:
Public Health                                                            UPC-approved objectives for courses in the
                                                                         Environmental Health Concentration
                                                                         created in spring 2008
Students are CHES qualified          Communication with students         Listserv established in fall 2007;
                                     outside of advisement and class     Anonymous Feedback on Website
                                                                         implemented in fall 2007


                                                     21
                                       Table 1.2e.1., Cont’d

 Strengths and Weaknesses of the B.S. Public Health Program Identified in the Self-Study

           Strengths                          Weaknesses               Program’s Responses to Weaknesses
Alumni                             Not enough opportunity to        PCH 432 revised in spring 2008 to maintain
                                   practice health promotion        skills and add practice component
Community presence of              Website                          Website reorganized in 2007-2008 and
students and alumni                                                 updated to become more student-friendly
                                                                    using new University platform
Student involvement in             Recruitment of freshman and      Sponsored graduate student Special Project
research, activities, day-to-day   sophomores                       in 2007-2008 to assist in program
operations, decisions                                               recruitment
Curricular integrity               Lack of academic standards for   Added academic standards for admission,
                                   admission, maintenance, and      maintenance, and dismissal of students,
                                   dismissal of students            effective fall 2008
Governing structure
Health promotion
concentration
Professional preparation
Public Health Society

1.2f. A description of the manner in which the self-study document was developed,
      including effective opportunities for input by important program constituents,
      including institutional officers, administrative staff, teaching faculty, students,
      alumni and representatives of the public health community.

       The Program evaluation, conducted by the Department, included both a qualitative and
       quantitative assessment of its success in achieving its mission, goals, objectives, and
       competencies. The self-study process was highly reflective, thoughtful and analytical and
       resulted in a candid assessment of the Program’s strengths and weaknesses. All significant
       and appropriate constituencies, including institutional officers, administrative staff,
       teaching faculty, students, alumni, and selected representatives of the public health
       community played a role in providing data and feedback for the preparation of the Self-
       Study Document.

       The self-study process for re-accreditation began with the renewal of the University,
       School and Department’s commitment to seeking re-accreditation, followed by the charge
       by the Department Chairperson to initiate the self-study process. Subsequently, the
       Coordinators reviewed the 2005 CEPH Accreditation Criteria, 2006 Accreditation
       Procedures, Technical Assistance Papers, and the two 2007 Technical Assistance Seminar
       Presentations, as well as informal consultations with members of the CEPH staff, other
       Program directors, and attendance at information sessions at professional meetings. Next
       the Coordinators developed a CEPH Self-Study Planning Framework see pp. ____). The
       Framework comprised of a horizontal table, included criteria, documentation required,

                                                 22
type of data (e.g., statistical, exhibits, narrative, etc), source(s) of data, point person, and
due date. The Framework assured that each criterion was identified, the person responsible
for acquiring the data was designated along with date for submission and required
documentation was provided from the appropriate source and in the appropriate format.
Next, a critical review of the findings of the 2001 CEPH Site Team Observations and
Recommendations was conducted by the Coordinator of Graduate Studies who was
charged with the responsibility of coordinating the self-study process and drafting the Self-
Study Report. Those full-time faculty of the Department who teach in the graduate and
undergraduate Programs comprised the Self-Study Committee. The members were:

   Dr. Michael J. Perlin, Coordinator of Graduate Studies and Director of the Self-Study
   Dr. William G. Faraclas, Chairperson, Department of Public Health
   Dr. Ellen Beatty
   Dr. Jean Breny Bontempi
   Ms. Mary Ann Booss
   Dr. Sandy Bulmer
   Dr. Deborah Flynn
   Dr. Peggy Gallup
   Ms. Carolyn Grantham-Millman
   Dr. John Nwangwu
   Dr. David A. Pearson – (retired FT position in May 2007; part-time during Fall 2007)
   Mr. Scot Phelps
   Dr. Debra Risisky
   Dr. William L. Stohler, Former Coordinator of Graduate and Undergraduate Studies
   Dr. Christine Unson
   Dr. Michele Vancour, Coordinator of Undergraduate Studies

To increase efficiency, an Advisory Sub-Committee of the Self-Study Committee was
created which consisted of Dr. Michael J. Perlin (Coordinator of Graduate Studies), Dr.
William G. Faraclas (Department Chairperson), Dr. Michele Vancour (Coordinator of
Undergraduate Studies), and Dr. William L. Stohler (former Coordinator of Graduate and
Undergraduate Studies).

The completion of the Preliminary Self-Study Document involved the following nine
discrete phases:

   Phase 1 - Review of CEPH Documents, and informal consultations, CEPH Site Team
             Observations and Recommendations, and assessment of the University,
             School and Department’s support for and commitment to seeking re-
             accreditation (March 2005-May 2007).
   Phase 2 - Identification of required resources and assessment of their availability and
             existence of gaps (September 2005-May 2007)
   Phase 3 - Distribution of writing assignments to members of the Self-Study
             Committee and faculty (February-May 2006).

                                           23
         Phase 4 - Coordination of individual sections of the Document, review for accuracy
                   and proof-reading in consultation with the Advisory Sub-Committee
                   (March-April 2008).
         Phase 5 - Submission of draft version of Document to Committee members, Dean of
                   the School of Health and Human Services, Provost and Vice President of
                   Academic Affairs, Dean of the School of Graduate Studies, President of the
                   Public Health Chapter of the SCSU Alumni Association, Advisory Council,
                   faculty, select graduate students for review and commentary and posting of
                   the Document on the Department’s Web site (May 2008).
         Phase 6 - Review of comments, refinements and completion of the Document (May
                   2008).
         Phase 7 - Submission of the final version of the Preliminary Document to the Dean of
                   the School of Health and Human Services and Provost and posting of the
                   Document on the Department’s Web site (June 2008).
         Phase 8 - Submission of the completed Preliminary Document to the CEPH assigned
                   reviewers and to the Council (July 1, 2008)
         Phase 9 - Resubmission of Final Self-Study Document to CEPH and Site-Team
                   members (September 1, 2008)

      The members of the Self-Study Committee worked in pairs to prepare their sections of the
      Document. Discussions regarding the Self-Study were conducted during regularly
      scheduled meetings of the faculty and Graduate and Undergraduate Program Committees
      (GPC/UPC) and through ongoing discussions between members of the Committee and the
      Coordinator. The members of the Advisory Sub-Committee met at strategic points
      throughout the self-study period, under the leadership of the Coordinator of Graduate
      Studies. The members of the Advisory Committee were familiar with all aspects of the
      evolution of the M.P.H. Program, with three of these members having served as the
      architects of the original version; the fourth, Dr. Vancour is a graduate of the Program and
      a faculty member during the last re-accreditation period. Members of the Self-Study
      Committee were given a great deal of freedom in constructing their assigned sections of
      the Document and were directed and assisted when necessary by the Coordinator.

1.2g. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

      This Criterion is met.

      Strengths. The Coordinators of Graduate and Undergraduate Studies, through their
      respective Committees, have established an explicit process for the evaluation,
      management, and planning of the Program’s current activities and for planning its future.
      Regular data collection mechanisms provide information needed for these purposes and
      facilitate participation of each of the Program’s major constituent groups, using a variety
      of quantitative and qualitative methods.

      As already described under this Criterion, the Department's Program self-evaluation was

                                               24
both thoughtful and analytical, contained qualitative and quantitative assessments and
involved input from each of its several constituents. The analysis of the Program's
strengths and weaknesses is a candid assessment, presented as an Executive Summary,
which is consistent with the findings presented in the Report. The Self-Study was
conducted with strict attention to the expected documentation and is organized and
presented in a manner that clearly reflects its compliance with CEPH guidelines. In
addition, the Self-Study also addresses each of the recommendations and findings of the
2001 CEPH Site Team Report and the Site Team Observations and Recommendation
Report, both based on a review for the Program's initial re-accreditation, awarded in
October 2001.

Weaknesses. The assessment methods of the M.P.H. program are clearly superior to the
B.S. program given that this is the Program’s first accreditation review. The UPC is fully
committed to increasing the sophistication of its evaluation and planning processes, which
to date, have been substantial, though somewhat less formal that those of the M.P.H.
program.




                                        25
                                                CRITERION 1.3

                                   INSTITUTIONAL ENVIRONMENT

Criterion 1.3.: The Program shall be an integral part of an accredited institution of higher
education.

1.3a. A brief description of the institution in which the program is located, along with the
      names of accrediting bodies (other than CEPH) to which the institution responds.

         Southern Connecticut State University (SCSU), a comprehensive, metropolitan, public
         university, was founded in 1893 as the New Haven Normal School. Today, Southern is a
         fully accredited institution of higher education, authorized by the Connecticut General
         Assembly to offer courses and programs leading to the bachelor’s and master’s degrees in
         the arts and sciences and in various professional fields. Southern also offers a sixth-year
         diploma in several specialized areas. In 2002, Southern was approved to offer its first
         doctoral degree, the doctorate in education (Ed.D.). Southern serves primarily the State of
         Connecticut, with particular emphasis on the State's southern region, including the Greater
         New Haven metropolitan area. “As a learning community grounded in the values of liberal
         education, SCSU is committed to students distinguished by their intellectual
         competencies, their skills for flexible adaptation to global change, and by their habits of
         cultural enrichment for life-long learning. As the lead institution of advanced study in the
         Connecticut State University system (CSUS), SCSU is committed to the professional
         preparation of graduate learners for success in their careers and in service to their
         communities. As an academic environment, SCSU is committed to innovative teaching
         strategies and to scholarship and creative activity that produces knowledge, refreshes
         faculty expertise and amplifies teaching effectiveness.1” SCSU is one of four universities
         within the Connecticut State University System(CSUS) that provides baccalaureate and
         masters degree programs. In addition to Southern Connecticut State University, located in
         New Haven, CSUS serves the entire State of Connecticut and beyond, through its other
         three major campuses: Central Connecticut State University (New Britain), Eastern
         Connecticut State University (Willimantic), and Western Connecticut State University
         (Danbury). As of Fall 2007, CSUS enrolled more than 35,000 students, making it the
         second largest public institution of higher education in New England. Among CSUS's total
         enrollment, 7,631 (23.2%) were enrolled in graduate programs. SCSU, the second largest
         of the four campuses had 11,930 students, with 28.63 percent (or 3,415 students)
         participating in graduate programs. Its undergraduate programs draw from an applicant
         pool that is 29% minority, reflecting the diverse, urban population of the region.

         CSUS traces its origins to New Britain, where the first of its units was founded in 1893. Since
         that time the four campuses have evolved from normal schools, to teachers colleges,

__________________________________________________________________________
1
    Excerpted from the University’s mission statement, 2008.

                                                         26
to multi-dimensional state colleges, and finally to universities. Today, each of the four
universities stands as a thoroughly diversified institution.

The School of Health and Human Services houses the Departments of Communication
Disorders, Marriage and Family Therapy, Nursing, Public Health, Recreation and Leisure
Studies, and Social Work. The Department’s Master of Public Health Program is the only
public health program within CSUS and the only one in Connecticut that prepares
community health educators. The Department offers the only Bachelor of Science degree
in Public Health in Connecticut and New England. In addition, the environmental health
specialization option in the B.S. program is the only source of University-based training
for entry-level sanitarians in the state.

The Department also conducts and co-sponsors the Environmental Health Training
Program (EHTP), in cooperation with the Connecticut Department of Public Health, and
endorsed by the CT Association of Directors of Health, CT Environmental Health
Association and the CT Public Health Association. The EHTP is designed to help prepare
and train sanitarians, including those presently and aspiring to be employed in local health
departments. Details of this important collaboration will be discussed under Criterion 3.3
Workforce Development.

Southern Connecticut State University is a fully accredited institution, having met the
standards of the Connecticut Board of Governors for Higher Education and the
Connecticut Department of Higher Education. Its continuing membership in the New
England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC), one of six regional accrediting
associations in the United States, indicates that the University has been evaluated carefully
and found to meet the standards agreed upon by qualified educators. In addition to these
University-wide accreditations, there are several schools and departments at SCSU that are
accredited by their respective professional associations. These include:

School Psychology - Council on the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational
Programs; Speech-Language and Audiology Programs in Communication Disorders -
American Speech- Language-Hearing Association; School of Education - National Council
for Accreditation of Teacher Education; Recreation and Leisure Studies - Council on
Accreditation of the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA)(pending) and
American Association for Leisure and Recreation (AALR); Chemistry - American
Chemical Society; Library Science - American Library Association; Nursing –
Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education; Social Work - Council on Social Work
Education; Marriage and Family Therapy - Commission on Accreditation for Marriage
and Family Therapy; The Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Professionals;
and the National Association of School Psychology. Public Health – National Commission
for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. (NCHEC) for its continuing education program.




                                          27
1.3b. One or more organizational charts of the university indicating the program’s
      relationship to the other components of the institution, including reporting lines.

      To best understand the Program's (Department's) relationship to the other components of
      the University, a four-tier Table of Organization is presented on the following page, as
      Table 1.3b. In descending order, it shows SCSU's relationship to the Connecticut State
      University System (CSUS) (Tier 1); SCSU and its six (6) academic schools, including the
      School of Health and Human Services, within the University (Tier 2); the Department of
      Public Health, as one of six departments within the School of Health and Human Services
      (Tier 3); and finally, the Program in public health (Tier 4). Appendix 6 contains the
      President Direct Reports Chart, Human Resources Organizational Chart and the Academic
      Affairs Organizational Charts.




                                             28
                                                                                            Table 1.3b.

                           CSUS, SCSU, School of Health and Human Services and Program in Public Health Table of Organization
    Tier 1: Connecticut State University System (CSUS)                                      Board of Trustees

                                                                                            Chancellor, CSU



                   Southern CT State University               Central CT State University                  Eastern CT State University                               Eastern CT State University
                           New Haven                                  New Britain                                  New Britain                                               New Britain


    Tier 2: Southern Connecticut State University (SCSU)
                                                                                       President, SCSU                               Administrative Assistant to President              CSU Administrative Assistant
                                                                                                                                       toReResources Chancellor, CSU                     ReResources Chancellor, CSU

                            Information Technology      Diversity & Equity Programs                             Intercollegiate Athletics           Human Resources
                                                                                                                                                      ReResources
                                                                                                                                                         Chancellor, CSU


                           Provost &Vice-President             Executive Vice-President                        Vice-President                               Vice-President
                              Academic Affairs                 Finance & Administration                 Institutional Advancement                     Student & University Affairs


Health & Human Services            Arts & Sciences                    Business                           Education                          Communication, Information                      Graduate Studies
                                                                                                                                               & Library Science




    Tier3: School of Health and Human Services (SHHS-SCSU)                            Provost &Vice-President
                                                                                         Academic Affairs

                                                                                      Dean, School of Health &
                                                                                          Human Services


        Chair                              Chair                             Chair                                  Chair                                    Chair                                    Chair
 Communication Disorders         Marriage & Family Therapy                  Nursing                              Public Health                    Recreation & Leisure Studies                     Social Work



    Tier4: Program in Public Health
                                                                                             UPC/Coordinator                    GPC/Coordinator


                                                                                                B.S. Degree                      M.P.H. Degree
                                                                    29
1.3c. A brief description of the university practices including:

      ►Lines of accountability, including access to higher-level officials.

         Connecticut State University System (CSUS) Lines of Accountability.

         Board of Trustees and Chancellor. A 16-member Board of Trustees is responsible for
         governing the CSU System. The Chancellor of CSUS reports to the Board of Trustees
         and is responsible for the administration of the entire System.

         A 16-member Board of Trustees for the Connecticut State University System is
         responsible for the governance of the four universities under its jurisdiction. Fourteen of
         the Trustees are appointed by the Governor, and two are students elected by their
         classmates. The Board determines the general policy of the university system, reviews
         and approves institutional budget requests, sets tuition and fees, and appoints the
         Chancellor of the system and the university presidents. Specific powers and duties are
         prescribed in Section 10a-87 -10a-101 of the Connecticut General Statutes. The
         Chancellor, who reports to the Board, is responsible for administration of the entire
         system and oversees the Presidents of the four constituent campuses. Dr. David Carter
         is the current Chancellor of the CSUS.

         President: Each University President functions as chief executive officer of the
         University and exercises power under the auspices Board of Trustees for the governance
         and advancement of the educational and business aspects of the University. Dr. Cheryl
         J. Norton is the current President of Southern Connecticut State University.

         Southern Connecticut State University Lines of Accountability

         Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs. The Provost of the University also
         holds the title of, and functions as, the Vice President for Academic Affairs. (For ease
         of reading, the title “Provost” will be used henceforth in this self-study document.) The
         Office of the Provost carries the responsibility for the academic mission of the
         University, providing direct supervision of all academic units, support services and
         operations, and coordinating all academic programs. Reporting to the Provost are the
         Deans of the academic schools and graduate studies, Office of Academic Advisement,
         Admissions and Enrollment Management, First Year Experience, One Stop Student
         Information Center, Registrar, Office of Faculty Development, Library Services, Office
         of Management Information and Research, Library, Operations, Office of Assessment,
         Planning and Academic Programs, Banner, Institutional Research, and Sponsored
         Programs and Research. The Provost acts on behalf of the President in the absence of
         the President. Dr. Selase W. Williams is the current Provost of Southern Connecticut
         State University.

         Dean of the School of Health and Human Services. The Dean provides overall

                                                30
budget, personnel, and curricular management of the School. The School operates a
number of clinics that provide direct services to community members, thereby
providing students with hands-on experiences on campus. As a member of the
administrative team of the Office of the Provost, the Dean participates in the decision-
making and resource allocation process for the entire division of Academic Affairs. The
Dean is expected to lead strategic planning at the School level and to assist in the
development of a vision for the future. Working closely with directors of health and
social service agencies, the Dean participates as a member of the health and human
services community, and engages the School in addressing identified community issues.
Dr. Gregory Paveza is the current Dean of the SHHS.

Faculty Senate. The “voice of the faculty,” the Faculty Senate at Southern Connecticut
State University serves in an advisory capacity to the University President and may
offer advice in all matters affecting the quality and mission of the University. Professor
Brian Johnson is currently the President of the Faculty Senate (Reference File 2).

Program Lines of Accountability

Department Chairperson. A department chairperson is in the unique position of
functioning simultaneously as a scholar, teacher, administrator, and he/she should have
the best talents of each. As a scholar, the chairperson will be setting high standards of
academic and professional excellence for the members of his/her department,
stimulating and recognizing achievements in this direction. As a teacher, the
chairperson will be devoted to the academic and professional growth of students,
promoting in the members of his/her department the highest ideals of concern,
commitment, and respect for students and their educational experiences. As an
administrator, the chairperson must not only facilitate the educational interaction of
student and faculty in his/her department, he/she must conduct his/her department as an
integral part of a larger academic community, representing his/her department to the
administration and the administration to the department. The ability of chairpersons to
mediate departmental with university interests will, to a large degree, determine the
success of both groups. Dr. William G. Faraclas is the current Chairperson of the
Department of Public Health.

Coordinator of Graduate Studies and Graduate Program Committee. The
Coordinator or Graduate Studies is appointed by the Chairperson to oversee the
graduate program. In addition, the Coordinator chairs the Graduate Program Committee
(GPC), which is the policy-making body of the program. The responsibilities of the
GPC are discussed under Criterion 1.4 a. & b. Dr. Michael J. Perlin is the current
Coordinator of Graduate Studies.

Coordinator of Undergraduate Studies and Undergraduate Program Committee.
The Coordinator or Undergraduate Studies is appointed by the Chairperson to oversee
the undergraduate program. In addition, the Coordinator chairs the Undergraduate

                                       31
  Program Committee (UPC), which is the policy-making body of the program. The
  responsibilities of the UPC are discussed under Criterion 1.4 a. & b. Dr. Michele
  Vancour is the current Coordinator of Undergraduate Studies.

► Prerogatives extended to academic units.

  At Southern, the Office of the President has four Vice Presidents, one each for
  Academic Affairs, Student and University Affairs, Finance and Administration and
  Institutional Advancement. In 2005, the University hired it first Provost who also serves
  as the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the University’s chief academic officer. In
  2007, the University initiated a national search for an Associate Vice-President for
  Academic Affairs. The responsibilities of each Vice President are implicit in their
  respective titles. However, greater specificity can be determined by a review of Table
  1.3b., SCSU's Administration Organization. It shows, for example, that there are six
  academic schools for which the Provost is responsible. A dean oversees each of the six
  academic schools and reports to the Provost on all academic, administrative and
  financial matters. The School of Health and Human Services (SHHS) is the school in
  which the Department of Public Health is located. Also shown on the Organization
  Chart are the six departments within the School of Health and Human Services; each is
  headed by a Chairperson who reports to the Dean of the School of Health and Human
  Services. In 2007, Dr. Gregory Paveza, formerly of the University of South Florida, was
  hired as the Dean of the SHHS, replacing an acting dean. Dr. Paveza will be the first
  Dean of the SHHS who possesses a doctorate in Public Health (Epidemiology).

  ► Budgeting and resource allocation. The Chancellor's Office allocates all funds and
    resources to each of the four Universities, based on budget requests submitted by
    each of the University Presidents. The dean of each school and the chairperson of
    each department within the school are then given budgets for each academic year.
    Each year the chairperson of each department within the school submits his or her
    budget request to the dean for allocation of the department’s operating and support
    staff budget.

  ► Personnel recruitment, selection and advancement. Personnel recruitment is
    initiated at the departmental level based on faculty line allocations by the Office of
    the Provost and academic and salary criteria established by the University. In the
    Department of Public Health, an elected Personnel Committee undertakes
    searches for new faculty members and makes its final recommendations to the
    Chairperson; if he approves the Personnel Committee's recommendations, he then
    sends all endorsements to the Dean of the School who, in turn, forwards approved
    recommendations to the Provost. An integral part of the recruitment process involves
    the Department faculty, student feedback, as well as the University's Office of
    Human Resources, which gives guidance to ensure compliance with Equal
    Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action requirements. For example, the

                                        32
Office of Public Affairs, which assists with all advertising for faculty positions; the
Department consults, and is. The University provides training sessions for
departmental personnel committees, during which the policies and processes of
faculty recruitment and selection are reviewed. It has been the practice of the
Department’s Personnel Committee to send at least one member of the Committee to
the training session.

  ►Selection of faculty. Once a search is approved by the Administration, as
   noted above, the selection process for new faculty is initiated by the
   Department Chairperson, conducted by the Department Personnel Committee
   with input from the full faculty of the Department and approved by the
   Chairperson before recommendations are made sequentially to the Dean of the
   School, the Provost, and, finally, the University's President. All procedures are
   conducted within SCSU and CSUS guidelines. Final approval for hiring is
   granted by the CSU Board of Trustees.

  ►Faculty advancement. Recommendations for re-appointment, promotion and
   tenure follow a similar administrative path as above, except that the process for
   non-renewal appointment and tenure is initiated by the Personnel Office and
   then the Department Chairperson, while promotion is initiated by the
   candidate. These assessment procedures are developed by SCSU's Faculty
   Senate (a University-wide body responsible for all academic policies), in
   mutual agreement with the University's President, and in conformance with
   requirements of State law and the Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA)
   (Reference File 3).

Consistent with the Faculty Senate's document, "Promotion, Tenure, Renewal and
Professional Assessment Procedures for Faculty," faculty members are evaluated for
promotion and tenure in the following sequence: the Department Evaluation
Committee (DEC) makes recommendations to the Department Chairperson; the
Chairperson provides his or her recommendations and the Committee’s
recommendations to the School Dean; the Dean evaluates the candidate’s file and
forwards it with a recommendation to the University Promotion and Tenure
Committee, for its recommendations to the President; finally the President
recommends candidates to the CSU Board of Trustees. Evaluation for renewal and
sixth year professional assessments are submitted to the Provost (see Reference File
2).

► Academic standards, policies and oversight of curricula. In each university of
  CSUS there is a designated Faculty Senate that is responsible for establishing
  academic standards and policies, consistent with state and national laws and the
  Collective Bargaining Agreement. The Senate's Constitution, Bylaws and
  resolution become effective upon Presidential approval and govern both
  substantive and procedural standards and policies within the University. Thus,

                                    33
               every school and department within the University is governed by the decisions of
               the Faculty Senate.

               Curricular oversight is a shared responsibility among the Department’s,
               UPC/GPC, a School curriculum committee, and University undergraduate and
               graduate curriculum committees. Proposals for new programs, courses and
               academic standards begin within the Department and are forwarded to the
               appropriate School and University committees for approval.

1.3d. If a collaborative program, descriptions of all participating institutions and
      delineation of their relationship to the program.

       Not applicable.

1.3.e If a collaborative program, a copy of the formal written agreement that establishes
      the rights and obligations of the participating universities in regard to the program’s
      operation.

       Not applicable.

1.3f   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

       This Criterion is met.

       Strengths. The Program is an integral part of Southern Connecticut State University, an
       institution of higher education fully accredited by the New England Association of
       Schools and Colleges. The Program is governed and abides by institutional policies, has a
       well-defined place in the University structure, plays a role in contributing to the University
       governance including policy development, and is recognized for its important contribution
       to the University’s reputation. For example, the Department of Public Health carries the
       designation as a "Distinctive Program," awarded by CSUS, based on excellence in both its
       undergraduate and graduate public health degree Programs.

       Weaknesses. None identified.




                                                 34
                                        CRITERION 1.4

                        ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION

Criterion 1.4.: The Program shall provide an organizational setting conducive to teaching and
learning, research and service. The organizational setting shall facilitate interdisciplinary
communication, cooperation and collaboration. The organizational structure shall effectively
support the work of the program’s constituents.

1.4a   One or more organizational charts showing the administrative organization of the
       program, indicating relationships among its component offices or other
       administrative units and its relationship to higher-level departments, schools and
       divisions.

       Table 1.4a. illustrates the organization of the Department of Public Health. The
       Department’s relationship to other departments within the School of Health and Human
       Services and other departments within the University were presented under Criterion 1.3b.

       The integration of the Department of Public Health and its sister departments within the
       School of Health and Human Services is ensured by monthly meetings of the chairpersons
       of departments chaired by the Dean of the School of Health and Human Services, as well
       as by School Faculty Meetings sponsored by the Dean once each semester. In spring 2007,
       an initiative by the Chairperson of the Department of Public Health resulted in the creation
       of a University-wide Council of Academic Chairpersons (CAC) to increase
       interdisciplinary understanding and collaboration. The Chairperson of the Department of
       Public Health has chaired the CAC since its inception. A School Curriculum Committee,
       comprised of a faculty representative from each of the School's six academic Departments,
       further provides faculty with opportunities to gain insight into the programs and curricula
       offered by each Department comprising the School.

1.4b. Description of the roles and responsibilities of major units in the organizational
      chart.

       The Program’s Organizational Chart shows that the Department of Public Health is
       administered by a Chairperson who has two major Program Coordinators reporting to him:
       the Coordinator of Graduate Studies and the Coordinator of Undergraduate Studies, who
       are responsible for all Graduate affairs and Undergraduate affairs, respectively. The
       Coordinators chair, respectively, the Graduate Program Committee (GPC) and
       Undergraduate Program Committee (UPC), the policy-making bodies of the undergraduate
       and graduate programs. Recommendations of these two Committees are presented to the
       Chairperson for approval, modification or rejection. At monthly faculty meetings, the
       Coordinators report on what has been submitted to the Chairperson. The GPC and UPC
       report to the Chairperson through the Program Coordinators. Also reporting to the
       Chairperson is a group of Standing and Ad Hoc Committees, an Internship Coordinator,

                                               35
staff, University Assistant, Department secretary, graduate assistants, and student workers.
Roles and responsibilities of major units in the organizational table are described in detail
in Table 1.4b.




                                         36
                                           Table 1.4a.

                                  Department of Public Health
                                     Organizational Chart


      Coordinators and
                                                Chairperson
    Program Committees                                                           Standing Committees
                                    William G. Faraclas, Dr. P.H., M.P.H.


    Graduate Coordinator                                              Advisory        Continuing
Michael J. Perlin, Ed.D, M.P.H.                                       Council         Education

      Graduate Program                                                                Personnel
      Committee (GPC)
                                  Department                     Ad Hoc
                                   Secretary                    Committees          Grade Appeals
  Undergraduate Coordinator
Michele Vancour, Ph.D., M.P.H.

                                                                                      Evaluation/
   Undergraduate Program           University                   Graduate              Sabbatical
     Committee (UPC)               Assistants                   Assistants

                                                     Student                         Accreditation
        Coordinator of                               Workers                            (AC)
          Internships
Michael J. Perlin, Ed.D, M.P.H.




                                                37
                                                          Table 1.4b.

                                         Department of Public Health
                Roles, Composition and Responsibilities of Major Units in the Organizational Table

 Position/Committee         Composition                                          Responsibilities
Coordinator of Graduate Member of the         Chairs the Graduate Program Committee; responsible for the day-to-day management
Studies                 graduate faculty      of the graduate program; responsible for the coordination of all internal and external
                        appointed by the      accreditation self-studies.
                        Department
                        Chairperson
Graduate Program        Graduate faculty      Policy-making body for the Graduate Program; responsibilities include: review of
Committee               appointed by the      program proposals and revisions; review of course proposals and revisions; coordinate
                        Department            graduate catalog revisions; periodic review of graduate program; set minimum
                        Chairperson;          graduate course objectives, review course syllabi, and set service-program criteria; set
                        Student cohort        academic standards for, and review academic performance of, graduate students and
                        representatives       take appropriate actions; set and review graduate advisement procedures; set and
                        from each of the      review recruitment policies; conduct appropriate public relations; conduct other
                        full-time and part-   appropriate functions concerning the graduate program.
                        time cohorts.
Coordinator of          Member of the         Chairs the Undergraduate Program Committee; responsible for the day-to-day
Undergraduate Studies faculty appointed       management of the undergraduate program; responsible for assisting with the
                        by the Department     coordination of all external and internal accreditation self-studies.
                        Chairperson
Undergraduate Program Faculty appointed       Policy-making body for the Undergraduate Program; responsibilities include: review of
Committee               by the Department     program proposals and revisions; review of course proposals and revisions; coordinate
                        Chairperson           undergraduate catalog revisions; periodic review of undergraduate program; set
                                              minimum undergraduate course objectives, review course syllabi, and set service-
                                              program criteria; set academic standards for, and review academic performance of,
                                              undergraduate students and take appropriate actions; set and review undergraduate
                                              advisement procedures; set and review recruitment policies; select outstanding major
                                              for Honors Convocation recognition; conduct appropriate public relations; conduct
                                              other appropriate functions concerning the graduate program.


                                                               38
                                                      Table 1.4b., Cont’d

                                         Department of Public Health
                Roles, Composition and Responsibilities of Major Units in the Organizational Table

 Position/Committee        Composition                                              Responsibilities
Department Advisory     Diverse group of      Provides expert consultation to the Department and its program committees on public
Council                 public health         health issues and trends, State and community health needs, requisite and desired
                        professionals,        professional skills, careers in public health, educational methods and opportunities,
                        legislators, alumni   and Department development; the Advisory Council strengthens the Department’s
                        and others (18)       programs and improves the Department’s impact on State residents.
Coordinator of Public   Member of the         Provides oversight for public health internships; responsibilities include acquisition of
Health Internships      faculty appointed     new internship sites, ongoing review of current internship sites and preceptors, policy-
                        by the Department     setting, curriculum development, creation of all resource materials and documents,
                        Chairperson           and conducting orientation sessions.
Department              Appointed by the      The Department Chairperson leads the Department in meeting its obligations for
Chairperson             President based on    academic programs and personnel matters, as well as for overall functioning of the
                        Department            Department.
                        selection process
Evaluation and          Elected tenured       Conducts contractually mandated activities related to promotion, tenure, professional
Sabbatical Committee    faculty (3-5)         assessment, renewal and sabbatical leave; conducts evaluation of adjunct faculty.
Personnel Committee     Elected faculty (3)   Conducts Department Chair selection process; conducts searches for full-time faculty
                                              positions initiated by the Department Chair in accordance with University policy.
Grade Appeals           Elected tenured       Maintains and publishes a set of guidelines for grade appeal hearings to be approved
Committee               faculty (3)           and amended by the full-time faculty; conducts grade appeal hearings, referred by the
                                              Department Chairperson in accordance with University and Faculty Senate policy.
Continuing Education    Faculty and           Conducts the Department’s continuing education offerings and sponsorships.
Committee               community
                        members appointed
                        by Chairperson
Accreditation           Faculty members   Advisory to the Self-Study Coordinator in the conduct of the CEPH Self-Study.
Committee               appointed by
                        Chairperson (4-5)

                                                               39
1.4c.   Description of the manner in which interdisciplinary coordination, cooperation and
        collaboration are supported.

        As an interdisciplinary field, public health requires the sharing of theory and application
        across a wide spectrum of academic disciplines. As such, faculty teaching in the
        Department have diverse academic backgrounds and training in public health, medicine,
        nursing, economics, psychology, English, exercise science, political science,
        communication studies, health sciences, and others. Students admitted to the Program
        also have multidisciplinary backgrounds and come from fields as diverse as research,
        medicine, occupational therapy, nursing, political science, dentistry, business,
        psychology, sociology, and anthropology to name a few.

        Faculty of the Department serve on national committees with professionals from varied
        fields, publish with colleagues in complementary disciplines, and collaborate on research
        with individuals from other academic areas and universities.

        The University and School of Health and Human Services encourages interdisciplinary
        coordination, cooperation and collaboration by offering scholarship and research
        reassigned time for interdisciplinary activities. In addition, the Sirico Center on Aging,
        within the School of Health and Human Services, provides faculty from across the
        curriculum opportunities for collaboration. The envisioned multimillion dollar West Rock
        Community revitalization project, a private-public partnership, which will place the
        University in the “heart” of the community, will offer both faculty and students a broad
        array of interdisciplinary research and service opportunities unlike any other to date. The
        Department also cross lists courses from anthropology and women’s studies, and is
        initiating a cooperative agreement with the geography department to provide GIS training
        for undergraduates. In AY 08 the Program presented a writing workshop for its incoming
        M.P.H. students in collaboration with the English department. Faculty from other
        departments teach in the Department of Public Health, and many nursing majors minor in
        public health.

        Included in the University’s “A New Blueprint for Campus Growth” is a new School of
        Health and Services building, to house all School departments and provide specialty
        classrooms, faculty offices and outpatient clinical areas. This new building will provide
        faculty from the six departments with easy access to colleagues and facilitate increased
        interdisciplinary cooperation.

1.4d. Identification of written policies that are illustrative of the program’s commitment
      to fair and ethical dealings.

        The Program’s commitment to fair and ethical practices is illustrated by its core values.
        The Program follows the University’s Statement on Pluralism that forbids acts of
        violence or harassment reflecting bias or intolerance based on an individual’s race,
        religious creed, gender, sexual orientation, disability, ethnicity or cultural origin

                                                 40
        (Appendix 7). The Program operates under the University’s Affirmative Action Policy
        Statement which states, “It is the intellectual and moral responsibility, but more
        importantly, the POLICY of the leadership of the Connecticut State University System, to
        advance social justice and equity by exercising affirmative action and upward mobility”
        (Appendix 8). The Program also has it’s own Students’ Bill and Rights and
        Responsibilities, created in 1991, which states: “[the] Department of Public Health must
        be sensitive to cultural, racial, linguistic, religious, gender, and other differences as well
        as the needs of persons with disabilities (Appendix 9). In addition, a cultural competency
        training workshop and the inclusion of faculty and students in all policy-making decisions
        promote fair and ethical treatment of faculty and students. The Program’s students and
        faculty are cognizant of their professional responsibilities as empowerment agents and, as
        such, create opportunities for inclusion of their constituencies in Program design,
        implementation and evaluation activities, essential components of effective health
        promotion and disease prevention.

        As a group of public health professionals, the faculty ascribes to and supports the Public
        Health Code of Ethics and the Unified Code of Ethics as promulgated by the American
        Association for Health Education (AAHE), American Public Health Association
        (APHA), American School Health Association (ASHA) and the Society for Public Health
        Education (SOPHE). In spring 2008, the Department adopted a student-developed Code
        of Conduct that provides a framework of shared values within which students fulfill their
        responsibilities in the Department (Appendix 10).

        As a component of an equal opportunity University, the Program is committed to fair and
        ethical dealings with all its constituencies. As stated in the Strategic Plan for Southern
        Connecticut State University, 2007-2012, “[t]he University is a community that upholds
        academic freedom and celebrates human diversity. We will sustain through affirmative
        effort the freedom to learn and teach. We will continue to build a University community
        that respects and reflects - in its Programs, students, faculty and staff - the diversity of our
        society and our world” (Reference File 4).

        Beginning with the Program’s mission statement, through Program design, student
        recruitment, admissions, retention, graduation, and participation in governance and
        faculty recruitment, appointment, promotion, assignments, and participation in
        governance, the Program has created policies and procedures that are illustrative of its
        commitment to high ethical standards in dealings with each of its constituencies.

1.4e.   Description of the manner in which student grievances and complaints are
        addressed, including the number of grievances and complaints filed for each of the
        last three years.

        Satisfaction among public health students is consistently high. The Program
        administrators and faculty expend an extraordinary effort to ensure that students are
        treated with dignity and respect from their initial contact with the Department through

                                                   41
        graduation, and that there are sufficient opportunities for students to stay fully informed
        about the Program and provide input into the Program. The graduate cohort
        representatives are available to their constituencies to address and/or bring student
        concerns to the attention of the Chairperson, Coordinator of Graduate Studies and the
        Graduate Program Committee. All students also have access to an anonymous online
        feedback tool that allows for the submission of concerns directly to the respective
        Coordinators. A student-oriented faculty and administration with an open-door policy
        contribute to the high degree of satisfaction of students. In addition, the Alumni Surveys
        and Program Exit Surveys serve as additional mechanisms for students to convey their
        concerns. Student concerns regarding professors are directed to the Department
        Chairperson who has sole authority to address personnel matters. A widely publicized
        Department Grade Appeals Committee (Appendix 11) is available to students who feel
        they have suffered a palpable injustice with respect to course grading. Over the last three
        years, two grade appeals have been filed by undergraduate students, both in March 2008.

1.4f.   Assessment of the extent to which the criterion is met.

        The Criterion is met.

        Strengths. The organization and administration of the Program promotes and enhances
        the potential for fulfillment of its stated mission, goals and objectives, and provides for
        effective participation of its faculty and students in all activities of importance to them.
        The administrative structure and resources allow the Program to carry out its teaching,
        research and service functions and facilitates interdisciplinary coordination, cooperation
        and collaboration. Like the School and Department, the Program is characterized by
        commitment to the integrity of the institution, including high ethical standards in the
        management of its affairs, fairness in its dealings with all constituents, support for the
        pursuit and dissemination of knowledge, and accountability to its constituents.

        Weaknesses. Although the Program’s faculty supports and currently participates in
        collaborative efforts, it is committed to exploring new and ongoing opportunities, within
        and outside of the Department, School and University.




                                                  42
                                      CRITERION 1.5

                                       GOVERNANCE

Criterion 1.5.: The Program administration and faculty shall have clearly defined rights and
responsibilities concerning Program governance and academic policies. Students shall, where
appropriate, have participatory roles in conduct of Program evaluation procedures, policy-
setting and decision-making.

1.5a. Description of the program’s governance and committee structure and processes,
      particularly as they affect:

       ► General program policy development. University policies for program development
         and governance are governed by the Collective Bargaining Agreement between the
         American Association of University Professors (AAUP) and the Board of Trustees of
         the Connecticut State University System (CSU) (CBA, August 25, 2007-August 25,
         2011) (see Reference File 3).

         The CBA establishes the faculty role in Program governance and academic policies,
         many of which are executed at the Departmental level. The CBA document is
         comprehensive, providing a framework for many governance-related topics. The role
         of the faculty in governance is best appreciated as stated in the Preamble to the CBA:

         "Collegiality in academic governance at each university in the Connecticut State
         University System can best be accomplished through the Senates selected by
         representatives of the appropriate university constituencies in accordance with each
         institution's constitution and tradition. Matters of concern to the Senate include: (a)
         curriculum policy and curricular structure, (b) requirements for degrees and granting of
         degrees, (c) policies for recruitment, admission and retention of students, (d) academic
         policies relating to students, and (e) other matters of campus community concern..."
         (CBA, pp.1-2).

         The Faculty Senate is an elected body of full-time faculty which has developed specific
         guidelines, in the form of Faculty Senate Documents, on governance and
         responsibilities. Approved by the President, the guidelines implement in detail the
         substance, procedures, and spirit of the CSUS Collective Bargaining Agreement. The
         Senate is one of many participatory structures available to faculty for effecting policy,
         decision-making and program integrity. Program faculty participates in governance
         through representation on University-wide Standing and Ad Hoc, School and
         Department committees. The Department of Public Health has consistently been
         represented on the major University-wide committees through elected representatives
         (Table 1.5d.).

       ► Planning. As discussed earlier in this section, major responsibility for Program
         governance is granted to academic departments in accordance with CBA and Faculty

                                               43
   Senate guidelines.

   At the Departmental level, as discussed under 1.4a., the Graduate Program Committee
   and Undergraduate Program Committee (“Program Committees”) serve as the policy-
   making bodies for the respective degree programs and are responsible for program
   development, planning, implementation, management and evaluation. All aspects of
   the Program can, and have been, the subject of the Program Committees’ attention and
   action. The Committees evaluate current Program requirements and consider proposals
   for new courses, specializations, certificates, and programs, as deemed appropriate.
   The Committees have the responsibility to consider, discuss and ultimately present
   decisions on all matters germane to the design and conduct of the programs, including
   the pursuit of CEPH accreditation and conduct of the self-study document, to the
   Department Chairperson.

   Although the Program Committees’ roles are advisory to the Chairperson, and the
   Chairperson is granted veto power by the Department Bylaws (Appendix 12), in cases
   where the Chairperson has concerns about recommendation from either of the
   Committees, it is his policy to consult with the affected Committee and/or Coordinator
   prior to acting on recommendations. In the history of the Department, the Chair has
   never vetoed an action of the either Program Committee, but rather has negotiated
   mutually agreeable solutions.

► Budget and resource allocation. The Provost establishes the budget for the Academic
  Departments, based upon total available funding determined by the CSUS Board of
  Trustees. For the Department of Public Health (and all others) the budget for full-time
  faculty is set by the Provost on the basis of student enrollment and contractual
  obligations. Additional funds are allocated by the Provost to the deans of each school.

   The Dean recommends a funding level for each Department within the School of
   Health and Human Services in consultation with the department chairpersons who are
   required to submit a proposed budget. In preparation of the budget request, it is the
   policy of the Chairperson of the Department of Public Health to consult the Program
   Coordinators and the faculty, who are encouraged to submit budget requests.

   Beyond its annual allocation, the Department has access to additional funding sources
   for large or out-of-the-ordinary expenditures. The University provides, through the
   Academic Computing Center, funding for faculty computers and upgrades. In the event
   of an urgent or unusual need, the Department Chairperson can petition the Dean and
   Provost for additional funds. For example, funding for costs associated with the
   accreditation process, including reassigned-time for the Self-Study Coordinators, was
   provided through the Office of the Provost. To support supplementary clerical and
   office assistance, the Department can request student workers from the Federal and
   University work-study programs. Currently, the Department employs three part-time
   undergraduate work study students, three part-time graduate assistants, and one part-
   time University Assistant, who assists the Program Coordinators.

                                        44
  Funding for the Graduate and Undergraduate Programs is included in the general
  Department budget. Requests for financial support are submitted by the Coordinators
  on behalf of their programs. As discussed previously, Coordinators and Chairperson
  conduct independent, yearly Program audits to determine the needs of the Programs.
  Audits are compared, and needs are determined. Historically, virtually all requests for
  financial support for Program activities have been favorably acted upon by the
  Chairperson, except where funds were unavailable.

► Student recruitment, admission and award of degrees. The University Office of
  Public Affairs assumes the major responsibility for general Program advertising and
  student recruitment for the Program. The University’s advertising line for AY 06-07
  was $372,946, 52% allocated to undergraduate/graduate programs combined, 22% for
  graduate studies only, 16% for events advertising, and 10% for undergraduate
  programs only. Recruitment efforts are enhanced by the reputation of the University
  for offering high quality programs at a reasonable cost, and by the inclusion of the
  Program on the list of U.S. Schools of Public Health and Graduate Public Health
  Programs Accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health. The Office of the
  Dean of Graduate Studies conducts an annual open house in November and April in
  which the Department participates on a regular basis. Recruitment for the
  undergraduate program occurs through the University Open House conducted in
  October and a mini-open house held in March. The Offices of the Graduate and
  Undergraduate Coordinators assume major responsibility for fulfilling requests for
  Program information and application materials and ultimately for admissions.

     ►M.P.H. Degree. The initial stage of the selection process occurs at the Program
      level. The Program Coordinator, as Chairperson of the Graduate Program
      Committee, has the responsibility for overseeing the selection of qualified
      applicants for admission. The Coordinator and volunteer faculty members serve
      on two Admissions Committees (Generalist and CHE) and review the completed
      files of applicants using an admissions screening matrix developed by the GPC,
      and subsequently approved by the Department Chairperson.

       Students are awarded degrees by the University on the basis of completing
       requirements which are developed by the Department of Public Health, in
       accordance with the University and Board of Higher Education. As mandated by
       the Graduate School and University policies, all M.P.H. students must maintain an
       overall 3.0 Grade-Point Average (GPA) (A = 4.0) for courses in the planned
       program of study to be eligible to apply for graduation, in addition to fulfilling
       Department-specific graduation requirements.

       Candidates for the M.P.H. degree must complete a minimum of 48 credits,
       including a thesis or special project and a field internship, as well as cultural
       competency training, a writing assessment, and the CHES Examination for
       students in the CHE specialization. The Coordinator of Graduate Studies, upon
       notification from the Office of Graduate Records, is responsible for conducting

                                        45
       transcript audits to determine students’ graduation eligibility. Departments and
       Programs may institute more stringent admission, retention and graduation
       requirements than University mandates unless specifically prohibited by the CBA
       or Faculty Senate. An example of the Department’s implementation of a standard
       superseding an existing one is the GPA of 3.0 for admission to the M.P.H.
       program. The University GPA standard for admission to graduate programs is 2.5,
       although a few select departments have implemented a higher standard. A review
       of all University departments reveals that with rare exception, students admitted to
       graduate programs present with a GPA of 3.0 or higher.

          ► B.S Degree. Admission to the B.S. degree program is based on distinct
            criteria and academic standards. A student interested in the program meets
            with a designated faculty advisor who has the authority to admit the student.
            Prior to fall 2008, all students, who were in good academic standing, with a
            minimum GPA of 2.0, were offered admission to the program, with
            retention based on established University policy of a 2.0 GPA for all courses
            on the planned program. Beginning fall 2008, the B.S. program will require
            a minimum overall GPA of 2.5 both for admission and graduation, as well
            as a minimum GPA of 2.5 in the major for graduation, placing the
            program’s standards above the University standards.

             The program also requires a minimum grade of “C” for all courses in the
             major. Students who fail to achieve a grade of “C” in a major course must
             repeat the course and earn a grade of “C” or better. Students are afforded
             two opportunities to earn a “C” after which they are released from the
             Department.

► Faculty recruitment. The allocation of faculty lines to departments is a function of the
  Office of the Provost, as described under Criterion 1.3c. The recruitment of faculty is a
  department-level responsibility conducted by a Department Personnel Committee
  (DPC), elected by the Public Health faculty and operating under Department Bylaws.

  The Department’s Personnel Committee (DPC) works closely with the Offices of the
  Provost, the Dean, the Office of Diversity and Equity, Human Resources, and Public
  Affairs to conduct searches, identify appropriate candidates and make
  recommendations for hiring actions. It is the practice of the DPC to involve
  Department faculty in every level of recruitment and candidate review.

  The retention of faculty is a shared responsibility of the Department, School Dean,
  Provost and President. Annual reappointment of non-tenured faculty is preceded by
  annual evaluations initiated at the Department level and conducted by its Evaluation
  and Sabbatical Committee in accordance with CBA and Faculty Senate guidelines.

  Faculty promotions and tenure are also a shared responsibility among the Department,
  School Dean, the University Promotion and Tenure Committee, University President

                                        46
  and Board of Trustees for CSUS. The Department Evaluation and Sabbatical
  Committee conducts an evaluation in accordance with the CBA and Faculty Senate
  guidelines. The Department Chairperson also prepares an independent evaluation of
  the candidate.

  At Southern Connecticut State University, all tenured faculty, regardless of rank,
  receive regularly scheduled sixth-year assessments conducted by the Department
  Evaluation and Sabbatical Committee, using the same criteria applied to evaluations
  for promotion and tenure (see CBA, Article 4.12, p.28).

  The Department is exploring the feasibility of developing specific outcome measures
  for tenure, promotion and professional assessments. On occasion, new faculty have
  inquired about the existence of such measures, apparently not uncommon in many
  universities, as a guide to judge the timing of making application for tenure and/or
  promotion.

► Academic standards and policies. As discussed under 1.3c., academic standards and
  policies are the responsibility of the Faculty Senate, as approved by the University
  President. Development and application of academic standards and policies for
  individual courses within the Program are a shared responsibility between the
  UPC/GPC, the Department and the course instructor. The general structure and content
  of the course outlines is stipulated in the Department Bylaws, Section IV, p.7. Student
  learning objectives for all required courses are developed by the UPC/GPC in
  accordance with the Program's mission, goals and objectives, in consultation with the
  course instructor. Course grading procedures are the prerogative and responsibility of
  the instructor. It is the responsibility of the Coordinators to review course syllabi each
  semester, to ensure compliance with the Bylaws requirements for syllabi and the
  UPC/GPC guidelines for course goals and objectives (see Appendix 12).

  Course instructors are assigned by the Department Chairperson according to interest,
  qualifications, demonstrated competencies and Program need. In the M.P.H. program
  an instructor must have a terminal degree to be assigned to teach a course. For the B.S.
  program course instructors must have an appropriate master’s degree and experience.

► Research and service expectations and policies. Faculty participation in establishing
  University research and service expectations and policies is accomplished through
  membership in the American Association of University Professors (AAUP), its
  contract negotiating team, the University Research and Scholarship Advisory
  Committee, the Faculty Senate and Strategic Planning Committee. These bodies are
  responsible for setting the agenda for the University and determining the mix and
  emphasis assigned to various academic and professional activities of the faculty.

  At the School and Department levels, faculty participate in establishing research and
  service expectations and policies through membership on the School Scholarship
  Reassigned-Time Committee, which reviews faculty research proposals and advises

                                         47
          the Dean about research-related matters, and through the membership of the
          Department Chairperson on the School Executive Leadership Council. Other
          opportunities for the faculty to provide input include service on the Department's Ad
          Hoc Goals and Objectives Committee and the GPC and UPC.

1.5b. A copy of the constitution, Bylaws or other policy document that determine the
      rights and obligations of administrators, faculty, and students in governance of the
      program (see Appendix 12).

1.5c.   A list of standing and important committees, with a statement of charge,
        composition, and current membership for each.

        The Department faculty has consistently served on Department, School, and major
        University committees, as members and in leadership roles. Table 1.5c. presents a list of
        all Department standing and ad hoc committees and other representative and advisement
        positions for the most recent academic year (2007-2008). Table 1.5d. lists major School
        and University committees and other positions through which Program faculty participate
        in University governance and affairs.




                                                48
                                                                 Table 1.5c.

                                                      Department of Public Health
                                        Standing and Ad Hoc Committees and Other Representative
                                                   and Advisement Positions, 2007-2008

               Committee                                         Composition                                        Charge
Program Committees

Undergraduate Program Committee (UPC)            Six-appointed members and Department            Policy-making body for the undergraduate
M. Booss; S. Bulmer; D. Flynn; C. Millman;       Coordinator of Undergraduate Program as         public health program
W. Stohler; W. Faraclas (Ex Officio) M.          Chair
Vancour, Chair
Graduate Program Committee (GPC)                 Six-appointed members, student cohort           Policy-making body for the graduate public
J. Breny Bontempi; W. Faraclas (Ex Officio);     representatives and Department Coordinator of   health program
P. Gallup; J. Nwangwu; ; M. Perlin, Chair;       Graduate Program as Chair
D. Risisky; C. Unson
Standing Committees
Evaluation/Sabbatical Committee (DEC)            Three elected tenured members                   Conducts contractually-mandated activities
S. Bulmer; P. Gallup; M. Perlin; W. Stohler,                                                     related to renewal, promotion, tenure,
(Chair); M. Vancour,                                                                             professional assessment and sabbatical leave
Grade Appeals Committee (DGAC)                   Three elected members and one elected           Conduct student grade appeal hearings,
M. Perlin (expires ’10); W. Stohler (expires     alternative member                              referred by Department Chairperson, consistent
’08); C. Unson (expires ’09); J. Nwangwu                                                         with Department and Faculty Senate guidelines
(alternate)                                                                                      and University policy
Personnel Committee (DPC)                        Three elected tenured members                   Conducts elections for Department
J. Breny Bontempi (expires ’10); P. Gallup                                                       Chairperson. Graduate Assistants, Committee
(expires ’09); M. Perlin (expires 08)                                                            members and Faculty searches
Continuing Education Committee                   Chairperson, one Graduate School liaison, two   Provide recommendations for CEU courses to
D. Flynn (Chair); D. Hendrick (UA); D.           appointed faculty and one appointed             be offered by the Department
Risisky; M. Vancour; W. Faraclas (Ex             practitioner
Officio); Outside members by invitation
Department Elections Representative              One member                                      Conducts Department elections

                                                                     49
                                                           Table 1.5c., Cont’d

                                                    Department of Public Health
                                      Standing and Ad Hoc Committees and Other Representative
                                                 and Advisement Positions, 2007-2008

                 Committee                               Composition                                      Charge
Representative Positions

AAUP Liaison                                     One tenured member              Conduit between faculty and AAUP
S. Bulmer
Buley Library Acquisition Liaison                Two members                     Submit library purchase requests to librarian
W. Faraclas; M. Mann
Connecticut Partnership for PH Workforce         One member                      Promotes collaborative training to enhance the quality of
Development                                                                      public health services
P. Gallup
DEC Hardship Pool                                One tenured member              Available to sit on other Department's DEC by request
J. Nwangwu
Emergency Management Program Planning            One member                      Develop academic programs in emergency management
Coordinator                                                                      for the University
S. Phelps
Environment Health Training Coordinator          One member                      Coordinate State-approved Environmental Health
W. Faraclas                                                                      Training Program
Eta Sigma Gamma Advisor                          One member                      Advisor to national health education honorary
S. Bulmer
Faculty Senator                                  One tenured member              Represent Department on Faculty Senate
W. Faraclas
Graduate Council                                 One tenured member              Represent Department on Graduate Council
M. Perlin (expires 2010)
Graduate Minority Scholars Program Coordinator   One member                      Coordinate Minority Scholars Program
Health Equities Project Coordinator              One member                      Coordinate research to eliminate health disparities
P. Gallup
Honors College Liaison                           One tenured member              Serve as liaison to the honor’s college
S. Bulmer

                                                                      50
                                                             Table 1.5c., Cont’d
                                                       Department of Public Health
                                         Standing and Ad Hoc Committees and Other Representative
                                                    and Advisement Positions, 2007-2008
                    Committee                            Composition                                          Charge
International Field Studies in Health Director    One member                        Direct field school program in Guatemala
W. Faraclas
Public Health Society Advisor                     One or two members                Faculty Advisor(s) to Public Health Society
D. Flynn
School Curriculum Committee                       One member, one alternate         Representative to School Committee which approves all
M. Perlin                                                                           undergraduate and graduate course and program proposals
School Scholarship Reassigned Time Committee      One member                        Review proposals submitted by faculty for release time.
P. Gallup                                                                           Advisors to the Dean of the SHHS
School Research Reassigned Time Committee         One member                        Advises the Dean on the award of research reassigned
P. Gallup                                                                           time to School faculty members
Undergraduate Curriculum Forum                    One member, one alternate         Represent Department of University-wide Committee
                                                                                    which approves all undergraduate Program proposals
Student Research Symposium Coordinator            One member                        Coordinate Department’s research symposium
Graduate Program Advisement Coordinator           Coordinator of Graduate Studies   Assign advisement responsibilities to Faculty Advisors
M. Perlin
Graduate Public Health Advisors                   Eight appointed members           Serve as Academic and Career Advisors to graduate
J. Breny Bontempi; W. Faraclas; P. Gallup;                                          students
J. Nwangwu; M. Perlin; D. Risisky; C. Unson
Undergraduate Program Advisement Coordinator      Coordinator of Undergraduate      Assign advisement responsibilities to Faculty Advisors
M. Vancour                                        Studies
Undergraduate Public Health Advisors              Ten appointed members             Serve as Academic and Career Advisors to undergraduate
J. Breny Bontempi; S. Bulmer; W. Faraclas;                                          students
D. Flynn; P. Gallup; J. Nwangwu; W. Stohler; M.
Vancour
Public Health Minor Advisors                      One appointed members             Advise major and non-majors on matters related to public
D. Flynn                                                                            health minors



                                                                       51
1.5d. Identification of program faculty who hold membership on university committees,
      through which faculty contribute to the activities of the university.

      For academic years 2001-2008, faculty of the Department served on 79 University and
      School Committees, including 49 during 2005-2008. Faculty in the Department of Public
      Health continue to provide a strong presence and voice on University-wide and School
      governing bodies and committees. Many of the Department faculty are consistently
      solicited by University administrators for service on important University and School
      committees. For example, in 2007, the Coordinator of Graduate Studies declined an offer,
      by the Provost, to serve as the University’s first director of the newly established First
      Year Experience (FYE) Committee and the Chairpersonship of the Graduate Council’s
      Academic Standards Committee on which he presently serves as a member; the Provost
      selected a former recipient of the Outstanding Teaching Award to chair this year’s
      selection process; and the Department Chairperson was appointed Chair of the search
      committee to nominate a new Dean of Health and Human Services.

      In the past three years, four faculty members served on University search committees for
      administrative positions, two as members and two as chairpersons. The reputation of the
      faculty remains consistently strong throughout the University as they continue to set new
      standards of excellence in whatever positions they assume.

      Table 1.5d. lists the University and School Committees on which members of the
      Department hold membership. The seven year time frame is presented to emphasize the
      faculty’s ongoing commitment to participation in the affairs of the School and University.




                                              52
                                                    Table 1.5d.

      School and University-Wide Committees on Which Faculty are Represented 2001-2008

                 Committee Name                                                      Committee Name
-Academic Standards Committee of the Graduate Council        -Partnership for Alcohol Responsibility Taskforce
Ad Hoc Committee on Graduate Student Support                 -Peer Education Steering Committee
Ad Hoc Committee on Plagiarism                               -Research and Scholarship Advisory Committee (RSAC)
-Ad Hoc General Education Committee                          -School of Health and Human Services Council of Chairs
-Ad Hoc Committee on Culminating Experiences                 -School of Health and Human Services Curriculum Committee
Ad Hoc Committee for Student Health Research                 -School of Health and Human Services Dean Search Committee
Ad Hoc Thesis Committee of the Graduate Council              -School of Health and Human Services Emergency Preparedness
                                                             Committee
-Advisor, Class of 2005                                      School of Health and Human Services Mission/Vision Committee
-Alcohol and Other Drug Task Force                           -School of Health and Human Services Scholarship Reassigned
                                                             Time Committee
Athletic Council                                             School of Health and Human Services Subcommittee on Diversity
-Be Healthy Coalition                                        -School of Health and Human Services Social Work Advisory
                                                             Committee
-Budget and Planning Committee                               -SCSU Liaison, AHHE/Carnegie Campus Program Affiliate
-Committee W - AAUP                                          SCSU Speaker's Bureau
CSU Teaching Award Committee                                 -Sirico Center on Aging
-Curriculum-Related Activities Committee                     Search Committee – Affirmative Action Officers
-DEC Hardship Pool Committee                                 -Search Committee – Director of Emergency Management
                                                             Masters Program
Executive Committee of the Faculty Senate                    -Search Committee – Director of Health Services
-Executive Committee of Graduate Council                     -Search Committee – Head Basketball Coach
Executive Committee of the University Curriculum             Search Committee – Vice President of University and Student
Committee                                                    Affairs
Faculty Development Committee                                -Senate Subcommittee on Student Policy
Faculty Marshall, Graduate Commencement                      -Student Center Board of Governors
-Faculty Marshall, Undergraduate Commencement                Student Policy Sub-Committee of the Faculty Senate
Faculty Senate                                               Tobacco Cessation Steering Committee
-First Year Experience Committee                             -Undergraduate Curriculum Forum
Freshman Under Restriction Program                           University Core Committee
-General Education Task Force                                -University Curriculum Forum
-Graduate Council and Curriculum Committee                   -University Educational Leadership Advisory Committee
Graduate Research Fellowship Committee                       -University Faculty Retraining Committee
-Graduate School Graduate Assistant Committee                University Honor’s Convocation Committee
Honors College Committee                                     -University Lactation Support Committee
-Health Advisory Liaison Board                               -University Mediation Committee
-Institutional Review Board                                  University Planning and Budget Committee
International Studies Committee                              University Research and Scholarship Advisory Committee
-Liberal Studies Advisement Committee                        -University Sabbatical Leave Committee
Mentoring Committee                                          University Search Committees
Minority Recruitment Committee                               -University Teacher of the Year Committee
-New Student Orientation Committee                           -University Terminations Hearing Committee
-Notifications Management Committee                          University Committee on Work-Life
Outstanding Teacher Selection Committee                      -Voices for Haiti Grant Writing Committee
                                                             -Work-Life Balance Conference Committee
         * -Italicized committees (N=49) represent those on which faculty served from AY 2006-2008.



                                                     53
Faculty contributions to School governance occur on a regular basis through meetings
between the Dean and Department Chairperson and through a variety of formal and
informal interactions between the Dean and Department faculty. Each semester, the Dean
conducts a School-wide meeting that focuses on the topics of faculty development and
provides an opportunity for inter-departmental communication among the faculty. The
School sponsors two standing committees, Scholarship Reassigned Time Committee and
Curriculum Committee, and an ad hoc Multi-disciplinary Project Committee, which
provide faculty with channels for influencing policy and decision-making regarding
research and interdepartmental cooperation—with Department representation on each.

Within the Department of Public Health the Chairperson assumes the leadership role in
Program administration. The Department faculty selects the Chairperson, whose
appointment recommendation is approved by the Dean of the School and the University
President. The selection process, conducted by the Department Personnel Committee,
follows the CBA and Faculty Senate guidelines, both of which require maximum faculty
participation in governance.

The terms of governance and Program development for the Department of Public Health
are defined and operationalized in the Department Bylaws. The CBA (Article 5.21, pp.
40-41) requires each department to have written procedures governing the operations of
the department that have been approved by the full-time faculty. The Department
periodically reviews and amends its Bylaws, as appropriate. The Bylaws describe the
administrative, governance and committee structures which affect general program and
policy development and regular Departmental operating procedures. In addition, the
Bylaws describe the procedures for the conduct of meetings, voting, composition and
responsibilities of committees and representative positions, content of course outlines,
responsibilities of adjunct faculty, and procedures for filing amendments and grievances
(see Appendix 12).

Prior to the beginning of each academic year, the Chairperson sets a schedule for monthly
faculty meetings, which all full-time faculty are required to attend, and to which adjunct
faculty are invited. The monthly meeting provides faculty with a formal opportunity to
contribute to Program policy and development, through participation in the development
of the agenda and in open discussions about Program-related matters. Meetings are
conducted using a relaxed form of Robert's Rules of Order.

At the Departmental level, the primary responsibility for Program governance is granted
to the GPC and UPC under the leadership of their respective Coordinators. The specific
roles and responsibilities of these program committees are stipulated in the Department
Bylaws, Section III. A.1 and 2, pages 2 and 3, respectively. The Committees are
composed of full-time faculty appointed by the Department Chairperson, who also is a
member ex officio. Since its inception, the GPC has invited participation of graduate
students who represent cohort members. The Coordinators conduct monthly meetings of
the Committees. In addition to the UPC and GPC, there are many other Department
committees which directly and indirectly affect the governance of the Program. The most

                                        54
        Program-relevant committees include: Evaluation and Sabbatical, Personnel, Continuing
        Education, Ad Hoc Goals and Objectives, and Grade Appeals. Other ongoing positions
        which have an impact on Program policy and decision-making include representatives to:
        Faculty Senate, Graduate Council, University Promotion and Tenure Committee, School
        Scholarship Reassigned-Time Committee, and School Curriculum Committee. For a
        complete list of Department committees, representative positions and faculty
        assignments, see Table 1.5c.

1.5e.   Description of student roles in governance, including any formal student
        organizations, and student roles in evaluation and planning functioning.

        Graduate students are offered a wide variety of opportunities to participate in Program
        governance, including policy-setting, decision-making and evaluation under the faculty-
        endorsed philosophies that learning is a partnership and that all Department activities
        should support the learning experience. Opportunities for student participation in the
        governance and evaluation of the B.S. degree program are somewhat more limited,
        although ample opportunity for input is made available. Documentation related to student
        participation in Program governance will be provided under appropriate criteria.

        ► Participation on GPC. As previously referenced under various criteria in this
          Document, the GPC is the policy-making body for the Program whose members
          oversee the quality of the graduate curriculum. The composition and roles of the
          Committee are established in the Department Bylaws and include appointed faculty
          and student cohort representatives. Firm in its belief in "learning as partnership," the
          Department has encouraged active participation of students in the governance of the
          Graduate Program since its inception and relies on the student cohort representatives to
          communicate the needs and concerns of their constituencies to the GPC and to serve as
          information channels to members of the various cohorts. Student representatives are
          provided with class time for the purpose of reporting to and/or eliciting comments
          from students. Student representatives are invited to contribute to all discussions at
          GPC meetings and are included as a standing item on all GPC agendas. Committee
          meetings, scheduled monthly during the regular academic semesters, also are open to
          all students and faculty. Student participation presently is not included on the
          Undergraduate Program Committee.

        ► Report to the Graduate Council. See previous discussion under Criterion 1.3c.

        ► Course Evaluations. Students are presented with the opportunity to participate in the
          evaluation of core courses through both mid-semester and end-of-term course
          evaluation surveys. Students are encouraged to participate in these assessments and are
          aware that the outcomes are given significant weight in decisions regarding faculty
          reappointments, tenure and promotion by Department and University evaluation
          committees. Mid-course evaluations, although not a contractual requirement, have
          been part of the degree programs for at least 15 years. A description of the processes
          used for student course evaluation and evaluation of teaching effectiveness is

                                                55
  discussed under Criterion 4.2d.

► Evaluation of Internship. As discussed under Criterion 2.4a., students are involved in
  the evaluation of their internship experience through completion of the Confidential
  Student's Internal Evaluation of the Field Placement Experience Form which is used,
  in part, by the Coordinator, to determine the appropriateness of retaining the
  agency/program as a future placement opportunity and/or the preceptor in his or her
  present role. The internship seminar, required weekly journals, final Assessment of
  Fieldwork Site, and an Activities and Recommendations presentation, afford additional
  opportunities for students to offer in-depth evaluations of the internship experience.

► SCSU Alumni Association, Public Health Chapter. All graduates are provided
  continued opportunities to contribute to the evaluation of the Program through their
  association with the Public Health Chapter of the SCSU Alumni Association, in two
  significant ways. First, the Alumni Chapter conducts extensive and independent
  Alumni Surveys on a regular basis. The surveys, developed and analyzed by the
  Chapter, provide a comprehensive assessment of the Program, whose results are
  forwarded to the Coordinators for review. The second means, perhaps more relevant to
  the preparation of the CEPH Self-Study Document, is the opportunity to participate on
  the Chapter's Accreditation Committee, which has provided the Department with
  significant Program analyses viewed as critical to the conduct of the comprehensive
  Study required by CEPH. M.P.H graduates have been surveyed since 1994 and B.S.
  graduates since 2007 (Reference File 5).

► All-Cohorts Meeting. An additional formal mechanism available to facilitate graduate
  student participation in Program evaluation and functioning includes the all-cohorts
  meeting which provides students with an open forum to discuss their concerns and
  suggestions within a supportive environment comprised of their colleagues.

► Contact With Faculty and Program Administration. An informal mechanism
  which provides students with ongoing opportunities to impact Program functioning is
  through contact with faculty advisors, the Department Chairperson and Coordinators.
  Students are actively encouraged to voice their ideas and concerns.

► Graduate Assistants and University Assistant. Students who serve as Graduate
  Assistants, working closely with faculty, and the University Assistant who serves as
  Program staff, are advantageously positioned to offer valuable input related to the
  Program’s administration, student needs and satisfaction.

► CEPH Self-Study. Graduate and undergraduate students and alumni involvement in
  the CEPH Self-Study process are an integral part of the overall assessment. The
  M.P.H. and B.S. Alumni Surveys and student version of the Graduate Council Survey
  were analyzed to obtain detailed information about student perceptions of the each of
  the Programs, for use and preparation of appropriate sections of the Self-Study
  Document and for program revision where appropriate.

                                       56
        ► Program Exit Survey. Beginning in 2006, all graduating M.P.H. students were
          provided the opportunity to complete a 20-item Program Exit Survey. The Survey was
          implemented for graduating B.S. students in Spring 2008 (Reference File 6).

        ► Evaluation of M.P.H. Orientation. Students’ evaluations help shape the Orientation
          for the subsequent year (Reference File 7).

        ► Academic and Career Satisfaction Survey. Provides the opportunity for students to
          comment on the relevancy of the Program’s academic and career advisement
          (Reference File 8).

        ► Evaluation of Cultural Humility Training Workshop. Students’ evaluations are
          discussed with the trainer to enhance effectiveness of subsequent workshops
          (Reference File 9).

        ► Web-based Anonymous Feedback. The Department provides students with the
          opportunity to submit anonymous comments to either the Graduate or Undergraduate
          Program Coordinators. Commentary received by the respective Coordinators are
          shared with their Committees and are discussed under Criterion 4.6b.

        ► List-Servs. To maximize student-to-student contact, providing important
          announcements, requests, and position announcements, the Department maintains list-
          servs for graduate and undergraduate students and alumni. URLs for the Listservs are
          available under Criterion 4.6a.

        ► Public Health Society. As a faculty-advised organization for undergraduates students,
          the Public Health Society provides a forum for student involvement in the affairs of the
          Department.

1.5f.   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

        This Criterion is met.

        Strengths. Within the framework of University rules and regulations, Program
        administration and faculty have access to extensive opportunities to participate in policy
        and decision-making to assure integrity of the Program and to allow accomplishment of
        the Program’s stated mission, goals and objectives. Within the School of Health and
        Human Services and Department of Public Health, the committee structure, Program
        governing bodies, cohort structure, student cohort representatives (graduate program),
        comprehensive advisement process and active alumni chapter provide faculty and
        students with many opportunities to contribute to Program governance.

        Within the University, School and Department, faculty and, to a lesser extent, students
        have played an active, and in many instances, a leadership role on committees and in
        representative capacities to affect policy and decision-making. The Department continues

                                                 57
to encourage its members to participate on each level of governance and is committed to
finding increased opportunities for student involvement in policy and decision-making,
especially at the Program level.

Opportunities for students to participate in Program evaluation procedures, policy-making
and decision-making are numerous and varied. The inclusion of students as a permanent
component of the Graduate Program Committee attests to the value placed on student
input by the Program's administration and faculty. As discussed previously, the Program
is founded on the belief that "learning is a partnership" and as such, there is an
expectation that students will be involved in every aspect of the Program with the
exception of those activities which are contractually reserved for faculty only.

The part-time status of the majority of graduate students limits opportunities for
individual participation in policy-setting and decision-making at the Program level due to
the difficulty of arranging meeting times which are convenient for all students and
faculty. The system of cohort representation was designed specifically to address this
limitation.

The Department's new Listservs provide all students and alumni with 24-hour access to
important information about the Department, Program, courses, continuing education and
career opportunities. An anonymous feedback link to the Department’s redesigned Web
site provides all students with a convenient communication tool for commenting on any
aspect of their experience in the program.

The Public Health Society provides opportunities for collective input by undergraduate
students into Program governance. Graduate students may serve on a University-wide
Graduate Student Affairs Committee as a representative of the graduate program. While
there is not a “club” for graduate students associated with the Department, M.P.H.
students are encouraged to participate in the Connecticut Public Health Association,
American Public Health Association, and Society for Public Health Education.

Student success is one of the Department’s highest priority. On-going attention is given to
creating opportunities and strategies for constituent input into program governance and
evaluation that promote educational excellence.

Weaknesses. The absence of undergraduate students on standing and ad hoc committees
remains an ongoing discussion in the Department. Interest in a graduate student
organization has been minimal with students citing lack of time as the greatest obstacle.




                                        58
                                        CRITERION 1.6

                                          RESOURCES

Criterion I.6.: The Program shall have resources adequate to fulfill its stated mission and
goals, and its instructional, research and service objectives.

1.6a. A description of the budgetary and allocation processes, sufficient to understand all
      sources of funds that support the teaching, research and service activities of the
      program. This should include, as appropriate, discussions about legislative
      appropriations, formula for funds distribution, tuition generation and retention,
      gifts, grants and contracts, indirect cost recovery, taxes or levies imposed by the
      university or other entity within the university, and other policies that impact on the
      resources available to the program.

       On behalf of the Public Health Faculty the Department Chairperson prepares and submits
       to the Dean of Health and Human Services a budget request for the upcoming fiscal year
       (beginning July 1), for funding for Department Operating Expenses and other-than-full-
       time personnel (which includes University Assistants, Graduate Assistants and work-
       study employees). Once approved by the academic dean, the proposed budget is
       submitted to the Office of the Provost, and reviewed by offices of Academic Affairs and
       Fiscal Affairs, where final decisions are made in consultation with the academic dean.
       Funding for full-time faculty, clerical staff and adjunct faculty is handled centrally, and is
       not directly allocated to departments. All full-time faculty positions are fully funded by
       the University.

       Tuition payments go into the University general account, and are not distributed to
       departments, with one potential exception. The Dean of Health and Human Services has
       proposed revenue sharing for special, budgeted courses for which tuition funds are made
       available for course expenses. Implementation of an enabling policy is anticipated from
       the Dean’s Office.

       To encourage the pursuit of grants in which the University receives its full Federal Fixed
       and Administrative Cost Rate (F&A rate), the Dean of Health and Human Services is in
       the process of instituting a new rebate policy for all grants receiving F&A in which a
       portion of the F&A is returned to the School. Distribution of funds received by the School
       will include 25% to the Department Chairperson and 25% to the Principal Investigator(s).
       A portion of the 50% of funds retained by the Dean’s Office will be used for travel
       support, small pilot grants for scholarly activities, or other appropriate requests.

1.6b. A clearly formulated budget statement, showing sources of all available funds and
      expenditures by major categories, since the last accreditation visit or for the first
      five years, which ever is longer. If the program does not have a separate budget, it
      must present an estimate of available funds and expenditures by major category and
      explain the basis of the estimate. This information must be presented in table format

                                                 59
         as appropriate to the program. See Data Template A.

         The major source of funding for the Department is the University, which provides support
         from a central budget for full- and part-time faculty and clerical staff, and which provides
         discretionary funding or operational expenditures, including educational equipment,
         office supplies, Graduate Assistantships, University Assistantships, University Student
         Employees, and other discretionary spending. Through a contractual arrangement, the
         University also provides travel reimbursement up to $1,000 per year for each full-time
         faculty member and $600 per year for each adjunct faculty member. Bond Fund
         allocations from the State are apportioned among departments. Grants and contracts
         provide a second major source of funding for the Department. In each budget cycle the
         Department fully expends all of its income to support faculty, staff and programs.

                                                  Table 1.6b.

Template A (1.6b.) Sources of Funds and Expenditures by Major Category

Table 1.6.b. Sources of Funds and Expenditures by Major Category, Fiscal Years 2002 to 2008
                              FY 02       FY 03        FY 04        FY 05         FY 06      FY 07     FY 08
Source of Funds
Tuition & Fees                  NA          NA           NA           NA            NA         NA       NA
State Appropriation             NA          NA           NA           NA            NA         NA       NA
University Funds -          Note: add
Dedicated                   FT/PT/sec
University Funds -            55,339      65,240       84,500       84,500        84,500     86,615    87,298
Discretionary
Grants/Contracts             106,885      19,514          0         62,397       185,156    153,443    35,246
Indirect Cost Recovery          NA          NA           NA           NA            NA         NA       NA
Endowment                       NA          NA           NA           NA            NA         NA       NA
Gifts                           NA          NA           NA           NA            NA         NA       NA
Bond Fund Allocation           3,000       4,000        5,000        5,000         6,200        0         0
Special Allocation              NA          NA           NA           NA            NA       1,500*     NA
Travel Funding                12,000      12,000       11,000       11,000        12,000     14,000    15,000
Total Revenue                 70,339      81,240      100,500      100,500       102,700    102,115   102,298

Expenditures
Faculty Salaries &          735,475     999,340       917,074    962,103     1,071,890    1,299,984   1,540,227
Benefits
Staff Salaries & Benefits
University Funds for        181,840     259,308       268,491    277,543      283,550      276,730    295,500
Adjunct Faculty
Operations                  55,339       65,240        84,500     84,500       84,500       88,115     87,298
Travel                      12,000       12,000        11,000     11,000       12,000       14,000     15,000
Student Support              NA           NA            NA         NA           NA           NA         NA
University Tax               NA           NA            NA         NA           NA           NA         NA
Total Expenditures          70,339       81,240       100,500    100,500      102,700      102,115    102,298
Balance                       0            0             0           0           0            0           0
*Special allocations was made to the Department by the Administration to support a “Preparing
  for Statistics” Workshop.

                                                      60
1.6c.   If the program is a collaborative one sponsored by two or more universities, the
        budget statement must make clear the financial contributions of each sponsoring
        university to the overall program budget. This should be accompanied by a
        description of how tuition and other income is shared, including indirect cost
        returns for research generated by public health program faculty who may have
        their primary appointment elsewhere.

        Not applicable.

1.6d. A concise statement or chart concerning the number (headcount) of core faculty
      employed by the program as of fall for each of the last three years.

        Table 1.6d. presents data on core program faculty for AY 2005-2008.

                                               Table 1.6d.

                               Core Program Faculty, AY 2005-2008

      2005-2006                   2006-2007                     2007-2008                    2008-2009
11 Full-time Members         12 Full-time Members          15 Full-time Members         15 Full-time Members
Dr. Carloyn Parks Bani         Resigned –CDC-P
                                                          Dr. Ellen Beatty              Dr. Ellen Beatty
                                                                                        Prof. Stanley Bernard
                                                                                        (ABD)
Dr. Jean Breny              Dr. Jean Breny                Dr. Jean Breny                Dr. Jean Breny
Bontempi                    Bontempi                      Bontempi                      Bontempi
                            Prof. Mary Ann Boos *         Prof. Mary Ann Boos *
Dr. Sandra Bulmer           Dr. Sandra Bulmer             Dr. Sandra Bulmer             Dr. Sandra Bulmer
                                                                                        Dr. Richard Cain
Prof. Debra Flynn           Prof. Debra Flynn             Prof. Debra Flynn             Dr. Debra Flynn
Dr. William Faraclas        Dr. William Faraclas          Dr. William Faraclas          Dr. William Faraclas
Dr. Peggy Gallup            Dr. Peggy Gallup              Dr. Peggy Gallup              Dr. Peggy Gallup
                                                          Prof. Carolyn Millman *
Dr. John Nwangwu            Dr. John Nwangwu              Dr. John Nwangwu              Dr. John Nwangwu
Dr. David Pearson           Dr. David Pearson                      Retired                      Retired
                                                          Prof. Scot Phelps             Prof. Scot Phelps
Dr. Michael Perlin          Dr. Michael Perlin            Dr. Michael Perlin            Dr. Michael Perlin
                                                          Dr. Debra Risisky             Dr. Debra Risisky
Dr. William Stohler         Dr. William Stohler           Dr. William Stohler           Dr. William Stohler
                            Dr. Christine Unson           Dr. Christine Unson           Dr. Christine Unson
Dr. Michele Vancour         Dr. Michele Vancour           Dr. Michele Vancour           Dr. Michele Vancour
* Special (Temporary) Appointee, eligible for two years of appointments in a six-year window.

        The Department of Public Health is comprised of 15 full-time faculty members. From
        2005 to 2008, the faculty grew from 11-15 members, an increase of 36%.

                                                     61
1.6e.    A table showing faculty, students, and student/faculty ratios, organized by specialty
         area, for each of the last three years. These data must be presented in table format
         and include at least: a) headcount of primary faculty who support the teaching
         programs, b) FTE conversion of faculty based on % time or % salary support
         devoted to the instructional programs, c) headcount of other faculty involved in the
         teaching programs (adjunct, part-time, secondary appointments, etc.), d) FTE
         conversion of other faculty based on estimate of % time commitment, e) total
         headcount of core faculty plus other faculty, f) total FTE of core and other faculty,
         g) headcount of students in department or program area, i) student FTE divided by
         regular faculty FTE and j) student FTE divided by total faculty FTE, including
         other. All programs must provide data for a), b) and i) and may provide data for c),
         d) and j) depending on whether the program intends to include the contributions of
         other faculty in its FTE calculations. Note: CEPH does not specify the manner in
         which FTE faculty must be calculated, so the program should explain its method in
         a footnote to this table. In addition, FTE data in this table must match FTE data
         presented in 4.1.a. and 4.1.b. See CEPH Data Template B.

                                                     Table 1.6e.

Template B (1.6e.) Faculty, Students, and Student/Faculty Ratios by Specialty Area

                         HC       FTEF       HC      FTEF        Total      Total     HC         FTE       SFR    SFR
                        Core      Core      Other    Other      Faculty     FTEF    Students   Students     by     by
                       Faculty             Faculty                HC                                      Core   Total
                                                                                                          FTEF   FTEF
MPH/CHE
MPH/Generalist


BS/Health
Promotion
BS/Environmental
Health
BS/Generalist         Effective fall 2008
* Table must include footnote explaining the school’s method for calculating faculty FTE and student FTE. CEPH
does not specify the manner in which this should be done.

Refer to Criterion 1.6.e. for further explanation of template categories.

Key:
HC = Head Count
Core = full-time faculty who support the teaching programs
FTE = Full-time-equivalent
FTEF = Full-time-equivalent faculty
Other = adjunct, part-time and secondary faculty
Total = Core + Other
SFR = Student/Faculty Ratio




                                                           62
1.6f.   A concise statement or chart concerning the availability of other personal
        (administration and staff).

        In addition to faculty, the Department of Public Health is staffed by one full-time
        secretary, one part-time University Assistant, three part-time Graduate Assistants, and
        three part-time University Student Employees (work-study).

        Program administration consists of a Department Chairperson, 75% of whose time is
        dedicated to administrative duties, and Graduate and Undergraduate Program
        Coordinators, who each dedicate 25% of time for administrative duties. The Coordinators
        are assisted by a University Assistant for 19 hours per week. In addition, the Department
        dedicates 12.5% of one member's time to serve as Internship Coordinator.

        A Department Secretary, assisted by three part-time work-study employees, provides
        broad clerical support, sufficient to address the needs of the program. The Department
        utilizes Graduate Assistants to support a variety of program-related activities.

1.6g. A concise statement or floor plan concerning amount of space available to the program
      by purposes (offices, classrooms, common space for student use, etc.), by program and
      location.

        The Department of Public Health is located in the Rocco Orlando Public Health Building,
        (a.k.a. "Orlando House"), an eight-room colonial farmhouse. The 1,750 square feet of
        useable space includes a secretary's office/reception and production area, conference
        room and six offices which accommodates nine faculty, one Secretary, one University
        Assistant, three Graduate Assistants, and three work-study students. Because of space
        limitations, six faculty are located outside the Orlando Building in single offices: four in a
        newly erected building; one in the Lang Social Work Center, and one in the old student
        center. The Graduate Assistants, work-study students and faculty adjuncts perform duties
        mainly in the Orlando Building conference room, but also use the reception area and
        faculty offices when available. The University Assistant is located in a cubicle in the
        main office space.

        The University Master Plan includes the construction of a building to house the entire
        School of Health and Human Services, including the Department of Public Health, to be
        completed by 2015. The Governor of Connecticut recently signed into law a $950 million
        dollar bonding initiative, known as “CSU 2020,” which will provide funding for the new
        building (Appendix 13). More immediately, the University is forging a partnership with
        the City of New Haven and a national developer to create a University community
        services building as part of a comprehensive, neighborhood revitalization program—the
        West Rock Project. The building will house interdisciplinary clinics and health-related
        programs, operated by departments of the University, including the Public Health. This
        project will focus the Department’s service and community-based participatory research
        activities.



                                                  63
        The Program has access to suitably-equipped University classrooms, sufficient to meet
        the instructional needs of the Program. In September 2006, the University opened the
        Michael J. Adanti Student Center, making available space for student meetings, study
        groups and other activities.

1.6h. A concise statement or floor plan concerning laboratory space, including kind,
      quantity and special features or special equipment.

        Not applicable.

1.6i.   A concise statement concerning the amount, location and types of computer facilities
        and resources for students, faculty, administration and staff.

        Every tenure-track faculty member receives a new personal computer every three years,
        and has continual access to computer software and updates, supported by the University's
        Office of Information Technology and a responsive “Helpdesk” that provides on-site and
        remote technical assistance. Faculty members, students, staff and Program administrators
        have wired and wireless access to the Internet and campus network, including software
        sufficient to support Program-related activities. The University provides computer access
        to students through an extensive network of computer laboratories.

1.6j.   A concise statement of library/information resources available for program use,
        including description of library capabilities in providing digital (electronic) content,
        access mechanisms and guidance in using them, and document delivery services.

        Hilton C. Buley Library is the center of learning activities on campus. The library
        currently holds more than 578,693 volumes and volume equivalents. This number
        includes 395,208 circulating book titles, 43, 412 reference book titles, 1,400 ebooks,
        64,140 bound journals, 35, 012 government documents, and 23, 605 microfilm volume
        equivalents. Buley also provides access to over 175 web-based indexes and databases and
        boasts the second most comprehensive health collection in Connecticut, including over
        700 health and health-related periodicals, and over 6,000 monographs, books, and
        government documents. The public health collection, most of which falls into Library of
        Congress Class RA, Public Aspects of Medicine, is among the fastest growing at Buley
        Library. Between 2003-2007, 1,460 titles were added to the public health collection. In
        2007, Buley Library was expanded by the addition of 135,430 square feet. This expansion
        provides an increase in both stack and reader space, bringing the Library up to the
        Association of College and Research Libraries space standards for an institution the size
        of SCSU (Appendix 14).

        Also located in Buley are several academic support centers, including the Curriculum
        Library, the Learning Resources Center, the Administrative Computer Center, the
        Educational Research Center, and the Instructional Resources Center. On the first floor
        are online and CD-ROM catalogs, the main circulation desk, reference stacks, circulating
        books, and study tables. On the second floor are more circulating books and additional

                                                64
        study areas, and on the third floor are the Mac and PC labs and the Learning Resources
        Center, which provides audiovisual learning tools for students. The fourth floor houses
        the Library Science and Instructional Technology Department.

1.6k. A concise statement describing community resources available for instruction,
      research and service, indicating those where formal agreements exist.

        A broad spectrum of community resources contributes to the Program's mosaic of
        instruction, research and service. Numerous health practitioners throughout the State,
        representing a wide range of public-health and health-education programs, health-care
        agencies and neighboring academic institutions, contribute to the Program as guest
        lecturers, instructors and consultants. These and other professionals comprise the
        membership of the Department Advisory Council.

        Since the inception of the Program's internship requirement in 1980 (B.S.) and 1995
        (M.P.H.), hundreds of student interns have completed the field practicum at 100 different
        field sites, including official (e.g., NCI. and CDC) and non-governmental agencies and
        programs, all of which have required, formal agreements with the University.

        Special Projects, one of the culminating experience options, must be agency-based,
        necessitating collaboration with many agencies for student research and service. Many
        theses fit this agency-relationship model, as well. Program faculty members, in turn,
        provide consultations to local health departments, voluntary health agencies and other
        health and health-related organizations.

        Through a co-sponsorship collaboration agreement with the State Department of Public
        Health, the Southern Connecticut State University Department of Public Health has
        become Connecticut's only training site for sanitarians. Our annual Environmental Health
        Training Program—endorsed by the Connecticut Association of Directors of Health, the
        Connecticut Public Health Association, and the Connecticut Environmental Health
        Association—leading to State certifications in both Food Protection and On-Site Septic
        Systems.

        Looking ahead, as described in 1.6g., the West Rock Project will provide a unique
        opportunity for faculty and students to conduct research and service activities in a
        community setting.

1.6l.   A concise statement of the amount and source of “in-kind” academic contributions
        available for instruction, research and service, indicating where formal agreements
        exist.

        Not applicable.

1.6m. Indication of outcome measures by which the program may judge the adequacy of
      its resources, along with data regarding the program’s performance against those

                                                 65
measures for each of the last three years. At a minimum, the program must provide
data on institutional expenditures per full-time equivalent student, research dollars
per full-time-equivalent faculty, and extramural funding (service or training) as a
percent of the total budget.

Table 1.6m. presents outcome measures by which the program judges the adequacy of its
resources, along with data regarding the program’s performance against those measures
for years 2006-2008. Shaded boxes indicate outcome measures that were not met.
Appendix 15 contains the Annual Audit of Program Resources for 2006-2008.




                                      66
                                                                       Table 1.6m.

                                                Summary Audit of Program Resources for 2006-2008

Completed by:          Department Chair (Chair)
                       Coordinator of Graduate Studies (CGS)
                       Coordinator of Undergraduate Studies (CUS)                                   Date ______________________________


   Category                  Resource Objectives                                      Outcome Measures (Targets)                  2006    2007   2008
Faculty/Staff   1. An adequate number of faculty will provide             100% of graduate academic advisors will have an        1:6     1:6      1:6
                academic advisement.                                      advisor-graduate student ratio of 1:15 or less. (CGS
                                                                          audit)
                                                                          100% of undergraduate academic advisors will have      1:17    1:17    1:16
                                                                          an advisor-undergraduate student ratio of 1:20 or
                                                                          less. (CUS audit)
                2. Sufficient full-time faculty will be available to      The majority of required graduate courses will be      100%    100%    100%
                teach required core courses.                              taught by full-time faculty. (CGS audit)
                                                                          The majority of required undergraduate courses will
                                                                          be taught by full-time faculty. (CUS audit)
                3. Required core courses will be taught by a              No more than 2 required graduate courses will be         0       0      0
                sufficiently broad number of faculty.                     taught by the same faculty member. (CGS audit)
                                                                          No more than 2 required undergraduate courses will       0       0      0
                                                                          be taught by the same faculty member. (CUS audit)
                4. Specialization courses in the M.P.H. program           At least three faculty, employed full-time by the        3       3      3
                will be taught by a sufficiently broad number of          University, will teach the courses in the
                faculty.                                                  specializations.
                5. Faculty will possess credentials appropriate to        100% of faculty of graduate courses will hold a        100%    100%    100%
                course assignments.                                       doctorate; and will have study or experience in the
                                                                          assigned subject area. (CGS audit)
                                                                          100% of faculty of undergraduate courses will hold     100%    100%    100%
                                                                          at least a master’s degree; and will have study or
                                                                          experience in the assigned subject area. (CUS audit)




                                                   67
  Category                Resource Objectives                               Outcome Measures (Targets)                   2006      2007     2008
             6. A demographically diverse faculty will serve     Each of the four major ethnic groups in Connecticut     3 of 4   3 of 4   3 of 4
             the Program.                                        (White Non-Hispanic; African American/Black Non-
                                                                 Hispanic; Hispanic; Asian-American-Pacific Islands)
                                                                 will be represented on the faculty of the Program.
                                                                 No gender shall comprise more than 2/3 of the full-     58%       58%      67%
                                                                 time faculty of the Program.                            Female   Female   Female
             7. Adequate secretarial/clerical support will be    1 or more full-time secretaries will support the          1        1        1
             provided to the Program.                            Department each academic year. (Chair audit)
                                                                 .25 or more clerical positions will support the          .25      .25      .25
                                                                 graduate program each academic year. (CGS audit)
                                                                 .25 or more clerical positions will support the          .25      .25      .25
                                                                 undergraduate program each academic year. (CUS
                                                                 audit)
                                                                 2 or more GAs will be employed by the Department          3        3        3
                                                                 each semester. (Chair audit)
                                                                 2 or more work study students will be employed by         4        5        4
                                                                 the Department each semester. (Chair audit)
             9. A demographically diverse staff will serve the   At least ¼ of the staff serving the Program will come   2 of 2   2 of 2   2 of 2
             Program.                                            from underrepresented ethnic groups.

Courses      1. Required fall courses will be offered with a     Each required graduate course, with the exception of    100%     100%     100%
             reasonable class size.                              PCH 510, which is offered as an institute course
                                                                 during wintersession, will have no more than 20
                                                                 students. (CGS audit)
                                                                 Each required undergraduate course will have no         85%       85%      85%
                                                                 more than 30 students. (CUS audit)
             2. Sufficient elective courses will be offered.     A minimum of 5 graduate elective course will be           7        6        6
                                                                 offered each year (CGS audit)
                                                                 A minimum of 5 undergraduate electives will be
                                                                 offered each semester. (CUS audit)

Space        1. High technology classrooms will be used for      100% of graduate courses will be offered in high        100%     100%     100%
             courses.                                            technology classrooms. (CGS audit)
                                                                 100% of required undergraduate courses will be          100%     100%     100%

                                               68
  Category                     Resource Objectives                                  Outcome Measures (Targets)                   2006      2007      2008
                                                                        offered in high technology classrooms. (CUS audit)
                 2. Faculty will have access to computer                100% of faculty teaching graduate biostatistics and      2 of 2    2 of 2    2 of 2
                 classrooms.                                            epidemiology will have access to computer
                                                                        classrooms. (CGS audit)
                                                                        100% of faculty teaching undergraduate                   1 of 1    1 of 1    1 of 1
                                                                        epidemiology will have access to computer
                                                                        classrooms. (CUS audit)
                 3. Adequate office space will be provided for          100% of full-time faculty of the Department will be       6 of      6 of      6 of
                 faculty.                                               assigned single offices. (Chair audit)                     12        15        15
                                                                        A single office will be provided for use by adjunct         0         0         0
                                                                        faculty. (Chair audit)
                 4. Adequate space for ancillary staff.                 UAs will be provided with office space. (Chair           1 of 1 1 of 1       1 of 1
                                                                        audit)
                 5. Adequate non-classroom space will be                A student congregation area will be provided with        Student   Student   Student
                 available for student use.                             computer and Internet access. (Chair audit)              Center    Center    Center


Faculty Access   1. Access to adequate audio-visual equipment and  100% of faculty of graduate courses will have access          100%      100%      100%
to Technology    support will be provided to faculty.              to AV support. (CGS audit)
                                                                   100% of faculty of undergraduate major courses will           100%      100%      100%
                                                                   have access to AV support. (CGS audit)
                 2. Access to personal computers and software will 100% of full-time faculty will be provided by the             100%      100%      100%
                 be provided to faculty                            University a computer every three years that is
                                                                   loaded with all appropriate software. (Chair audit)
                 3. Access to appropriate computer support will be 100% of faculty will have access to computer                  100%      100%      100%
                 provided to faculty.                              technical support. (Chair audit)
                 4. Internet access will be provided to faculty.   100% of faculty will have access to the Internet on           100%      100%      100%
                                                                   their University computer. (Chair audit)
                 5. Email accounts and access will be provided to  100% of faculty will have access to a University              100%      100%      100%
                 faculty.                                          email account. (Chair audit)

Library          1. A sufficient journal collection will be available   100% of faculty will have access to a journal            100%      100%      100%
Materials        in the library.                                        collection adequate for instructional purposes. (Chair
                                                                        audit)
                 2. Sufficient book collection will be available in     100% of faculty will have access to a book collection    100%      100%      100%

                                                   69
  Category                 Resource Objectives                                 Outcome Measures (Targets)                   2006     2007     2008
             the library.                                           adequate for instructional purposes. (Chair audit)
             3. Sufficient online references will be available in   100% of faculty will have access to online references   100%    100%     100%
             the library.                                           adequate for instructional and research purposes.
                                                                    (Chair audit)

Students     1. Students admitted to the M.P.H. Program will        100% of students admitted to the M.P.H. Program         100%     100%     100%
             express motivation for a career public health.         will have expressed in a written essay interest in a
                                                                    career in public health.
             2. Students admitted to the M.P.H. Program will        100% of students admitted to the M.P.H. Program         100%     100%     100%
             possess educational pre-requisites.                    will have a minimum of a Bachelor’s degree with a
                                                                    minimum GPA or 3.0.
             3. Students admitted to the B.S. Program will          100% of students admitted to the B.S. Program will      Academic standard for
             possess educational pre-requisites.                    have a minimum GPA of 2.5.                              admission effective fall
                                                                                                                            2008.
             4. Students admitted to the M.P.H. Program will        100% of students admitted to the M.P.H. Program         100% 100% 100%
             provide testimony of potential for a career in         will provide a minimum of two letters of
             public health.                                         recommendation indicating potential for a career in
                                                                    public health.
             1. The student body of the M.P.H. Program will         At least 1/3 of the student body will be comprised of    50%      60%     42%
             be demographically diverse                             persons of color.
             2. The student body of the B.S. Program will be        At least 1/3 of the student body will be comprised of    56%      45%     22%
             demographically diverse                                persons of color.

Student      1. Computers will be accessible to students on         100% of students will have access to computers on       100%    100%     100%
Resources    campus.                                                campus. (Chair audit)
             2. Email accounts and access will be provided to       100% of students will be provided with a University     100%    100%     100%
             students.                                              email account. (Chair audit)
             3. Means to provide input into Program will be         An anonymous computerized means of providing            100%    100%     100%
             provided to students.                                  feedback on the Program will be available to all
                                                                    graduate students. (CGS audit)
                                                                    An anonymous computerized means of providing              0        0       Yes
                                                                    feedback on the Program will be available to all
                                                                    undergraduate students. (CUS audit)



                                               70
  Category                   Resource Objectives                               Outcome Measures (Targets)                     2006    2007    2008
               3. Listservs will be provided to students and        100% of students and alumni will have access to             0    100%    100%
               alumni                                               Department maintained listservs.
               4. Access to Program documents will be provided      Major program documents will be accessible to all          0       0     100%
               to students.                                         graduate students. (CGS audit)
                                                                    Major program documents will be accessible to all         100%   100%    100%
                                                                    undergraduate students. (CUS audit)
               5. Institutional expenditures per full-time
               equivalent student.

Community      1. Appropriate community-based advisory group.       An active, qualified Advisory Council will support        Yes     No      Yes
Resources                                                           the Program. (Chair audit)
               2. Adequate thesis and special project sites.        A community agency site will be available for each        100%   100%    100%
                                                                    graduate student wishing to do an agency-based
                                                                    thesis or special project. (CGS audit)
               3. Adequate internship sites.                        A community agency site will be available for each        100%   100%    100%
                                                                    graduate student wishing to perform an internship
                                                                    (CGS audit)
                                                                    A community agency site will be available for each        100%   100%    100%
                                                                    undergraduate student wishing to perform an
                                                                    internship. (CUS audit)

Professional   1. Institutional support for research will be        SPAR will be available to 100% of faculty desiring        100%   100%    100%
Support        provided to faculty.                                 to conduct research. (Chair audit)
                                                                    The opportunity to apply for released time for            100%   100%    100%
                                                                    research will be provided to all full-time faculty each
                                                                    semester. (Chair audit)
               2. Support for attendance and presentation at        The opportunity to apply for financial support and        100%   100%    100%
               professional meetings will be provided to faculty.   released time to attend and present at professional
                                                                    conferences will be provided to 100% of full-time
                                                                    faculty each academic year. (Chair audit)
                                                                    The opportunity to apply for financial support and        100%   100%    100%
                                                                    released time to attend and present at professional
                                                                    conferences will be provided to 100% of adjunct
                                                                    faculty each academic year. (Chair audit)

                                                 71
Although the no outcome measures are set for faculty-generated research and extramural funding,
between AY 2006-AY 2008 faculty of the Department obtained $366, 758 and $210, 876,
respectively for a total of $577, 634. A detailed description of this funding is reported in table
3.1c.


1.6n. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

      The Criterion is met with commentary.

      Strengths. The Department has received substantial support from the University's
      Administration for the conduct of its public health Program. In an era of decreasing State
      support for higher education, the Department has been extremely successful in obtaining
      the resources, both material and personnel, to sustain its public health activities at a very
      high level.

      Weaknesses. Heavy teaching loads, a commitment to excellence in teaching and
      advisement compete for faculty time in obtaining externally funded research projects. This
      is a consistent challenge, one in which the faculty is committed to improving slowly over
      time.




                                                72
                                       CRITERION 2.0

                              INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS

Criterion 2.1.: Master of Public Health Degree. The Program shall offer instructional
programs reflecting its stated mission and goals, leading to the Master of Public Health (MPH.)
or equivalent professional masters degree. The Program may offer a generalist MPH degree
or an MPH with areas of specialization. The program, depending upon how it defines the unit
of accreditation, may offer other degrees, professional and academic, if consistent with its
mission and resources.

2.1a. An instructional matrix (See CEPH Data Template C) presenting all of the
      program’s degree programs and areas of specialization, including undergraduate,
      masters and doctoral degrees, as appropriate. If multiple areas of specialization are
      available, these should be included. The matrix should distinguish between
      professional and academic degrees and identify any programs that are offered in
      distance learning or other formats. Non-degree programs, such as certificates or
      continuing education, should not be included in the matrix.

       ►M.P.H. Degree. The Southern Connecticut University Public Health Program offers a
        Master of Public Health (M.P.H.) degree that provides prospective and current public-
        health workers with: 1) a strong, general background in areas of knowledge basic to
        public health; 2) the opportunity to apply public-health knowledge in independent
        research and an internship; and 3) the option to pursue specialized study in Community
        Health Education (CHE). The CHE specialization focuses on developing the capacity
        to plan, administer and evaluate health promotion and disease prevention programs.

       ►B.S. Degree. The Department also offers a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in Public
        Health with the option to pursue specialized study in Health Promotion or
        Environmental Health. The concentration in health promotion orients students to the
        theoretical, scientific, ethical, and practical foundations of health promotion, thus
        preparing them for entry-level positions in community, worksite, and clinic-based
        health promotion/disease prevention programs. The concentration in environmental
        health addresses current and on-going issues of environmental concern, regulation and
        public responsibility, the traditional role of the sanitarian and expanded responsibilities
        of public health specialists in environmental health. A strong emphasis is placed on the
        importance of primary prevention as a central strategy for health promotion in the
        challenging field of environmental health.

       Table 2.1a. presents all of the program’s degree programs and areas of specialization,
       including the B.S. and M.P.H. programs of study.

       Table 2.1a.1. presents the B.S. and M.P.H programs matrix, including core and
       specialization courses, credit and non-credit requirements and total program credits.


                                               73
                                                   Table 2.1a.

Template C (2.1a.) Instructional Matrix

Table 2.1a. Instructional Matrix – Degree/Specialization
                                                                 Academic          Professional
Bachelors Degrees
Generalist                                                                            B.S.
Health Promotion                                                                      B.S.
Environmental Health                                                                  B.S.

Masters Degrees
Generalist                                                                           M.P.H.
Community Health Education                                                           M.P.H.



                                                      2.1a.1.

                                    B.S. and M.P.H. Program Matrix

     Program                                   B.S.                                  M.P.H.
  Requirements
Core Courses            PCH 202 – Introduction to Public Health        PCH 500 – Found. of Public Health
(27 credits)            PCH 242 – Introduction to Epidemiology         PCH 551 – Epidemiology
                        PCH 275 – Public Health Education              PCH 520 – Health Behavior
                        MAT 107 –Elementary Statistics 1               PCH 515 – Biostatistics
                        PCH 340 – Public Health Research               PCH 516 – Public Health Research
                        PCH 351 – Health in Society                    PCH 564 – Health Systems and Policy
                        PCH 358 – Health Policy                        PCH 510 – Public Health
                        PCH 359 – Environmental Health                 Administration
                        PCH 363 – Program Planning                     PCH 577 – Program Planning and
                        PCH 365 – Illness and Disease                  Evaluation

Concentrations/
Specializations
Health Promotion        PCH 430 – Health Promotion Priorities
(15 credits)            PCH 431 – Health Promotion
                        Interventions
                        PCH 432 – Health Promotion Planning
                        and Evaluation (6 credits)
                        One Approved Elective
1
    Required to meet the all-University mathematics requirement.




                                                           74
2.1a.1., Cont’d

                              B.S. and M.P.H. Program Matrix

     Program                           B.S.                                    M.P.H.
  Requirements
Environmental       PCH 440 – Food Hygiene
Health              PCH 441 – Water Supply and
(15 credits)        Wastewater Treatment
                    PCH 445 – Emergency Preparedness
                    PCH 446 – Environmental Hazards
                    One Approved Elective
Generalist          15 approved elective credits               9-12 approved elective credits
Community                                                      PCH 504 – Introduction to Community
Health Education                                               Health Education
(12) credits                                                   PCH 586 – Health Promotion Methods
                                                               and Strategies
                                                               Two Approved Electives

Practice            PCH 497 – Public Health Internship         PCH 595 – Public Health Internship
Experience          (6 credits)                                (3-6 credits)
(3-6 credits)

Electives           24-27 free electives                       9-12 depending on specialization
                                                               option and length of internship
All University      46-49
Requirements
Culminating         None                                       PCH 590/591 – Thesis Seminar I & II
Experience                                                     or PCH 593/594 – Special Project
(6 credits)                                                    Seminar I and II
       Total        121                                        48
    Minimum
      Credits

2.1b. The bulletin or other official publication, which describes all curricula offered by
      the program. If the university does not publish a bulletin or other official
      publication, the program must provide for each degree and area of specialization
      identified in the instructional matrix a printed description of the curriculum,
      including a list of required courses and their course descriptions.

       The public health degree programs are described in detail in the University’s 2008-2009
       Graduate and Undergraduate Catalogs. These documents include general program
       information, admission requirements, faculty/staff listings, curriculum overview,
       specialization/concentration overviews, course descriptions, and other facets of the
       programs. The Catalogs are available online at:

                                              75
        http://www.southernct.edu/grad/currentstudents/graduatecatalog/ and at:
        http://www.southernct.edu/undergraduatecatalog/

        In addition, the graduate program description is available in the M.P.H. Program
        Information booklet available online at:

        http://www.southernct.edu/public_health/masterofpublichealth/programinformation/ and
        from the Office of the Coordinator.

2.1c.   Assessment of the extent to which the criterion has been met.

        The Criterion is met.

        Strengths. The Southern Connecticut State University public health Program offers
        instructional programs that are consistent with its mission, goals and objectives. All
        specializations/concentrations uphold the core requirements by which Program
        competencies and learning objectives are fulfilled.

        Weaknesses. None identified.




                                                76
                                         CRITERION 2.2

                                         Program Length

Criterion 2.2.: An MPH degree program or equivalent masters degree must have at least 42
semester credit units in length.

2.2a. Definition of a credit with regard to classroom/contact hours

        All core, specialization and elective courses in the Department of Public Health offered
        for credit use the same formula, that is, 1 credit equals 12.5 classroom/contact hours. All
        3-credit courses are scheduled for 37.5 classroom/contact hours.

2.2b. Information about the minimum degree requirements for all professional degree
      curricula shown in the instructional matrix. If the program or university uses a unit
      of academic credit or an academic term different that the standard semester or
      quarter, this should be explained and an equivalency presented in a table or
      narrative.

        ► MPH Degree. The Generalist MPH and MPH with a specialization in Community
          Health Education (CHE) each requires 27 credits of identical core courses, 6-credits of
          thesis or special project, and 3-6-credits of internship, in addition to the non-credit
          requirements. Students in the Generalist program are required to complete 9-12 credits
          of electives in areas of study related to the 10 essential services of public health.
          Students in the Community health education are required to complete elective course
          study in areas related to the seven areas of responsibility expected of graduate-level
          trained health educators. In addition to the credit requirements, all students must
          complete a 4- hour Cultural Humility Workshop (Appendix 16), Writing Assessment
          (Appendix 17), and Preparing for Statistics Workshop (or pass a waiver examination)
          (Appendix 18). Those students with specialization in CHE, are required to sit for the
          Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) examination during their final semester
          of study.

        ►B.S. Degree. The B.S. degree consists of a 27-credit core curriculum, a 15-
         credit specialization (health promotion or environmental health), and 6 credits of
         professional experience (internship). University and academic distribution
         requirements total 46-49 credits. The remaining 24-27 credits are for free electives.
         Majors are encouraged to develop a minor in an academic area which complements the
         public health major.

2.2c.   Information about the number of MPH degrees awarded for less than 42 semester
        credit units, or equivalent, over each of the last three years. A summary of the
        reasons should be included.

        Since the inception of the MPH degree, no student has been awarded his or her degree

                                                77
        without successfully completing all program requirements, including 48 semester credit
        hours, including a no-waiver policy for the internship requirement.

        Since the inception of the B.S. degree, no student has been awarded his or her degree
        without successfully completing all program and University requirements, including a no-
        waiver policy for the internship requirement.


2.2c.   Assessment of the extent to which the criterion has been met.

        This Criterion is met.

        Strengths. The 48-credit requirement for the M.P.H. degree is consistent with CEPH
        requirements. Credit requirements for the B.S. degree match those of the M.P.H.
        program.

        Weaknesses. None identified.




                                              78
                                      CRITERION 2.3

                               Public Health Core Knowledge

Criterion 2.3.: All professional degree students must demonstrate an understanding of the
public health core knowledge.

2.3a. Identification of the means by which the program assures that all professional
      degree students have a broad understanding of the areas of knowledge basic to
      public health. If this means is common across the program, it needs to be described
      only once. If it varies by degree or specialty area, sufficient information must be
      provided to assess compliance by each.

      As described in Criterion 2.2 b., all MPH students complete the same core course
      requirements as do students in the B.S. program. Each student is provided with a planned
      program of study upon admission to the Program. The planned program of study serves as
      the academic contract between the student, University and Department and describes
      credit and non-credit requirements of the Program. The graduate planned program carries
      the signatures of the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies, the Coordinator of Graduate
      Studies for Public Health, and the graduate student. The undergraduate planned program
      is signed by the academic advisor, Department Chairperson and student. No changes are
      permitted to the planned program of study without the approval of the student’s academic
      advisor and, in for graduate students the additional signature of the Coordinator of
      Graduate Studies. All core courses must be completed at SCSU, unless, prior to
      admission, a student completed a core course at another accredited institution of higher
      education and has been granted permission to transfer the course into his or her Program.
      Following completion of all graduate Program requirements and prior to a student’s
      approval for graduation, the Coordinator of Graduate Studies is charged with the
      responsibility to conduct an academic audit in which the student’s transcript is compared
      to his or her planned program of study. If the audit demonstrates adherence to all Program
      requirements the Coordinator signs the audit form and the student is cleared for
      graduation. Graduation audits for the B.S. Program are conducted by the Office of the
      Registrar. The following is a list of the core course requirements for both the MPH and
      BS programs of study first presented under Criterion 2.0. The core courses in the MPH
      program are presented first (o), followed by the core courses for the BS program (o o).

      o Foundations of Public Health (PCH 500) – Nature and scope of public health; basic
        concepts and principles of professional practice; development of a context for further
        study.

         o o Introduction to Public Health (PCH 202) – Overview of the field of public health:
             historical context; current issues; trends and practices; goals, roles and methods of
             practitioners; principles of professional application.

      o Ecological Determinants of Health (PCH 510) – Ecological analysis of forces that affect

                                              79
  personal and community health status.

  o o Environmental Health (PCH 359) – Overview of the interdependency and
      interrelationship of the major environmental stressors and their impact on the health
      and well-being of human populations.

o Biostatistics (PCH 515) – The statistics of rates and proportions and the parametric and
  non-parametric tests associated with their estimation.

  o o Elementary Statistics (MAT 107) – Measures of central tendency and measures of
      variation; elements of probability; introduction to estimation and hypothesis testing.

o Public Health Research (PCH 516) – Scientific inquiry into public health; research
  proposal development; interpretation and application of research literature.

  o o Public Health Research (PCH 340) – Introduction to the methods essential for
      planning, conducting and evaluating research in the health field.

o Health Behavior (PCH 520) – Review of biological, epidemiological and psycho-
  sociological bases of health-related behaviors.

  o o Public Health Education (PCH 275) – Role in public health; nature, scope, and
      foundations; intervention priorities and strategies.

o Health Services Systems and Administration (PCH 548) – Health service managers and
  their roles; management functions process, budgeting, organizational culture, leadership
  and motivation.

o Epidemiology (PCH 551) – Methods of identifying risk factors and determining effects
  of disease on human populations.

  o o Introduction to Epidemiology (PCH 242) – Principles underlying the measurement
      of health and illness in humans. Survey of methods and techniques used by the
      epidemiologist in investigating the distribution and causes of disease.

o Health Policy (PCH 564) –Analysis of the structure, function and policy issues
  associated with public health and medical care in the United States.

  o o Health Policy (PCH 358) – An investigation of issues and legislative procedures
      which shape health policy; a survey of important health legislation.

o Program Planning and Evaluation (PCH 577) – Conceptualizations and technical skills
  for the planning and evaluation of population-based, health-related programs and
  interventions.


                                        80
         o o Program Planning (PCH 363) – Design, development, implementation and
             evaluation of strategies to improve individual and community health.

         o o Health in Society (PCH 351) – Examination of health services and institutions;
             the role of health professionals and their relationships with clients; and, the
             relationship between illness and the social process.

         o o Illness and Disease (PCH 365) – Ecological perspective of illness and disease;
             etiological agents, environmental factors and prevention/control strategies.

2.3b. Assessment of the extent to which the criterion is met.

       This Criterion is met.

       Strengths. Concepts and competencies from each of the core areas of public health
       knowledge defined by CEPH are integrated in the M.P.H. and B.S. degree programs.

       Weaknesses. None identified.




                                             81
                                       CRITERION 2.4

                                        Practical Skills

Criterion 2.4.: All professional degree students must develop skills in basic public health
concepts and demonstrate the application of these concepts through practice experience that is
relevant to the students’ areas of specialization.

2.4a. Description of the program’s policies and procedures regarding practice
      placements, including selection of sites, methods for approving preceptors,
      approaches for faculty supervision of students, means of evaluating placement sites,
      preceptor qualifications and criteria for waiving the experience.

       ►Policies and Procedures. Consistent with its mission and research and service goals,
        and relying on its previous experience and success, the Department developed and
        instituted a graduate public health internship as a program requirement for all cohorts
        in 1995. An internship requirement for the B.S. degree program has existed since the
        program’s inception in 1980.

         Both the undergraduate and graduate internships serve to provide the context for the
         application of knowledge and skills through field experience in a public health or
         related setting. The internship is designed to provide students the opportunity to
         practice and improve acquired skills in a real-world setting and to discover what
         further skills may be needed to enhance their effectiveness as competent public health
         practitioners.

         Field opportunities in local and state heath agencies comprise many of the field
         placements obtained by students. However, it is the philosophy of the Program that
         placement of interns in agencies, organizations and programs not in the mainstream of
         public health, is important in advancing the sphere of influence of a population-based
         approach to enhancing health in human populations.

         The public health internship, which includes field-practice hours and a weekly seminar
         (PCH 595/PCH 497), is required of all matriculated students and based on the
         principle that the application of knowledge and skills brings learning to a higher plane.
         Regardless of previous work experience, all students benefit from the opportunity to
         apply what they learned in the Program. Furthermore, the internship is a vehicle for all
         students to provide service to the community. For these reasons, the Program
         maintains a no-waiver policy.

         The major differences between graduate and undergraduate internships are found in
         the range and depth of program competencies, degree of supervision required and the
         requirement that graduate students, regardless of specialization, complete a discrete
         field placement project.


                                              82
The public health internship consists of the following components, organized around
discrete, core competencies.

►Coordinator of Public Health Internships (“Coordinator”). The internship is
 coordinated by Dr. Michael J. Perlin, a senior faculty member, who receives 1.5
 credits of administrative time per semester and is responsible for all activities
 related to the placement of student interns and oversight of compliance with
 internship standards.

►Faculty Supervisor. The faculty supervisor is the internship instructor. S/he is a
 full-time member of the public health faculty, who on occasion, may be assisted by
 adjunct faculty. The faculty supervisor is responsible for conducting the weekly
 seminar, signing intern-agency contracts, grading, communicating with agency
 preceptors, serving as student-interns’ advocate, and mediating field placement
 disputes.

►Agency Preceptor. The agency preceptor is the onsite, agency member that
 supervises and mentors the student-intern. The preceptor is responsible for
 providing the student-intern with program-appropriate learning experiences,
 supervision, resources to complete assigned tasks, and evaluation of the student-
 intern’s performance at the agency, using official Program forms.

► Fieldwork. All matriculated students are required to complete an approved
   placement consisting of “agency-contact hours” during their final semester of
  study. M.P.H. students, have the option of either a 3-credit (150 hours/semester) or
  6-credit (300 hour/semester) internship. Since most graduate students are enrolled
  part-time, the majority choose the 3-credit option. B.S. students are required to
  complete a 6-credit internship.

► Weekly Seminar. All students are required to attend a weekly seminar that
  provides students with opportunities for group sharing and problem solving, social
  support and building self-confidence, and access to potential job opportunities.
  Seminar activities are included on the respective course syllabi and can be surmised
  by reviewing table 2.4a. which lists the degree-specific student learning objectives
  for the internship seminars.

►Student Learning Objectives. A core set of student learning objectives has been
 developed for the internship. Fieldwork and seminar comprise the principal
 experiences of the internship. It is through fieldwork that students are afforded
 opportunities to apply the knowledge, affect and skills learned in prior courses, and
 in doing so demonstrate to their internship preceptors that they possess the capacity
 to contribute in entry level/advanced positions to one or more of the Ten Essential
 Services of Public Health.



                                    83
           ►M.P.H. and B.S. students specializing in community health education/health
            promotion will demonstrate to their preceptors that they possess the capacity to
            fulfill one or more of the areas of responsibility of a health educator at the
            respective advanced and entry levels. The areas of responsibility include:

                       ►Assess individual and community needs for health education.
                       ►Plan health education strategies, interventions and programs.
                       ►Implement health education strategies, interventions and programs.
                       ►Conduct evaluation and research related to health education.
                       ►Administer health education strategies, interventions and programs.
                       ►Serve as a health education resource person.
                       ►Communicate and advocate for health and health education.


           ►B.S. students specializing in local environmental health practice will demonstrate to
            their preceptors that they possess the capacity to fulfill the responsibilities of a local
            environmental health practitioner. Responsibilities include:

                       ►Assess conditions relevant to food hygiene; water supply and waste-water
                        treatment; environmental hazards; and emergency preparedness.
                       ►Evaluate and report on conditions relevant to food hygiene; water supply
                        and waste-water treatment; environmental hazards; and emergency
                        preparedness.
                       ►Educate affected and concerned parties on matters relevant to food
                        hygiene; water supply and waste-water treatment; environmental hazards;
                        and emergency preparedness.

       Table 2.4a. presents the common and degree-specific student learning objectives for the
       M.P.H. and B.S. internships, including assessment methodologies.

                                                    Table 2.4a.

          Common and Degree-Specific Student Learning Objectives (and Assessment
                        Methodologies) for the Internship Seminars

No.
 1    Apply public health core and specialized competencies to public health practice (Project(s) and Preceptor and Faculty
      Evaluations);
 2    Apply a personal code of professional ethics to public health practice (Journals/Assignment);
 3    Demonstrate appropriate judgment and problem-solving skills (Preceptor Evaluations);
 4    Demonstrate the ability to work independently and as a member of a team (Preceptor Evaluations);
 5    Demonstrate an appreciation of the complexity of public health problems (Journals/Preceptor Evaluations);
 6    Tolerate ambiguity, conflict, uncertainty and change within a health-related organization (Preceptor Evaluations);
 7    Demonstrate a commitment to life-long learning and professional service including active participation in professional
      organizations (Assignment);
 8    Demonstrate self-confidence in the practice of public health (Preceptor Evaluations);


                                                       84
                                                Table 2.4a., Cont’d

          Common and Degree-Specific Student Learning Objectives (and Assessment
                        Methodologies) for the Internship Seminars

9     Demonstrate cultural sensitivity and humility (Preceptor Evaluations);
10    Obtain job references from health professionals (Preceptor Evaluations/Assignment);
11    Communicate a sense of professional identity (Assignment);
12    Demonstrate a basic humanistic and responsive public health philosophy in the practice of public health (Preceptor
      Evaluations);
13    Operationalize the public health code of ethics (Assignment)
14    Demonstrate the ability to receive, provide and respond to constructive criticism, constructively (Preceptor
      Evaluations);
15    Advocate for the advancement of the practice and profession of public health (Assignment);
16    Communicate effectively orally and in writing (Preceptor evaluations/Faculty evaluations and seminar presentations)
17    Respond to deadlines in the practice of public health (Preceptor Evaluations);
18    Demonstrate proficiency in CPR/AED (Obtaining Certification);
19    Assess the quality of supervision (Field Practicum Final Report/Confidential Intern Preceptor’s Evaluation);
20    Develop an appropriate relationship with supervisors and co-workers (Preceptor’s Evaluation); and
21    Conduct informational interviews with public health professionals to explore career options (Assignment).

             Degree-Specific Student Learning Objectives for the M.P.H and B.S. Internship Seminars
No.                              M.P.H.                                                      B.S.
 1    Carry out a discrete project that demonstrates the ability to Develop an effective job-marketing strategy;
      apply knowledge and skills to the solution of public health   (Assignments)
      problems and/or gaps in service delivery. (Project and
      Preceptor Evaluations)
 2    Demonstrate team building, negotiation, and conflict
      management skills; (Preceptor/Faculty Evaluations)

        ► Student Eligibility Requirements:

            Completion of all core and specialization course requirements;
            Be in good academic standing and have a grade point average of at least 3.0 (2.5 for
             undergraduates, effective fall 2008);
            Attend a pre-internship orientation meeting; and
            Obtain Departmental approval.

        Students’ introduction to the internship begins with their attendance at a mandatory, pre-
        enrollment internship orientation held in October for Spring internships and April for
        Summer and Fall session internships. The orientation provides the Coordinator with the
        opportunity to discuss the nature, scope, and requirements of the internship and provide
        prospective interns with the opportunity to ask questions, following a formal PowerPoint
        presentation (Appendix 19). Graduate and undergraduate students attend separate
        orientations to address their respective needs. Students are encouraged to obtain a copy of
        the appropriate Internship Manual, Preliminary Internship Forms Packet, Tips on the
        Successful Acquisition of an Internship, Most Frequently Asked Questions about the
        Internship, List of Completed Public Health Internship Placements, the Internship
        Brochure and Student and Preceptor Internship Manuals, prior to the Orientation
                                                       85
(Reference File 10). Reference File 10 also contains intern-related documents, including
official University and State documents required for placing students in University-
related internships.

► Selection of Sites.

  The Department maintains a listing of approved internship placements and preceptors,
  which can be accessed through its Web site. Students can select from this official
  inventory or can submit an alternative placement to the Coordinator for approval. To
  qualify as an approved placement, the agency or program must meet specific Program
  guidelines, which include, at a minimum, the offering of learning experiences that
  reflect the objectives of the internship program within the student’s area of
  specialization. In addition, agencies must be willing to sign four separate affiliation
  agreements with the University that must be approved by the Office of the Attorney
  General for the State of Connecticut and the Provost (see Reference File 10). The
  approval process has proved cumbersome and time consuming and the required forms
  have been revised several times in the past year alone by State officials. This process is
  part of the Governor’s focus on ethics in government reform, which required a review
  of the contracting processes of all State agencies. In response to this requirement, the
  University’s Department of Finance and Administration hired an experienced Contract
  Compliance Specialist, in 2007, who will assist with all contracting, including
  Personal Service Agreements, Honorariums, Student Affiliation Agreements and
  Facility Usage Agreements. The Department and Dean of the SHHS have taken the
  position that since affiliation agreements between the University and external agencies
  transcend departmental programs, they are not the responsibility of the Department and
  have petitioned the University administration to assume this responsibility.

  ► Agency selection criteria include:

       a. Ability to offer learning experiences relevant to the roles and competencies of a
          professional public health practitioner in the student’s area of specialization.
       b. Availability of a qualified supervisory staff person to serve as a preceptor.
       c. Suitable physical facilities and resources that enable the intern to complete his
          or her assignments in a professional manner.
       d. Willingness to meet the University's administrative requirements, which
          include executing agreements, conferring with faculty on the student's progress,
          and submitting reports on performance.

►Methods for Approving Preceptors.

  ► Preceptors selection criteria include:

       The Department recognizes the importance of the academic and professional
       experiences of preceptors in providing meaningful and practical field experiences
       in which students can apply and refine their knowledge and competencies. To

                                        86
      maximize student learning opportunities, a prospective preceptor must meet the
      following criteria:

      a. Possess a Master’s Degree in public health, community health, health
         education, environmental health or a health-related discipline, or extensive
         professional public health experience in lieu of an appropriate degree.
      b. Have a minimum of three years of experience in public or community health.
      c. Have previous experience supervising interns.
      d. Anticipate continuous employment at the agency, for the full duration of the
         student intern's field placement.

  If feasible, it is preferred that the preceptor has experience as a mentor to students in
  the health professions. With the approval of the Coordinator, preceptors may be
  selected from:

      a. Prior successful participation in the Department's undergraduate or graduate
         Internship programs, as appropriate.
      b. Recommendations from faculty and, in some cases, from students.
      c. Recommendations from the Connecticut Coalition of Health Educators.
      d. Recommendations from Advisory Council members.
      e. Recommendations from alumni.
      f. Self-referral.

► Field Placement Approval Process.

  Approval of an internship assignment is a highly formalized process. Following
  evaluation of eligibility and attendance at the orientation, a student may begin to seek a
  field placement. With appropriate sign-offs, a student may petition to a current place of
  employment as a field placement; however, the placement cannot be in the student’s
  current position or division of employment, nor can the student be supervised by his or
  her current supervisor or manager.

  Exhibit 2.4a.1. on the following page illustrates the public health field site sources,
  required forms and site and preceptor approval process.




                                        87
                                           Exhibit 2.4a.1.

                   Public Health Internship Field Site Sources, Required Forms
                                 and Field-Site Approval Process




Field Site Sources


                       Site of                              Coordinator           Bettycjung         Personal &
Department             Current            Faculty          of Internships         Web Site           Professional
 Web Site            Employment                                                                       Networks


Required Forms
                                                                                   Student Education
                                                                                 Affiliation Agreement,
Employment             Agency-                                Project
                                         Relevancy                                Certified Resolution,
 as Field Site          Intern-                            Proposal Form
+                                        Statement                               & Nondiscriminatory
     Forms           Contract Form                          (MPH only)
                                                                                       Resolution
  [If needed]


Site and Preceptor Approval Process

                                Agency Offer

                                Submission of
                               Forms to Faculty


                               Faculty Review


                 Approved                            Not Approved


             Acceptance of                                                  Approved
                Offer                                                       Internship
                                                                             Site

        ► Faculty Supervision and Student Assessment. Guidelines for faculty supervision
          and student assessment are contained in the respective Internship Manuals.
          Monitoring, supervision and assessment of student interns are recognized by the
          Department as a shared responsibility of the agency preceptor and faculty supervisor.
          The Department maintains that it is not its role to interpose itself into an agency to
          provide direct supervision of interns. Rather, it is expected that preceptors, following

                                                    88
Department guidelines, will approach their interactions with students in a professional
manner and will provide appropriate levels of supervision, mentoring, and learning
opportunities. These learning opportunities are designed to facilitate the student's
acquisition of skills and experiences in the application of basic and advanced public
health concepts and knowledge to the solution of community health problems.

Assessment of interns is conducted as a formal process utilizing multiple evaluation
instruments. The first includes the following categorical criteria: 1) extent of
knowledge-base, 2) quality of interpersonal skills, 3) level of public health
competencies, 4) extent and quality of leadership abilities, and 5) management skills
as applied to a specific project or program to which the student has been assigned.

The second, is an evaluation of the student’s performance against the specialization
learning objectives (to be discussed under Criterion 2.6b.).The third instrument
addresses items related to student preparation, reality of expectations, sufficiency of
information provided by the Department, student potential and willingness to accept
future interns.

The first and third instruments are used for students in the generalist specialization.
Students in the health promotion/community health education and environmental
health specializations receive all three evaluation instruments (see Tables 2.4a.2. and
2.4a.3. at end of this Criterion.).

Evaluation instruments are provided to the preceptor with a letter of introduction after
the internship has been approved by the faculty supervisor. Following the completion
of the internship, the preceptor completes the Preceptor's Evaluation of Intern forms
and discusses the evaluation findings with the intern. The intern is provided an
opportunity to submit, as an attachment, a rebuttal of any items with which he or she
disagrees. The student intern is required to complete the Confidential Student-Intern's
Evaluation of Field Placement Experience form, which is the intern's assessment of
the performance of the preceptor and the support afforded by the agency. This
assessment is utilized by the Coordinator in evaluating the appropriateness of
retention of the preceptor and agency on the approved field sites lists. The grade
earned for the internship course is a function of the student's performance evaluations,
and performance in the seminar. Each intern is also required to complete a weekly
journal which contains sections about activities, observations, thoughts and feelings,
ethical dilemmas, lessons learned and special problems. The journal serves as a log
for the student and as a status report for the faculty supervisor. In addition, graduate
interns must prepare a Field Practicum Final Report that compares pre- and post-
project goals; offers a detailed description of the work environment; description of the
orientation and supervision; includes a summary of the field experience; makes
recommendations for enhancement of the educational potential of the field
experience; and, assesses the viability of the field placement as an option in the
Program. The course grade for PCH 595/497 - Public Health Internship is assigned by
the course instructor.

                                     89
             The Department's careful selection of agencies and preceptors, maintenance of
             ongoing student assessment data, and eliciting of faculty input during the internship,
             ensure that relevant, real-world learning opportunities will be afforded each student
             intern. Preceptor assessments of M.P.H. and B.S. student interns are presented in
             Tables 2.4a.2. and 2.4a.3., respectively.

             Contact between the supervisor and preceptor occurs as needed. In some instances the
             faculty member visits the agency; in others, contact is through email and telephone.

                                                 Table 2.4a.2.

                 Preceptors’ Evaluations of Graduate Student Interns, 2001-2008

Student         2001          2002           2003        2004        2005        2006        2007         2008
              P      G      P      G       P      G    P      P    G      G    P      G    P      G   P          G
     1       100 100       100    100      95    97   100 97      100 100     100 100      75    80
     2        98    98     100    100     100 90      100 96       95 95      100 100      97    97
     3       100 100        95     95      90    95    90    95   100 100     100 100      95    95
     4        97    95      98     98      99    99    95    95    75 85      100 100      98    98
     5        98    98     100    100      95    95   100 100      97 97       85    90   100 100
     6       100 100        96    100      98    98   100 100      97    99    98    99   100 100
     7       100 100       100    100     100 100      98    98   100 100      95    95    97    97
     8        99    99      80     90     100 100     100 99       97 97      100 100     100 100
     9       100 100       100    100      95    95    97 100      95 95       95    95   100 100
    10       100 100       100    100      90    85    99    99    97 97       95    95   100 100
    11        95    95      90     88     100 100      98    99   100 100      90    86    95    96
    12       100 100       100    100      98    98   100 99      100 100      97    95    98    98
    13        97    99     100    100     100 100     100 100     100 100      98    98    98    98
    14        98    98      98     90     100 98       96    97    97 99      100 100      92    95
    15        98   100     100    100     100 100      98    98    97 97      100 100      95    95
    16       100 100       100    100     100 98      100 100      80 80      100 100      95 100
    17       100 100        98     98      98    98   100 100     100 100     100 100
    18        98    95      97     98      95    95   100 100     100 100      98    98
    19        95    95      95    100     100 100     100 100      90    95   100 98
    20        90    95     100    100     100 100     100 100      96    96
    21       100 100       100    100     100 100                  95    95
    22        96    98     100    100     100 100                 100 100
    23        95    95      90     90     100 100                  95    95
    24       100 100       100    100      95    95                85    85
    25        95   100      99    100      94    95                95    95
    26                      98    100     100 100                  98    98
    27                     100    100      97    97               100 100
    28                                     99 100                  90    90
    29                                    100 100                  98    98
    30                                    100 100                 100 99
    31                                     98 100                 100 95
    32                                                             98    96
    33                                                            100 100
 Average      98     98     98      98     98    98   99    99     96    96   97    97    96    97
P = Score for project; G = Score for fieldwork


                                                      90
                                          Table 2.4a.3.

           Preceptors’ Evaluations of Undergraduate Student Interns, 2002-2008

                      2002       2003     2004        2005        2006        2007       2008
     Student         Score       Score    Score       Score       Score       Score      Score
          1             97         93       95         98           87         90
          2             98         97       97         99           67         95
          3             93         95       93         98          100         95
          4             96         98       95         100         100         100
          5            100         97       93         93          100         99
          6            100        100       91         91           93         100
          7             98        100       91         96           89         98
          8             93         97       95         97          100         97
          9             97         93       98         96           93         95
         10             94         95       97         94           90         98
         11             93         96       95         97           95         100
         12            100         95       93         96          100         99
         13             95         97       98         93           90         97
         14             93         93       94         91           98         98
         15             97         98       91         92           95         94
         16             94         93      100         95           95         93
         17             99         96       98         96           95         91
         18             97         97       93         90           98         91
         19             92         92       96         89          100         96
         20             94         96       94         89           95         97
         21             93         94       95         93           95         96
         22             98         96       95         98           98         98
         23                        94       93         93          100         95
         24                        96       97         93          100         98
         25                        97       96         98          100         90
         26                        98                  100         100         92
         27                       100                  93           98
         28                       100                  89           93
         29                        92                  89           91
         30                                            98           89
         31                                            98           98
         32                                            93           93
         33                                            100          95
         34                                            98           97
         35                                            89           98
         36                                            98           89
         37                                            93
      Average           96        96        99         95          95          96
       G = Score for fieldwork

2.4b. Identification of agencies and preceptors used for practice experiences for students, by
      specialty area, for the last two academic years.

       Tables 2.4b and 2.4b.1. and 2.4b.2. and 2.4b3. contain the name of graduate and
       undergraduate students, respectively, completing the internship, area of specialization,

                                                 91
        agency, preceptor, and degree(s) for years 2007 and 2008.

                                                 Table 2.4b.

                       Agencies and Preceptors Used for Practice Experience
                           for M.P.H. Students by Specialty Area, 2007

     Specialization            Student Name                    Agency Name                  Preceptor
Community Health         Emily Adamski                 Atena, Inc.                   Robin Aldieri, MPH
Education (CHE)
CHE                      Morenike Akpo                 AIDS Project New Haven        Julie Anderson, MSHRM
CHE                      Myra Cagganello               Yale Griffin Prevention       Judy True, MPH
                                                       Center
CHE                      Peter Ennin                   CT. DPH                       Vine Samuels, MPH
CHE                      Carol Felder                  AHEC                          Joan N. Lane, MPH
CHE                      Traci Frye                    American Cancer Society       Valerie Gallo, MPH
CHE                      Crystal Jeter                 Hill House H.S., SBHC         Sarah Vaughan, APRN
CHE                      Amy Tillman (Lehaney)         Stamford Department of        Dr. Jonnie Lee, M.D.
                                                       Health and Social Services
CHE                      Alessandra Litro              Middlesex Hospital            Susan J. Macary, MPH
CHE                      Linda Mako                    Aetna, Inc.                   Laura Grafton, MPH
CHE                      Stephanie Marcucio            Quinnipiac Valley Health      Leslie Balch, MPH, RS
                                                       District
CHE                      Andrew Meiman                 Hill Health Center            Jennifer Brickett, MPH
CHE                      Augustine Okeke               Yale New Haven Hospital       Gary R. Smart, MPA
CHE                      Tochukwu Okeke                Yale New Haven Hospital       Carla Giles, MPH
CHE                      Patrica Ordway                City of Milford Health        Deepa D. Joseph, MPH
                                                       Department

                                                 Table 2.4b.1.

                       Agencies and Preceptors Used for Practice Experience
                           for M.P.H. Students by Specialty Area, 2008

      Specialization            Student Name                   Agency Name                   Preceptor
CHE                      Martin Tolentino              Yale Griffin Prevention       Judy True, MPH
                                                       Center
Generalist               Rose Abrue-Sanchez            Leeway, Inc.                  Martha Dale, MPH
CHE                      Selma Alves                   CT. DPH                       Krista Veneziano, MPH
CHE                      Sara Burns-Rivera             City of Bridgeport Health     Marian Evans, MD
                                                       Department
CHE                      Patricia DeWitt               United Way                    Jennifer McGrady Heath,
                                                                                     MPA
CHE                      Maya Greene                   New Haven Family Alliance     Sherman Mallone, MSW,
                                                                                     LCSW, BCD
CHE                      Stephanie Guess               South Eastern Mental Health   Claire Burchfield, MSW
                                                       Authority
Generalist               Kathryn Haemer                City of Bridgeport Health     Marian Evans, MD
                                                       Department
CHE                      Sandra Hanley-Grant           Yale New Haven Hospital       Carla Giles, MPH


                                                  92
                                            Table 2.4b.1., Cont’d

                       Agencies and Preceptors Used for Practice Experience
                           for M.P.H. Students by Specialty Area, 2008

     Specialization            Student Name                  Agency Name                   Preceptor
CHE                     Syed Irfan                    Middlesex Hospital           Susan J. Macary, MPH
Generalist              Vicky Koehler                 Global Volunteer Network     Courtney Montague, MPH
CHE                     Ligia Masilamania             Norwalk Health Department    Rhonda Collins, MPH
CHE                     Barbara Naclerio              East Shore District Health   Alex Cinotti, MPH
                                                      Department
CHE                     Annette Sauerbrunn            North Haven Public Schools   Michele Vancour, PhD,
                                                                                   MPH
CHE                     Michele Soeters               FoodNet-CT Emerging          Sharon Hurd, MPH
                                                      Infections Program



                                                Table 2.4b.2.

                       Agencies and Preceptors Used for Practice Experience
                            for B.S. Students by Specialty Area, 2007

      Specialization           Student Name                   Agency Name                  Preceptor
Health Promotion        Allison Cuomo                 Yale Griffin Prevention      Judy True, MPH
                                                      Center
Environmental Health    Amanda Hampton                City of Bridgeport Health    Warren Blunt, R.S.
                                                      Department
Health Promotion        Amy Crumb                     Planned Parenthood           Misty Perez. B.A.
Health Promotion        Antoinette Pasqua             Stamford Hospital            Dr. Madhu Mathur
Environmental Health    Anton Trojanowski             New Haven Health             Brian Wnek, MPH
                                                      Department
Environmental Health    Carol Einsman                 City of Stanford Health      Jeanne Ormond, MSW
                                                      Department
Environmental Health    Christopher Murphy            CT. DPH                      Lorrie Mathieu. B.A.
Environmental Health    Corey Kozuch                  Milford Hospital             Allan Lynn, MPH
Environmental Health    Danene Avery                  New Haven Health             Paul Kowalski, MPH, RS
                                                      Department
Environmental Health    Deandra Singh                 New Haven Health             Brian Wnek, MPH
                                                      Department
Health Promotion        Despina LImberis              Stamford Health and Social   Jean Ormond, MSW
                                                      Service Department
Health Promotion        Genese Rountree               Vista Vocational and Life    Linda Rogen, MPH
                                                      Skills Center
Health Promotion        Gina Touttoulos               Yale New Haven Hospital      Peggy DeZino, BSN, RN
Health Promotion        Heather Harris                WIC Program YNHH             Lovelle Porrazzo, MS,RD,
                                                                                   CDN, CLC
Environmental Health    Hilary Blasco                 New Haven Health             Paul Kowalski, MPH, RS
                                                      Department
Environmental Health    Jennifer Henaire              Southington Health           Charles I. Motes, Jr., MPH,
                                                      Department                   RS



                                                 93
                                            Table 2.4b.2., Cont’d

                       Agencies and Preceptors Used for Practice Experience
                            for B.S. Students by Specialty Area, 2007

      Specialization           Student Name                    Agency Name                  Preceptor
Environmental Health    Jennifer Purdie               Torrington Area Health        Gil Roberts, BS
                                                      Department
Environmental Health    Jeong-Eun Lee                 New Haven Health              Brian Wnek, MPH
                                                      Department
Health Promotion        Kathleen Mahon                AIDS Project New Haven        Nicholas Boshnack, MSW
Health Promotion        Kathryn Glendon               Valley Substance Abuse        Pamela Mautte, MS
                                                      Action Council
Health Promotion        Kimberly DelVecchio           TEAM, Inc.                    Jamie Ives, BS
Environmental Health    Koreena Glanville             NYS Environmental             John Fitpatrick, BS, MS
                                                      Conservation Police
Environmental Health    Latoya Gordon                 CT DPH                        Tracey Weeks, MPH
Health Promotion        Loralee Geil                  Yale Griffin Prevention       Karem Shuvalm MS, PhD
                                                      Research Center               (c)
Health Promotion        Marissa Camerato              Hospital of St. Raphael       Dorothy Ventriglio., BS
Health Promotion        Melody Miller                 Milford Health Department     Deepa Joseph, MPH
Environmental Health    Naveed Shinwari               Quinnipiac Valley Health      Lynn Fox, BSPH
                                                      District
Environmental Health    Reena Patel                   CT DPH                        Tracey Weeks, MPH
Health Promotion        Reign Poetress Cooper         Wheeler Clinic                Laura Minor, PA, MS
Health Promotion        Renee Andrews                 Southwestern AHEC             Joan Lane, BA, MPH
Environmental Health    Sarah Bosill                  Chesprocott Health District   Lorraine DeNicola, BS,
                                                                                    MS, MPH
Health Promotion        Sharon Giulietti              Meriden Health Department     Lea Crown, MPH
Health Promotion        Tara Antalosky                American Red Cross            Stuart Betheil, BS,FSC
Environmental Health    Theresa Goncalves             Naugatuck Valley Health       Jason Bashura, MPH
                                                      District



                                                Table 2.4b.3.

                       Agencies and Preceptor’s Used for Practice Experience
                             for B.S. Students by Specialty Area, 2008

     Specialization            Student Name                  Agency Name                    Preceptor
Health Promotion        Allison Esposito              Healthtrax at the Gaylord     Vincent Lambri, MPH
                                                      Hospital Wellness Center
Environmental Health    Ashley Carlson                Milford Health Department     Deepa Joseph, MPH
Health Promotion        Ashley Murphy                 Women and Families Center     Jessica Buttrey, BS
Health Promotion        Beth Brickett                 The Mary Wade Home            John Dresko, BA
Health Promotion        Bliss Dixon                   Yale University School of     Cara Hamann, MPH
                                                      Medicine, Dept.
                                                      Surgery/Section of
                                                      Emergency Medicine




                                                 94
                                              Table 2.4b.3., Cont’d

                       Agencies and Preceptor’s Used for Practice Experience
                             for B.S. Students by Specialty Area, 2008

     Specialization           Student Name                      Agency Name                   Preceptor
Health Promotion        Chinequia Bailey                State of CT - Department of   Heidi Jenkins, BS
                                                        Public Health
Health Promotion        Christen Cucurello              Domestic Violence Services    Tracey Parks, BS
                                                        of Greater New Haven
Health Promotion        Colleen Ryan                    Connecticut Department of     Heidi Jenkins, BS
                                                        Public Health - STD Control
Health Promotion        Collette Forbes                 Planned Parenthood of         Pierrette Silverman, BS
                                                        Connecticut, Inc.
Health Promotion        Debra Tomaselli                 Milford Hospital              Diane Frankel-Gramelis,
                                                                                      BS, MS
Health Promotion        Dominick Eula                   Milford Hospital              Alan Lynn. MPH
Environmental Health    Elina Mangasarova               Connecticut Department of     Krista Veneziano, MPH,
                                                        Public Health                 CHES, RS
Environmental Health    Elizabeth Lanteigne             Central CT Health District    Paul Hutcheon, MPH
Health Promotion        Erin Murphy                     Yale University Rudd Center   Victoria Brescoll, PhD.,
                                                        for Food policy & Obesity     MS, M Phil, BA
Environmental Health    Ginena Du                       Sikorsky Aircraft             Jay Vaughn, MS
                                                        Corporation
Health Promotion        Jennifer Pruna                  Naugatuck Valley Health       Jason Bashura, BS, MPH
                                                        District
Health Promotion        John Fournier                   Milford Hospital              Alan Lynn, MPH
Health Promotion        Kelly Jo DeLauretis             Stay Well Health Center       Christine Bianchi, MSW
Health Promotion        Lauren Henderson                Wellness Center               Lisa Seely, BS, MPH
Health Promotion        Martine Liberte                 Women and Families Center     Jessica Buttrey, BS
Environmental Health    Matthew Payne                   Mohegan Tribal Hygiene        Scott Sjoquist, BS, MS
                                                        Health Department
Environmental Health    Maurice Angme                   CT Department of Public       Tracey Weeks, BA, MS
                                                        Health
Health Promotion        Melissa Ferrer                  Women's and Families Center   Jessica Buttrey, BS
Health Promotion        Mona Mathieu                    Women and Families Center     Jessica Buttrey, BS
Environmental Health    Padraig Martin                  Meriden Health Department     Scott Bryden, MBA
Environmental Health    Padraig Martin                  Town of Wallingford           Eloise Hudd, BS,MPH
Environmental Health    Richard Kokorus                 Sikorsky Aircraft             Julius Vaughn, BS
Health Promotion        Samantha Duncan                 New Haven Health              Mary Ann Zavorskas, MS
                                                        Department
Environmental Health    Sonia Brinckwirth               City of New Haven, Bureau     Paul Kowalkski, MPH, RS
                                                        of Environmental Health
Health Promotion        Stephanie Fabrizi               Milford Health Department     Rick Fontana, MS
Health Promotion        Victoria Griffo                 CT Center for Healthy Aging   Pamela Smith, BA, MA
Health Promotion        Victoria Romano                 AIDS Project New Haven        Nick Boshnack, MSW




                                                   95
2.4c.   Data on the number of students receiving waiver of practice experience for each of
        the last three years.

        None.

2.4d. Data on the number of preventive medicine, occupational medicine, and public
      health and general preventive medicine residents completing the academic program
      for each of the last three years, along with information on their practice rotations.

        Not applicable.


2.4e.   Assessment of the extent to which the criterion has been met.           .

        The Criterion is met.

        Strengths. The Program requires all students to complete a practice experience
        appropriate to their area of specialization, selected from a broad array of excellent field
        sties and experienced preceptors. Explicit policies and procedures for eligibility to enroll
        in the internship, site selection criteria, methods for approval of preceptors, approaches
        for faculty supervision of students, field-site evaluation criteria, preceptor selection
        criteria, and a no-waiver policy provide students with appropriate opportunities to
        demonstrate their ability to apply basic and specialized public health concepts in
        addressing “real world” public health challenges. Preceptor evaluations of student-interns
        performance reveal an extraordinary high level of satisfaction with their ability to
        complete projects and assignments with a high level of proficiency in preparation for
        entry or advanced positions in public health.

        Weaknesses. None identified.




                                                96
                                       CRITERION 2.5

                                    Culminating Experience

Criterion 2.5.: All professional degree programs identified in the instructional matrix shall
assure that each student demonstrates skills and integration of knowledge through a
culminating experience.

2.5a. Identification of the culminating experience required for each degree program. If
      this is common across the program’s professional degree programs, it need be
      described only once. If it varies by degree or specialty area, sufficient information
      must be provided to assess compliance by each.

       ► Culminating Experience Options. The culminating experience for undergraduate
         students consists of the internship. As discussed previously under Criterion 2.4, the
         internship is designed to provide students the opportunity to practice and improve
         acquired skills in a real-world setting and to discover what further skills may be
         needed to enhance their effectiveness as competent public health practitioners.

         For graduate students the culminating experience options consist of a thesis or special
         project. Graduate students select the culminating experience of their choice, assuming
         they meet eligibility requirements. For either option, a formal application (Appendix
         20) is required that must be approved by the Culminating Experience Review
         Committee (CERC), comprised of thesis and special project advisors. The Culminating
         Experience Approval Process in presented in Table 2.5a., p. 101.

         ► Thesis. The thesis serves as a measure of the student's ability to integrate his or
           her knowledge, understanding and research skills as applied to the investigation
           and analysis of a public health issue.

              Thesis students must employ an ethical, systematic and evidential approach to the
              conduct of a public health research study that demonstrates integration of public
              health core and specialized knowledge, conceptual understanding and
              competencies. The thesis must be justified as pertinent to one or more of the ten
              essential services of public health and/or the seven areas of responsibilities for
              health educators.

              The Department has approved five types of theses consistent with School of
              Graduate Studies guidelines: 1) traditional research thesis; 2) investigative thesis;
              3) descriptive thesis; 4) historical research thesis; 5) qualitative research thesis.

         ► Special Project. The special project serves the same integrative function as the
           thesis. It requires the student to integrate theory, science and ingenuity into
           professional practice. It is comprised of planning and developing a response to an
           agency-related health problem. Students selecting a special project are required to

                                               97
demonstrate their capability to provide valuable service to a health-related agency.
The Department supports three types of special projects: 1) a service agreement to
create an appropriate response to an agency-identified health-related problem
(e.g., the agency wants an unspecified response to lower the incidence of diabetes
among employees); (2) a service agreement to provide a pre-determined response
to an agency-identified health-related problem (e.g., the agency wants an
evaluation of an existing employee physical activity program); and (3) a non-
agency-based, entrepreneurial approach to responding to a documented health-
related problem. Each type of special project is comprised of three parts: 1) the
prospectus, 2) the response and 3) the report, which describes the process by
which the response was designed.

Because of the importance of both the thesis and special project as culminating
activities, faculty and students have come to share a common expectation that the
products of these labors must be works of the highest quality and represent, to
most students, the most challenging, intense, and rewarding experience of the
Program (SCSU Alumni Association M.P.H. Accreditation Committee 2006-2007
Annual Report).

►Eligibility. Each option also requires a common core of eligibility requirements
 including:

       Matriculated status
       GPA of 3.0 or higher
       Completion of all core and specialization courses.

   In addition, those students who select the thesis, must possess a grade of “B” or
   higher in PCH 515 – Biostatistics, PCH 516 – Public Health Research, and
   PCH 551 – Epidemiology. This requirement, approved in 2004, was
   implemented due to the difference in skill set necessary to complete the thesis
   (Table 2.5a.1.) On a case-by-case basis, a student who desires to complete a
   thesis, but who has earned a grade of less than “B” in one of the three courses
   listed above, may still be approved on the recommendation of the instructor of
   the affected course. To date, no such requests have been received.

► Mandatory Orientation. A student's participation in the thesis or special
  project begins with attendance at a mandatory pre-culminating experience
  orientation (similar to the internship orientation meeting discussed in the
  previous section), which is held in March, on the same day as the Department’s
  Research Symposium, and prior to a student’s final academic year of study. At
  this meeting, the Coordinator of Graduate Studies and other faculty, review the
  Program’s Thesis Guidelines and Requirements, Special Project Guidelines
  and Requirements and accompanying documents (Reference File 11). The
  orientation provides the opportunity to discuss the nature, scope, requirements,
  and comparison of the two culminating experience options (Appendix 21)

                                98
  through a formal presentation (Appendix 22). This orientation complements the
  information students previously received about the culminating experiences in
  PCH 516 - Public Health Research, PCH 577 – Health Promotion Planning and
  Evaluation, the Graduate Student Handbook, and online at the Department’s
  Web site. Some students completing their culminating experience are invited to
  the orientation to share their insights about the process. The Department’s
  Research Symposium, held immediately following the orientation, provides an
  opportunity for students to understand the nature and scope of the culminating
  experience and prepares them for their own presentations following completion
  of their culminating experiences (Appendix 23). Beginning with cohorts
  entering in fall 2007, all students are required to present their thesis or special
  project research at the Department’s Research Symposium in one of two
  formats—PowerPoint presentation or poster session.

►Approval and Enrollment Process. Upon receipt of applications for thesis or
 special project, the Coordinator catalogues applications and prepares them for
 distribution to the members of the Department’s Culminating Experience
 Review Committee. The applications are forwarded to the members without the
 identification of the applicant. Each committee member submits a score for
 each applicant using the official scoring form (Appendix 24). Following the
 submission of scores, Committee members meet to compare scores, deliberate
 and make a decision on each application. The choices include approval,
 conference required (includes resubmission of application in accordance with
 members’ inquiries) and rejection of the application. Applications approved by
 the Committee may still require revisions as per advisor recommendations.
 Applicants required to attend a conference with the Committee must also
 submit a revised application in accordance with members’ inquiries. Based
 upon re-submission and conference, the application will be either approved or
 rejected. An application is rejected based on the applicant’s failure to provide
 sufficient evidence of his/her ability to conceptualize and develop a coherent
 thesis or special project plan. A student whose application is rejected is not
 permitted to enroll in a culminating experience during the upcoming academic
 year. In consultation with the Committee, he/she is given the option of
 submission of a new application for the next academic year. A student whose
 application is rejected is offered advice from Committee members as to how to
 better prepare for resubmission the following year. In 2007, one student was
 denied permission to begin her thesis and was required re-take selected
 portions of PCH 516 – Public Health Research, as a preliminary requirement
 prior to re-applying to the Committee in Fall 2008. Students are only permitted
 to enroll in PCH 590 - Thesis Seminar I or PCH 593 - Special Project Seminar
 I in the fall semester and PCH 591 - Thesis Seminar II or PCH 594 – Special
 Project Seminar II in the spring semester.

►Selection of Advisors. The student is provided an opportunity to identify
 his/her first three choices of a thesis or special project advisor from a list of

                                 99
available faculty (based on credit load) appearing on the application. Faculty
advisors receive one-half credit per student for each of two semesters. All
thesis and special project advisors must be full-time Department members.
Appropriately credentialed and experienced professionals from outside the
Department may serve as second readers for theses and special projects.




                             100
                          Exhibit 2.5a.

           Culminating Experience Approval Process


                         Mandatory orientation                      PowerPoint Presentation;
                     To the culminating experiences                 introduction to required
                                                                    documents; Q & A

                Submission of application for culminating           Submission of 8 copies of
                 experience to Coordinator of Graduate              application with single
                                Studies                             cover sheet and name


  Not                     Coordinator verifies                      Review of applicant’s
Eligible                  applicant’s eligibility                   transcripts


                                Eligible


                      Coordinator prepares copies of
                                                                    Copies are numbered
                     applications for Ad Hoc Review
                                                                    sequentially; reviews are
                       Committee on Culminating                     blind
                                Experience


                           Committee members                        Scoring is performed
                              independently                         using official Committee
                            score applications                      forms



                           Committee members                        Scores are entered onto
                            meet to compare                         an EXCEL spreadsheet;
                                 scores                             Committee deliberates



                                Decisions


            Application        Conference             Application         Three potential
             rejected           required               approved             decisions


                                                                       Rejected- or conference
                              Re-submission
                                                                       required- application
                                 required                              must be re-submitted


                      Application          Application                 Re-submissions may be
                                            Approved                   approved or rejected. If
                       rejected
                                                                       rejected student must re-
                                                                       apply for the next fall
                                                                       semester.
                              101
                 ►Core Competencies for Culminating Experiences. A student will
                  successfully employ a problem-solving approach that is appropriate to the
                  nature of a problem/need and the desired resolution. The approach will be:

                       Ethically consistent with the Public Health Code of Ethics, as endorsed by
                        the American Public Health Association.
                       Systematic in nature, i.e., will represent a logically defensible progression
                        of activities.
                       Evidential in nature, i.e., will apply scientific and/or logical evidence as the
                        foundation for decision-making.

                                                Table 2.5a.1.

                 Student Learning Objectives for the Thesis and Special Project

                      Thesis                                               Special Project
1. Develop a research proposal that contains:           1. Draft a service-agreement proposal between the
                                                           student, University and (when appropriate)
   a. a defined public health problem.                     health agency/organization that contains:
   b. justification for pursuing research in that
      area.                                                a. specification of the problem
   c. research questions and/or hypotheses.                b. service-agreement objective(s)
   d. application of an appropriate theoretical or         c. the conduct of a problem analysis resulting in
      analytical model to the research problem.                descriptions of nature, scope, consequences,
   e. analysis of current state of knowledge in the            and precursors of the problem.
      selected area through a review and critical          d. specification of research and development
      analysis of the literature.                              procedures, and subsequent work plan.
   f. plan for conducting research including
      methodology and analysis.                         2. Execute service-agreement proposal, including:
   g. approval from the Institutional Review
      Board for working with human participants,           a. plan the response, including conduct
      if required.                                            appropriate assessments, setting strategy,
                                                              design the methodology and specify
2. Conduct research, including:                               development procedures.
                                                           b. develop the response, including produce a
   a. collect data or compile existing data.                  refined (pre-tested and modified) response
   b. analyze data.                                           and produce operating system for the
   c. summarize key findings of analysis.                     implementation response.
                                                           c. Secure IRB approval
3. Draft a formal written report that describes the
   research activities and findings, and interprets     3. Draft a formal written report of the activities,
   the relevance of the findings to other research in       findings and products of the project that
   the area and to the practice of public health.           provide evidence of successful fulfillment of
                                                            the service-agreement.




                                                    102
     ►Certified Health Education Specialist Examination (CHES). As discussed under
      Criterion 2.2b., the Department requires that all students eligible for graduation sit for the
      CHES. examination. At this time, undergraduate students specializing in health
      promotion have the option to sit for the examination, but are not required to do so.

2.5b. Assessment of the extent to which the criterion is met.

       The Criterion is met.

       Strengths. All M.P.H. students are required to complete a thesis or special project as
       their culminating experience. The special project and thesis require students to
       demonstrate the ability to integrate knowledge, concepts and skills essential to public
       health research or intervention planning. Undergraduate students complete an internship
       that is a bridge between the academic study and practice of public health.

       Students are provided with a comprehensive orientation to the internship, thesis and
       special project. Guidelines and extensive supportive documentation help students
       negotiate and complete the application process for these culminating experiences. Faculty
       oversight at multiple stages of the process promotes student success. For thesis and
       special projects, students are carefully matched to advisors, and where deficiencies are
       identified, appropriate remediation is prescribed.

       The inclusion of the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) Examination as a
       Program requirement for graduate students in the CHE specialization is evidence of the
       Department’s commitment to preparing students with knowledge and skills deemed
       relevant to the professional practice of community health education, as recommended by
       the leading national health education associations, credentialing and accrediting bodies.

       Weaknesses. None identified.




                                               103
                                        CRITERION 2.6

                                    Required Competencies

Criterion 2.6.: For each degree program and area of specialization within each program
identified in the instructional matrix, there shall be clearly stated competencies that guide the
development of educational programs.

2.6a. Identification of core public health competencies that all MPH or equivalent
      professional master’s degree students are expected to achieve through their course
      of study.

       M.P.H. and B.S. graduates will demonstrate the competencies identified by the
       Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH) as fundamental to public health practice.
       The competencies are organized around core disciplinary and interdisciplinary, cross-
       cutting areas.

       Tables 2.6a. & b. and 2.6a.1. & b.1. contain a horizontal analysis of the public health core
       course and cross-cutting competencies by courses in the M.P.H. and B.S degree
       programs, respectively.

       Although both the M.P.H. and B.S. programs use the ASPH core and cross-cutting public
       health competencies, the B.S. program uses only selected competencies, while the M.P.H.
       program requires that all competencies are addressed. The use of selected competencies
       and depth of coverage are two of the distinguishing characteristics of the graduate and
       undergraduate degree programs of study.

2.6b. A matrix that identifies the learning experiences by which the core public health
      competencies are met. If this is common across the program, a single matrix will
      suffice. If it varies by degree or specialty area, sufficient information must be
      provided to assess compliance by each.

       Tables 2.6a. & b. and 2.6a.1. & b.1. also contain the learning experiences by which the
       core public health competencies are met in the M.P.H. and B.S. degree programs,
       respectively.




                                               104
                                                                         Table 2.6a. &. b.

                         Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for M.P.H. Degree

                Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                               Learning Experiences – Courses
                        Domain: BIOSTATISTICS
 Develop and apply statistical reasoning and methods in addressing, analyzing
and solving problems in public health; health care; and biomedical, clinical and
                                                                                       500   510   515   516   520   548   551   564      577   595   CCT
                           population-based research.
 A. 1.    Describe the roles biostatistics serve in the discipline of public health.               √

A. 2.     Describe basic concepts of probability, random variation and                             √
          commonly used statistical probability distributions.
A. 3.     Describe preferred methodological alternatives to commonly used                          √
          statistical methods when assumptions are not met.
A. 4.     Distinguish among the different measurement scales and the                               √
          implications for selection of statistical methods to be used based on
          these distinctions.
A. 5.     Apply descriptive techniques commonly used to summarize public                           √
          health data.
A. 6.     Apply common statistical methods for inference.                                          √
A. 7.     Apply descriptive and inferential methodologies according to the type                    √
          of study design for answering a particular research question.
A. 8.     Apply basic informatics techniques with vital statistics and public                                               √
          health records in the description of public health characteristics and in
          public health research and evaluation.
A. 9.     Interpret results of statistical analyses found in public health studies.                √
A. 10.    Develop written and oral presentations based on statistical analyses for                       √
          both public health professionals and educated lay audiences.




                                                         105
                                                                Table 2.6a.&.b., Cont’d

                  Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for M.P.H. Degree

             Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                               Learning Experiences – Courses
                Domain: ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
   Acquire knowledge of environmental factors including, biological, physical
                                                                                   500    510   515   516    520   548   551   564     577   595   CCT
           and chemical factors that affect the health of a community.
B. 1. Describe the direct and indirect human, ecological and safety effects of            √
       major environmental and occupational agents.
B. 2.   Describe genetic, physiologic and psychosocial factors that affect                √
        susceptibility to adverse health outcomes following exposure to
        environmental hazards.
B. 3.   Describe federal and state regulatory programs, guidelines and                    √
        authorities that control environmental health issues.
B. 4.   Specify current environmental risk assessment methods.                            √
B. 5.   Specify approaches for assessing, preventing and controlling                      √
        environmental hazards that pose risks to human health and safety.
B. 6.   Explain the general mechanisms of toxicity in eliciting a toxic response          √
        to various environmental exposures.
B. 7.   Discuss various risk management and risk communication approaches                 √
        in relation to issues of environmental justice and equity.
B. 8.   Develop a testable model of environmental insult.                                 √




                                                      106
                                                                 Table 2.6a.&.b., Cont’d

                       Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for M.P.H. Degree

               Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                              Learning Experiences – Courses
                       Domain: EPIDEMIOLOGY
Ability to study the patterns of disease and injury in human populations and the
                                                                                   500     510   515   516   520   548   551   564      577   595   CCT
            application of this study to the control of health problems.
 C. 1. Identify key sources of data for epidemiologic purposes.                                                           √

 C. 2.   Identify the principles and limitations of public health screening         √                                     √
         programs.
 C. 3.   Describe a public health problem in terms of magnitude, person, time                                             √
         and place.
 C. 4.   Explain the importance of epidemiology for informing scientific,                                                 √
         ethical, economic and political discussion of health issues.
 C. 5.   Comprehend basic ethical and legal principles pertaining to the                                                  √
         collection, maintenance, use and dissemination of epidemiologic data.
 C. 6.   Apply the basic terminology and definitions of epidemiology.               √                                     √
 C. 7.   Calculate basic epidemiology measures.                                                                           √
 C. 8.   Communicate epidemiologic information to lay and professional                                                    √
         audiences.
 C. 9.   Draw appropriate inferences from epidemiologic data.                                                             √
C. 10.   Evaluate the strengths and limitations of epidemiologic reports.                                                 √




                                                      107
                                                                  Table 2.6a.&.b., Cont’d

                        Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for M.P.H. Degree

              Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                                Learning Experiences – Courses
            Domain: HEALTH POLICY AND MANAGEMENT
Strong understanding of delivery, quality and costs of health care for individuals
 and populations. Comprehension of management and policy concerns with the
structure, process and outcomes of health services including the costs, financing,
                organization, outcomes and accessibility of care.
                                                                                     500    510   515   516    520    548   551    564   577   595   CCT
 D. 1.    Identify the main components and issues of the organization, financing                                                    √
          and delivery of health services and public health systems in the US.
 D. 2.    Describe the legal and ethical bases for public health and health                                                         √
          services.
 D. 3.    Explain methods of ensuring community health safety and                                                                   √
          preparedness.
 D. 4.    Discuss the policy process for improving the health status of                                                             √
          populations.
 D. 5.    Apply the principles of program planning, development, budgeting,                                            √                 √
          management and evaluation in organizational and community
          initiatives.
 D. 6.    Apply principles of strategic planning and marketing to public health.                                       √
 D. 7.    Apply quality and performance improvement concepts to address                                                √
          organizational performance issues.
 D. 8.    Apply "systems thinking" for resolving organizational problems.                                              √                 √
 D. 9.    Communicate health policy and management issues using appropriate                                            √
          channels and technologies.
D. 10.    Demonstrate leadership skills for building partnerships.                                                     √




                                                       108
                                                                  Table 2.6a.&.b., Cont’d

                       Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for M.P.H. Degree

             Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                                 Learning Experiences – Courses
           Domain: SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
 Address the behavioral, social and cultural factors related to individual and
population health and health disparities over the life course. Understanding of
 the development, administration and evaluation of programs and policies in
public health and health services to promote and sustain healthy environments
               and healthy lives for individuals and populations.
                                                                                      500   510   515   516    520    548   551    564   577   595   CCT
E. 1.    Identify basic theories, concepts and models from a range of social and                                √
         behavioral disciplines that are used in public health research and
         practice.
E. 2.    Identify the causes of social and behavioral factors that affect health of                             √
         individuals and populations.
E. 3.    Identify individual, organizational and community concerns, assets,                                                             √
         resources and deficits for social and behavioral science interventions.
E. 4.    Identify critical stakeholders for the planning, implementation and                                                             √
         evaluation of public health programs, policies and interventions.
E. 5.    Describe steps and procedures for the planning, implementation and                                                              √
         evaluation of public health programs, policies and interventions.
E. 6.    Describe the role of social and community factors in both the onset and                                                         √
         solution of public health problems.
E. 7.    Describe the merits of social and behavioral science interventions and                                                          √
         policies.
E. 8.    Apply evidence-based approaches in the development and evaluation                                                               √
         of social and behavioral science interventions.
E. 9.    Apply ethical principles to public health program planning,                                                                     √
         implementation and evaluation.
E. 10.   Specify multiple targets and levels of intervention for social and                                     √                        √
         behavioral science programs and/or policies.




                                                       109
                                                                Table 2.6a. &.b., Cont’d

                      Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for M.P.H. Degree

            Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                                 Learning Experiences – Courses
          Domain: COMMUNICATION AND INFORMATICS
The ability to collect, manage and organize data to produce information and
meaning that is exchanged by use of signs and symbols; gather, process, and
 present information to different audiences in-person, through information
  technologies, or through media channels; and to strategically design the
                                                                                   50      510   515   516    520   548    551    564   57   59   CCT
information and knowledge exchange process to achieve specific objectives.
                                                                                    0                                                    7    5
F. 1.    Describe how the public health information infrastructure is used to                                               √      √
         collect, process, maintain, and disseminate data.
F. 2.    Describe how societal, organizational, and individual factors influence   √                    √                               √
         and are influenced by public health communications.
F. 3.    Discuss the influences of social, organizational and individual factors                                                        √
         on the use of information technology by end users.
F. 4.    Apply theory and strategy-based communication principles across                                                                √
         different settings and audiences.
F. 5.    Apply legal and ethical principles to the use of information technology                        √                               √
         and resources in public health settings.
F. 6.    Collaborate with communication and informatics specialists in the                                                              √
         process of design, implementation, and evaluation of public health
         programs.
F. 7.    Demonstrate effective written and oral skills for communicating with      √
         different audiences in the context of professional public health
         activities.
F. 8.    Use information technology to access, evaluate, and interpret public                    √
         health data.
F. 9.    Use informatics methods and resources as strategic tools to promote       √
         public health.
F. 10.   Use informatics and communication methods to advocate for                 √
         community public health programs and policies.



                                                     110
                                                                    Table 2.6a. &.b., Cont’d

                         Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for M.P.H. Degree

               Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                                  Learning Experiences – Courses
                 Domain: DIVERSITY AND CULTURE
The ability to interact with both diverse individuals and communities to produce
                                                                                        500    510   515   516   520   548    551   564     577   595   CCT
                   or impact an intended public health outcome
 G. 1.     Describe the roles of, history, power, privilege and structural inequality   √                                            √                   √
           in producing health disparities.
 G. 2.     Explain how professional ethics and practices relate to equity and           √                                            √            √      √
           accountability in diverse community settings.
 G. 3.     Explain why cultural competence alone cannot address health disparity.       √                                            √                   √
 G. 4.     Discuss the importance and characteristics of a sustainable diverse          √                                                                √
           public health workforce.
 G. 5.     Use the basic concepts and skills involved in culturally appropriate                                                             √            √
           community engagement and empowerment with diverse communities.
 G. 6.     Apply the principles of community-based participatory research to                               √                                             √
           improve health in diverse populations.
 G. 7.     Differentiate among availability, acceptability, and accessibility of                                        √            √                   √
           health care across diverse populations.
 G. 8.     Differentiate between linguistic competence, cultural competency, and                                                     √                   √
           health literacy in public health practice.
 G. 9.     Cite examples of situations where consideration of culture-specific                                                              √
           needs resulted in a more effective modification or adaptation of a
           health intervention.
G. 10.     Develop public health programs and strategies responsive to the                                                                  √
           diverse cultural values and traditions of the communities being served.




                                                         111
                                                                Table 2.6a. &.b., Cont’d

                       Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for M.P.H. Degree

              Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                               Learning Experiences – Courses
                       Domain: LEADERSHIP
 The ability to create and communicate a shared vision for a changing future;
champion solutions to organizational and community challenges; and energize
                                                                                    500    510   515   516   520   548    551   564     577   595   CCT
                              commitment to goals.
H. 1.     Describe the attributes of leadership in public health.                                                   √
H. 2.     Describe alternative strategies for collaboration and partnership among                                   √
          organizations, focused on public health goals.
H. 3.     Articulate an achievable mission, set of core values, and vision.                                         √
H. 4.     Engage in dialogue and learning from others to advance public health                                      √
          goals.
H. 5.     Demonstrate team building, negotiation, and conflict management                                           √                         √
          skills.
H. 6.     Demonstrate transparency, integrity, and honesty in all actions.                                          √                         √
H. 7.     Use collaborative methods for achieving organizational and community                                      √                   √
          health goals.
H. 8.     Apply social justice and human rights principles when addressing          √                                                   √
          community needs.
H. 9.     Develop strategies to motivate others for collaborative problem                                           √
          solving, decision-making, and evaluation.




                                                      112
                                                                 Table 2.6a. &.b., Cont’d

                       Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for M.P.H. Degree

              Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                                Learning Experiences – Courses
                Domain: PUBLIC HEALTH BIOLOGY
 The ability to incorporate public health biology- the biological and molecular
                                                                                    500     510   515   516   520    548   551   564     577   595   CCT
               context of public health- into public health practice.
 I. 1.    Specify the role of the immune system in population health.                       √
 I. 2.    Describe how behavior alters human biology.                                       √
 I. 3.    Identify the ethical, social and legal issues implied by public health            √
          biology.
 I. 4.    Explain the biological and molecular basis of public health.                      √
 I. 5.    Explain the role of biology in the ecological model of population-based           √
          health.
 I. 6.    Explain how genetics and genomics affect disease processes and public             √
          health policy and practice.
 I. 7.    Articulate how biological, chemical and physical agents affect human              √
          health.
 I. 8.    Apply biological principles to development and implementation of                  √
          disease prevention, control, or management programs.
 I. 9.    Apply evidence-based biological and molecular concepts to inform                  √
          public health laws, policies, and regulations.
I. 10.    Integrate general biological and molecular concepts into public health.           √




                                                      113
                                                                    Table 2.6a. &.b., Cont’d

                         Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for M.P.H. Degree

                Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                                 Learning Experiences – Courses
                      Domain: PROFESSIONALISM
    The ability to demonstrate ethical choices, values and professional practices
   implicit in pubic health decisions; consider the effect of choices on community
stewardship, equity, social justice and accountability; and commit to personal and
                                                                                        500    510   515   516   520    548    551   564    577   595   CCT
                                institutional development.
   J. 1.     Discuss sentinel events in the history and development of the public       √
             health profession and their relevance for practice in the field.
   J. 2.     Apply basic principles of ethical analysis (e.g. the Public Health Code    √                                             √
             of Ethics, human rights framework, other moral theories) to issues of
             public health practice and policy.
   J. 3.     Apply evidence-based principles and the scientific knowledge base to       √                                                   √
             critical evaluation and decision-making in public health.
   J. 4.     Apply the core functions of assessment, policy development, and                                                          √
             assurance in the analysis of public health problems and their solutions.
   J. 5.     Promote high standards of personal and organizational integrity,           √                                                         √
             compassion, honesty and respect for all people.
   J. 6.     Analyze determinants of health and disease using an ecological                    √
             framework.
   J. 7.     Analyze the potential impacts of legal and regulatory environments on                                                    √
             the conduct of ethical public health research and practice.
   J. 8.     Distinguish between population and individual ethical considerations                                                     √
             in relation to the benefits, costs, and burdens of public health
             programs.
   J. 9.     Embrace a definition of public health that captures the unique             √
             characteristics of the field (e.g., population-focused, community-
             oriented, prevention-motivated and rooted in social justice) and how
             these contribute to professional practice.
  J. 10.     Appreciate the importance of working collaboratively with diverse          √                                                   √
             communities and constituencies (e.g. researchers, practitioners,
             agencies and organizations).

                                                         114
 J. 11.    Value commitment to lifelong learning and professional service                                                                            √
           including active participation in professional organizations.


                                                                       Table 2.6a. &.b., Cont’d

                          Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for M.P.H. Degree

                Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                                    Learning Experiences – Courses
                    Domain: PROGRAM PLANNING
The ability to plan for the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of
                                                                                            500   510   515   516   520    548    551   564    577   595   CCT
              strategies to improve individual and community health.
  K. 1. Describe how social, behavioral, environmental, and biological factors              √     √                         √            √
            contribute to specific individual and community health outcomes.
  K. 2. Describe the tasks necessary to assure that program implementation                                                  √                               √
            occurs as intended.
  K. 3. Explain how the findings of a program evaluation can be used.                                                                                       √
  K. 4.    Explain the contribution of logic models in program development,                                                                                 √
           implementation, and evaluation.
  K. 5.    Differentiate among goals, measurable objectives, related activities, and                                                                        √
           expected outcomes for a public health program.
  K. 6.    Differentiate the purposes of formative, process, and outcome evaluation.                                                                        √
  K. 7.    Differentiate between qualitative and quantitative evaluation methods in                            √
           relation to their strengths, limitations, and appropriate uses, and emphases
           on reliability and validity.
  K. 8.    Prepare a program budget with justification.                                                                     √                               √
  K. 9.    In collaboration with others, prioritize individual, organizational, and                                                                         √
           community concerns and resources for public health programs.
  K. 10.   Assess evaluation reports in relation to their quality, utility, and impact on                                                                   √
           public health.




                                                           115
                                                                  Table 2.6a. &.b., Cont’d

                        Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for M.P.H. Degree

               Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                                Learning Experiences – Courses
                    Domain: SYSTEMS THINKING
    The ability to recognize system level properties that result from dynamic
     interactions among human and social systems and how they affect the
   relationships among individuals, groups, organizations, communities, and
                                                                                      500    510   515   516   520   548    551   564     577   595   CCT
                                    environments.
L. 1.      Identify characteristics of a system.                                                                √                  √      √
L. 2.      Identify unintended consequences produced by changes made to a                                                          √      √
           public health system.
L. 3.      Provide examples of feedback loops and “stocks and flows” within a                                                      √      √
           public health system.
L. 4.      Explain how systems (e.g. individuals, social networks, organizations,                               √                  √
           and communities) may be viewed as systems within systems in the
           analysis of public health problems.
L. 5.      Explain how systems models can be tested and validated.
L. 6.      Explain how the contexts of gender, race, poverty, history, migration,                               √                               √
           and culture are important in the design of interventions within public
           health systems.
L. 7.      Illustrate how changes in public health systems (including input,                                                       √
           processes, and output) can be measured.
L. 8.      Analyze inter-relationships among systems that influence the quality of    √                                            √
           life of people in their communities.
L. 9.      Analyze the effects of political, social and economic policies on public                                                √
           health systems at the local, state, national and international levels.
L. 10.     Analyze the impact of global trends and interdependencies on public        √                                            √
           health related problems and systems.
L. 11.     Assess strengths and weaknesses of applying the systems approach to                                                     √
           public health problems.




                                                       116
                                                                      Table 2.6a.1. & b.1.

                      Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for B.S. Degree

               Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                                Learning Experiences – Courses
             Domain: MATHEMATICS 107 (BIOSTATISTICS)
 Develop and apply statistical reasoning and methods in addressing, analyzing
                                                                                                                                                MA
and solving problems in public health; health care; and biomedical, clinical and
                                                                                       202   242   275   340   351   358   359   363      365   107   497
                           population-based research.
 A. 1.    Describe the roles biostatistics serve in the discipline of public health.                                                             √
A. 2.     Describe basic concepts of probability, random variation and                                                                           √
          commonly used statistical probability distributions.
A. 4.     Distinguish among the different measurement scales and the                                                                             √
          implications for selection of statistical methods to be used based on
          these distinctions.
A. 7.     Apply descriptive and inferential methodologies according to the type                          √
          of study design for answering a particular research question.
A. 9.     Interpret results of statistical analyses found in public health studies.                      √




                                                          117
                                                                 Table 2.6a.1. & b.1., Cont’d

                          Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for B.S. Degree

               Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                              Learning Experiences – Courses
                  Domain: ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
                                                                                                                                              MA    497
     Acquire knowledge of environmental factors including, biological, physical
                                                                                     202   242   275   340    351   358    359   363    365   107
             and chemical factors that affect the health of a community.
  B. 1. Describe the direct and indirect human, ecological and safety effects of                                            √
         major environmental and occupational agents.


                                                                 Table 2.6a.1. & b.1., Cont’d

                          Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for B.S. Degree

               Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                              Learning Experiences – Courses
                  Domain: ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
                                                                                                                                              MA    497
Acquire knowledge of environmental factors including, biological, physical and
                                                                                     202   242   275   340    351   358    359   363    365   107
chemical factors that affect the health of a community.
  B. 2. Describe genetic, physiologic and psychosocial factors that affect                                                  √
          susceptibility to adverse health outcomes following exposure to
          environmental hazards.
  B. 3. Describe federal and state regulatory programs, guidelines and                                                      √
          authorities that control environmental health issues.
  B. 4. Specify current environmental risk assessment methods.                                                              √
  B. 5.   Specify approaches for assessing, preventing and controlling                                                      √
          environmental hazards that pose risks to human health and safety.
  B. 6.   Explain the general mechanisms of toxicity in eliciting a toxic response                                          √
          to various environmental exposures.
  B. 7.   Discuss various risk management and risk communication approaches                                                 √
          in relation to issues of environmental justice and equity.
  B.8.    Develop a testable model of environmental insult.                                                                 √


                                                        118
                                                                Table 2.6a.1. & b.1., Cont’d

                          Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for B.S. Degree

               Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                                Learning Experiences – Courses
                       Domain: EPIDEMIOLOGY
Ability to study the patterns of disease and injury in human populations and the
                                                                                                                                                MA
            application of this study to the control of health problems.
                                                                                     202   242     275   340    351   358   359   363     365   107   497
 C. 1.    Identify key sources of data for epidemiologic purposes.                          √
 C. 3.    Describe a public health problem in terms of magnitude, person, time                 √
          and place.
 C. 4.    Explain the importance of epidemiology for informing scientific,                     √
          ethical, economic and political discussion of health issues.
 C. 5.    Comprehend basic ethical and legal principles pertaining to the                      √                 √
          collection, maintenance, use and dissemination of epidemiologic data.
 C. 6.    Apply the basic terminology and definitions of epidemiology.                         √                             √
 C. 9.    Draw appropriate inferences from epidemiologic data.                                 √                 √
 C.10     Evaluate the strengths and limitations of epidemiological reports.                                     √

                                                                Table 2.6a.1. & b.1., Cont’d

                          Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for B.S. Degree

             Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                                  Learning Experiences – Courses
          Domain: HEALTH POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION
Strong understanding of delivery, quality and costs of health care for individuals
 and populations. Comprehension of management and policy concerns with the
                                                                                                                                                MA
structure, process and outcomes of health services including the costs, financing,
                                                                                     202   242     275   340    351   358   359   363     365   107   497
                organization, outcomes and accessibility of care.
 D. 1.     Identify the main components and issues of the organization, financing                                      √
           and delivery of health services and public health systems in the US.

                                                       119
               Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                                  Learning Experiences – Courses
D. 2.     Describe the legal and ethical bases for public health and health                                              √
          services.
D.3.      Explain methods of ensuring community safety and preparedness.                                                 √      √
D. 4.     Discuss the policy process for improving the health status of                                                  √
          populations.
D.10      Demonstrate leadership skills for building partnerships.                                                       √


                                                                Table 2.6a.1. & b.1., Cont’d

                          Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for B.S. Degree

               Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                                  Learning Experiences – Courses
           Domain: SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
 Address the behavioral, social and cultural factors related to individual and
population health and health disparities over the life course. Understanding of
 the development, administration and evaluation of programs and policies in
                                                                                                                                                  MA
public health and health services to promote and sustain healthy environments
                                                                                      202      242   275    340   351     358   359   363   365   107   497
               and healthy lives for individuals and populations.
E. 1.    Identify basic theories, concepts and models from a range of social and                     √
         behavioral disciplines that are used in public health research and
         practice.
E. 2.    Identify the causes of social and behavioral factors that affect health of                  √
         individuals and populations.
E. 6.    Describe the role of social and community factors in both the onset and                     √
         solution of public health problems.
E. 7.    Describe the merits of social and behavioral science interventions and                      √
         policies.




                                                       120
                                                                 Table 2.6a.1. & b.1., Cont’d

                          Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for B.S. Degree

             Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                                     Learning Experiences – Courses
           Domain: COMMUNICATION AND INFORMATICS
 The ability to collect, manage and organize data to produce information and
meaning that is exchanged by use of signs and symbols; gather, process, and
  present information to different audiences in-person, through information
                                                                                                                                                   MA
   technologies, or through media channels; and to strategically design the
                                                                                       202      242   275    340   351   358    359   363    365   107   497
 information and knowledge exchange process to achieve specific objectives.
F. 1.    Describe how the public health information infrastructure is used to          √                                                                 √
         collect, process, maintain, and disseminate data.
F. 7.    Demonstrate effective written and oral skills for communicating with                                                                            √
         different audiences in the context of professional public health
         activities.
F.8.     Use information technology to access, evaluate, and interpret public                                 √
         health data.

                                                                 Table 2.6a.1. & b.1., Cont’d

                          Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for B.S. Degree

               Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                                   Learning Experiences – Courses
                 Domain: DIVERSITY AND CULTURE
The ability to interact with both diverse individuals and communities to produce
                                                                                                                                                   MA    497
                   or impact an intended public health outcome
                                                                                       202   242      275   340    351   358   359    363    365   107
G. 1.     Describe the roles of, history, power, privilege and structural inequality    √                           √                                    √
          in producing health disparities.
G. 2.     Explain how professional ethics and practices relate to equity and           √                           √                         √           √
          accountability in diverse community settings.
G. 3.     Explain why cultural competence alone cannot address health disparity.                                   √                                     √
G. 4.     Discuss the importance and characteristics of a sustainable diverse          √                                                                 √
          public health workforce.

                                                        121
                Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                               Learning Experiences – Courses
  G.5.     Use the basic concepts and skills involved in culturally appropriate                                                                          √
           community engagement and empowerment with diverse communities.
  G.6.     Apply principles of community-based participatory research to improve                          √
           health of diverse populations.
  G. 7.    Differentiate among availability, acceptability, and accessibility of      √
           health care across diverse populations.

                                                                Table 2.6a.1. & b.1., Cont’d

                          Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for B.S. Degree

               Domain: DIVERSITY AND CULTURE, Cont’d
The ability to interact with both diverse individuals and communities to produce
                                                                                                                                                  MA    497
or impact an intended public health outcome
                                                                                    202    242     275   340    351   358   359    363    365     107
  G.8.     Differentiate between linguistic competence, cultural competency, and     √
           health literacy in public health practice.
  G. 9.    Cite examples of situations where consideration of culture-specific                      √
           needs resulted in a more effective modification or adaptation of a
           health intervention.

                                                                Table 2.6a.1. & b.1., Cont’d

                          Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for B.S. Degree

                Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                       Learning Experiences – Courses or Other Venues
                         Domain: LEADERSHIP
  The ability to create and communicate a shared vision for a changing future;
                                                                                                                                                  MA
 champion solutions to organizational and community challenges; and energize
                                                                                    202    242     275   340    351   358   359   363     365     107   497
                               commitment to goals.
 H. 1.     Describe the attributes of leadership in public health.                                                     √
 H.5.      Demonstrate team building, negotiation, and conflict management                                                                √
           skills.
 H. 6.     Demonstrate transparency, integrity, and honesty in all actions.                                            √                                √

                                                       122
             Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                        Learning Experiences – Courses or Other Venues
H. 8.    Apply social justice and human rights principles when addressing                                             √                               √
         community needs.

                                                              Table 2.6a.1. & b.1., Cont’d

                        Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for B.S. Degree

              Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                               Learning Experiences – Courses
                Domain: PUBLIC HEALTH BIOLOGY
The ability to incorporate public health biology- the biological and molecular
                                                                                                                                                MA
              context of public health- into public health practice.
                                                                                   202   242     275   340    351   358   359   363     365     107   497
I. 1.    Specify the role of the immune system in population health.                                           √                         √
I. 2.    Describe how behavior alters human biology.                                                                                     √
I. 3.    Identify the ethical, social and legal issues implied by public health                                                          √
         biology.
I. 4.    Explain the biological and molecular basis of public health.                                                                   √
I. 5.    Explain the role of biology in the ecological model of population-based                                                        √
         health.
I. 6.    Explain how genetics and genomics affect disease processes and public                                                          √
         health policy and practice.
I. 7.    Articulate how biological, chemical and physical agents affect human                                              √            √
         health.
I. 8.    Apply biological principles to development and implementation of                                                               √
         disease prevention, control, or management programs.
I.9.     Apply evidence-based biological and molecular concepts to inform                                                               √
         public health laws, policies, and regulations.
I.10.    Integrate general biological and molecular concepts into public health.                                                        √




                                                     123
                                                                  Table 2.6a.1. & b.1., Cont’d

                           Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for B.S. Degree


                Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                                Learning Experiences – Courses
                      Domain: PROFESSIONALISM
    The ability to demonstrate ethical choices, values and professional practices
   implicit in pubic health decisions; consider the effect of choices on community
                                                                                                                                                 MA
stewardship, equity, social justice and accountability; and commit to personal and
                                                                                        202   242   275    340   351   358    359   363    365   107   497
                                institutional development.
   J. 1.     Discuss sentinel events in the history and development of the public       √
             health profession and their relevance for practice in the field.
   J. 2.     Apply basic principles of ethical analysis (e.g. the Public Health Code                                    √
             of Ethics, human rights framework, other moral theories) to issues of
             public health practice and policy.
    J.3.     Apply evidenced-based principles and the scientific knowledge base to                                      √
             critical evaluation and decision-making in public health.
   J. 4.     Apply the core functions of assessment, policy development, and            √                               √
             assurance in the analysis of public health problems and their solutions.
   J. 5.     Promote high standards of personal and organizational integrity,                                           √
             compassion, honesty and respect for all people.
   J. 6.     Analyze determinants of health and disease using an ecological             √                               √
             framework.
   J. 7.     Analyze the potential impacts of legal and regulatory environments on                                      √
             the conduct of ethical public health research and practice.
   J. 8.     Distinguish between population and individual ethical considerations                                       √
             in relation to the benefits, costs, and burdens of public health
             programs.
   J. 9.     Embrace a definition of public health that captures the unique             √
             characteristics of the field (e.g., population-focused, community-
             oriented, prevention-motivated and rooted in social justice) and how
             these contribute to professional practice.
  J. 10.     Appreciate the importance of working collaboratively with diverse          √
             communities and constituencies (e.g. researchers, practitioners,

                                                         124
                Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                                  Learning Experiences – Courses
           agencies and organizations).
 J. 11.    Value commitment to lifelong learning and professional service                                                                                √
           including active participation in professional organizations.

                                                                   Table 2.6a.1. & b.1., Cont’d

                           Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for B.S. Degree

                Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                                  Learning Experiences – Courses
                    Domain: PROGRAM PLANNING
The ability to plan for the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of
                                                                                                                                                   MA
              strategies to improve individual and community health.
                                                                                          202   242   275    340   351   358    359   363    365   107   497
  K. 1.    Describe how social, behavioral, environmental, and biological factors                                         √            √                  √
           contribute to specific individual and community health outcomes.
  K. 2.    Describe the tasks necessary to assure that program implementation                                                          √                 √
           occurs as intended.
  K. 3.    Explain how the findings of a program evaluation can be used.                                      √                        √                 √
  K. 4.    Explain the contribution of logic models in program development,                                                            √
           implementation, and evaluation.
  K. 5.    Differentiate among goals, measurable objectives, related activities, and                                                   √
           expected outcomes for a public health program.
  K. 6.    Differentiate the purposes of formative, process, and outcome evaluation.                                                   √
  K. 7.    Differentiate between qualitative and quantitative evaluation methods in                           √                        √
           relation to their strengths, limitations, and appropriate uses, and emphases
           on reliability and validity.
  K. 8.    Prepare a program budget with justification.                                                                                √




                                                          125
                                                                 Table 2.6a.1. & b.1., Cont’d

                          Domains, Core Public Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for B.S. Degree

               Domain and Core Public Health Competencies                                               Learning Experiences – Courses
                    Domain: SYSTEMS THINKING
    The ability to recognize system level properties that result from dynamic
     interactions among human and social systems and how they affect the
                                                                                                                                               MA
   relationships among individuals, groups, organizations, communities, and
                                                                                      202   242   275   340   351   358    359   363     365   107   497
                                    environments.
L. 1.      Identify characteristics of a system.                                       √          √                  √
L. 2.      Identify unintended consequences produced by changes made to a              √
           public health system.
L. 3.      Provide examples of feedback loops and “stocks and flows” within a          √
           public health system.
L. 4.      Explain how systems (e.g. individuals, social networks, organizations,      √          √
           and communities) may be viewed as systems within systems in the
           analysis of public health problems.
L. 6.      Explain how the contexts of gender, race, poverty, history, migration,                 √            √
           and culture are important in the design of interventions within public
           health systems.
L. 8.      Analyze inter-relationships among systems that influence the quality of                             √
           life of people in their communities.
L. 9.      Analyze the effects of political, social and economic policies on public                            √
           health systems at the local, state, national and international levels.
L. 10.     Analyze the impact of global trends and interdependencies on public                                 √     √
           health related problems and systems.
L. 11.     Assess strengths and weaknesses of applying the systems approach to         √          √            √
           public health problems.




                                                       126
2.6c.   Identification of a set of competencies for each specialty area identified in the
        instructional matrix, including professional and academic degree curricula.

        Table 2.6c. and 2.6c.1. contain a horizontal analysis of the areas of responsibilities, core
        and sub-competencies expected of graduate and undergraduate trained health educators,
        respectively. The undergraduate program uses those competencies and sub-competencies
        recommended for B.S. level trained health educators and the graduate program includes
        each of the three levels of competencies, including Bachelors, Masters and Doctorate.
        Table 2.6c.2. contains the competencies for the B.S. specialization in environmental
        health presented for each of the four required courses comprising the specialization.




                                                127
                                                                                      Table 2.6c.

                                   Areas of Responsibilities: Course Analysis of CHES Competencies for M.P.H. Degree Program

               Responsibility                 Responsibility                Responsibility               Responsibility           Responsibility      Responsibility      Responsibility
                    I                              II                            III                          IV                       V                   VI                 VII
 Comps.   A    B C D E             F    A    B C D E F                 G    A B C D                 A    B C D E             F    A B C D             A B C D             A B C D
  Subs    5    4 3 3 4             3    5    5 7 5 5 5                 4    5 5 6 2                 4    6 2 7 8             3    7 2 6 3             5 2 3 6             6 7 5 4
PCH 500
PCH 504                                 1-   1-                                                                                                                           1-        1-   1-
                                        5    5                                                                                                                            6         5    4
PCH 510
PCH 515
PCH 516   1-   1-
          5    4
PCH 520             1-
                    3
PCH 548                                                                                                                           1-   1-   1-   1-                  1-
                                                                                                                                  7    2    6    3                   6
PCH 551
PCH 564
PCH 586                  1-                                       1-        1-   1-    1-   1-                                                        1-   1-   1-             1-
                         3                                        5         5    5     6    2                                                         5    2    3              7
PCH 577   1-   1-   1-   1-   1-   1-   1-   1-   1-   1-   1-         1-                           1-   1-   1-   1-   1-   1-
          5    4    3    3    4    3    5    5    7    5    4          4                            4    6    2    7    8    3
 PCH
590/591
 PCH
593/594
PCH 595




                                                                 128
                                                                    Table 2.6c.1.

                              Areas of Responsibilities: Course Analysis of CHES Competencies for B.S. Degree Program

             Responsibility             Responsibility          Responsibility          Responsibility       Responsibility   Responsibility   Responsibility
                  I                          II                      III                     IV                   V                VI              VII
Comps.   A   B C D E          F    A   B C D E F            G   A B C D             A   B C D E          F   A B C D          A B C D          A B C D
 Subs    5   4 3 3 4          3    5   5 7 5 5 5            4   5 5 6 2             4   6 2 7 8          3   7 2 6 3          5 2 3 6          6 7 5 4
 PCH            √         √
 202
 PCH
 242
 PCH             √                                                                                                                             √
 275
 PCH     √                                                                                                           √
 340
 PCH
 351
 PCH
 358
 PCH
 359
 PCH
 363
 PCH
 365
 PCH         √                                                                                                                √                √   √
 430
 PCH     √   √   √            √    √   √   √   √        √   √   √   √    √                  √   √                             √       √            √
 431
 PCH     √   √   √       √         √   √   √                √            √          √   √   √       √                         √
 432
 PCH
 497




                                                     129
                                                                   Table 2.6c.2.

                  Domains, Environmental Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for B.S. Degree

                            Domain and Environmental Health Competencies                                    Learning Experiences- Courses
                                        Domain: FOOD HYGIENE
Students completing the concentration in local environmental health practice will demonstrate competency
                                                                                                             440     441     445    446
                 in inspection, evaluation and reporting, and education in food hygiene.
A. 1. Identify and describe safe sources of food.                                                             √
A. 2.    Identify and describe safe methods of food handling.                                                 √
A. 3.    Articulate the nature and extent of foodborne diseases.                                              √
A. 4.    Identify and distinguish between the major foodborne pathogens and intoxicants and specify their     √
         modes of transmission.
A. 5.    Explain the contributing factors for foodborne diseases.                                             √
A. 6.    Name and describe health codes related to food safety.                                               √
A. 7.    Define active and passive food safety surveillance methods.                                          √
A. 8.    Describe risk assessment procedures and measures.                                                    √
A. 9.    Define foodborne disease outbreak.                                                                   √
A. 10.   List criteria for beginning an outbreak investigation.                                               √
A. 11.   Explain how to document and report the results of an outbreak investigation.                         √
A. 12.   Describe the steps in a Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP).                          √
A. 13.   Explain the foodborne disease reporting and data collection system and identify reports used to      √
         document foodborne illness.
A. 14.   List steps for submitting samples to a laboratory for testing.                                       √
A. 15.   Describe the role of the local environmental health practitioner as educator.                        √
A.16.    Evaluate the need to inform the public through risk communication.                                   √
A. 17.   Develop community strategies for reducing the occurrence of foodborne illness.                       √

                                                     130
                                                               Table 2.6c.2., Cont’d

                  Domains, Environmental Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for B.S. Degree

                            Domain and Environmental Health Competencies                                   Learning Experiences- Courses
                  Domain: WATER SUPPLY AND WASTE-WATER TREATMENT
Students completing the concentration in local environmental health practice will demonstrate competency
                                                                                                            440     441     445    446
   in inspection, evaluation and reporting, and education in waster supply and waster-water treatment.
B. 1. Explain the hydrologic cycle.                                                                                  √
B. 2.    Distinguish between different types of water supplies (public, private).                                    √
B. 3.    Identify water quality parameters that directly impact health.                                              √
B. 4.    Identify and explain laws and regulations that govern water supply safety.                                  √
B. 5.    Identify biological and chemical contaminants of water and their sources.                                   √
B. 6.    Explain the role of public health agencies in the regulation of water supplies.                             √
B. 7.    Explain how federal legislation impacts community water and wastewater management                           √
         technologies.
B. 8.    Enumerate and explain historical advances in pollution prevention strategies.                               √
B. 9.    Describe how private septic treatment systems work.                                                         √
B.10.    Explain how municipal water treatment systems work.                                                         √
B.11.    List and explain the duties of a health inspector relative to water supply.                                 √
B.12.    List and explain the duties of a health inspector relative to waste water.                                  √
B.13.    Describe the process of reclamation of polluted water sources.                                              √
B. 14.   Describe the relationship between land use management and water.                                            √
B. 15.   Evaluate recreational area environmental water issues.                                                      √
B. 16.   List steps for submitting samples to a laboratory for testing.                                              √




                                                     131
                                                            Table 2.6c.2., Cont’d

                  Domains, Environmental Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for B.S. Degree

                           Domain and Environmental Health Competencies                                    Learning Experiences- Courses
                 Domain: WATER SUPPLY AND WASTE-WATER TREATMENT
Students completing the concentration in local environmental health practice will demonstrate competency
                                                                                                            440     441     445    446
    in inspection, evaluation and reporting, and education in waster supply and waster-water treatment.
B. 17. Describe the role of the local environmental health practitioner as educator.                                 √
B. 18.   Evaluate the need to inform the public through risk communication.                                          √
B. 19.   Develop community strategies for reducing the occurrence of waterborne illness.                             √

                                                            Table 2.6c.2., Cont’d

                  Domains, Environmental Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for B.S. Degree

                           Domain and Environmental Health Competencies                                    Learning Experiences- Courses
                Domain: EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS FOR PUBLIC HEALTH
Students completing the concentration in local environmental health practice will demonstrate competency
                                                                                                            440     441     445    446
   in inspection, evaluation and reporting, and education in emergency preparedness for public health
C. 1. Explain the primary agents and their use in biological, chemical, radiological, or nuclear                             √
        emergencies.
C. 2. Analyze public health issues in natural disasters and disease outbreaks.                                               √
C. 3.    Identify the principles of the Incident Command System and the role of public health within the                     √
         structure.
C. 4.    Describe the psychological and emotional response of emergency workers and the public to                            √
         disasters.
C. 5.    Analyze methods of surveillance employed to detect disease outbreaks and issues concerning the                      √
         use and legal aspects of Isolation and Quarantine.




                                                  132
                                                              Table 2.6c.2., Cont’d

                  Domains, Environmental Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for B.S. Degree
                         Domain and Environmental Health Competencies                             Learning Experiences- Courses
                 Domain: EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS FOR PUBLIC HEALTH
Students completing the concentration in local environmental health practice will demonstrate competency
                                                                                                               440     441     445    446
   in inspection, evaluation and reporting, and education in emergency preparedness for public health
C. 6. Analyze international treaties concerned with control of biological, chemical and nuclear agents.                         √
C. 7.    Define the inter-disciplinary nature of preparing for and responding to emergencies and disasters.                     √
C. 8.    Analyze problems of public health funding and personnel in emergency response.                                         √
C. 9.    Explain the roles and responsibilities of federal, state and local agencies in preparedness and                        √
         response.
C. 10.   Explain the principles of Risk Communication and their importance in providing honest, credible,                       √
         timely information to the public in an emergency.
C. 11.   Explain the role of the World Health Organization (WHO) in disease control.                                            √
C. 12.   Describe the role of the local environmental health practitioner as educator.                                          √
C. 13.   Explain the role of the local environmental health practitioner in risk communication.                                 √

                                                              Table 2.6c.2., Cont’d

                  Domains, Environmental Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for B.S. Degree

                           Domain and Environmental Health Competencies                                       Learning Experiences- Courses
                               Domain: ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARDS
Students completing the concentration in local environmental health practice will demonstrate competency
                                                                                                               440     441     445    446
            in inspection, evaluation and reporting, and education in environmental hazards.
D. 1. Discuss and define the terms vector and pest.                                                                                    √
D. 2.    Identify the major arthropod and mammalian vectors of disease                                                                 √



                                                    133
                                                             Table 2.6c.2., Cont’d

                 Domains, Environmental Health Competencies and Learning Experiences by Course for B.S. Degree

                          Domain and Environmental Health Competencies                                      Learning Experiences- Courses
                              Domain: ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARDS
Students completing the concentration in local environmental health practice will demonstrate competency
                                                                                                             440     441     445    446
             in inspection, evaluation and reporting, and education in environmental hazards.
D. 3. Describe specific methods of vector control and issues of ecological damage of pesticide, pesticide                            √
        resistance, and adverse health effects.
D. 4. Discuss pesticide toxicity and alternatives to chemical pesticides                                                             √
D. 5.   Identify the consequences of improper solid waste disposal                                                                   √
D. 6.   Differentiate the types of hazardous waste and discuss proper disposal                                                       √
D. 7.   Discuss relevant federal, state and local laws, codes and ordinances                                                         √
D. 8.   Identify indoor and outdoor air pollution and populations affected                                                           √
D. 9.   Recognize options for health promotion and primary prevention in reducing environmental hazards                              √
        in housing
D.10.   Explain the duties and training of environmental health inspectors with special emphasis on the                              √
        identification of hazards, enforcing policies and regulations and the mitigation process
D.11.   Implement risk assessment measures in natural and man-made disasters                                                         √




                                                   134
2.6d. A description of the manner in which competencies are developed, used and made
      available to students.

        The Graduate and Undergraduate Program Committees (GPC/UPC) are charged with
        developing, revising and monitoring the core and specialization competencies for the
        Program. In 2006, the Committees decided to define “the capacity necessary to contribute
        to the successful execution of public health’s essential services” as the core public health
        competencies promulgated by the Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH),
        Master’s of Public Health Core Competency Development Project, May 2007 Version
        2.3. Despite some reservations concerning the processes of development and validation,
        the adoption of the competencies seemed prudent given the launching of the public health
        certification examination by the National Board of Public Health Examiners (NBPHE) in
        2008. The Committees finalized their decision after the conduct of a comparison audit
        between the ASPH and Council on Linkages competencies which revealed a significant
        concordance. As part of its ongoing assessment of Program relevance, a review of
        competencies will be continuous and will include those under revision by the Council on
        Linkages scheduled for release as early as May 2008.

        The competencies for the specialization in Community Health Education (M.P.H.) and
        Health Promotion (B.S.) were similarly selected by the GPC and UPC. For these
        specializations the Committees adopted the competencies promulgated by the
        collaboration of SOPHE and NCHEC. As previously stated in Criterion 1.0, competencies
        for the environmental health concentration in the B.S. program were established by an ad
        hoc committee of the Undergraduate Program Committee. The Committee was guided by
        positions taken by the National Environmental Health Association, the Environmental
        Health Science and Protection Accreditation Council, the Connecticut Department of
        Public Health and the Connecticut Department of Administrative Services (DAS); and by
        consultations with local and State environmental health professionals and directors of
        local health departments.

        To assure use and availability to students, core and specialized competencies in the form
        of student learning objectives are listed on affected course syllabi. To ensure adherence,
        all course syllabi are reviewed by the respective Coordinators and/or their Committees
        each semester, prior to their distribution to students. In addition, students complete mid-
        course and end-course evaluations, and an exit survey during which they have the
        opportunity to assess their satisfaction with the overall Program.

2.6e.   A description of the manner in which the program periodically assesses the
        changing needs of public health practice and uses this information to establish the
        competencies for its educational programs.

        Assessment of relevance of competencies is conducted by the GPC and UPC on the basis
        of reviews of the leading public health organizations, including CEPH, ASPH, NCHEC,
        and Council on Linkages as well as best practices reported in the literature. In addition, all
        professors, as part of their continuous course updating, contribute recommendations for

                                                 135
        the addition or deletion of course competencies. The faculty, who are active participants
        and leaders in local and national public health organizations, keep well informed about
        the changing landscape of public health practice. The Department’s Advisory Council
        also informs the program, as does the Alumni Association’s post graduation surveys, and
        feedback from internship preceptors, as well as agencies and organizations that sponsor
        student research.

2.6f.   Assessment of the extent to which the criterion is met.

        The Criterion is met.

        Strengths. The Program has adopted a carefully selected and relevant set of core and
        specialization competencies that reflect best practices in public health training. These
        competencies are continually monitored and assessed to assure relevance and are made
        available readily to students through course syllabi to make manifest to the students the
        learning objectives of the Program. The horizontal analyses of competencies across
        courses and Program experiences offer a clear differentiation between graduate and
        undergraduate degrees.

        Weaknesses. None identified.




                                               136
                                       CRITERION 2.7

                                    Assessment Procedures

Criterion 2.7.: There shall be procedures for assessing and documenting the extent to which
each student has demonstrated competence in the required areas of performance.


2.7a. Description of the procedures used for monitoring and evaluating student progress
      in achieving the expected competencies.

       Table 2.7a.& b. presents the outcome measures for Program objectives referenced in
       Criterion 1.2c. and the procedures used for monitoring and evaluating student progress in
       achieving the expected competencies.

       In addition to the procedures reported in Table 2.7a.& b., the Program requires instructors
       to notify the appropriate Coordinator when a student fails to achieve a course grade
       sufficient to meets the academic standards for his or her degree program.

       M.P.H. students also must meet specific academic standards as prerequisites for
       enrollment in the thesis or special project. Both M.P.H. and B.S. students must meet
       specific academic standards for enrollment in the internship. These standards are well-
       publicized and compliance is checked by the Coordinator of Internships prior to granting
       permission for enrollment.

2.7b. Identification of outcomes that serve as measures by which the program will
      evaluate student achievement in each degree program, and presentation of data
      assessing the program’s performance against those measures for each of the last
      three years.

       Combined with 2.7a.




                                              137
                                                                    Table 2.7a. & b.

                                             Outcome Measures to Evaluate Student Achievement

                      Objective                                               Outcome Measure (Target)                            Assessment Methodology
               Instructional Objectives

M.P.H. students will demonstrate the capacity to            100% of graduating M.P.H. students will have completed an           Graduate Coordinator conducts
contribute in advanced positions to the essential           internship with a grade of C+ or higher.                            pre-graduation audits of
services of public health, as evidenced by:                 100% of graduating M.P.H. students will complete each required      student transcripts.
                                                            core course with a grade of C+ or higher.
B.S students will demonstrate the capacity to               100% of graduating B.S. students will have completed an             Undergraduate audits are
contribute in entry positions to the essential services     internship with a grade of C or higher.                             conducted by Office of the
of public health, as evidenced by:                          100% of graduating B.S. students will complete each required        Registrar.
                                                            core course with a grade of C or higher.
M.P.H. students specializing in health education will       100% of graduating M.P.H. students will complete an internship      Graduate Coordinator conducts
demonstrate the capacity to fulfill the responsibilities    in health education with a grade of C+ or higher.                   pre-graduation audits of
of a health educator at Levels II and III or the CHES       100% of graduating M.P.H. students will complete each required      student transcripts.
certification standards as evidenced by:                    specialization course with a grade of C+ or higher.
                                                            100% of graduating M.P.H. students specializing in health           Coordinator Reviews NCHEC
                                                            education will pass the health education credentialing exam.        Institutional Report
B.S. students with a concentration in health                100% of graduating B.S. students will complete an internship in     Undergraduate audits are
promotion will demonstrate the capacity to fulfill the      health promotion with a grade of C or higher.                       conducted by Office of the
responsibilities of a health educator at Level I of the     100% of graduating B.S. students will complete each required        Registrar.
CHES certification standards, as evidenced by:              concentration course with a grade of C or higher.
B.S. students concentrating in environmental health         100% of B.S. students concentrating in environmental health will    Undergraduate audits are
will demonstrate the capacity to fulfill the                have completed an internship in the concentration with a grade of   conducted by Office of the
responsibilities of a sanitarian I, as evidenced by:        C or higher.                                                        Registrar.
                                                            100% of B.S. students concentrating in environmental health will    Undergraduate audits are
                                                            have completed each required concentration course with a grade      conducted by Office of the
                                                            of C or higher.                                                     Registrar.




                                                      138
                                                                Table 2.7a. & b., Cont’d

                                              Outcome Measures to Evaluate Student Achievement

                        Objective                                             Outcome Measure (Target)                            Assessment Methodology
               Instructional Objectives
B.S. students graduating with a minor in public health       100% of B.S. students with a minor in public health will have      Undergraduate audits are
will demonstrate a conceptual knowledge and affect           completed each required course in the minor with a grade of C or   conducted by Office of the
that is favorable to private and public displays of          higher.                                                            Registrar.
support for the mission and priorities of public health,     100% of B.S. students with a minor in public health will have      Undergraduate audits are
as evidenced by:                                             completed each elective course in the minor with a grade of C or   conducted by Office of the
                                                             higher.                                                            Registrar.
                 Research Objectives
M.P.H. students will conduct an independent thesis or        100% of M.P.H. students will have completed a thesis or special    Graduate Coordinator conducts
special project that is relevant to the essential services   project with a grade of C+ or higher.                              pre-graduation audits of
of public health and/or responsibilities of a health                                                                            student transcripts.
educator, as evidenced by:
                  Service Objectives
M.P.H. students will perform health-related                  100% of M.P.H. students will have completed a health-related       Graduate Coordinator conducts
internships at community-based agencies and                  community-based internship with a grade of C+ or higher.           pre-graduation audits of
organizations, as evidence by:                                                                                                  student transcripts.
B.S. students will perform health-related internships        100% of B.S. students will have completed a health-related         Undergraduate audits are
at community-based agencies and organizations, as            community-based internship with a grade of C or higher.            conducted by Office of the
evidence by:                                                                                                                    Registrar.




                                                      139
2.7c.   If the outcome measures selected by the program do not include degree completion
        rates and job placement experience, then data for these two additional indicators
        must be provided, including experiential data for each of the last three years.

        Table 2.7c. presents data on the degree completion for M.P.H. graduates, 2006-2008.
        Table 2.7c.1. presents data of number of B.S. graduates. Table 2.7c.2. presents data on
        job placement experience for M.P.H. and B.S. graduates, 2006-2008.

                                           Table 2.7c.

                 Degree Completion Rates for M.P.H. Graduates, 2006-2008

Cohort  Expected          Number        Completed             Continued           Separated
 Year  Graduation         Enrolled    Number    %           Number    %         Number    %
2004FT    2006              12           9     75%            0        0          3      25%
2003PT    2006              16          12     75%            0        0          4      25%
2005FT    2007               8           8    100%            0        0          0        0
2004PT    2007              16           9     56%            4      25%          3      19%
2006FT    2008              17          10     58%            3      18%          4      24%
2005PT    2008              17           8     47%            8      47%          1       6%


                                           Table 2.7c.1.

                             Number of B.S. Graduates, 2006-2008

          Year                       2005                   2006                    2007
                             HP      EH Totals       HP     EH Totals        HP     EH Totals
   May Graduates
  August Graduates
     December
       Totals


                                           Table 2.7c.2.

               Job Placement Rates for M.P.H. and B.S. Graduates, 2006-2008

                                             M.P.H.                            B.S.
            Year                   2005       2006         2007      2005     2006        2007
        Job Placement              100%      100%          100%          No data available




                                               140
2.7d. A table showing the destination of graduates for each of the last three years. The
      table must include at least the number and percentage of graduates by program
      area each year going to a) government (state, local, federal), b) nonprofit
      organization, c) hospital or health care delivery facility, d) private practice, e)
      university or research institute, f) proprietary organization (industry,
      pharmaceutical company, consulting), g) further education, h) non-health related
      employment, or i) not employed. See CEPH Template D.

       Table 2.7d. and 2.7d.1. present data on destination of M.P.H. and B.S. graduates,
       respectively, by Department, 2006-2008.


                                            Table 2.7d.

     Template D (2.7d.) Destination of M.P.H. Graduates by Department or Specialty,
                                        2006-2008

            Table 2.7.d. Destination of Graduates by Program Area 2006-2008
     Government    Non-     Health   Private    University/   Proprietary    Further     Non-       Not
                   Profit    Care    Practice    Research                   Education   Health    Employed
                                                                                        Related
       #     %    #    %    #   %    #     %     #     %       #     %       #    %     #   %     #    %




                                           Table 2.7d.1.

     Template D (2.7d.1.) Destination of B.S. Graduates by Department or Specialty,
                                        2006-2008

            Table 2.7.d. Destination of Graduates by Program Area, 2006-2008
     Government    Non-     Health   Private    University/   Proprietary    Further     Non-       Not
                   Profit    Care    Practice    Research                   Education   Health    Employed
                                                                                        Related
       #     %    #    %    #   %    #     %     #     %       #     %       #    %     #   %     #    %


                                         No Data Available




                                                141
2.7e.    In public health fields where there is certification of professional competence, data
         on the performance of the program’s graduates on these national examinations for
         each of the last three years.

         Table 2.7e. presents test results on the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES)
         examination for 2005-2007 required of M.P.H. students in the community health
         education specialization and optional for B.S. students in the health promotion
         specialization

                                             Table 2.7e.

                              CHES Institutional Scores, 2005-2007

                                     2005                  2006                2007
                  M.P.H.             82-86                 73.68
                   B.S.

2.7f.    Data describing results from periodic assessments of alumni and employers of
         graduates regarding the ability of the program’s graduates to effectively perform
         the competencies in a practice setting.

         As described under 1.2a. the Program periodically surveys all health department directors
         in Connecticut as well as internship preceptors to assess graduates’ proficiency in the
         practice of public health as well as targeted surveys of recent program graduates. Table
         2.7f. presents the results of the most recent 2008 general survey of directors and
         preceptors.. Of 225 agencies surveyed, 195 responded of which 176 had employed a B.S.
         graduate (103) and/or an M.P.H. graduate (73). Table 2.7.f.1. presents from the 2007-
         2008 Alumni Survey of graduates’ assessment of the ability to effectively perform the
         competencies of a public health practitioner, 2006-2008

                                             Table 2.7f.

         General Employer Satisfaction Assessment of B.S. and M.P.H. Graduates, 2008
                                        (N =195/225)

                       Southern B.S. graduates employed by my agency
                     demonstrate proficiency as public health practitioners.
        Degree          Strongly            Agree             Disagree                Strongly
                         Agree                                                        Disagree
      B.S.                 90                 12                  1                       0
    (N=103)
                      Southern M.P.H. graduates employed by my agency
                     demonstrate proficiency as public health practitioners.
        M.P.H.             70                  3                  0                      0
        (N=73)

                                                142
                                                Table 2.7f.1.

B.S. and M.P.H. Alumni Assessment of Ability to Effectively Perform the Competencies of
                          a Public Health Practitioner, 2006-2008

       Year               Theory                Breadth and     Knowledge to         Skills to Work
                        Application to           Depth of       Work in Public      in Public Health
                        Work Setting              Courses          Health
                                                    B.S.
       2006
       2007
       2008
                                                   M.P.H.
       2006                   1.78                  1.83              1.67                 1.89
       2007                   1.46                  1.55              1.60                 1.70
       2008                   1.00                  1.00              1.00                 2.00
Note: Mean Value Scale: From Very Well [1] to Poorly [5].

Of 206 respondents to the Year One Alumni Survey, 95% (196) indicated that they were well
(63%) or adequately (32%) prepared for a public health career. In addition, when compared to
others with an M.P.H. degree, 62% (128) of respondents thought that they were comparable,
while another 29% (60) said they were better prepared. Overall, this group appeared to indicate a
high level of satisfaction with their preparation to function effectively as part of the public heal,th
workforce (see Reference File 5).

2.7g. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

        This Criterion is met.

        Strengths. The Program uses definitive procedures for assessing and documenting the
        extent to which each student has demonstrated competence in instruction, research and
        service.

        Weaknesses. Tracking graduates, especially B.S. graduates, remains a challenge to the
        Program.




                                                     143
                                      CRITERION 2.8

                                      Academic Degrees

Criterion 2.8.: If the program also offers curricula for academic degrees, students pursuing
them shall obtain a broad introduction to public health, as well as an understanding about how
their discipline-based specialization contributes to achieving the goals of public health.

This Criterion is not applicable.

                                      CRITERION 2.9

                                      Doctoral Degrees

Criterion 2.9.: The program may offer doctoral degree programs, if consistent with its mission
and resources.

This Criterion is not applicable.

                                     CRITERION 2.10

                                        Joint Degrees

Criterion 2.10.: If the program offers joint degree programs, the required curriculum for the
professional public health degree shall be equivalent to that required for a separate public
health degree.

This Criterion is not applicable.

                                     CRITERION 2.11

                       Distance Education or Executive Degree Programs

Criterion 2.11.: If the program offers degree programs using formats or methods other
than students attending regular on-site course sessions spread over a standard term, these
degree programs must a) be consistent with the mission of the program and within the
program’s established areas of expertise; b) be guided by clearly articulated student
learning outcomes that are rigorously evaluated; c) be subject to the same quality control
processes that other degree programs in the university are; d) provide planned and
evaluated learning experiences that take into consideration and are responsive to the
characteristics and needs of adult learners. If the program offers distance education or
executive degree programs, it must provide needed support for these programs, including
administrative, travel, communication, and student services. The program must have an

                                            144
ongoing program to evaluate the academic effectiveness of the format, to assess teaching
and learning methodologies and to systematically use this information to stimulate
program improvements.

Although this Criterion is not applicable, as described, some instructors have utilized a hybrid
approach to classes in which one or two class sessions were offered using an online format. The
GPC has discussed the feasibility of offering distance education, although no decision has been
reached at this time.




                                              145
                                        CRITERION 3.0

        CREATION, APPLICATION AND ADVANCEMENT OF KNOWLEDGE

Criterion 3.1.: The Program shall pursue an active research program, consistent with its
mission, through which its faculty and students contribute to the knowledge base of the public
health disciplines, including research directed at improving the practice of public health.

3.1a. A description of the program’s research activities, including policies, procedures
      and practices that support research and scholarly activities.

       The Department faculty value research and consider research activities to be an integral
       component of service to the Program and community and to the advancement of the
       profession.

       The University’s recognition the importance of research as a component of a
       comprehensive University is established in its mission statement with the words, "…the
       University is committed to innovative teaching strategies and to scholarship and creative
       activity that produces knowledge, refreshes faculty expertise and amplifies teaching
       effectiveness.” From its inception as a normal school, the University has maintained
       teaching excellence as its highest priority, supported by the Department. Criterion 4.2e.
       describes the assigned weights given to the four categories required for assessing faculty
       for reappointment, tenure, promotion, and professional assessment. Teaching or
       professional competence is weighted at 50% or twice as high as the next category,
       Creative Activity. As noted in Criterion 4.2e. teaching and professional competence
       includes research under circumstances where a faculty receives load credit for this
       activity. Creative activity, weighted at 25%, includes "... delivering papers at professional
       conferences, production/performance of artistic works, research, study and publication."

       The foundation has been laid to increase the research activities of University faculty
       through the availability of additional research reassigned time and recent emphasis on
       research experience and interest in the hiring of new faculty.

       A “grants office” facilitates faculty research by providing resources and support.
       Reporting directly to the Provost, the Office of Sponsored Programs and Research
       (SPAR) assists faculty with the development and submission of proposals for external
       funding. SPAR also performs contract/grant administration services for all awarded
       grants, ensuring consistent compliance with all government (state and federal) regulations
       regarding the performance of grants at an educational institution.

       Despite efforts to increase research opportunities for faculty, the University policy which
       most affects research productivity is the required teaching load of four courses, or 12
       credit hours, each semester. Although this policy has not altogether impeded the research

                                               146
        activity of faculty, it has served to create competition among teaching, intra- and extra-
        Departmental committee work, community service and service to the profession, advising
        theses and special projects and student advisement (academic and career counseling)
        activities, each which involve very high levels of faculty commitment and recognized
        excellence. To encourage research, the University offers some support through the CSUS
        Research Grants program, whereby full-time faculty can apply for up to $4,000 to support
        research activities. Such funding, however, does not reduce the teaching load of
        recipients. Within the School, a modest amount of reassigned time is available to support
        faculty research, awarded on a competitive basis.

        Despite the challenges, there have been steady gains in research and scholarly activities
        by virtually all members of the faculty. An attempt at working “smarter, not harder” has
        met with measured success as the faculty struggles to maintain a balance in its
        contributions to the Department, University, community and profession.

        To facilitate and support student involvement in research, the School of Graduate Studies
        offers two non-need based, competitive awards: Graduate Research Fellowship (GRF)
        provides 10 scholarship of $8,000 each for student-initiated research; Graduate School
        Graduate Assistantship (GSGA) provides 10 scholarship of $16,000 each for students to
        assist faculty in the areas of teaching, research or administration. As one of 32 graduate
        programs, the Department’s students and five faculty have obtained 20.5% (9/44) of the
        GRF awards since the program’s inception in 2003. The Department’s faculty and
        students have also obtained at least one GSGA award each year since the program’s
        inception in 2003. Over the past three years, four undergraduate students have completed
        and defended honors theses under the direction of Dr. Sandy Bulmer (Appendix 25).

3.1b. A description of current community-based research activities and/or those
      undertaken in collaboration with health agencies and community-based
      organizations. Formal research agreements with such agencies should be identified.

        As discussed under Criterion 2.5a., students and faculty engage in community-based
        research activities through thesis and special projects. Most theses and all special projects
        involve research in conjunction with a health-related agency. Students also participate
        with faculty in their community-based research activities in a collaborative role. These
        activities are described under Criterion 3.1e.

3.1c.   A list of current research activity of all primary and secondary faculty identified in
        4.1.a and 4.1.b, including amount and source funds, for each of the last three years.
        This data must be presented in table format and include at least the following: a)
        principal investigator, b) project name, c) period of funding, d) source of funding, e)
        amount of total award, f) amount of current year’s award, g) whether research is
        community based, and h) whether research provides for student involvement. Only
        research funding should be reported here; extramural funding for service or
        training grants should be reported elsewhere. See CEPH Data Template E.


                                                147
A list of current research activity of full-time faculty is presented in Table 3.1c. Table
3.1c.1 presents extramural funding for service and training activities.




                                        148
                                                                      Table 3.1c.

                         Template E (3.1.c.) Research Activity of Full-time Faculty for AY 06 through AY 08

                                       Table 3.1.c. Research Activity of Full-time Faculty from AY 06 through AY 08
          Project Name                        Principal              Contract Agency/         Funding Period     Amount        Amount     Comm-   Student
                                           Investigator in            Funding Source            Start/End         Total        Current    Based    Partic
                                            Department                                                           Award          Year       Y/N      Y/N
                                                                       2005-2006
Emerg/Crisis Risk Communication 1    Faraclas, Stohler           CT Dept of Public Health    8/31/05-8/30/06           5,000      5,000    N        N
Emerg/Crisis Risk Communication 2    Faraclas, Stohler           CT Dept of Public Health    1/19/05-8/30/07           5,000          0    N        N
Community Health Profile for the     Gallup                      Susan G. Komen                   05-06                2,000      2,000    Y        Y
CT Affiliate of the Susan G. Komen                               Foundation
Found
Evaluation of the 2005 NAACP         Gallup                      New Haven NAACP                  05-06                 NA          NA     Y        N
Health Fair
Outreach Project to Increase         Gallup                      New Haven Health Dept            05-06                 NA          NA     N        Y
Enrollment in HUSKY                                              and Board of Education
National College Health Assessment   Bulmer                      SCSU*                            05-06                  754        754    N        Y
Understanding and Reporting          Gallup, Vancour             CSUS*                            05-06                3,360      3,360    Y        Y
Perinatal Death in New Haven
                                                                       2006-2007
Qualitative Study of Women’s         Bulmer                      Western Athletic Clubs           06-07               32,000     32,000    Y        Y
Experiences with Exercise During
and After Breast Cancer Treatment
Health Status Report of African      Nwangwu, Breny              Connecticut Health                 06           100,000        100,000    Y        Y
Americans in the State of            Bontempi                    Foundation
Connecticut
Effectiveness of Communication       Unson                       CSUS*                            06-07                2,000      2,000    N        N
Channels in Attracting Older
Minorities to Clinical Trials:
a Meta-Analysis
Emerg/Crisis Risk Communication 2    Faraclas, Stohler           CT Dept of Public Health    1/19/05-8/30/07           5,000      5,000    N        N




                                                     149
                                                                  Table 3.1c., Cont’d.

                          Template E (3.1.c.) Research Activity of Full-time Faculty for AY 06 through AY 08

                                        Table 3.1.c. Research Activity of Full-time Faculty from AY 06 through AY 08
           Project Name                        Principal              Contract Agency/         Funding Period     Amount        Amount     Comm-   Student
                                            Investigator in            Funding Source            Start/End         Total        Current    Based    Partic
                                             Department                                                           Award          Year       Y/N      Y/N
Emerg/Crisis Risk Communication 3     Faraclas, Stohler, Flynn    CT Dept of Public Health    8/31/06-8/30/07       8,102          8,102     N        N
                                                                       2007-2008
Re-establishment of a CT Dept of      Beatty                      CT Dept of Aging                 07-08          100,000        100,000    N        Y
Aging
Medical Interp in CT Hospitals        Gallup, Perlin, Faraclas    CT Dept of Public Health     2/1-07-6/30/08          50,000     50,000    N        N
Latinos Living with HIV/AIDS          Breny Bontempi              Yale CIRA Community              07-08               15,000     15,000    Y        N
Access to Sub-acute Care                                          Research Partnerships
Photovoice                            Breny Bontempi              CT Health Foundation             07-08               20,000     20,000    Y        Y
Qualitative Study of Fatherhood       Vancour                     CSUS*                            07-08                8,272      8,272    N        Y
Ideology, Role Balance, and Health-
Promoting Behaviors of Academic
Men with Children
Essential Components of Exercise      Bulmer                      CSUS*                            07-08                3,870      3,870    Y        Y
Programs for Breast Cancer
Survivors
National College Health Assessment    Bulmer                      SCSU*                            07-08                1,630      1,630    Y        Y
CORE: Alcohol and Drug Survey         Bulmer                      SCSU*                            07-08                1,770      1,770    Y        Y
Test and Evaluate a Public Health     Flynn                       SCSU Office of    Faculty        07-08                1,000      1,000    N        N
Course Using Three Formats                                        Development*
Attitudes of Graduate Students        Unson                       CSUS*                            07-08                2,000      2,000    N        N
Towards Biostatistics




                                                      150
                                                                      Table 3.1c.1.

              Extramural Funding for Service and Training Activities of Full-time Faculty for AY 06 through AY 08

                      Table 3.1.c. Extramural Funding for Service and Training Activities of Full-time Faculty for AY 06 through AY 08
                                            Department                                        Funding Period      Amount        Amount     Comm-   Student
          Project Name                    Project Director            Funding Source            Start/End          Total        Current    Based    Partic
                                                                                                                  Award          Year       Y/N      Y/N
                                                                        2005-2006
Administrative Contract              Faraclas                   CPHA                         1/1/05-12/31/06           5,000                N        N
Scholarship of Teaching and          Breny Bontempi             SCSU*                             05-06                2,000       2,000    N        N
Learning Workshop Series:
Bridging Research Ideas to
Implementation and Publication
SCSU Graduate Minority Scholars      Breny Bontempi             Connecticut Health                05-08          104,960.70       34,987    Y        Y
Program in Public Health                                        Foundation
                                                                       2006-2007
Administrative Contract              Faraclas                   CPHA                         1/1/06-12/31/07           5,000                N        N
Using CPBR to Eliminate Racial &     Breny Bontempi             SCSU*                             06-07                2,000       2,000    N        N
Ethnic Health Disparities: Speaker
Series
Development of an On-Line Health     Breny Bontempi             SCSU*                             06-07                2,000       2,000    N        N
Promotion Priorities Course
SCSU Graduate Minority Scholars      Breny Bontempi             Connecticut Health                05-08          104,960.70       34,987    Y        Y
Program in Public Health                                        Foundation
Diabetes Prevention and Control      Gallup, Stohler, Perlin    CT Dept of Public Health       03/07-04/09           70,000       35,000    N        Y
Training Grant
Promoting University and             Gallup                     SCSU Office of                    06-07                1,640       1,640
Community Collaboration                                         Faculty Development*
Beyond Behavior Management:          Flynn                      SCSU Office of                    06-07                2,000       2,000
School-Based Mental Health and                                  Faculty Development*
Positive Behavioral Supports
                                                                        2007-2008
Diabetes Prevention and Control      CT Dept of Public Health                                  03/07-04/09           70,000       35,000    N        Y
Training Grant




                                                      151
                                                                 Table 3.1c.1., Cont’d.

              Extramural Funding for Service and Training Activities of Full-time Faculty for AY 06 through AY 08

                       Table 3.1.c. Extramural Funding for Service and Training Activities of Full-time Faculty for AY 06 through AY 08
                                            Department                                         Funding Period      Amount        Amount     Comm-   Student
          Project Name                    Project Director             Funding Source            Start/End          Total        Current    Based    Partic
                                                                                                                   Award          Year       Y/N      Y/N
SCSU Graduate Minority Scholars       Breny Bontempi             Connecticut Health                05-08          104,960.70      34,987      Y        Y
Program in Public Health                                         Foundation

Administrative Contract               Faraclas                   CPHA                          4/1/08-3/31/09           7,500       1,875    N        N
Health Promotion Priorities           Breny Bontempi             SCSU Office of                     07-08               2,000       2,000    N        N
Curriculum Development Project                                   Faculty Development*
Developing a Minor in International   Faraclas                   SCSU Office of                    07-08                 750          750    N        N
Studies                                                          Faculty Development*
Development of Pedagogical Tools      Unson                      SCSU Office of                    07-08                2,500       2,500
for Biostatistics                                                Faculty Development*
On-line Course Addressing Work-       Vancour, Perlin            SCSU Office of                    07-08                4,000       4,000
Life Effectiveness                                               Faculty Development*
Work-Life Balance Conference          Vancour, Bulmer            SCSU Office of                    07-08                2,500       2,500
                                                                 Faculty Development*
Finding Balance for Care Givers       Vancour                    SCSU Office of                    07-08                1,150       1,150
                                                                 Faculty Development*
Care Givers Support Group             Vancour                    SCSU Office of                    07-08                1,500       1,500
                                                                 Faculty Development*




                                                        152
3.1d. Identification of measures by which the program may evaluate the success of its
      research activities, along with data regarding the program’s performance against
      those measures for each of the last three years. For example, programs may track
      dollar amounts for research funding, significance of finding (e.g., citation
      references), extent of research translation (e.g., adoption by policy or statute),
      dissemination (e.g., publications in peer- reviewed publications, presentations at
      professional meetings), and other indicators.

        Research-related outcomes have been set to ensure an active research program. These
        outcomes are written specific to faculty, students, and the Department. The outcomes
        have been set in part as a result of the findings associated with the process of self-study
        for re-accreditation. Before the self-study, implicit expectations were used, instead of
        explicit outcomes, to guide research activities. Since the Program's initial accreditation,
        most of the faculty and all students have been involved in research activities. The
        outcomes include:

                                             Table 3.1d.

   Outcome Measures and Targets for Faculty Research and Scholarly Work, 2005-2008

 Outcome Measure                            Target                       AY 2006     AY 2007      AY 2008
Faculty will engage in   25% or more of the full-time faculty will
research or scholarly    participate in funded research per
work                     academic year.
Faculty will engage in   25% or more of the full-time faculty will
peer-review              submit for publication in peer-reviewed
publishing.              sources each year.
Faculty will engage in   50% or more of the full-time faculty will
presentations at         submit for presentation at local, state
professional             and/or national meetings each year.
conferences.

3.1e.   A description of student involvement in research.

        Student-Faculty Collaborations.

        The major student-faculty collaborative activity is comprised of theses and special
        projects. In addition to this substantive obligation, faculty also have collaborated with
        students on scholarly activities, including joint research, projects, presentations, and/or
        publications. Recent examples of these latter activities are presented in Table 3.1e.




                                                 153
                                               Table 3.1e.

                Student-Faculty Collaboration in Scholarly Activities, 2005-2008

                          Activity                                   Faculty            Students      Year
CSU Grant on Perinatal Death in New Haven, CT                P. Gallup/M.Vancour       1 Graduate     2007
Danbury, CT Community Health Profile                         P. Gallup/Faraclas        3 Graduate     2005
Symposium on Health Informatics                              P. Gallup              2 Undergraduate   2005
MPH Research Symposium                                       S. Bulmer                 1 Graduate     2005
American College Health Association Survey                   S. Bulmer                 1 Graduate     2005
Manuscript for Publication                                   S. Bulmer                 1 Graduate     2005
Manuscript for Publication                                   S. Bulmer                 1 Graduate     2006
Manuscript of Publication                                    J. Breny Bontempi         2 Graduate     2005
SOPHE Workshop                                               J. Breny Bontempi         2 Graduate     2005
NYS DDP Translation and Readability Testing                  M. Perlin                 1 Graduate     2005
Avian Flu and Media Framing                                  C. Unson                  3 Graduate     2007
Graduate Students Attitudes Toward Biostatistics             C. Unson                  1 Graduate     2007
Abstract and Poster Presentation on Health Disparities       J. Breny Bontempi         1 Graduate     2008
Conference at Teachers College, Columbia University
Abstract and Poster Presentation, SOPHE                      S. Bulmer                1 Graduate      2006
Abstract and Poster Presentation, National Council on        S. Bulmer                1 Graduate      2006
Problem Gambling Annual Conference
Oral presentation at AAHPERD Conference                      S. Bulmer                1 Graduate      2006
Data Analysis for Manuscript on Trends in College            S. Bulmer                1 Graduate      2007
Students’ Drinking Behaviors
Poster Presentation at APHA National Conference              S. Bulmer                1 Graduate      2006
External Grant on Essential Components of Exercise           S. Bulmer                1 Graduate      2006-
Programs for Breast Cancer Patients                                                                   2007
Abstract- Gerontological Society of America Annual           C. Unson & J. Breny      1 Graduate      2008
Conference                                                   Bontempi
Abstract – New York College Health Association               C. Unson & S. Bulmer     1 Graduate      2008
Presentation at APHA                                         C. Unson                 1 Graduate      2007
Abstract- Gerontological Society of America Annual           C Unson                  1 Graduate      2008
Conference
Manuscript for Presentation                                  C. Unson & R. Buck       1 Graduate      2008
Abstract - APHA                                              C. Unson                 2 Graduate      2008
Abstract - APHA                                              C. Unson                 2 Graduate      2008
Abstract - CPHA                                              C. Unson                 2 Graduate      2007
Abstract - CPHA                                              C. Unson                 2 Graduate      2007
Abstract – Social History of Medicine Conference,            C. Unson                 1 Graduate      2008
Glasgow, Scotland
Abstract – National Conference on Health Communications,     C. Unson                 1 Graduate      2008
Marketing and Media
Abstract – National Conference on Health Communications,     C. Unson                 1 Graduate      2008
Marketing and Media
Data Analysis for Research Project on fatherhood ideology,   M. Vancour               1 Graduate;     2006
role balance, and health promoting behaviors of academic                            2 Undergraduate
men

                                               154
3.1f.   Assessment of the extent to which the criterion has been met.


        The Criterion is partially met.

        Strengths. Although the heavy teaching load required of faculty has not been reduced
        since the Program’s last re-accreditation, the Program has made significant strides in
        advancing its research agenda. The establishment of the Health Equities Project has
        focused research activities on contributing to the reduction of racial and ethnic health
        disparities. The Department has committed 50% of one faculty member’s time to
        directing the efforts of this Project. Reflecting its new mission statement and strategic
        plan, the University is attempting to provide a greater research infrastructure that includes
        pre- and post-award support from the Office of Sponsored Programs and Research;
        increased reassigned time for research activities; small, internal grants for faculty; and
        reduced teaching loads and/or research start-up funds for new faculty—all supported
        vigorously at the School level by the new Dean, who also provides reassigned time for
        research. As previously discussed, an initiative to provide return a share of indirect funds
        to the Office of the Dean, the Department and the investigator is in the process of
        implementation. At the Department level, the Chair consistently has negotiated additional
        research reassigned time for faculty.

        The Program faculty has accelerated its research efforts with modest success that is
        steadily moving the Program towards a balance of teaching, research and service
        appropriate for a nationally accredited program that resides within an institution whose
        highest priorities are access and teaching excellence. Position descriptions for recent
        faculty searches reflect the Program’s determination to hire faculty with research skills,
        who will contribute to and advance the Program’s research agenda.

        Weaknesses. As the University evolves from a teaching-centered institution to a more
        balanced center of learning, inclusive of research and service, greater emphasis is being
        placed on supporting research activities. Although it is possible for faculty to buy out
        time with grant funding, without significantly reduced teaching loads, it is difficult for
        faculty to create competitive research and grant proposals to accomplish this end.




                                                155
                                          CRITERION 3.2

                                              SERVICE

Criterion 3.2.: The Program shall pursue active service activities consistent with its mission,
through which faculty and students contribute to the advancement of public health practice.

3.2a. A description of the program’s service activities, including policies, procedures and
      practices that support service. If the program has formal contracts or agreements
      with external agencies, these should be noted.

        As discussed under Criterion 1.1c., although the major energies of the faculty are devoted
        to teaching, there is recognition of the importance of service to the community. The
        service objectives of the Program are an extension of its mission. Faculty service
        activities include teaching, consultation, and roles in professional and community
        organizations. Student service activities include theses, special projects, course projects,
        internship-related activities, and collaborations with faculty.

        As discussed under Criterion 4.2e., service to the community is a factor in the promotion,
        tenure, and professional assessment process and, therefore, an expectation of the
        University, School, Department and Program. To foster participation at professional
        conferences, workshops and seminars, a travel fund has been established by agreement
        between CSUS and AAUP which is available to all full-time faculty, to a maximum of
        $1,200 per annum. Adjunct faculty travel is supported to a maximum of $600.00. The
        This support enhances opportunities for faculty to contribute to the advancement of the
        profession of public health and to increase teaching, research and practice competencies.
        To facilitate student service to the profession, the Graduate Student Affairs Committee
        provides grants to graduate students for research and attendance at professional meetings.

3.2b. A list of the program’s current service activities, including identifications of the
      community groups and nature of the activity, over the last three years.

                                              Table 3.2b.

                           Program Service Activities of Faculty, 2006-2008

          Faculty                       Community Group                         Nature of Activity
Dr. Ellen Beatty           Visiting Nurse Health Care System, Inc.     Chairperson/President of Board of
                                                                       Directors
                           South Central Visiting Nurses Association   Member of Executive Board
                           Boy Scouts of America, Yankee Council       Health and Safety Officer




                                                  156
                                            Table 3.2b., Cont’d

                             Program Service Activities of Faculty, 2006-2008

          Faculty                         Community Group                           Nature of Activity
Dr. Jean Breny Bontempi      SOPHE                                        Trustee
                             Academic Advisory Committee for the
                             Connecticut Health Disparities Project       Member
                             AIDS Project New Haven                       Member, Board of Directors
                             New Haven Mayor’s Task Force on AIDS         Member
                             “Health Promotion Practice,” “Health         Manuscript Reviewer
                             Education Research,” “Health Education and
                             Behavior”
                             Jossey-Bass Inc.                             Textbook Reviewer
Professor Mary Ann Booss     Temporary Appointment
Dr. Sandra Bulmer            SOPHE                                        Trustee; abstract committee;
                                                                          program committee
                             Western Athletic Clubs                       Consultant-evaluator for IMPACT
                                                                          Cancer Exercise Program
                             Prevention Research Center (PRC)             Community Committee Member;
                             National Institute of Health (NIH)           Consultant-evaluator
                             New Haven Family Alliance                    Grant Reviewer

                                                                          Grant Writer/PI
Professor Deborah Flynn      CT. Department of Public Health              Consultant - Informational module
                                                                          entitled “Planning for Emergency
                                                                          and Crisis Response: A Contingency
                                                                          Approach”
Dr. William G. Faraclas      CT. Department of Public Health              Consultant - Informational module
                                                                          entitled “Planning for Emergency
                                                                          and Crisis Response: A Contingency
                                                                          Approach”
                             CPHA Board of Directors                      Member
                             Environmental Health Training Program        Director
                             Pomperaug Partners for Health                Member
Dr. Peggy Gallup             CT. Partnership for Workforce Development    Member
                             CT. Diabetes Surveillance and Advisory       Member
                             Group- CT. Department of Public Health
                             APHA – Community Health Planning and         Section leadership member;
                             Policy Development                           Abstract reviewer for annual meeting
Professor Carolyn Grantham   Temporary Appointment
Millman
Dr. John T. Nwangwu          Disease Control Thailand, Nigeria            Conduct epidemiologic investigation
                                                                          for control of Avian flu
                             National Institute of Health (NIH)           Grant Reviewer
                             Journal, Infection Control and Hospital
                             Epidemiology                                 Manuscript Reviewer




                                                      157
                                       Table 3.2b., Cont’d

                         Program Service Activities of Faculty, 2006-2008

         Faculty                      Community Group                           Nature of Activity
Dr. Michael J. Perlin    Council of Accredited MPH Programs             Vice-President
                         (C.A.M.P.).
                         New York State Drinking Driver Program         Vice-President
                         Directors Association
                         Alcohol Services Organization –Cornerstone     Member, Board of Directors
                         New York City STOP DWI Committee               Chair, Program Committee
                         Regional New England Minority Health           Member
                         Conference Planning Committee
                         SOPHE – Minority Health Committee              Member
                         NYSDMV – Office of Traffic Safety Services     Documents reviewer
                         NYS Drinking Driver Programs                   Provide staff development and
                                                                        consultation to 62 programs
                         Borough of Queens Driver Rehabilitation
                         Program                                        Director – Services retained through
                                                                        SCSU
                         NCHEC                                          Chief Examiner
                         NBPHE                                          Program Liaison
                         SOPHE                                          Program Liaison
                         Institute for Health Care Communications       Documents Reviewer
                         CEPH                                           Site Visitor
                         Council on Linkages                            Alternative member representing
                                                                        C.A.M.P. (last meeting attended
                                                                        3/17/08)
Professor Scot Phelps    Hudson Valley Regional Resource Center,        Senior Emergency Management and
                         Valhalla, N.Y.                                 Anti-Terrorism Instructor
                         China Business Continuity Management           Consultant
                         Professional Committee
                         DRII Education Commission                      Commissioner
                         International Association of Emergency         Certification Commissioner
                         Managers
Dr. Debra Risisky        Emory University Regional Training Center      Consultant
                         CT Sexual Violence Prevention Planning         Member
                         Committee
                         Journal of School Health                       Manuscript Reviewer
Dr. William G. Stohler   CT. Department of Public Health                Consultant - Informational module
                                                                        entitled “Planning for Emergency
                                                                        and Crisis Response: A Contingency
                                                                        Approach”
Dr. Christine Unson      American Public Health Association –           Abstract Reviewer
                         Gerontological and Section and Community
                         Health and Planning and Policy Development
                         Section
                         Center for Health Communication and Health     Member
                         Marketing, University of Connecticut, Storrs
                         Journal of Aging and Health                    Manuscript Reviewer
                         NIH                                            Review grant applications on
                                                                        HIV/AIDS clinical trials
Dr. Michele Vancour      Anthem BCBS                                    Facilitator - Health promotion
                                                                        workshop presentations

                                                158
                                           Table 3.2b., Cont’d

                              Program Service Activities of Faculty, 2006-2008

         Faculty                           Community Group                           Nature of Activity
Dr. Michele Vancour, cont’d   Journal of Marriage and Family                Manuscript Reviewer
                              American College Health Association (ACHA)    Abstract Reviewer



3.2c. Identification of the measures by which the program may evaluate the success of its
      service efforts, along with data regarding the program’s performance against those
      measure for each of the last three years.

       Service-related outcomes have been set to ensure an active service program. These outcomes
       are written specific to faculty and students and presented in Table 3.2.c.

                                                Table 3.2c.

           Outcome Measures and Targets for Program Service Efforts, 2006-2008

        Service Objectives                    Outcome Measure (Target)                 AY        AY        AY
                                                                                      2006      2007      2008
M.P.H. students will perform health-   100% of graduating M.P.H. students             100%      100%      100%
related internships at community-      will have completed a health-related
based agencies and organizations, as
                                       community-based internship with a
evidenced by:
                                       grade of C+ or higher.
B.S. students will perform health-     100% of graduating B.S students will           100%      100%      100%
related internships at community-      have completed a health-related
based agencies and organizations, as
                                       community-based internship with a
evidenced by:
                                       grade of C or higher.
Program faculty will provide           100% of the Program’s faculty will provide     100%      100%      100%
volunteer and paid professional        evidence, (each academic year) of service to
services to communities and/or         the community and/or profession.
professional organizations, as
evidenced by:
The Program will conduct a             Each academic year the Health Equities           NA         5       5
deliberate agenda to advance the       Project will have at least four active
health of minority, disadvantaged      initiatives.
and underserved populations in local
communities and the State, as
evidenced by:
The Program will conduct a             During the academic year, the Department,         6         9       3
deliberate agenda to promote the       under the auspices of the Continuing
professional development of local      Education Committee, will sponsor, support,
and State public health and health     or co-sponsor at least five (5) continuing
care professionals, as evidenced by:   education programs for area and regional
                                       professionals and health service providers.


                                                    159
3.2d. A description of student involvement in service.

        The major sources of student involvement in service are the internship for graduate and
        undergraduate students and the thesis and special project for graduate students. From
        2005-2007 student interns provided approximately 43,000 hours of direct service to
        public health agencies and programs. For these same years graduate students, through
        theses and special projects, provided agencies with invaluable service in the form of
        agency-related research and tangible products for public health interventions to address
        gaps in agency services.

3.2e.   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

        This Criterion is met.

        Strengths. The Program provides many and varied service activities, consistent with its
        mission, through which faculty and students actively contribute in a meaningful way to
        the advancement of public health practice.

        Weaknesses. None identified.




                                               160
                                       CRITERION 3.3

                              WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT


Criterion 3.3: The Program shall engage in activities that support the professional
development of the public health workforce.


3.3a. A description of the program’s continuing education activities, including policies,
      needs assessment, procedures, practices, and evaluation that support continuing
      education and workforce development strategies.

      ►Philosophy

        In the ever-expanding and rapidly evolving field of public health, whose scientific bases,
        environmental contexts, and practice methodologies are constantly re-evaluated and
        refined, learning is inescapably a life-long process for practitioners. Academic
        institutions with programs in public health have a responsibility to organize and offer
        continuing education programs responsive to the needs of the profession.

      ►Mission

        The Program is committed to supporting efforts to protect the public's health through
        the development and provision of continuing professional education, thereby
        strengthening current levels of practice and providing support for innovation. The
        Program’s main constituency for continuing education is all public health practitioners
        in the state of Connecticut. To maximize the learning experience and course
        effectiveness, curriculum is defined by careful needs assessment (Appendix 26), and
        individual course teaching goals and outcome objectives are matched with appropriate
        educational methodologies.

      ►Administration

        The Continuing Education Committee, comprised of educators and practitioners, is
        chaired by a Coordinator of Continuing Education. Course directors are appointed for
        each activity. Usual procedures for identifying needs include surveys of target
        audiences, course evaluations, consensus of experts and faculty perceptions.

      ►Curriculum Design

        Every continuing education course is developed according to sound curriculum
        planning principles. Multiple levels of review ensure appropriateness and consistency
        of design and content.



                                              161
 ►Target Audience. Needs may be identified for specific target audiences (e.g., directors
  of health, health educators, sanitarians), or, when a need is identified which has broad
  implications for the field (e.g., the need to be able to recognize emerging infections),
  appropriate segments of the profession may be identified as a conglomerate target
  audience (i.e., directors of health, school nurses, health educators).

 ►Course Director/Pre-Planning. Once a need is identified for a specific target audience,
  an appropriately credentialed course director is selected. The coordinator of Continuing
  Education meets with the course director to review specific planning and course
  requirements, including the creation of academically defensible teaching goals and
  learning objectives. At this point, a planning timetable is established.

 ►Goals and Objectives. The course director creates a set of teaching goals and learning
  objectives which are reviewed first by the coordinator of Continuing Education and
  then by the Continuing Education Committee. Teaching goals are defined as what the
  instructor expects to accomplish; learning objectives are defined as the participant's
  expected competency at the conclusion of the course. Teaching goals and learning
  objectives are communicated to potential participants through a formal course
  announcement.

 ►Faculty. Subject to approval of the coordinator of Continuing Education, faculty are
  recommended by the course director. Faculty selection is based upon expertise as well
  as teaching capability. Faculty credentials are made known to participants on the course
  announcement and course syllabus

►Evaluation

 ►Course Evaluation - A standard evaluation form is used for all continuing education
  activities. Course evaluations are reviewed in an "exit interview" between the
  coordinator of Continuing Education and the course director.

 ►Program Evaluation - On an annual basis, the coordinator of Continuing Education
  prepares an evaluation of the program for submission to the Department Chair.

►Resources

  The Continuing Education program has access to Departmental equipment and supplies
  and clerical support. Individual offerings are self-sustaining with regard to course-related
  expenses. Reasonable fees are established for courses to generate funds for these costs,
  while ensuring access to participants.




                                          162
    ►Outside Support

       When a grant is accepted to cover course costs, full disclosure of the funding source and
       relationship of any speaker to the funding agent is made in the course announcement and
       syllabus. Funded courses remain under complete control of the Department, and it is
       understood that participant lists are not made available to donors.

    ►Joint Sponsorship

       Joint sponsorships are considered by the Department when a course is offered largely for
       the benefit of a cooperating organization and/or the main faculty expertise is drawn from
       a cooperating organization. In all cases of joint sponsorship, the Department is the
       primary sponsor. All course-related funds shall be processed through the usual University
       channels, and the course evaluation shall be conducted by the Department.

    ►NCHEC Multiple Event Provider Designation

       As the State’s only NCHEC-accredited, multiple event provider of continuing education
       activities for Certified Health Education Specialists, the Department has both conducted
       and co-sponsored many continuing education programs for professionals seeking CEUs
       for maintaining certification. Table 3.3c. presents data on Department’s CHES-related
       activities, including CEU provided.

3.3b. Description of certificate programs or other non-degree offerings of the program,
      including enrollment data for each of the last three years.

      Since 1985, the Department has offered the Environmental Health Training Program
      (EHTP) in cooperation with the Connecticut Department of Public Health. The EHTP is
      endorsed by the Connecticut Association of Directors of Health, the Connecticut
      Environmental Health Association and the Connecticut Public Health Association. The
      Program is designed to train sanitarians, including those presently employed in local health
      departments and those aspiring to be employed in local health departments. The full course
      is conducted from January-May, once a week (seven hours/day) for a total of 112 hours.
      The EHTP is made available to the Program’s students, which increases their
      marketability, while encouraging their participation in professional development
      (Appendix 27).

                                              Table 3.3b.

                Environmental Health Training Program Enrollments, 2006-2008

            2006                              2007                             2008
             71                                58                               40



                                              163
      The Program offers a Graduate Public Health Certificate designed for individuals with a
      minimum of a baccalaureate degree who are currently employed in public health or a
      related discipline for which pursuit of a master’s degree in public health is not feasible,
      desirable or necessary for their career at this time. It is comprised of four graduate courses,
      including Ecological Determinant of Health, Health Behavior, Epidemiology, and Health
      Systems and Policy. It is endorsed by the CT Department of Public Health and is part of its
      2007 Train Connecticut course offerings. There have been no registrants at this time
      (Appendix 28).

      Following a 2-year comprehensive analysis of need, The Department will offer, beginning
      in Fall 2008, a Graduate Certificate in Emergency & Disaster Management. It is comprised
      of four courses, three core courses, including Emergency, Disaster, and Catastrophe
      Management Concepts I, Emergency, Disaster, and Catastrophe Management Concepts II,
      and Emergency Project Management and a choice of one of seven endorsements. There are
      two general endorsements, three industry-specific endorsements, and two specialization
      endorsements (Appendix 29) and Reference File 12. The certificate is but the first step in
      the development of an interdisciplinary Master’s Degree in Emergency & Disaster
      Management to be offered beginning fall 2009.

3.3c. A list of continuing education programs offered by the program, including number
      of students served, for each of the last three years. Those that are in distance learning
      format should also be identified.

                                             Table 3.3c.

                    Continuing Education Programs Offered, 2004-2008

      Date                             Event Title                         Credits     CHES          Total
                                                                          Available   Petitions   Participants
    10/15/04       CPHA Annual Meeting                                       5           13           156
    11/17/04       Finding Public Health Information on the World            2            5            5
                   Wide Web
    03/19/05       Public Health Ethics: Steps to Professional Practice      2            3             3
    04/29/05       A Practical Guide to Focus Groups                         3            4            12
    10/19/05       Risk Communication                                        2            4             4
    10/27/05       CPHA: A Vision of Public Health in CT                     5           17           220
    10/19/05       Risk Communication                                        2            4             4
    10/27/05       CPHA Annual Meeting: A Vision of Public Health in         5           17           150
                   CT
    01/11/06       Avian Flu 101                                              1           4            4
    04/12/06       Communication 101                                          1           6            6
    06/14/06       Health, Safety and Learning Issues of Children             1           5            5
    09/13/06       Mock Press Conference                                      1           8            8
    10/27/06       CPHA Annual Meeting: Broad Reach of Public                4.5         20           189
                   Health in CT
    11/08/06       Social Health Marketing                                   1           5             5



                                                 164
                                        Table 3.3c., Cont’d

                    Continuing Education Programs Offered, 2004-2007

      Date                           Event Title                    Credits     CHES          Total
                                                                   Available   Petitions   Participants
    01/10/07       Brain Injuries: The Silent Epidemic                1            4            4
    04/11/07       Childhood Obesity: Prevalence, Interventions,      1            5            5
                   Resources and Tools
    06/13/07       Underage Drinking in CT                            1            8            8
    06/13/07       CT Poison Control Center 101                       1            8            8
    09/12/07       Health Communication                               1            5            5
    09/12/07       Lead Poisoning Prevention Program                  1            5            5
    10/26/07       CPHA Annual Meeting                                5           11           266
    11/14/07       Fall Prevention                                    1            4            4
    11/14/07       Crisis Communication                               1            4            4
 Total Programs                            17                        41.5        157           926



3.3d. A list of other educational institutions or public practice organization, if any, with
      which the program collaborates to offer continuing education.

      The Continuing Education (CE) program regularly collaborates with the Connecticut
      Public Health Association (CPHA) to offer continuing education to area public health
      practitioners. Each October, the CE coordinator works with the CPHA Annual Meeting
      Planning Committee to assure each workshop offered at the meeting meets the National
      Commission for Health Education Credentialing guidelines for providing CE credit hours
      to certified health education specialists. Additionally, the coordinator works regularly with
      the CPHA Health Education committee to assure the CE programs offered at monthly
      meetings also meet CHES requirement guidelines for CECH.

3.33. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

      This Criterion is met.

      Strengths. The Department meets its primary educational function by offering its students
      a rigorous, state-of-the-art public health program of study. In addition, it provides a
      modest, but evolving continuing education program to address the needs of the large
      numbers of personnel engaged in public health practice without formal training and
      previously trained professionals who seek to maintain and advance their knowledge and
      skills. The availability of two carefully designed certificate programs, provide access to
      public health practitioners to increase knowledge and skills for the practice of public
      health. The Department is committed to advancing workforce development in the State of
      Connecticut.

      Weaknesses. With a large proportion of the current public health workforce practicing
      without formal training, and trained practitioners seeking advanced knowledge and
                                                 165
practice skills, there is always more that the Department can do in providing workforce
development opportunities outside its degree programs. A more targeted and sophisticated
needs assessment would help the Department refine its continuing education offerings and
determine appropriate methods of delivery. Discussions are being held at the School level
about the need for and means to establish an Office of Continuing Education within the
School to provide enhanced administrative and marketing support. The advent of this
service would greatly expand the Program’s capability to offer meaningful post-graduate
professional development.




                                       166
                                        CRITERION 4.0

                            FACULTY STAFF AND STUDENTS


Criterion 4.1.: Faculty Qualifications: The Program shall have a clearly defined faculty which,
by virtue of its distribution, multidisciplinary nature, educational preparation, research and
teaching competence, and practice experience, is able to fully support the Program's mission,
goals and objectives.

4.1a. A table showing primary faculty who support the degree programs offered by the
      program. It should present data effective at the beginning of the academic year in
      which the self-study is submitted to CEPH and should be updated at the beginning
      of the site visit. This information must be presented in table format and include at
      least the following: a) name, b) title/academic rank, c) FTE or % time, d) tenure
      state or classification*, e) gender, f) race, g) graduate degrees earned, h) discipline in
      which degrees were earned, i) institutions from which degrees were earned, j)
      current teaching areas, k) current research interests, l) current and past public
      health practice activities. *Note: classification refers to alternative appointment
      categories that may e used at the institution. See CEPH Data Template F.

       The Department of Public Health is staffed by fourteen (15) full-time members, all but
       two whom are doctorally-trained, (one holds the juris doctor; one is ABD).

       There are presently eleven (12) full-time faculty who spend at least twenty-five (25%) of
       their teaching time in service to the graduate program. There is one faculty adjunct who
       co-teaches a core course (PCH 510). Of the present graduate faculty, six appointments are
       new and took effect between August 2006 and August 2008. Faculty contributions to the
       graduate program are detailed on the following pages. Of the complement of graduate
       teaching faculty at least fifty-percent (50%) have received at least one of their graduate
       degrees in the area of community health education or a closely related area. Faculty are
       assigned teaching responsibilities in the area(s) of their specialization, with those faculty
       trained in community/health education serving as instructors for the community health
       education courses comprising the specialization. The average years of experience of the
       faculty in public health, including teaching, is seventeen.

       Graduate teaching faculty is encouraged to maintain ongoing practice links with public
       health and health education agencies on the state and local levels. Faculty has achieved
       significant levels of community involvement through: providing consultations, serving on
       agency and association boards of directors, supervising student class projects linked to
       agencies and programs, advising of student special projects (required to be agency-linked)
       and theses, serving as directors of major community public health programs, conducting
       national and international workshops and conferences, participating as guest lecturers,
       and conducting community-based research. Information on the specific contributions
       made by the faculty in the areas of service and research is provided under Criteria 3.0 and

                                               167
3.2, respectively.

Table 4.1a. presents faculty demographics which include name and role, universities
attended, academic degrees, licenses and certifications, gender, ethnicity, discipline area
of specialization, tenure status, rank, years in field, percent of time devoted to Program,
areas of teaching responsibility(ies), research interests and current/past public health
activities.

►Brief biographies of all faculty teaching in the graduate and undergraduate programs,
 including adjuncts appear in Appendix 30.

►Curriculum vitae for all faculty teaching in the graduate and undergraduate program,
 including adjuncts appear in Reference File 13 .




                                        168
                                                                                     Table 4.1a.

                                                                            Faculty Demographics
                                                                                [Template F]

                                 Current Core Faculty Supporting Degree Offerings of Program by Specialty Area
Faculty *, Degrees   Gender   Ethnicity   Universities Attended        Major         Rank      Tenure   Year    Years   % of Time    Courses    Electives      Research         Current/Past
& Specialty Area                                                                               Status   Hired    in     Devoted to   Taught     Taught         Interests            PH
                                                                                                                Field    Program                                                 Activities
   Ellen Beatty,       F         W          Molloy College,                           Prof.     Yes     1979     35                  PCH 340,
Ed.D., M.A., M.Ed.                        New York University                                                                         590/591
   (Generalist)                           Columbia University

Stanley N. Bernard     M         B        Columbia University,      Health Policy    Assit.     No      2008     21
                                            Yale University,             and
                                          Columbia University      Administration,
                                                                    Sociomedical
                                                                      Sciences
 Mary Ann Boos         F         W           Trinity, Univ. of        Political      Special    No      2007      5                  PCH 358,                                     Emergency
                                              Pennsylvania,           Science,        App’t                                          PCH 497                                       Planner,
                                             Villanova, SCSU        Public Health                                                                                                   Health
                                                                                                                                                                                   Director,
                                                                                                                                                                                    Health
                                                                                                                                                                                   Educator
   Jean Breny          F         W        WCSU, San Jose State,     Community        Assoc.     Yes     2000     15                  PCH 430,               Health Promotion,     HIV/AIDS
 Bontempi, Ph.D.,                               UNC                   Health          Prof.                                          PCH 504,                 Intervention      Health Planner,
     M.P.H.                                                          Education                  2005                                 590/591,                   Planning,          Tobacco
(Community Health                                                                                                                     593/594               Women’s Health,       Prevention
Education & Health                                                                                                                                              Program             Health
   Promotion)                                                                                                                                                  Evaluation       Educator, HIV
                                                                                                                                                                                Test Counselor,
                                                                                                                                                                                 and College
                                                                                                                                                                                    Health
                                                                                                                                                                                   Educator
  Sandy Bulmer,        F         W           Cal State Univ.,       Community        Assoc.     Yes     1999     15                  PCH 340,                   Wellness
   Ph.D., M.S.,                           Univ. of Oregon, Texas      Health          Prof.                                          PCH 516,               Education, Health
     C.H.E.S.                                Women’s Univ.           Education                  2004                                 590/591,                  Promotion,
    (Generalist)                                                                                                                      593/594               Physical Activity
 Richard E. Cain,      M         w          Pennsylvania State     Health Planning   Assoc.     No      2008     17
   Ph.D., M.Ed.                             University, George           and
                                            Mason University       Administration,
                                                                       Health
                                                                     Education




                                                                   169
                                                                                 Table 4.1a., Cont’d

                                                                             Faculty Demographics
                                                                                 [Template F]

                                   Current Core Faculty Supporting Degree Offerings of Program by Specialty Area
Faculty *, Degrees     Gender   Ethnicity   Universities Attended       Major          Rank      Tenure   Year    Years   % of Time    Courses    Electives       Research         Current/Past
& Specialty Area                                                                                 Status   Hired    in     Devoted to   Taught     Taught          Interests            PH
                                                                                                                  Field    Program                                                  Activities
William G. Faraclas,     M         W        UCONN, Yale Univ.       Health Policy       Prof.     Yes     1976     33                  PCH 500,     PCH         Evaluation,
 Dr.P.H., M.P.H.                                                    and Resources                                                         510,    540, 566,     Curriculum
    (Generalist)                                                                                  1979                                  590/591     570        Development,
                                                                                                                                                               International
                                                                                                                                                                  Health
  Deborah Flynn,         F         W          Albertus Magnus,        Community        Assist.    No      2004     15                  PCH 202,                 Bioethics,         P.H. Nursing,
Ph.D., M.P.H, R.N.,                                SCSU,                Health                                                           351                    Narrative,           Manager
     C.H.E.S.                                   Salve Regina          Education,                                                                               Mental Health          SBHC,
(Community Health                                                     Humanities                                                                              Med. Humanities       Consultant
Education & Health
    Promotion)
   Peggy Gallup,         F         W           Colgate Univ.,        Health Policy      Prof.     Yes     1992     25                    PCH      PCH 560     Evaluation, Health
Ph.D., M.P.H., R.N.                         Nightingale School of    and Research                                                      590/591,                    Policy,
    (Generalist)                            Nursing, Yale Univ.                                   1997                                 593/594                 Homelessness,
                                                                                                                                                                    Needs
                                                                                                                                                                Assessment,
                                                                                                                                                                    Health
                                                                                                                                                                 Informatics
 Carolyn Grantham        F         W          Albertus Magnus,      Biology, Public    Special    No      2007     23                  PCH 359,                                    Environmental
     Millman                                   Yale University      Health, Environ.    App’t                                          PCH 365                                        Health
                                                                        Health                                                                                                      Consultant,
                                                                                                                                                                                    Community
                                                                                                                                                                                      Health
                                                                                                                                                                                   Administrator
John T. Nwangwu,         M         B         Univ. of Nebraska,      Epidemiology       Prof.     Yes     1991     24                  PCH 242,               Tropical Diseases,
 Dr.P.H., M.P.H.                             Loma Linda Univ.,                                                                            353                      Clinical
   (Generalist)                               Columbia Univ.                                      1995                                 PCH 551,                 Epidemiology,
                                                                                                                                        590/591                Minority Health,
                                                                                                                                                               Health Services
 David A. Pearson,       M         W           SUNY, Univ. of       Health Policy       Prof.     Yes     2002     45                  PCH 548,                  Health Care
  Ph.D., M.P.H.                                  Michigan,           and Public                                                          564,                 Management and
 Retired Fall 2007                               Yale Univ.            Health                     2004                                                           Leadership
   (Generalist)                                                     Administration




                                                                    170
                                                                               Table 4.1a., Cont’d

                                                                            Faculty Demographics
                                                                                [Template F]

                                  Current Core Faculty Supporting Degree Offerings of Program by Specialty Area
Faculty *, Degrees    Gender   Ethnicity   Universities Attended       Major        Rank      Tenure   Year    Years   % of Time    Courses     Electives      Research        Current/Past
& Specialty Area                                                                              Status   Hired    in     Devoted to   Taught      Taught         Interests            PH
                                                                                                               Field    Program                                                  Activities
 Michael J. Perlin,     M         W          Brooklyn College,       Community      Prof.      Yes     1979     40                  PCH 497,    PCH 545     Health Behavior,   DWI Director,
Ed.D., M.P.H. M.S.                           UCLA, Columbia            Health                                                       PCH 520,                 DWI, Human        School Health
   (Generalist)                                   Univ.               Education                1985                                 590/591,                   Sexuality,        Educator,
                                                                                                                                    593/594,                Substance Abuse      Sexuality
                                                                                                                                      595                                        Educator,
                                                                                                                                                                                  Pyscho-
                                                                                                                                                                                 therapist,
                                                                                                                                                                               Public Health
                                                                                                                                                                                Consultant
   Scot Phelps          M         W             Columbia,           Public Health   Assoc.     No      2007     20                                           Ant-Terrorism,
   M.P.H., J.D                                    Yale,              Emergency       Prof.                                                                     Diversity in
   (Generalist)                            Brooklyn Law School      Preparedness                                                                               Emergency
                                                                                                                                                              Management
                                                                                                                                                                 Theory
  Debra Risisky,        F         W           Ithaca College,        Community      Assist.    No      2007     12                  PCH 432                    Adolescent          Grants
   Ph.D., M.Ed.                            University of Georgia,      Health        Prof.                                          PCH 577,                     Health,       Administrator,
(Community Health                           University of North       Education                                                      590/591                  Reproductive      Curriculum
Education & Health                               Carolina                                                                            593/594                     Health,         Evaluator,
    Promotion)                                                                                                                                              Program Planning   Health Equities
                                                                                                                                                                   &               CBPR
                                                                                                                                                               Evaluation        Assistant,
                                                                                                                                                                                  Family
                                                                                                                                                                                 Planning
                                                                                                                                                                                Consultant
William L. Stohler,     M         W         West Chester Univ.,      Community      Prof.      Yes     1976     30                  PCH 275,    PCH 566     Health Planning
  Ph.D., M.Ed.                             Trenton State College,      Health                                                       363, 432,               and Evaluation,
Generalist & Health                           Univ. of Toledo         Education                1982                                 PCH 577,                  Curriculum
   Promotion)                                                                                                                       590/591,                 Development,
                                                                                                                                     593/594                   Wellness
                                                                                                                                                             Programming
 Christine Unson        F         A          Maryknoll College         Health       Assoc.     No      2006     11                  PCH 275,    PCH 573     Health Behavior,
   Ph.D., MSc.                             London School of Eco.    Communication    Prof.                                          351, 431                     Health
Generalist, CHE and                              UCONN                                                                              PCH 515,                Communications
 Health Promotion                                                                                                                      586,                        &
                                                                                                                                     590/591                     Aging
                                                                                                                                     593/594

                                                                    171
                                                                                   Table 4.1a., Cont’d

                                                                               Faculty Demographics
                                                                                   [Template F]

                                    Current Core Faculty Supporting Degree Offerings of Program by Specialty Area
Faculty *, Degrees   Gender      Ethnicity    Universities Attended       Major          Rank      Tenure    Year     Years     % of Time       Courses      Electives       Research        Current/Past
& Specialty Area                                                                                   Status    Hired     in       Devoted to      Taught       Taught          Interests           PH
                                                                                                                      Field      Program                                                      Activities
 Michele Vancour,       F           W                CCSU,              Community        Assoc.     Yes      1998      11                       PCH 275                   Media, College       Program
  Ph.D., M.P.H.,                                     SCSU,                Health          Prof.                                                  PCH                       Health, Peer      Coordinator,
     C.H.E.S.                                         NYU                Education                  2004                                        593/594                  Health Education;      Health
(Community Health                                                                                                                                                        Work-life Balance    Educator,
Education & Health                                                                                                                                                                            Marketing
   Promotion)                                                                                                                                                                                  Manager

   * Classification of faculty may differ from school to school, but may refer to teaching, research, service faculty or tenured, tenure-track, non-tenure-track faculty or alternative
     appointment categories used by the school




                                                                      172
4.1b. If the program uses other faculty in its teaching programs (adjunct, part-time,
      secondary appointments, etc.), summary data of their qualifications should be
      provided in table format including at least a) name, b) title/academic rank, c) title
      and current employment, d) FTE or % time allocated to teaching program, e)
      gender, f) race, g) graduate degrees earned, h) disciplines in which degrees were
      earned, and i) contributions to the teaching program. See CEPH Data Template G.

       All courses in the M.P.H. program are taught by full-time faculty assigned to the Department
       of Public Health. There are no adjuncts teaching in the health promotion specialization.

                                                           Table 4.1b.

  Template G (4.1b.) Other Faculty Used to Support Teaching Programs (adjunct, part-
                         time, secondary appointments, etc.) 1

                  Table 4.1.b. Current Other Faculty Used to Support Teaching Program (Adjunct, Part-Time, Secondary, etc.)
 Department/           Name          Title/      Title & Current    FTE or     Gender    Race or      Highest     Discipline   Teaching
Specialty Area                     Academic         Employer        % Time               Ethnicity    Degree                    Areas
                                     Rank                                                             Earned
 Core Courses
   PCH 340            Barbara      Instructor        Project                      F          W         MPH,        Public      Research
 P.H. Research        Barton                    Manager/Coordin                                         RN,        Health      Methods
                                                       ator                                            CHES       Education
                                                      Yale
                                                 Univ./YNHH
                                                   Center for
                                                   Outcomes
                                                  Research and
                                                   Evaluation
  PCH 351               Paul      Instructor     Consultant in                    M          W           JD        Bioethics   Health and
  Health and           Drager                      Bioethics,                                                                   Society
   Society                                       Self Employed
  PCH 497               Paul       Instructor        Retired                      M          W       MPH/RS        Environ.    Internship,
P.H. Internship        Schur                        CT State                                                        Health      Environ.
                                                 Department of                                                                   Health
                                                 Public Health
  PCH 497             Annette      Instructor   Grants Specialist                 F          W         MPH,         P.H.       Internship,
P.H. Internship        Hird                      Hospital of St.                                       CHES       Education     Wellness,
                                                    Raphael                                                                      Health
                                                                                                                               Promotion
  PCH 362              Deepa       Instructor   Health Educator                   F          A         MPH        Maternal        P.H.
 Public Health         Joseph                   City of Milford,                                                  and Child      Admin.
 Management                                           CT                                                           Health
                                                 Department of
                                                     Health
Environmental
    Health
   PCH 250             Patrick     Instructor     Director of                     M         W         MSME          Thermo-     Occupat.
 Occupational          Norton                    Engineering,                                                      dynamics,    Health &
Safety & Health                                 Environmental                                                       Nuclear      Safety,
   PCH 444                                      Health & Safety                                                     physics,    Environ,
     Injury                                        Southern                                                        metalurgy     Health
Epidemiology &                                    Connecticut
    Control                                     State University


                                                             173
                                                     Table 4.1b., Cont’d

     Template G (4.1b.) Other Faculty Used to Support Teaching Programs (adjunct, part-
                             time, secondary appointments, etc.)

            Table 4.1.b. Current Other Faculty Used to Support Teaching Program (Adjunct, Part-Time, Secondary, etc.)
     Department/     Name       Title/     Title & Current    FTE or   Gender   Race or     Highest   Discipline       Teaching
    Specialty Area            Academic        Employer        % Time            Ethnicity   Degree                      Areas
                                Rank                                                        Earned
  PCH 441            Eloise   Instructor    Director of                  F         W        MPH/RS    Environ.       Introduction
Water Supply &       Hudd                     Health                                                   Health          to P.H.,
 Waster-Water                                Town of                                                                     Risk
  Treatment                                 Wallingford,                                                           Communication,
                                                CT                                                                 Fundamentals of
                                                                                                                    Epidemiology,
                                                                                                                       Outbreak
                                                                                                                    Investigations
1
 The Department employs a total of 34 adjuncts, including 3 directors of health. All adjuncts have at least Master’s
degree. Of the 34 adjuncts, 22 are women of whom 7 are from underrepresented population groups. The Department
offers a large service program and 11 undergraduate elective courses, including an Emergency Medical Technician
(EMT) Training Program.

4.1c.      Description of the manner in which the faculty complement integrates perspectives
           from the field of practice, including information on appointment tracks for
           practitioners, if used by the program.

           Core and faculty teaching in the CHE specialization integrate perspectives from the field
           of practice in their coursework. Dr. Faraclas, Director of International Field Studies in
           Public Health incorporates his experiences in Mexico and Guatemala in PCH 500 –
           Foundations of Public Health and PCH 510 – Ecological Determinants of Public Health
           in informing students about global health issues; Dr. Jean Breny Bontempi integrates her
           work in community participatory research projects in PCH 504 – Introduction to
           Community Health Education; Dr. Debra Risisky integrates her work in evaluation of
           community health programs in PCH 342 and 577 – Program Planning and Evaluation; Dr.
           John Nwangwu integrates his international public health work in infectious diseases in
           PCH 242, and 551 – Epidemiology and his international consultancies in PCH 353 –
           World Health; Dr. Christine Unson integrates her research on aging in PCH 515 –
           Biostatistics and her research in health communications and behavior change in PCH 431
           and 586- Health Promotion Methods and Strategies; Dr. Sandy Bulmer integrates her
           qualitative research in physical fitness and cancer survivorship and her survey research on
           college health in PCH 340 and 516 – Public Health Research; Dr. Peggy Gallup integrates
           her research on health equities in PCH 358 and 564 – Health Systems and Policy; and,
           Dr. Michael Perlin integrates his research on drugged-driving behavior and health
           behavior theory design in PCH 520 – Health Behavior and his directorship of a large,
           driver rehabilitation program in PCH 497 and 595 – Public Health Internship. Dr. Ellen
           Beatty is currently the principal investigator for a State of Connecticut grant charged with
           developing a model for the restructuring of the Department of Aging in Connecticut. This
           research experience is integrated into PCH 516 (340) – Public Health Research and thesis
           advisement. Dr. Michele Vancour integrates her research on mothers and work on

                                                             174
        creating a family-friendly campus at SCSU in PCH 356- Maternal and Child Health
        Services and PCH 532 – Programs and Practices in Maternal and Child Health.

4.1d. Identification of outcome measures by which the program may judge the
      qualifications of its faculty complement, along with data regarding the performance
      of the program against those measures for each of the last three years.

        Outcomes have been set to promote the presence of a clearly- defined, highly-qualified,
        diverse faculty. The outcomes address the desired qualifications of faculty as related to
        the a) assignment of faculty to courses, b) reassignment of faculty to courses, and
        c) conduct of faculty searches. The outcomes are presented in Table 4.1d.

                                                  Table 4.1d.

                  Outcome Measures and Targets for Judging the Qualification of
                        the Program’s Faculty Complement, 2006-2008

      Resource Objectives                      Outcome Measure (Target)                  2006   2007    2008
1. An adequate number of faculty     On average graduate academic advisors will           1:6    1:6     1:6
will provide academic                have an advisement-graduate student ratio of
advisement                           1:10 or less.
                                     On average undergraduate academic advisors          1:17   1:17    1:16
                                     will have an advisement-undergraduate student
                                     ratio of 1:15 or less.
2. Sufficient full-time faculty will The majority of required graduate courses will      100%   100%    100%
be available to teach required       be taught by full-time faculty.
courses                              The majority of required undergraduate courses      85%    85%     85%
                                     will be taught by full-time faculty.
3. Required core courses will be     No more than 2 required graduate courses will        0      0       0
taught by a sufficiently broad       be taught by the same faculty member.
number of faculty.                   No more than 2 required undergraduate courses        0      0       0
                                     will be taught by the same faculty member.
4. Specialization courses in the     At least three faculty, employed full-time by the    3      3       3
M.P.H. program will be taught by University, will teach the courses in the
a sufficiently broad number of       specializations.
faculty.
5. Faculty will possess              100% of faculty of graduate courses will hold a     100%   100%    100%
credentials appropriate to course    doctorate; and will have study or experience in
assignments.                         the assigned subject area.
                                     100% of faculty of undergraduate courses will       100%   100%    100%
                                     hold at least a master’s degree; and will have
                                     study or experience in the assigned subject
                                     area.

        A review of pertinent teaching assignments for the last three years revealed that the program
        has been successful in achieving the standards of performance for assigning and reassigning
        qualified faculty to courses.

                                                    175
41e. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

      The Criterion is met.

      Strengths. The faculty is comprised of a sufficient core of highly trained, qualified and
      experienced public health professionals, who provide students with an outstanding
      educational experience. The faculty of the Department is known for its commitment to
      teaching excellence and for its devotion to the field of public health. Each member's
      teaching responsibilities are relevant to his or her academic and professional preparation
      and experience and each is professionally involved, on an ongoing basis, in the practice of
      public health in his or her area(s) of specialization. The Program remains highly
      committed to forging linkages with agencies and programs, in addition to maintaining a
      teaching load of 12 credits, academic advisement responsibilities, advisement of students'
      special projects and theses and other general demands of the University, School and
      Department on faculty energy and time.

      To enrich the learning experience for students, Program faculty have consistently used the
      services of outside public health experts in both core and specialization courses and have
      structured many of the elective courses to facilitate the use of these valuable resource
      professionals on a regular basis.

      Weaknesses. None identified.




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                                       CRITERION 4.2

                        FACULTY POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

Criterion 4.2.: The Program shall have well-defined policies and procedures to recruit, appoint
and promote qualified faculty, to evaluate competence and performance of faculty, and to
support the professional development and advancement of faculty.

4.2a. A faculty handbook or other written document that outlines faculty rules and
      regulations.

       University-wide policies and procedures for the Connecticut State University System
       (CSUS) govern the faculty in accordance with state and federal legislation and resolutions
       established by the Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) between Connecticut State
       University (CSU), the American Association of University Professors (AAUP), and the
       Board of Trustees for Connecticut State University System (CSUS). This document
       covers faculty recruitment, appointment, tenure, promotion, and performance evaluation.
       Faculty appointment, tenure, and promotion are further defined in the University’s
       Faculty Senate Documents.

       The CBA can be accessed at: http://www.ctstateu.edu/hr/documents/AAUP2007-
       2011FINALContract050807August8.pdf. SCSU faculty Senate documents can be
       accessed at: http://www.southernct.edu/employment/Faculty_Senate/. The University
       faculty handbook can be accessed at:
       http://www.southernct.edu/faculty_development/resources/

4.2b. Description of provisions for faculty development, including identifications of
      support for faculty.

       The mission of the Office of Faculty Development (OFD) is to support teaching and
       learning at all levels and in all contexts in which instruction occurs at Southern. The OFD
       supports faculty in their roles as teachers, scholars, and members of the university and
       wider community.

       The Office of Faculty Development is committed to promoting a spirit of innovation,
       collaboration, and love of learning, as well as enhancing a sense of collegiality among
       faculty as they expand their intellectual, teaching, and scholarly horizons. In pursuing
       these goals, the OFD works to enhance the intellectual climate and promote open and
       ongoing dialogue among all members of the university community. It serves as an
       advocate for academic initiatives and enterprises that relate to teaching and learning
       through a variety of programs, activities, and resources in achieving the university's
       mission. The vision of the OFD is to create an environment at Southern that facilitates
       and promotes effective teaching, professional development, research, university service,
       and integration of new instructional technologies.


                                              177
Specifically, faculty development for Southern includes the seven competencies outlined
by Sell and Chism (1991). The Office of Faculty Development:

      Engages in needs assessment activities;
      Designs and develops strategies that promote individual, pedagogical, curricular,
       and organizational growth;
      Organizes and implements specific programs, projects, and studies;
      Plans and delivers oral presentations;
      Produces print and non-print communications;
      Conducts research about teaching and learning; and
      Establishes and maintains consulting relationships.

The primary way in which the University encourages and supports faculty development is
to grant time to faculty through: (1) leaves of absence; (2) sabbatical leaves; (3)
attendance at professional meetings; (4) attendance at seminars and workshops; and (5)
reassigned time for research.

In addition, the University supports faculty development through the availability of: (1)
Forums, workshops and training, including new faculty orientation, part-time faculty
orientation, summer tech, continuing professional development workshops for new
faculty, new faculty mentoring program, writing support committee, and chairpersons
institute; (2) Faculty development grants; (3) Curriculum-related activity grants; (4) CSU
research grants; (5) Minority recruitment and retention committee grants; (6) Yale
Visiting Fellows Program; (7) Yale library card program; (8) Sabbatical leave; (9)
Reassigned time for research; (10) Poster design and production service; (11) Awards and
fellowships; (12) Publications; (13) External publications; (14) Teaching innovation
ideas; (15) Leadership resources, and (16) Discussion and interest groups.

The University also provides a number of support services to enhance its faculty
development programs:

Academic Computing - services are provided to support the creation of faculty and
student multimedia presentations involving text, images, animation, video and audio.
Special emphasis is given to the creation of a positive attitude towards computers,
workshops, personal coaching, and individual office visits, computer videos and manuals,
and demonstrations on the classroom use of computers. Future projects include
videoconferencing, voice-activated word processing, web site development, and
computerized grade systems and personal journals.

The Learning Resources Center - is equipped for individualized study. It provides a wide
range of electronic equipment and most non-print media owned by the University. The
services provided include: audio tape duplication, slide and transparency production,
limited graphic services, video tape inspection, cleaning and repair, lamination services,
and poster production.


                                       178
        Sponsored Programs and Research (SPAR) - Provides information regarding federal,
        foundation, corporate and individual funding sources which may be available to support
        the research and instructional interests of faculty members. Guidance is also provided to
        assist in project design and grant proposal preparation. Workshops on the development of
        grants are provided to classes, departments or groups of departments upon request. The
        University is a member of the Office of Federal Programs of the American Association of
        State Colleges and Universities (OFP/AASCU), which is a Washington-based grants
        information and technical assistance program to enhance external funding possibilities for
        public higher education.

        Research and Scholarship Advisory Committee - is a continuing advisory body within the
        Division of Academic Affairs charged to: articulate the several research missions of
        Southern Connecticut State University; provide a forum for exchange of perspectives and
        experiences among the community of researchers; identify standards and benchmarks of
        good practice in research; identify desirable resources, practices, and policies for further
        enhancement of the research and creative climate at the University; and review and report
        annually on the effectiveness of University policies and practices regarding research.
        Each of Southern's Schools in represented via appointment by the Provost.

        The Office of Faculty Development provides support for the on-going program of faculty
        development. It provides information regarding sources for funding and support of a wide
        variety of activities. It publishes and distributes the Weekly Events Calendar as well as
        Dialogue, a monthly newsletter. The office also maintains a small library of resources on
        teaching and learning, institutional assessment, cultural diversity and other issues
        currently of importance in higher education. In addition to these supports, the Office of
        Provost sponsors semi-annual University forums. The SCSU Foundation also sponsors a
        series of guest lectures by authorities in their respective fields. A complete listing of all
        faculty development activities and resources can be accessed at
        http://www.southernct.edu/faculty_development/resources/.

4.2c.   Descriptions of formal procedures for evaluating faculty competence and
        performance.

        The Department, School and University use a variety of mechanisms in the evaluation of
        faculty competence and performance, in addition to those described as part of the
        recruitment, retention, tenure, promotion, and assessment processes. These evaluative
        strategies include:

        ► Department Evaluation and Sabbatical Committee (DEC). The Department DEC
          is responsible for conducting evaluation of faculty for renewal appointment,
          promotion, tenure, and sixth-year professional assessment, and evaluation of faculty
          on special appointment as directed by the School Dean and/or Provost and Vice-
          President or Academic Affairs (CBA, Sections 4.11-4.12, pp. 21-28). The DEC also
          receives sabbatical applications (CBA, Section 13.7, pp. 95-96). As part of its charge
          and responsibility, the Committee is granted permission to obtain information about

                                                179
   faculty competence and performance from any source, unless expressly prohibited by
   the CBA or Faculty Senate guidelines.

► Chairperson's Assessment of Performance. The Department Chairperson
  participates as one step in the formal evaluation process for reappointment,
  promotion, tenure, and sixth-year professional assessment. In addition to a review of
  the candidate's file, the Chairperson conducts classroom observations to assess faculty
  performance.

► Chairperson's Consultation with the Program Coordinators. Meet with the
  Department Chairperson regularly, to discuss level and quality of faculty performance
  with an emphasis on responsiveness to Program requests.

► Chairperson's Consultation with Department Committee Chairs. As an integral
  responsibility of faculty, service on Department committees affords faculty the
  opportunity to participate in the governance of the Department and Program.
  Committee chairpersons often meet with the Department Chairperson to share
  information about faculty contributions to the assigned tasks for which the committee
  is responsible.

► Dean's Assessment of Performance. The Dean of the School of Health and Human
  Services participates as one step in the formal evaluation process for renewal
  appointment, promotion, tenure, and sixth-year professional assessment. In addition
  to a review of the candidate's file, the Dean may choose to conduct classroom
  observations to assess faculty performance.

► Provost. The Provost participates as one step in the formal evaluation process for
  renewal appointment, promotion, tenure and sixth-year professional assessment.

► University President. The University President participates as one step in the formal
  evaluation process for renewal appointment, promotion, tenure and sixth-year
  professional assessment.

► Report to the Graduate Council. Discussed under Criterion 1.2a., the Report to the
  Graduate Council requires a student survey which includes a number of statements
  relevant to faculty performance.

► Special Assessment. Initiated by the appropriate School Dean, a special assessment is
  conducted if reasonable grounds exist to investigate a faculty member's performance
  or duties (see CBA, Section 4.13, p. 29.).

► M.P.H. Alumni Survey. Conducted by the SCSU Alumni Association, Public Health
  Chapter, annually, the survey contains a broad range of questions pertaining to
  Program quality, relevance and by inference, faculty competence and performance.


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      ► CEPH Self-Study. A structured, in-depth, Program analysis, including assessment of
        faculty competence and performance, conducted for the purpose of achieving national
        accreditation.

      ► Case Conferences. Conducted by the Department Chairperson or Coordinator in
        instances in which faculty may not be fulfilling their roles and expectations in an
        acceptable manner.

      ► Faculty Evaluation of Program Administrators. Conducted by the Department
        Evaluation Committee (DEC). A written evaluation of the Department Chairperson
        and Coordinators of Graduate and Undergraduate Studies. The performance of the
        Chair and Coordinators for AY 2008 were rated as excellent by the faculty (Appendix
        31).

      ► Faculty Self and Program Evaluation. A 42-item survey that addresses performance
        issues, knowledge of Program and faculty relationships (Appendix 32).

4.2d. Description of the processes used for student course evaluation and evaluation of
      teaching effectiveness.

      Students are afforded multiple opportunities to participate in the evaluation of faculty and
      all required and elective courses and of the Program. Many of the items listed under
      Criterion 1.5.e. are pertinent to students’ evaluation of faculty performance, including
      teaching effectiveness.

           ►Student Evaluation of Faculty. Graduate students are afforded multiple
            opportunities to participate in the evaluation of faculty and all required and
            elective courses and of the Program.

                 ► The Mid-Course Student Evaluation. In 1989, the Graduate Program
                   Committee passed a friendly resolution in which the members agreed to
                   conduct anonymous mid-course evaluations in all core courses in the
                   Program. This has since become a policy of the Committee and has
                   continued without interruption, although faculty is not contractually
                   obligated to conduct interim evaluations. Unlike end-of-term course
                   evaluations, which assess what "was" and perhaps leave a legacy to others,
                   the purpose of the mid-course evaluation is to assess what "is" so that
                   course adjustments can be made, if appropriate, for the benefit of students
                   currently enrolled in the course. Although not part of the policy, many
                   faculty members voluntarily share the results of their evaluations with their
                   class and in many instances with the Coordinator and/or Chairperson. As
                   with all student-completed course evaluations, with the exception of those
                   required for tenure, promotion and renewal, instructors are free to utilize
                   any type of written, oral or combination instrument or technique for the
                   purpose of conducting this evaluation. Mid-course student evaluations

                                              181
                      reveal a high level of satisfaction across most courses.

                   ► The End-of-Course Student Evaluation. The University Office of
                     Institutional Research provides a standardized form for student course
                     evaluation for use by faculty. Although not contractually required, all
                     Program faculty members administer an end-of-course evaluation to assess
                     select aspects of course instruction and course conduct. End-of-course
                     student evaluations reveal a high satisfaction across all courses. (Reference
                     File 14).

                   ► Web-based Anonymous Feedback. As discussed under Criterion 1.5e., all
                     students have the opportunity to provide feedback about any Program
                     matter, including faculty performance.

            ► M.P.H. Alumni Survey. The Survey provides an opportunity for graduates to
              participate in the ongoing evaluation of Program and faculty performance from a
              different and broader vantage point. The information obtained from this Survey is
              used as one tool in program planning and assessment of faculty performance and
              competence. A statistical analysis of the 2006-2007 Survey revealed that when
              alumni compared themselves to others with an MPH degree, 62% thought they
              were comparable, while another 30% said they were better. (see Reference File 5).

          ► Graduate Council Survey. The Report to the Graduate Council includes a
            required student survey which includes a number of statements relevant to faculty
            performance (Appendix 33).

4.2e.   Description of the emphasis given to community service in the promotion and tenure
        process.

        Faculty evaluation is based on four categories, each assessed on the singular criterion of
        quality of activity. The specific processes for each category of evaluation differ, and
        categories are weighted in order of presentation (assigned weights are in parenthesis):

        ► Teaching or Professional Competence (Load Credit or the Equivalent) – encompasses
          those activities for which the faculty member receives load credit or the equivalent:
          teaching, counseling, chairing the department, directing, library service, research,
          student supervision, or any other function specified in the letter of appointment or
          subsequent extension of modifications of such appointment or identified in a letter of
          agreement. Teaching is judged by peer observation and student evaluations (50%).
        ►Creative Activity - encompasses activities appropriate to one's field, such as delivering
          papers at professional conferences, research, study, publication and community
          involvements (25%).
        ►Productive Service to the Department and University - encompasses constructive
          participation on departmental and university-wide committees and activities, self-study
          and evaluation and advising students regarding program planning (15%).

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        ► Professional Attendance and Participation - encompasses attendance, and
          participation in conferences and workshops, membership and service in appropriate
          professional organizations and professional activity in the community that reflects
          credit to the university (10%).

        As evident in the above evaluation categories, service to the community is included in
        three of the four (4) categories, under Creative Activity, Productive Service to the
        Department and University and Professional Attendance and Participation. Each of these
        categories address “community” as the local community, University community and
        professional community. The categories of evaluation are utilized by the Department
        Evaluation and Sabbatical Committee, Chairperson, Dean and University Promotion and
        Tenure Committee to ensure consistency in the evaluation process.

4.2f.   Assessment of the extent to which this criterion has been met.

        The Criterion is met.

        Strengths. The Program has well-defined policies and procedures to recruit, appoint and
        promote qualified faculty, to evaluate competence and performance of faculty, and to support
        the professional development and advancement of faculty.

        Weaknesses. None identified.




                                               183
                                       CRITERION 4.3

                           FACULTY AND STAFF DIVERSITY

Criterion 4.3.: The Program shall recruit, retain and promote a diverse faculty and staff, and
shall offer equitable opportunities to qualified individuals regardless of age, gender, race,
disability, sexual orientation, religion or national origin.

4.3a. Summary demographic data on the program’s faculty, showing at least gender and
      ethnicity; faculty members should be consistent with those shown in the table in
      4.1a. Data must be presented in table format. See CEPH Data Template H.

       Table 4.3a. presents data on the Program’s faculty, including gender and ethnicity.

                                           Table 4.3a.

Template H (4.3a.) Summary Demographic Data – Faculty

 Table 4.3a. Summary Demographic Data for Current Core and Other Faculty
                                             Core         Other         Total
                                           Faculty       Faculty
                                           #      %     #      %      #      %
 # % Male                                  2      47                  2      47
 # % African American Male                 2      13                  2      13
 # % Caucasian Male                        5      33                  5      33
 # % Hispanic/Latino Male                  0                          0
 # % Asian/Pacific Islander Male           0                          0
 # % Native American/Alaska Native Male    0                          0
 # % Unknown Other Male                    0                          0
 # % International Male                    0                          0

 # % Female                                       8      53                       8      53
 # % African American Female                      0                               0
 # % Caucasian Female                             7      47                       7      47
 # % Hispanic/Latino Female                       0                               0
 # % Asian/Pacific Islander Female                1       7                       1      7
 # % Native American/Alaska Native Female         0                               0
 # % Unknown Other Female                         0                               0
 # % International Female                         0                               0
 TOTAL                                           15                              15




                                              184
4.3b. Summary demographic data on the program’s staff, showing at least gender and
      ethnicity. Data must be presented in table format. See CEPH Data Template I.

        Table 4.3b. presents data on the Program’s staff including gender and ethnicity.


                                           Table 4.3b.

Template I (4.3.b.) Summary Demographic Data – Staff*

 Table 4.3b. Summary Demographic Data for Full-Time Staff*
                                           Full-Time Staff                      TOTAL
 # % Male                                         0                               0
 # % African American Male                        0                               0
 # % Caucasian Male                               0                               0
 # % Hispanic/Latino Male                         0                               0
 # % Asian/Pacific Islander                       0                               0
 Male
 # % Native American/Alaska                  0                                0
     Native Male
 # % Unknown/Other Male                      0                                0
 # % International Male                      0                                0
 # % Female                                  1                                1
 # % African American Female                 0
 # % Caucasian Female                        0                                0
 # % Hispanic/Latino Female                  0
 # % Asian/Pacific Islander                  1                                1
 Female
 # % Native American/Alaska                  0                                0
     Native Female
 # % Unknown/Other Female                    0                                0
 # % International Female                    0                                0
 TOTAL                                       1                                1
   * The Department employs one part-time Hispanic female as a University Assistant.

NOTE: Schools and programs may also include other aspects to demonstrate diversity among
     staff at their discretion.

4.3c.   Description of policies and procedures regarding the program’s commitment to
        providing equitable opportunities without regard to age, gender, race, disability,
        sexual orientation, religion or national origin.

        The following statement is a description of the policies and procedures regarding the
        Program’s commitment to providing equitable employment opportunities without regard

                                               185
       to age, sex, race, disability, religion or national origin. The Program enthusiastically
       supports the University's affirmative action policy:

       It is the intellectual and moral responsibility, and the policy of the leadership of the
       Connecticut State University System, to advance social justice and equity by promoting
       affirmative action and upward mobility. Accordingly, Southern Connecticut State
       University as a constituent unit of the CSUS, in concert with the affirmative action
       commitment and policies of CSUS, undertakes with conviction and purposeful effort, to
       overcome the present effect of past practices, policies, or barriers to equal employment
       opportunity, and to achieve the full and fair participation of females, African-Americans,
       Hispanics, and any other protected group found to be underutilized in the work force.

       Equal opportunity, a distinctly different matter, is employment of individuals without
       consideration of race, creed, age, sex, marital status, national origin, ancestry, mental
       retardation, physical disability, or a prior conviction of a crime, unless the provisions of
       Section 46a-60 (b), 46a-80 (b), or 46a-81 (b) of the Connecticut General Statutes are
       controlling or there is a bona fide occupational qualification excluding persons in one of
       the above protected groups. Equal employment opportunity is the purpose and goal of
       affirmative action under Section 46a-68-31 through 46a-68-74.

       Clearly, affirmative action and equal employment opportunity are immediate and
       necessary agency objectives for SCSU, where services and programs are applied in a fair
       and impartial manner. The University also recognizes the hiring difficulties experienced
       by the physically disabled and many older persons, and undertakes measures to overcome
       these conditions. This policy of nondiscrimination is not limited to employment practice
       but extends to all services and programs provided by the University.

4.3d. Description of recruitment and retention efforts used to attract and retain a diverse
      faculty and staff, along with information about how these efforts are evaluated and
      refined over time.

       Southern’s commitment to recruitment and retention efforts used to attract and retain
       diverse faculty and staff begins with its mission “As an intentionally diverse and
       comprehensive university…” The new University Strategic Plan, Overarching Goal D. is
       to “Foster a campus climate that respectfully includes and celebrates diversity by
       recruiting, supporting and retaining students, faculty and staff who represent a broad
       spectrum of cultural backgrounds.” The applicable strategic initiative for this goal is to:
       “Attract, retain, and support a diverse faculty and staff.” The composition of the
       University administration, described under Criterion 4.5a, is a tangible example of the
       University’s unwavering commitment to diversity. Recruitment of faculty at Southern
       begins with workshops conducted by the Provost and the Director of Diversity and Equity
       for members of Department Personnel Committees. Recruiting of faculty and staff must
       follow precise guidelines, including the submission of a detailed affirmative action plan
       that must be approved by the Provost and the Director of Diversity and Equity. In
       addition, Personnel Committees must provide a list of recruiting and advertising sources

                                               186
        that include venues that are likely to be frequented by female and minority candidates.

        Southern's Multicultural Center serves as a resource for the University and the community
        in promoting an awareness and appreciation of cultural diversity. It offers educational
        programs and services to assist in the recruitment and retention of students. The Center
        also sponsors outreach programs with area schools, conducts art exhibits, film programs,
        lectures, and conferences and houses a book and video library.

        In addition, the University sponsors a Minority Recruitment and Retention Committee,
        whose purpose is to assist search committees in their recruitment of minorities and other
        protected groups, as well as support departments in the retention of said individuals.
        Funding is available to minority faculty, and awards range from $500 to $2,000 per
        academic year for the purposes of professional enhancement, mentoring and research of
        non-tenured minority faculty.

        Faculty searches during AY 2007 resulted in offers from the Provost to the Department’s
        two preferred candidates, one Hispanic male and one African-American female, reduced
        teaching loads and a pool of unrestricted research funds. This offer represented an
        extraordinary attempt to respond to the Department’s quest to further diversify its faculty.
        In the end, the two candidates decided to remain at their present positions, despite the
        University’s best offer.

        In AY 2008 searches, four of six preferred candidates invited to interview for faculty
        vacancies were persons from underrepresented population groups. Faculty positions were
        offered to two candidates, one white and one African-American male. Both individuals
        accepted positions with the Department for Fall 2008.

4.3e.   Description of efforts, other than recruitment and retention of core faculty, through
        which the program seeks to establish and maintain an environment that supports
        diversity.

        The Program’s dedication to the values of social justice, a democratic process, cultural
        humility, beneficence, and trust creates an atmosphere is which each faculty member is
        nurtured and respected. The Department’s commitment to eliminating racial and ethnic
        disparities as its major research thrust, its Minority Scholars Program, required cultural
        humility training for all graduate students, unwavering support for the University’s
        affirmative action efforts, all contribute to an environment that supports and values
        diversity. In AY 2006 the Department also adopted a goal of increasing the number of
        faculty adjuncts from underrepresented groups. Since that time, four additional minority
        faculty adjuncts have taught courses in the Department.




                                                187
4.3f.   Identification of outcome measures by which the program may evaluate its success
        in achieving a diverse faculty and staff, along with data regarding the performance
        of the program against those measures for each of the last three years.

        Outcome measures by which the program evaluates its faculty and staff diversity are
        presented in table 4.3f. and efforts to achieve faculty diversity in table 4.3f.1.

                                                Table 4.3f.

   Outcome Measures and Targets for Achieving Faculty and Staff Diversity, 2006-2008

   Resource            Outcome Measure (Target)                2006     2007           2008
   Objectives
A                    Each of the four major ethnic             3 of 4   3 of 4         3 of 4
demographically      groups in Connecticut (White
diverse faculty      Non-Hispanic; African
will serve the       American/Black Non-Hispanic;
Program              Hispanic; Asian-American-
                     Pacific Islands) will be
                     represented on the faculty of the
                     Program.
                     No one gender shall comprise               58%      58%           58%
                     more than 2/3 of the full-time            Female   Female        Female
                     faculty of the Program.
A                    At least .25 of the staff serving          .25      .25            .25
demographically      the Program will come from
diverse staff will   underrepresented ethnic groups.
serve the Program

        To ensure that a sincere effort is made by the Department to recruit, hire and retain
        qualified and diverse faculty and staff, outcome measures and targets for 2006-2008 have
        been set, as shown in Table 4.3f.1.

                                               Table 4.3f.1.

                     Efforts to Achieve Faculty and Staff Diversity, 2006-2008

      Process           Process Measure (Target)               2006     2007           2008
    Objective
1. The Program       100% of faculty searches for              100%     100%           100%
will use fair        qualified and diverse faculty will
employment           be conducted consistent with the
practices.           principles, regulations, and
                     practices established by
                     affirmative-action/equal-
                     opportunity laws.



                                                    188
                                          Table 4.3f.1., Cont’d.

                     Efforts to Achieve Faculty and Staff Diversity, 2006-2008


     Process            Process Measure (Target)            2006             2007             2008
    Objective
                     100% of staff searches for             100%             NA               NA
                     qualified and diverse staff will be
                     conducted consistent with the
                     principles, regulations, and
                     practices established by
                     affirmative-action/equal-
                     opportunity laws.
2. The Program       All new tenure-track faculty shall     100%            100%             100%
will make            be assigned an experienced
attempts to retain   member of the faculty to serve as
minority faculty     her/his mentor for the first year
and staff.           of service.
                     All new staff (UA, secretary)          100%             NA               NA
                     shall be assigned an experienced
                     member of the staff to serve as
                     her/his mentor for the first year
                     of service.
                     All faculty will be renewed,           100%            100%             100%
                     tenured and promoted using a
                     single set of University-approved
                     criteria applied equally.
                     All staff will be renewed and          100%            100%             100%
                     promoted using a single set of
                     University-approved criteria
                     applied equally.

4.3g. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

        This Criterion has been met.

        Strengths. The Department is fully committed to recruit, retain, and promote a diverse
        faculty and staff, with the support of a University administration dedicated to diversity
        and equity. The Department offers equitable opportunities to qualified individuals
        regardless of age, gender, race, disability, sexual orientation, religion, or national origin.

        Weaknesses. Despite the Department’s best efforts, recruitment of faculty from
        underrepresented population groups remains an ongoing challenge.




                                                    189
                                       CRITERION 4.4

                     STUDENT RECRUITMENT AND ADMISSIONS

Criterion 4.4.: The Program shall have student recruitment and admissions policies and
procedures designed to locate and select qualified individuals capable of taking advantage of
the Program's various learning activities which will enable each of them to develop competence
for a career in public health.

4.4a. Description of the program’s recruitment policies and procedures.

       The University Office of Public Affairs, in cooperation with the School of Graduate
       Studies and Undergraduate Admissions, assumes the major responsibility for Program
       advertising and general student recruitment. Expenditures for University advertising for
       2005-2007 totaled $1,165,738.00 for an average of $385,246.00 per year. Advertising for
       graduate and undergraduate programs comprises approximately 52% of these amounts. In
       addition, all areas of the University benefit from the branding and image building effects
       of events advertising which comprise 16% of total advertising expenditures.

       The recruitment of prospective students includes both formal and informal mechanisms.
       As the "health professions" University within the CSUS, the Department enjoys
       considerable name recognition which provides a steady source of free advertising. With
       the majority of its graduates employed in public health and related agencies throughout
       the tri-state area (New York, New Jersey and Connecticut), many prospective students
       become aware of the Program through informal contact with Program graduates. In
       addition, there is a significant number of both undergraduate and graduate students who
       are active members of the Connecticut Public Health Association, as well as other health-
       related professional organizations (e.g., Physician Assistants Association, American
       Dental Association, American Medical Association, American Dental Hygienist
       Association, American Nursing Association, and the Visiting Nurse Association of
       Connecticut) who are another source of natural advertisements. In addition, the faculty's
       extensive and multiple professional affiliations, community ties and activities increase
       Program visibility and recruitment potential. The Department’s many foreign graduates
       promote the Program among their compatriots, especially for the MPH degree.

       Formal recruitment processes include the distribution of Program information to more
       than two-hundred (200) health-related agencies and programs in Connecticut, including
       all departments of health, voluntary public health agencies, hospitals and universities. An
       additional data base, comprised of the traditionally Black Colleges and Universities, was
       created in 1997. In 2005, the Department revised its lighted display, under a grant from
       the School of Graduate Studies, for use at open houses, meetings and annual conventions.
       Between 2001-2007, the Offices of the Coordinators redesigned their respective program
       information packets which are sent to all requestors and which is distributed at all
       professional meetings attended by the faculty. The most recent edition of the M.P.H.
       program information materials includes a single, 48-page information booklet that

                                              190
contains all required forms in an easy to access, perforated format. During this same
period a new eight-panel brochure was created for foreign applicants who are interested
in the M.P.H. program (Reference File 16).

When feasible, the Department arranges to display Program material at professional
meetings as it has at the Association of Prevention Teaching and Research (APTR), the
American Public Health Association (APHA), Connecticut Public Health Association
Annual Meeting, and the Council of Accredited MPH Programs (C.A.M.P.). Other formal
recruitment mechanisms include the listing of the Program in the SCSU Graduate
Catalog, Peterson's Guide, and the University’s and Department's home-pages on the
Internet. The Department also participates in the bi-annual University-sponsored
Graduate and Undergraduate Open Houses which are advertised to more than twenty-
thousand (20,000) prospective students. University-sponsored open houses for
undergraduate students reach more than 7,000 potential applicants. The "distinctive"
designation awarded by the University to the Graduate and Undergraduate degree
programs in 1996 continues to increase the Program's visibility through mention in the
University's print and broadcast advertisements.

The publication of the “M.P.H. News,” the official newsletter of the M.P.H. Program,
launched in 1994 and published each semester, is a function of the Office of the Graduate
Coordinator. It has been exceptionally well-received by students, alumni and faculty and
provides an additional avenue of advertisement and another communication channel for
students, faculty and prospective students who can access the “News” online (Appendix
34).

In an AY 2008 special project, a graduate student created a marketing campaign directed
at informing high school guidance counselors about the career opportunities in the field of
public health and the degree programs available at SCSU. Dr. Michele Vancour,
Coordinator of Undergraduate Studies, serves as advisor to the project, and Dr. Michael
Perlin, Coordinator of Graduate Studies, representing the Department of Public Health,
served as agency preceptor (Reference File 16).

The Department has worked diligently to offer its students a Program of high quality,
relevance and, wherever reasonably possible, convenience. The Department firmly
believes that satisfied students serve as “Program ambassadors” and provide the very best
source of encouragement and inspiration to prospective students. As such, they continue
to provide one of the most effective and efficient avenues of recruitment.

The Department also believes that the well-known employment prospects of the
Program's graduates further serves to enhance its recruiting effort. As of Spring 2007,
there were 300 M.P.H. Program graduates and more than 1,300 B.S. graduates. Of the
201 M.P.H. alumni who the 2007-2008 Year One Survey question related to finding a
job, 59% indicated that they were “already working”; 12% said that finding a job was
“very easy”; 13% said it was “moderately easy”; and 16% indicated “other.” For years
post graduation, year one, five and ten, percent of employed graduates were 83, 93, 94

                                       191
      and 90, respectively (see Reference File 5).

4.4b. Statement of admissions policies and procedures.

      ►Introduction. The M.P.H. and B.S. planned programs of study are designed to respond
       to the needs of both part-time and full-time students (Appendix 35). The Department's
       goal to create programs of high quality and maximum accessibility has been realized.
       To achieve high quality, a carefully designed series of courses and learning
       opportunities was created by well-qualified, experienced, and diverse faculty, and is
       continuously evaluated to ensure relevance with University and professional
       expectations and standards. To respond to needs of graduate students, all required
       courses are scheduled during the evening hours on a permanent rotation, permitting
       part-time and full-time students to attend the Program one and two evenings per week,
       respectively. Students are periodically surveyed to determine their desire for course
       offerings during alternative hours and days and in other formats (e.g., hybrid, online).
       With a few exceptions, the Department offers all of its graduate elective courses during
       the three regularly scheduled summer sessions to maintain the convenience of the fall
       and spring semester schedules, but also maintains an extensive interdisciplinary listing
       of approved electives that are offered throughout the year. The Program also has an
       approval process for courses not on the approved list (Appendix 36).

         Graduate students are generally enrolled in the Program beginning with the fall
         semester (limited number of spring acceptances) and accepted into either a part-time
         (three-year) or full-time (two-year) cohort, in which under normal circumstances they
         remain for the duration of the planned program of study. In select instances, a student
         may petition to change his/her cohort status. It is also possible under compelling
         personal or medical circumstances for a student to petition to extend his/her planned
         program beyond the three-year format. In these instances, a revised planned program is
         devised by the student and Coordinator of Graduate Studies.

         The use of a planned program in the graduate program provides students with
         predictability in arranging their extra-Program activities to accommodate Program
         requirements, since the schedule of courses (days and times) is known to the students
         at the time of his/her acceptance into the Program. The cohort structure of the Program
         also encourages a sense of community among students within cohorts. Both students
         and faculty have expressed high satisfaction with the graduate program's structure and
         have commented favorably about the regularity of their respective schedules.

         Undergraduate students accepted by the University may declare a major in public
         health at any time, subject to eligibility requirements, shown in Table 4.4b.3.

         Course scheduling for both graduate and undergraduate programs is based on a regular
         rotation of courses established by the Department Chair in consultation with the
         Program Coordinators to ensure student success in a timely and predictable manner.


                                             192
At the graduate level, the Department schedules two sections of each required core
course, which effectively limits course enrollments to sixteen students (on the basis of
an annual acceptance of thirty-two students). The only exception to the two-section
format is PCH 510, Ecological Determinants of Health, which is offered as a single
section during the winter intersession to provide a format in which a greater number of
public health practitioners can participate in instruction. An exception to the course
enrollment limit is PCH 500, Foundations of Public Health. This, the first course in the
M.P.H. planned program of study, may exceed the limit of sixteen students per section.
Prospective students and select students who were unsuccessful applicants, may be
granted permission to enroll in this course for purposes of determining interest in
applying to the Program or gaining admission at a subsequent time. Each year several
students from other disciplines also enroll in this course as an elective in their graduate
programs.

At the undergraduate level, all core courses and the health promotion concentration
courses are offered in both the fall and spring semester, and occasionally in the
summer. The environmental health concentration courses are divided between the fall
and spring semesters, and offered regularly. Public Health electives are offered
throughout the year on the same predictable basis.

Tables 4.4b.1. and 4.4b.2. presents a summary of the admission policies and
procedures for the M.P.H. and B.S. degree programs. Table 4.4b.3 presents a summary
of the standards for acceptance, continuance, and graduation for the M.P.H. and B.S.
degree programs.




                                     193
                                                    Table 4.4b.1.

                        Summary of M.P.H. Admission Policies and Procedures

No.          Steps           Documents Sent or Received                         Description/Notes
 1    Request for            None                             Received via email, face-to-face, online or telephone
      Information is                                          to the Department or Graduate School; Potential
      received                                                applicant is entered into Access Database
2     Information sent to    M.P.H. Admissions Packet sent    Contains 49-page information booklet, all required
      potential applicant    as requested                     forms, graduate catalogue, and schedule of classes;
                                                              sent within 48 hours of request.
3     Applicant submits      Department:                      Applicant file is created comprised of all required
      required documents      Personal essay                 documents. * In special circumstances or for
      to Department and       Two letters of                 applicants with extenuating conditions, the
      Graduate School          recommendation                 Department can recommend conditional acceptance
                              Professional experience form   of no more than 3 students who do not meet the
                              MPH screening matrix           minimum GPA requirement for full admission. For
                              Minimum GPA of 3.0/4.0 *       AY 2005-2007, only two applicants were admitted
                             Graduate School:                 with conditional acceptance status.
                              Application and fee
                              Transcripts (foreign
                               translations required)
                             International Student Office:
                              Financial Statement
                             Health Services:
                              Proof of immunizations
4     Applicant files        Completed files                  Three-person admission committees exist for
      forwarded to                                            generalist and community health education
      Admissions                                              specializations; Files are reviewed using the M.P.H
      Committee                                               Screening Matrix




                                                    194
                                                   Table 4.4b.1., Cont’d

                     Summary of M.P.H. Admission Policies and Procedures

No.         Steps            Documents Sent or Received                           Description/Notes
 5    Committees make       Screening Matrices are             Recommendations include: full acceptance;
      recommendations       completed                          conditional acceptance; wait listed; denied.
                                                               Recommendations are forwarded to the Coordinator
                                                               of Graduate Studies; Coordinator and Department
                                                               Chairperson confer.
6     Coordinator           Written notification               Successful applicants receive:
      transmits decision                                        Departmental Letter of Acceptance
      to applicants                                             Cohort Contract
                                                                Letter of Intent
                                                                Planned Programs
                                                                Pledge of Academic Integrity
7     Interest applicants   Submission of required, signed     Department submits letter of acceptance and copy of
      notify department     documents                          the signed planned program to Graduate Dean
8     Graduate Dean                                            Dean makes final decision regarding admission; In
      reviews applicant’s                                      cases of disagreement, the Dean with consult with
      transcripts                                              the Department Coordinator of Graduate Studies
9     Applicants are        Receive letter of                  Admission is essentially a 4-step process:
      notified by the       acceptance/denial                  1. Departmental acceptance
      Graduate Dean                                            2. Applicant’s acceptance of Department’s
                                                                  acceptance
                                                               3. Acceptance by Graduate Dean
                                                               4. Applicant enrolls in program



                                                       Table 4.4b.2.

                       Summary of B.S. Admission Policies and Procedures

No.            Steps        Documents Sent or Received                           Description/Notes
1     Request for           None                              Received via email, face-to-face, online or telephone
      information is                                          to the Department, major or potential major schedules
      received                                                an appointment with probable advisor
2     Students sign-in at   Welcome to Public Health          Students complete intake form and declaration of
      the front desk, if    Packet, which contains cover      major form prior to or during their meetings with
      this is their first   sheet with probable advisor       their advisors; students declaring public health for the
      visit and they want   checked, faculty office hours,    fall 2008 semester must adhere to the new academic
      more info or to       intake form, declaration of       standards, which include a GPA and GPA
      change major to       major form, information on        requirement
      PCH                   the major and concentrations,
                            including new academic
                            standards for admissions,
                            maintenance, and graduation,
                            and an undergraduate catalog




                                                      195
                                                   Table 4.4b.2., Cont’d

                          Summary of B.S. Admission Policies and Procedures

No.           Steps           Documents Sent or Received                           Description/Notes
3       Advisors pass         Intake form, declaration of        New major files are created, names and information
        documents to D.       major form, copy of degree         are added to the Dept’s database, and names are
        Hendrick              evaluation, and/or notes from      added to the BSPH listserv, declaration of major
                              advisement session are given       forms are forwarded to the Registrar
                              to D. Hendrick
4       Coordinator of        Pertinent information will be
        Undergraduate         shared with students at this
        Studies sends         time, like dates for that
        correspondence        semester’s registration,
        welcoming new         information on obtaining pin
        students to the       numbers.
        public health major

                                                    Table 4.4b.3.

       Standards for Acceptance, Continuance, and Graduation for the M.P.H. and B.S.
                                     Degree Programs

       Criterion                    Standards of M.P.H.                              Standards for B.S.
      Acceptance       Minimum GPA of 3.0. Conditional                   Minimum GPA of 2.5 (regardless of number
                       acceptance is an option. The Department           of credits)
                       has set a maximum of 10% admissions
                       under conditional acceptance status.
                       Students admitted conditionally, must
                       achieve a minimum grade of B in each of
                       the first three core courses or their
                       conditional acceptance is revoked.
      Probation        GPA fall below 3.0 (regardless of credits).       QPR falls below 2.5 (regardless of credits); or
                       Once on probation, student has 9 additional       major QPR fall below 2.5; or failure to
                       credits to achieve a minimum GPA of 3.0.          achieve a grade of C or higher in a major
                                                                         course on the first attempt.
    Termination        Failure to resolve probation issues by the        Failure to resolve probation issues by the end
                       end of the next 9 credits; failure to achieve a   of the next semester; failure to achieve C or
                       grade of C+ or higher in a major or               higher (on first attempt) in more than 2
                       specialization course after the second            courses; failure to achieve a grade of C or
                       attempt.                                          higher in a major course after two attempts;
                                                                         GPA falls below 2.5 (regardless of credits)
                                                                         after one semester of probation; major QPR
                                                                         falls below 2.5 after one semester on
                                                                         probation.
      Graduation       Minimum GPA for all courses on the                Minimum GPA and major QPR of 2.5; and C
                       planned program of 3.0.                           or better in all major courses.




                                                       196
                                              Table 4.4b.3., Cont’d

        Standards for Acceptance, Continuance, and Graduation for the M.P.H. and B.S.
                                      Degree Programs

   Criterion                     Standards of M.P.H.                               Standards for B.S.
 Appeal Process       As desired by student to the Associate Dean     As desired by student to the Coordinator of
                      of Graduate Studies. The decision of the        Undergraduate Studies (CUS). The decision
                      Associate Dean is final and binding.            of the CUS is final and binding.
    Extended          As recommended by the CGS to the                As recommended by the CUS and approved
    Probation         Associate Dean. The decision of the             by the Department Chairperson.
                      Associate Dean is final and binding.
  Reinstatement       Remedying of deficiencies                       Remedying of deficiencies

4.4c.    Examples of recruitment materials and other publications and advertising that
         describe, at a minimum, academic calendars, grading, and the academic offerings of
         the program. If a program does not have a printed bulletin/ catalog, it must provide
         a printed web page that indicated the degree requirements as the official
         representation of the program. In addition, references to website addresses may be
         included.

         Recruitment materials for the Program can be found at the Department’s Web site:

         Department - http://www.southernct.edu/public_health/
         M.P.H. - http://www.southernct.edu/public_health/masterofpublichealth/
         B.S. - http://www.southernct.edu/public_health/bachelorsofscience/

4.4d. Quantitative information on the number of applicants, acceptances and enrollment,
      by specialty area, for each of the last three years. Data must be presented in table
      format. See CEPH Data Template J.

                                                 Table 4.4d.

Template J (4.4d.) Quantitative Information on M.P.H. Applicants, Acceptances, and
Enrollments, by Specialty Area, 2006-2008

Table 4.4d. Quantitative Information on Applicants, Acceptances, and Enrollments by Program Area*, 2006 to 2008
                                     Academic Year 2006        Academic Year 2007        Academic Year 2008
MPH                 Applied                 47                        24                        20
Community           Accepted                42                        20                        17
Health              Enrolled                24                        15                        11
Education

MPH                 Applied                                             31                        32
Generalist          Accepted                                            28                        26
                    Enrolled                                            20                        20



                                                     197
                                                Table 4.4d., Cont’d

Template J (4.4d.) Quantitative Information on B.S. Applicants, Acceptances, and
Enrollments, by Specialty Area, 2006-2008

Table 4.4d. Quantitative Information on Applicants, Acceptances, and Enrollments by Program Area*, 2006 to 2008
                                        Academic Year 2006           Academic Year 2007         Academic Year 2008
BS                   Applied                   40                           50                         66
Health               Accepted                  40                           50                         66
Promotion            Enrolled                  40                           50                         66

BS                   Applied                      10                          12                          4
Environmental        Accepted                     10                          12                          4
Health               Enrolled                     10                          12                          4

BS                                     Date of implementation – fall 2008
Generalist
* Specialty area is defined as each degree and area of specialization contained in the instructional matrix

4.4e.    Quantitative information on the number of students enrolled in each specialty area
         identified in the instructional matrix, including headcounts of full- and part-time
         students and full-time-equivalent conversion, for each of the last three years. Non-
         degree students, such as those enrolled in continuing education or certificate
         programs, should not be included. Explain any important trends or patterns,
         including a persistent absence of students in any program or specialization. Data
         must be in table format for each of the last three years. See CEPH Data Template
         K.

                                                       Table 4.4e.

Template K (4.4e.) Students Enrolled in each Degree Program (Area of Specialization)
Identified in Instructional Matrix, 2006-2008

Table 4.4e. Students Enrolled in Each Degree Program by Area of Specialization, 2006 to 2008
                                  Academic Year 2006           Academic Year 2007             Academic Year 2008
 Master of Public Health          HC     HC      FTE         HC FT HC PT       FTE          HC FT HC PT       FTE
                                  FT     PT
MPH – CHE                         16     45      38.5           13       38        32.0       16        20    26.0
MPH – Generalist                   --     --      --             9       11        14.5       16        20    26.0
Total Students Enrolled           16     45      38.5           22       49        46.5       32        40    52.0

Bachelor of Public Health        Academic Year 2006          Academic Year 2007                Academic Year 2008
                                     HC            FTE           HC             FTE               HC           FTE
BS – Health Promotion                138            *            123             *                116           *
BS – Environmental Health             55            *             38             *                 48           *
BS - Generalist                       --            --            --             --                --           --
Total Students Enrolled              193            *            161             *                164           *
* Data for B.S. program majors is reported to the Department by total headcount only.


                                                          198
4.4f.     Identification of outcome measures by which the program may evaluate its success
          in enrolling a qualified student body, along with data regarding the performance of
          the program against those measures for each of the last three years.

          Outcomes measures have been set to ensure the recruitment and admission of qualified
          students, who demonstrate promise for a career in public health are presented in Table
          4.4f.

                                              Table 4.4f.

        Outcomes Measures and Targets to Ensure Admission of Qualified Students, Who
                Demonstrate Promise for a Career in Public Health, 2006-2008

        Resource Objectives                  Outcome Measure (Target)             2006     2007      2008
1. Students admitted to the M.P.H.   100% of students admitted to the M.P.H.      100%     100%      100%
Program will express motivation      Program will have expressed in a written
for a career public health.          essay interest in career in public health.
2. Students admitted to the M.P.H.   100% of students admitted to the M.P.H.      100%     100%      100%
Program will possess educational     Program will have a minimum of a
pre-requisites.                      Bachelor’s degree with a minimum GPA or
                                     3.0.
3. Students admitted to the B.S.     100% of students admitted to the B.S.         Academic standard for
Program will possess educational     Program will have a minimum GPA of 2.5.       admission effective fall
pre-requisites.                                                                            2008.
4. Students admitted to the M.P.H.   100% of students admitted to the M.P.H.      100% 100%          100%
Program will provide testimony of    Program will provide a minimum of two
potential for a career in public     letters of recommendation indicating
health.                              potential for a career in public health.

4.4g. Assessment of the extent to which the criterion is met.

          The criterion is met.

          Strengths. The graduate program has student recruitment and admissions policies and
          procedures designed to locate and select qualified individuals capable of taking advantage
          of the Program's various learning activities that will enable each of them to develop
          competence for a career in public health.

          Weaknesses. With no shortage of undergraduate students, the undergraduate program has
          relied on University recruitment strategies. In fact, the Department has had such an
          increase in undergraduate majors, that it had to add sections and has been able to raise
          academic standards. Nonetheless, the Department desires to develop a recruitment plan to
          expand its pool of qualified applicants.




                                                 199
                                        CRITERION 4.5

                                    STUDENT DIVERSITY

Criterion 4.5.: Stated application, admission, and degree-granting requirements and
regulations shall be applied equitably to individual applicants and students regardless of age,
gender, race, disability, sexual orientation, religion or national origin..

4.5a. Description of policies, procedures and plans to achieve a diverse student
      population.

       As a public institution, Southern Connecticut State University has a distinguished history
       of commitment to affirmative action and access. As such, the Department of Public
       Health adheres to a policy of non-discrimination on the basis of race, sex, age, sexual
       preference, disability, color, or national origin in admission to, access to, employment in
       and treatment in its programs and activities. Furthermore, neither the Department nor its
       programs discriminate on the basis of sex or disability, as such discrimination is
       prohibited by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the
       Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and 34 C.F.R. Part 106 and 34 C.F.R. Part 104, respectively.

       The Connecticut State University System’s commitment to diversity, social justice and
       fairness is exemplified at the highest levels of the System’s Administration by David G.
       Carter, Chancellor who wrote on his Web site, “Evolving circumstances require that we
       adjust what we do and how we do it, but our values and commitment to fairness, justice,
       and the pursuit of excellence does not change.”

       Southern’s mission clearly identifies its stance on the value of diversity: “[As] an
       intentionally diverse and comprehensive university, Southern is committed to academic
       excellence, access, social justice, and service for the public good.” This statement applies
       to the University’s commitment to both students and faculty. The President’s Cabinet
       reveals her commitment to diversity and equity in that the newly appointed Provost (Dr.
       Selase W. Williams), Director of Diversity and Equity and Executive Assistant to the
       President (Dr. Marcia Smith Glasper), and Chief Information Officer (Alvin W. Chai) are
       all people of color, as is the Coordinator of International Students (Aliya S. Amin), Dean
       of the Graduate School (Dr. Sandra C. Holley), Associate Dean of Student Affairs (Mr.
       Aaron Washington), Interim Director of Undergraduate Admissions (Dr. James L.
       Williams), and Director of Student Supportive Services (Mr. James Barber).

       It is the position of the members of the Department of Public Health that it has an
       intellectual and moral responsibility to advance social justice and equity by exercising
       affirmative action and upward mobility. Accordingly, the Department, with conviction
       and effort, undertakes positively to overcome the present effect of past practices, policies,
       or barriers to equal access to education, and to achieve the full and fair participation of
       females, African-Americans, Hispanics, and any other protected group found to be

                                               200
underrepresented in the programs and activities of the Department. To sustain and
enhance the Program's attention to the issue of student diversity, members of the faculty
have participated in cultural diversity training and have engaged in many School-,
Department- and Program-level discussions related to recruitment and retention of
students from among protected groups.

As referenced under Criterion 2.2b., the Department sponsors a 4-hour Cultural Humility
Workshop to communicate the importance of and commitment to issues of diversity that
is required of all graduate students during their first semester of study. This requirement,
implemented in Fall 2000, was designed by the Department in collaboration with the
Connecticut Institute for Cultural Literacy and Wellness, Inc., Currently, the workshop is
conducted by Ms. Michelle Stewart-Copes, LSW, a consultant to the CT State
Department of Public Health and experienced trainer in issues of multiculturalism. She
has worked closely with the Coordinator of Graduate Studies to assure that the goals of
the workshop are consistent with the focus of eliminating health disparities among ethnic
and racial minorities. In 2008, the Coordinator of Graduate Studies was appointed to the
New England Regional Minority Health Conference Planning Committee’s Youth
Development Committee to help with its “Seeding the Pipeline” initiative aimed at
increasing the number of high school and college students from underrepresented
population groups interested in pursuing a career in public health. In conjunction with
Committee charges, the Coordinator will be working to establish a dialogue among the
nine public health programs in New England to design strategies for achieving this goal.

Presently, issues relating to diversity among groups of individuals are addressed through
the method of infusion in required courses throughout the program and in elective courses
entitled, “Multicultural Issues in Health,” “International Field Studies in Health” and
“Health Studies Abroad” (Reference File 17). Given rapidly changing demographics in
the U.S., the Program's commitment to the preparation of culturally-diverse and
culturally-sensitive public health professionals, and the recommendations of the leading
public health professional organizations, this well-established training initiative is most
appropriate. University-trained public health professionals must be prepared to work
effectively with and create programs for an increasingly culturally-diverse population.
This is especially appropriate given the national public health agenda, as delineated in
Healthy People 2010, on closing the gap in health disparities among and between
population groups in the United States.

The Program has been active in its commitment to affirmative action, employing a
nondiscriminatory admissions policy and attempting to actively recruit prospective
students from diverse population groups.

In addition, the faculty’s unanimous agreement to pursue an agenda of eliminating health
disparities among racial and ethnic minorities through it creation of a “Health Equities
Project” (Reference File 18), its Minority Scholars Program (Reference File 19), and
decades-long running International Field Study Program, are a few of the examples of its

                                        201
        intention of sending a strong and public message of its unwavering commitment to and
        value of diversity.

        Consistent with the University policy, the M.P.H. program has utilized the “Conditional
        Acceptance” discussed under Criterion 4.4, to support Program applicants who do not
        meet minimum acceptance standards for admission. This alternative admission route has
        provided many students from protected groups an opportunity to pursue a graduate public
        health degree, while receiving institutional and Departmental support to improve upon
        existing academic weaknesses.

        To date, the Department has received no formal or informal complaints regarding its
        affirmative action policies as applied to student recruitment, admission and/or retention.
        The Department is unwaveringly committed to affording equal opportunities for success
        to all students.

4.5b. Description of recruitment efforts used to attract a diverse student body, along with
      information about how these efforts are evaluated and refined over time.

        Students from underrepresented groups comprised approximately 50% of admissions to
        the M.P.H program and 43% of admissions to the B.S. program for 2005-2007. The
        success of the Department’s recruitment efforts at the graduate level serves as the best
        tool for furthering its desire to maintain its current admission profile. A major
        Department initiative to recruit graduate students of color was the award of a grant of
        $104,000 by the Connecticut Health Foundation for the Department’s Minority Scholars
        Program (MSP), referenced above. MSP was designed to increase the number of Black
        and Hispanic public health practitioners who were dedicated to contributing to the
        elimination of racial and ethnic disparities in the state. One Hispanic and one Black
        student funded by this initiative received the M.P.H. degree in May 2008.

        Although the Program does not set outcome measures for gender, male representation, a
        constant challenge in public health programs, averaged 21.4% and 18% for 2005-2007 in
        the M.P.H. and B.S. degree programs, respectively. Representation of males in the
        M.P.H. program has increased each year since 2005.

4.5c.   Quantitative information on the demographic characteristics of the student body,
        including data on applicants and admissions, for each of the last three years. Data
        must be presented in table format. See CEPH Data Template L.

        Tables 4.5c. and 4.5c.1.contain the demographic characteristics of the M.P.H. and B.S.
        student bodies, including data on applicants and admissions for AY 2006-2008.




                                               202
                                              Table 4.5c.

 Template L (4.5c.) Demographic Characteristics of the M.P.H. Student Body, Including
                     Data on Applicants and Admissions, 2006-2008

            Table 4.5c. Demographic Characteristics of M.P.H. Student Body from 2006 to 2008
                                               2005-2006             2006-2007             2007-2008
                                             M          F          M          F          M          F
                         Applied              4         9           2        14           2        10
African American         Accepted             4         5           2        11           2         6
                         Enrolled             0         4           1         8           1         2
                         Applied              2        16           7        14           3        11
   Caucasian             Accepted             2        15           5        13           3         9
                         Enrolled             1        10           4         9           3         9
                         Applied              0         3           0         6           0         3
Hispanic/Latino          Accepted             0         3           0         4           0         3
                         Enrolled             0         2           0         4           0         3
  Asian Pacific          Applied              2         2           0         1           2         8
    Islander             Accepted             2         2           0         1           2         5
                         Enrolled             1         0           0         1           2         4
    Native               Applied              0         0           0         0           0         0
American/Alaska          Accepted             0         0           0         0           0         0
    Native               Enrolled             0         0           0         0           0         0
                         Applied              1         5           3         5           7         6
Unknown/Other            Accepted             0         4           3         5           5         5
                         Enrolled             0         2           0         4           1         4
                         Applied              2         2           4         1           1         1
  International          Accepted             2         2           4         1           1         1
                         Enrolled             2         2           3         1           1         1
                         Applied             11        37          16        41          15        39
    TOTAL                Accepted            10        31          14        35          13        29
                         Enrolled             4        20           8        27           8        23




                                                  203
                                                 Table 4.5c.1.

Template L (4.5c.1.) Demographic Characteristics of the B.S. Student Body, Including Data
                        on Applicants and Admissions, 2006-2008

                Table 4.5.c. Demographic Characteristics of B.S. Student Body from 2006 to 2008
                                                 2005-2006               2006-2007            2007-2008
                                                M         F            M          F          M         F
                            Applied             2         9             3        15          4         9
 African American           Accepted            2         9             3        15          4         9
                            Enrolled            2         9             3        15          4         9
                            Applied             1        21            10        24          4        38
    Caucasian               Accepted            1        21            10        24          4        38
                            Enrolled            1        21            10        24          4        38
                            Applied             2         6             1         3          0         4
 Hispanic/Latino            Accepted            2         6             1         3          0         4
                            Enrolled            2         6             1         3          0         4
   Asian Pacific            Applied             0         2             0         0          0         1
     Islander               Accepted            0         2             0         0          0         1
                            Enrolled            0         2             0         0          0         1
     Native                 Applied             0         1             0         0          0         0
 American/Alaska            Accepted            0         1             0         0          0         0
     Native                 Enrolled            0         1             0         0          0         0
                            Applied             1         3             0         4          1         2
 Unknown/Other              Accepted            1         3             0         4          1         2
                            Enrolled            1         3             0         4          1         2
                            Applied             1         1             0         2          2         5
   International            Accepted            1         1             0         2          2         5
                            Enrolled            1         1             0         2          2         5
                            Applied             7        43            14        48          7        63
     TOTAL                  Accepted            7        43            14        48          7        63
                            Enrolled            7        43            14        48          7        63



4.5.d Identification of measures by which the program may evaluate its success in
      achieving a demographically diverse student body, along with data regarding the
      program’s performance against these measure for each of the last three years.

        Outcomes measures have been set to ensure equitable treatment of prospective and
        accepted students. These outcomes address requirements and regulations related to
        application, admission, and graduation and are presented in Table 4.5d.




                                                      204
                                           Table 4.5d.

        Outcome Measures and Targets for Achieving Student Diversity, 2006-2008

       Resource Objectives                  Outcome Measure (Target)              2006    2007      2008
The student body of the M.P.H.    At least 1/3 of the student body will be        50%     60%       42%
Program will be demographically   comprised of persons of color.
diverse
The student body of the B.S.      At least 1/3 of the student body will be        56%     45%       40%
Program will be demographically   comprised of persons of color.
diverse


4.5.e. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

       The Criterion is met.

       Strengths. The Program’s application, admission, and degree-granting requirements and
       policies are applied equitably to individual applicants and students without regard to any
       characteristic other than academic preparation, performance and experience (M.P.H.
       only). The Offices of the Coordinators have been especially cognizant of the importance
       of recruiting candidates from under-represented groups, including persons of color. The
       Program has been very successful in recruiting a highly-diverse student body and
       continues to discuss new and innovative ways to attract the broadest representation of
       students.

       Weaknesses. None identified.




                                               205
                                       CRITERION 4.6

                        ADVISING AND CAREER COUNSELING

Criterion 4.6.: There shall be available a clearly explained and accessible academic advising
system for students, as well as readily available career and placement advice.

4.6a. Description of the advising and career counseling services, including sample
      orientation materials such as student handbooks.

       “Faculty is subordinate to Program.” This position, adopted by the faculty many years
       ago, underscores its commitment to students and curriculum integrity. Faculty members
       are recruited and retained, in large measure, for their desire and passion for teaching and
       to serve as mentors to students. The faculty believe that advisement of students is an
       integral part of its professional responsibility. As such, many formal and informal
       advisement mechanisms have been created to ensure that students will receive the
       guidance necessary to facilitate their success throughout the Program and beyond, through
       career planning and placement advising.

       ► Academic Advisement.

          ► Request for Information. The Program’s philosophy is that academic
            advisement begins when a prospective student seeks information about the
            Program. This is especially important in public health, given that it is a less well-
            known discipline of study with few undergraduate programs to provide a basis for
            making an informed decision regarding career potential. The Coordinators or
            Department’s University Assistant handle all email, phone and written requests
            for information. The Graduate Coordinator assumes the major responsibility for
            all personal contacts and schedules appointments with all potential graduate
            applicants. Because of the larger number of students enrolled in the undergraduate
            program (2:1), responsibilities for pre-enrollment advisement are distributed
            among the entire faculty.

              It is the policy of the Coordinators that all inquiries are answered within 24-48
              hours, upon receipt, including the forwarding of application materials. Many
              students applying to the graduate program have commented on the response time
              as a major factor in their decision to apply to the Program and frequently have
              shared their frustration with the failure of other programs to respond to their
              inquiries in a timely manner.

              In addition, all members of the staff, including the Department secretary, graduate
              assistants and student workers are fully informed and trained to treat all potential
              students with the utmost respect and provide them with accurate information
              and/or contact numbers of appropriate faculty.

                                              206
► M.P.H. New Student Orientation. As described previously, all newly
  matriculated M.P.H. students are required to attend a Program orientation session.
  Each student is provided with a copy of the Program's Graduate Student
  Handbook, a “user-friendly” guide to important information about the
  Department, Program and University (Reference File 20). At the orientation,
  students are provided with a cohort list which includes the names, addresses,
  telephone numbers, and cohort status of all newly matriculated students and the
  names of their faculty advisors. The assignment of faculty advisors is a
  responsibility of the Coordinator of Graduate Studies and is done randomly.
  Student-faculty advisor ratio is maintained at approximately 6:1. The cohort
  structure of the Program simplifies the process of advising, given that all full-time
  and part-time students, respectively, follow identical planned programs, with the
  exception of selection of elective courses (see Appendix 35). To ensure that all
  students receive accurate, updated and consistent guidance, the faculty is provided
  with a comprehensive faculty handbook and faculty advisement handbook
  (Reference Files 21 and 22).

► B.S. New Student Orientation. Unlike the graduate program, student enrollment
  in the undergraduate program occurs on an ongoing basis with entry possible
  during any semester. Most undergraduate students enroll in the program as
  sophomores or juniors, arriving at the Department following a change in major.
  New students receive their orientation to the program by the faculty advisor with
  whom they meet and through a student handbook available online. To date, few
  students select public health as their first choice in major, probably due to the lack
  of familiarity with public health as a major. As discussed under Criterion 4.4a.,
  Drs. Perlin and Vancour are co-sponsoring a graduate special project student who
  is developing a communication tool to educate high school guidance counselors
  about the opportunities available in public health and the curriculum offered at
  Southern. Presently, Drs. Faraclas and Vancour are in ongoing discussions with
  Gateway Community College to develop an articulation agreement to increase
  interest in community college students’ transition into the undergraduate public
  health program at Southern. In AY 2007, Drs. Faraclas, Perlin and Vancour met
  with high school and community college guidance counselors in the southeastern
  part of the state to describe undergraduate public health studies.

► Faculty Office Hours. The most obvious form of academic advisement is
  provided by the individual faculty members, who are contractually required to be
  available on designated days and times for student advisement (Appendix 37).
  Faculty office hours are available in the Graduate Student Handbook, online and
  in the Orlando Public Health Building as a handout under the title of “Full-time
  faculty office hours.” All graduate faculty members serve as cohort advisors,
  although for some semesters, on the basis of course load, individual faculty
  members may not be assigned as an advisor. All faculty, with the exception of the
  Coordinator of Graduate Studies serve as advisors in the undergraduate program.

                                    207
   Advisors meet with students both individually and, if deemed appropriate,
   collectively. One of the acknowledged strengths of the faculty is its willingness to
   exceed its contractual obligations and make itself available to students at many
   mutually convenient times, including weekdays, evenings and weekends. To
   increase their accessibility, most faculty members provide students with their
   home telephone numbers. The faculty is cognizant of students’ multiple
   obligations and hectic schedules and has endeavored to be available at times
   convenient to students. In addition, the Coordinators of Graduate and
   Undergraduate Studies and the Department Chairperson are liberally available to
   students. It is the established Department practice that faculty who fail to keep
   their regularly scheduled office hours reschedule missed hours. The issue of
   missed office hours is expeditiously addressed by the Department Chairperson.

► Department’s Web Site. The Department’s Web site is maintained on an
  ongoing basis. As such, it provides student access to up-to-date and extensive
  information about every aspect of the Program including requirements, forms,
  commonly asked questions, minutes of the Program Committees, and online MPH
  News. The Web site can be accessed at
  http://www.southernct.edu/departments/publichealth.

► Online Links. One of the Program’s most outstanding graduates and alumni,
  Betty C. Jung, R.N., M.P.H., C.H.E.S., created and maintains one of the most
  extensive public health information and career planning Web sites available on
  the Internet. This Web site, recipient of many national awards and accessed by
  universities, private and public agencies and governments worldwide, is
  maintained by Ms. Jung who is an adjunct professor in the Department of Public
  Health and an epidemiologist III for the CT State Department of Public Health.
  The Web site can be accessed easily through the Department’s Web page or at
  www.bettycjung.

   The Web site provides its users, both students and professionals, with the widest
   array of academic and professional resources in academic public health and
   practice. Whether the user is a student interested in how to present statistical data
   for a class project or report, complete a tutorial in epidemiology, obtain free
   software applicable to public health, locate an internship or job locally or around
   the world, or a professional interested in obtaining the latest information on topics
   related to public health, the Web site has much to offer.

► Cohort Design of the M.P.H. Program. The cohort design of the Graduate
  Program lends itself to the formation of natural support structures and
  opportunities for information exchange. Since all members of a cohort follow an
  identical planned program of study, academic, social and professional, mutual
  support networks develop among students as the groups move through their
  respective programs-of-study and share similar academic experiences. The
                                   208
   establishment of social supports increases a student’s connection with the
   Program and undoubtedly ameliorates some of the distress associated with
   managing academic, family, social, and professional responsibilities. These
   networks facilitate the advisement process through the creation of ongoing
   opportunities for a variety of social supports, including encouragement, assistance
   and reinforcement. More recently, the Department has seen an increase in the
   number of students seeking a career change, having completed or completing
   successful careers.

► All Cohorts Meeting. Another faculty-directed group-advisement strategy is the
  Graduate All-Cohorts Meeting, convened each October, during which students are
  afforded an opportunity to discuss any Program-related issues and concerns. The
  meeting is usually structured around a guest speaker who presents on a topic of
  general interest to graduate public health students. The meeting is conducted by
  the Department Chair and Coordinator and attended by many graduate faculty
  who are available to answer students’ questions and to facilitate a dialogue among
  students and between students and faculty. Past guest speakers have included: Dr.
  Karen Denard Goldman, nationally recognized President of the Society of Public
  Health Education (SOPHE) and consultant in health education; Dr. Lowell Levin,
  Professor Emeritus of Health Policy and International Health at the Yale
  University School of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health;
  and Dr. Joxel Garcia, Commissioner of Health for Connecticut. In 2005, guest
  speakers included four current M.P.H. students, two that recently completed
  international internships and two that recently returned from the Department’s
  International Field Studies in Health course in Guatemala. In 2006, two students,
  both physicians from Pakistan, discussed their experiences in the Pakistan
  earthquake. In 2007, Professor Scot Phelps presented a lecture on the new
  emergency preparedness curriculum and certificate program currently under
  development at SCSU.

► Role of Alumni. A significant strength of the Department’s advisement strategy is
  the role played by the Public Health Chapter of the Alumni Association through
  its professional mentoring program, since 1994. Starting modestly as an alumni-
  centered activity, today the mentoring program called P.H.E.N.O.M. (Public
  Health Expertise Network of Mentors), features 51 national and international
  public health mentors (Appendix 38). Mentors, all of whom are volunteers, are
  available to potential and current students and alumni for academic and career
  planning advisement. The mentoring program description and a list of mentors are
  distributed to students at the Program orientation and are also available online.
  Since many of the Alumni Mentors are employed in the public health field, they
  offer students access to a vast network of health practitioners, who can also
  provide information and access to job opportunities. From 1999-2000, the Alumni
  Mentors responded to more than 90 requests for information. By comparison, as
  of September 2005, there were a total of 5,600 online inquiries from around the

                                  209
   world. As of April 23, 2008, the P.H.E.N.O.M. Web site recorded more than
   13,941 inquiries. In a relatively short period of time, P.H.E.N.O.M. has more than
   earned its name. P.H.E.N.O.M has been approved by the international Web-based
   organization, Peer Resources Network. In addition, the Alumni Association also
   has created the Public Health E-News (Appendix 39) and Public Health Jobs
   Electronic Newsletter (Appendix 40).

► Internship Placement Advisement. As discussed under Criterion 2.4a., separate,
  mandatory group orientations are conducted for all prospective graduate and
  undergraduate student interns. The purposes of the orientations are to 1) distribute
  and review the respective Program’s Internship Manual and Preceptor’s Guide
  (see Reference File 10) that describes the structure and requirements of the
  internship, 2) review the steps to successful acquisition of an internship
  placement, and 3) provide an opportunity for students to ask questions. Each
  orientation session provides a highly efficient, problem-solving forum in which
  the group and professor are challenged to deal creatively with the often severe
  time constraints under which most of these prospective interns must function. The
  significant amount of direct faculty-to-student advisement is inherent in the nature
  of the activity. Obviously, the structure of the internship, which provides students
  with access to experienced preceptors, creates additional, invaluable mentoring
  opportunities.

► Thesis and Special Project Orientation. In early spring, a mandatory group
  orientation is conducted for all students eligible to enroll in the graduate thesis or
  special project in the fall. The purposes of this meeting are to 1) explain the nature
  and comparison of the thesis and special project, 2) provide an opportunity for
  students to ask questions, and 3) discuss the Department’s Thesis and Special
  Project Guidelines and Requirements Documents.

► Written Documents. The Offices of the Coordinators, with the assistance of
  faculty, have prepared and maintain an extensive collection of outstanding and
  informative reference manuals and guides to assist students and faculty in
  navigating the undergraduate and graduate programs. These materials, which
  address various aspects of the programs, offer students the opportunity to increase
  their potential for success by informing them, in writing, about Program
  expectations, requirements and support mechanisms. Many of these documents
  have been requested and replicated by other departments within the University
  and universities throughout the United States. Referenced throughout this Report,
  a sampling of the Program’s written documents and reference material appear in
  Table 4.6a.




                                    210
                                                Table 4.6a.

                             Program Documents and Supportive Materials

     Document/              Last    Pages                              Description
     Publication           Update
M.P.H. Application          2007     44     Contains the forms and requirements for admission, catalog,
Packet and Brochure                         schedule of classes and Program information.
M.P.H. Orientation          2007     30     Contains information about getting started, orientation agenda,
Handbook                                    University services and avoiding plagiarism.
Graduate Student            2007    149     Contains detailed information about the Program, University,
Handbook                                    academic standards, graduate calendar, Program requirements,
                                            academic integrity, life after graduation, and information about
                                            the health education profession.
M.P.H. Thesis Guide-        2007    100     Contains requirements and procedures for conducting and
lines and Requirements                      completing a thesis.
M.P.H. Special Project      2007     87     Contains requirements and procedures for conducting and
Guidelines and                              completing a special project.
Requirements
Graduate Assistant          2007     13     Describes the policies, procedures and expectations for service as
Manual                                      a graduate assistant in the Department.
Creating an Effective       2007     80     Contains ideas, examples, exercises, and information for job
Job-Marketing Strategy                      seekers.
in Public Health
M.P.H. Student              2008     57     Contains the policies, procedures, expectations and forms
Internship Manual                           required in the public health internship program.
M.P.H. Preceptor’s          2008     71     Contains a detailed orientation to the internship program,
Internship Guide                            including polices, procedures, expectations, forms and course
                                            descriptions.
M.P.H. Internship           2005     8      Presents an overview of the internship program, including
Brochure                                    advantages of program participation, agency and preceptor
                                            responsibilities, examples of assignments and definition of public
                                            health values, concepts and ethics.
Academic Standards          2007     6      Describes the Department’s policy on academic honesty,
and Program                                 plagiarism, grading, leave-of-absence, graduation, public health
Regulations Brochure                        internship, and culminating experience.
Guidelines for Effective    2007     41     Provides an in-depth discussion of all aspects of oral and
Public Health                               technical presentations, including a summary of the most
Presentations                               important presentation methods and strategies.
Essentials of Writing       2007     87     Presents grammar basics, APA general guidelines, guidelines for
                                            writing different types of papers, discussion of working in groups
                                            and a sample paper written in APA style.
On Line Mentoring           2007     NA     Lists of public health practitioners who are available to answer
Program                                     questions and provide career guidance about the field of public
                                            health.
Extensive Web Site-         2007     NA     Contains pertinent information about the Department with links to
http//www.southernct.e                      relevant public health sites.
du/departments/
publichealth/




                                                 211
                                           Table 4.6a., Cont’d

                          Program Documents and Supportive Materials

     Document/             Last    Pages                              Description
     Publication          Update
Promoting Excellence       2005     6      Describes the various opportunities and acknowledgement
Brochure                                   available in the Department and University for promoting
                                           academic excellence. Presents information about Departmental
                                           awards, School of Graduate Studies Research Fellowships (GRF)
                                           and Graduate School Graduate Assistantships (GSGA), Eta
                                           Sigma Gamma, National Honorary Society, Who’s Who Among
                                           Students in American Universities and Colleges, Research
                                           Assistants, and Participation in Professional Associations.
M.P.H. News (Official      2007    12-25   Contains a message from the Coordinator, alumni, student and
newsletter of the                          faculty happenings and achievements, upcoming events, public
M.P.H. program)                            health news, and relevant dated material of interest.
Graduate Faculty           2007    157     Provides faculty with an orientation to the University and
Handbook                                   Department, quick telephone reference, faculty biographies,
                                           general and instructional policies, and the most commonly used
                                           forms.
Faculty Advisement         2007    122     Contains information about the process of advising, admission
Handbook                                   requirements and related documents and detailed information
                                           about every aspect of the graduate public health program to better
                                           facilitate student advisement and success.
The Foreign Graduate       2007     8      Welcomes the prospective foreign graduate applicant and
Applicant’s Guide to                       provides information about the International Student Office,
Admission                                  graduate school and Department admission requirements for
                                           admission, health services requirement, obtaining an I-20,
                                           registration, important telephone numbers, summary checklist of
                                           admission requirements, submission of documents, and a select
                                           list of approved credential evaluation services.
Master of Public Health    2005     8      The University’s official MPH brochure that describes the MPH
Brochure                                   program, admission requirements, application procedures,
                                           faculty, careers, and contact information.
Employ a Certified         2004     8      The official information brochure of the National Commission for
Health Education                           Health Education Credentialing, Inc. (NCHEC). Describes the
Specialist                                 advantages of hiring a certified health education specialist
                                           (CHES).
Administrative Guide       2007     42     A step-by-step procedural guide that describes the admission
for Conducting the                         process from response to inquiries, database, tracking, admission,
M.P.H. Program                             and orientation.
Administrative Guide       2007     30     A step-by –step procedural guide that describes the internship
for Conducting the                         database, correspondence, preliminary forms, and evaluation
Graduate Internship                        procedures.
Program
Certificate Brochure       2007     6      A description of the Graduate Certificate Program to enhance the
                                           public health workforce.
Cultural Competency        2007            A description of the Cultural Competency Training Workshop
Training Brochure                          required of all matriculated students.



                                                212
   ► Graduate Calendar. The Graduate Calendar is included in the M.P.H. Student
     Handbook and contains all the important dates for the activities comprising the
     Program. It serves as a reminder to students of upcoming activities and special
     events, including major professional conferences, orientation sessions for theses,
     special projects and internships, and University events relevant to graduate public
     health students (Appendix 41).

   ► Quick Telephone and Email Reference Cards. Each student is provided a
     laminated, wallet-size card containing the telephone numbers of all relevant
     University services and the names, telephone numbers and email addresses of all
     public health faculty (Appendix 42).

   ► Planned Programs. The cohort structure of the graduate public health program is
     such that students in a particular cohort follow an identical planned program.
     Undergraduate students are also provided with a planned program of study that
     lists the required, specialization and elective courses. Students in the
     undergraduate program are provided with an online Student Evaluation Record
     that contains the sequence of courses required for the major and specialization. In
     addition, new students are provided with a packet of materials that assist them in
     navigating the Program.

   ► Scheduling. The Department maintains a regularly published and carefully-
     followed sequenced schedule of courses, sufficient to permit a matriculated
     student to follow his or her planned program of full-time or part-time study, along
     with some provisions made for summer coursework. Students who contract for a
     specific planned program are guaranteed the courses required to complete their
     program of study as long as they complete said program in a timely manner. In
     practice, when changes in course sequence have been implemented, it has been
     necessary to run parallel programs to accommodate both current and entering
     students. There have been no instance where a student was unable to complete his
     or her course of study due to the unavailability of courses. Similarly, there have
     been no instances where a course was waived for a student due to its
     unavailability, nor necessary for a student to complete a course elsewhere for the
     same reason.

► Career Counseling.

   ► Creating an Effective Job-Marketing Strategy in Public Health. This
     comprehensive guide, produced specifically for the public health student,
     provides the user with a step-by-step approach to career planning, including self-
     assessment exercises, resume and cover letter preparation, development of
     effective interviewing skills, sample correspondences, job tips and sources of job
     opportunities. This publication is available to all students in paper and online
     formats and in the SCSU Career Services office. In addition, the Department
                                      213
   works closely with the SCSU Office of Career Services, which sponsors an annual
   career fair, provides individual career advisement, distributes an information
   packet containing career planning materials and provides the Department with
   “recruitment” or position advertisements on a regular basis (Reference File 23).

► Program Administration. The Coordinators of Graduate and Undergraduate
  Studies are the Programs’ administrators. The Coordinators and Department
  Chairperson work closely together, maintain an open-door policy and are regularly
  available to speak with students during scheduled office hours and at other times
  convenient to students, including weekends, either at the Department, at home by
  telephone or via email. The Coordinators’ and Chairperson’s availability and
  willingness to engage students is typical of the faculty's commitment toward
  students and their academic and professional success.

► ListServs. The Department maintains a separate ListServ for undergraduate and
  graduate students and alumni. These ListServs provide students with position
  announcements received through the Department and faculty. Students also can
  use the ListServs for a variety of reasons, including the posting of position
  announcements of which they have become aware. The ListsServs are:
  Mph_students@lists.southernct.edu, Bsph_students@lists.southernct.edu
  Mph_alumni@lists.southernct.edu, Bsph_alumni@lists.southernct.edu

► Connecticut Public Health Association (CPHA) Mentoring Program. In
  progress, it provides a listing of health professionals available for discussing
  career interests and opportunities in public health.

► Internship Placement Counseling. Students are informed of the importance of
  the field placement as an excellent opportunity for potential employment. During
  the orientation to the internship, students are encouraged to inquire, as part of the
  field practicum placement interview, about the future availability of employment.

► Internship Seminar Activities. Graduate and undergraduate interns are required
  to complete a structured interview with a public health professional who occupies
  a position to which they aspire. In addition, graduate interns are exposed to a
  panel of public health practitioners who have used their public health degrees to
  obtain positions in traditional and non-traditional public health venues.

► Public Health Expert Network of Mentors (P.H.E.N.O.M.). Online mentoring,
  discussed previously under this Criterion, provided by an international group of
  public health professionals available to students for the purpose of exploring
  career options and opportunities. A product of the founder of the Department’s
  chapter of the University Alumni Association.



                                    214
          ► Betty C. Jung Web Site. One of the most comprehensive, public health Internet
            sites, previously discussed under this Criterion. Created by Betty C. Jung, MPH
            (1994), it offers one-stop shopping for public health, including a comprehensive
            careers and jobs site that contains the most popular job search engines.

          ► The SCSU Center for Career Services. Provides students with the most up-to-
            date and comprehensive career development tools, the Center for Career Services
            offers an array of career planning services to help students decide what major to
            pursue, what career best suits them, or to begin the all important job search
            process. The mission or the Center is to connect students with their future -- in
            other words, to link employers with students, interns, soon-to-be-graduates, and
            alumni who can fit the job description and contribute to an agency's success.

4.6b. Description of the procedures by which students may communicate their concerns to
      program officials, including information about how these procedures are publicized
      and about the aggregate number of complaints submitted for each of the last three
      years.

      The Department believes that a commitment to transparency of conduct, respect for
      students, high faculty integrity, a students’ bill of rights, opportunities for input into
      program governance, a publicized grade appeals committee, open-door policy of program
      administrators, mid- and end-course evaluations, an anonymous feedback mechanism,
      extensive written material, all have created an atmosphere that promotes students’
      satisfaction. Despite these efforts, there are on occasion, student concerns, albeit few.
      Student are encouraged and have the opportunity to voice their concerns through a wide
      variety of ways. In the graduate program, concerns are most likely to be shared with the
      cohort representative who presents the concern to the GPC or Coordinator if an
      immediate response is warranted. Concerns shared with individual faculty will be brought
      to the attention of the Chair or Coordinators or shared with the faculty.

      The Department has always encouraged students to voice their concerns and raise issues
      affecting the quality of their education. As such, there is a well-publicized grade appeals
      committee, and a graduate and undergraduate online anonymous feedback link that is
      forwarded directly to the respective Coordinators.

      ► M.P.H. Degree. Complaints for the period 2006-2008 were limited to PCH 515 –
        Biostatistics. This was not unexpected, since students express varying degrees of
        anxiety about attempting the course. In 2005, the Department created a “Preparing for
        Statistics” workshop that introduced students to the pre-requisite skills required for the
        course. In 2007, the Department retained the services of an experienced statistics tutor
        and in 2008 hired this individual as an assistant to the course instructor to provide
        extra, in-class assistance, online tutoring and face-to-face tutoring on Saturday
        mornings.


                                              215
        ► B.S. Degree. Complaints for the period 2006-2008 were limited to issues pertaining to
          faculty performance. These matters were referred to the Department Chairperson who
          discuss the issues with the affected faculty members.

                                             Table 4.6b.

                     Aggregate Number of Student Complaints, 2006-2008

                                              2006          2007           2008
                         MPH                    3             4
                          BS                    4             4

4.6c.   Information about student satisfaction with advising and career counseling services.

        As discussed earlier, student success is one of the Department’s highest priorities.
        Academic and career advisement are important aspects of student success. To evaluate
        the outcomes of these efforts, a Program exit survey and an academic and career
        advisement satisfaction survey is distributed to all graduating students. Beginning fall
        2008, the latter survey will be distributed to all students each year. Results from both
        surveys reveal more than a 90% satisfaction rate among graduate and undergraduate
        students with their experiences in the Program, including academic and career
        advisement. Graduate student have had access to the Program exit survey since 2006 and
        the advisement survey since 2007. Undergraduate students were first surveyed in 2008.
        Survey results appear in Appendices 43 and 44).

4.6d. Assessment of the extent to which this criterion is met.

        The Criterion is met.

        Strengths. All students have access, from time of enrollment, to faculty advisors who are
        knowledgeable about the Program’s curricula overall and about specific courses and
        programs of study. From the onset, all students are provided with orientation materials,
        including print and online documents. Career planning and placement advisement are
        offered to students throughout the Program in written, online and face-to-face formats.

        Weaknesses. The Coordinators endeavor to work more closely with the University’s
        Career Services to increase its attention to the needs of public health students. In addition,
        increased emphasis will be given to career planning in the internship programs.




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