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12.17.2012 - Village of Deerfield

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					                               AGENDA FOR THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES
                                 Monday, December 17, 2012, 7:30 P.M.

Call to Order
Roll Call
Pledge of Allegiance – State Senator Susan Garrett, 29th District
Proclamation – Honoring the Public Service of State Senator Susan Garrett
Minutes of Previous Meeting
Bills and Payroll
Treasurer’s Report
Report on Departmental Objectives - Administration
Public Comment
REPORTS
12-124         Report and Recommendation of the Plan Commission re: Text Amendments to C-2 Outlying
               Commercial District to Strengthen Retail
CONSENT AGENDA

OLD BUSINESS
12-105-1  Approval of Wastewater Reclamation Facility Improvement Project Change Order No.16

NEW BUSINESS
12-118-1 Ordinance Levying Taxes for Corporate Purposes for the Current Fiscal Year, Commencing on
         the First Day of May, 2012, and Ending on the Thirtieth Day of April, 2013, for the Village of
         Deerfield, Lake and Cook Counties, Illinois – 2R

12-119-1      Ordinance Abating All of the 2012 Tax Levy Requirements for the Series 2008 General Obligation
              Bonds – 2R

12-120-1      Ordinance Abating a Portion of the 2012 Tax Levy Requirements for the Series 2010 General
              Obligation Bonds – 2R

12-121-1      Ordinance Abating a Portion of the 2012 Tax Levy Requirements for the Series 2011B General
              Obligation Bonds – 2R

12-122-1      Ordinance Abating All of the 2012 Tax Levy Requirements for the Series 2011A General
              Obligation Bonds – 2R

12-125        Ordinance Establishing the Fiscal Year of the Village of Deerfield – 1R

12-126        Resolution Approving an Amendment to the Personnel Policies and Procedures of the Village of
              Deerfield

12-127        Authorization for Additional Work for Linden Avenue Infrastructure Rehabilitation Project –
              Contract Final

12-128        Authorization for Additional Work Under 2012 MFT Street Rehabilitation Project – Contract Final

12-129        Authorization for Sanitary Sewer Assessment System by RedZone Robotics

Items for discussion by Mayor and Board of Trustees
Reports of the Village Manager – Medical Cannabis
Adjournment
             Proclamation Honoring the Public Service of
           Illinois State Senator Susan Garrett, 29th District

      WHEREAS, Susan Garrett has served as the Illinois State Senator for
      th
the 29 Legislative District since first being elected in 2002; and

       WHEREAS, Susan Garrett has represented the interests of the
residents, businesses and other agencies in Deerfield throughout her tenure as
the State Senator from the 29th District; and

      WHEREAS, Susan Garrett has been instrumental in preserving clean
water for the Village and supporting other environmental concerns; and

       WHEREAS, Susan Garrett secured favorable financing for the
Wastewater Reclamation Facility Reconstruction Project through the Illinois
Finance Authority, which will save Deerfield residents well over a million
dollars in interest payments; and

       WHEREAS, Susan Garrett has actively supported grant funding for
many Deerfield projects, including repaving Waukegan Road and increasing
the safety and capacity at the entrance to Deerfield High School; and

      WHEREAS, Susan Garrett has demonstrated compassion, diligence,
approachability and responsiveness throughout her tenure as the Illinois State
Senator representing Deerfield; and

      NOW, THEREFORE, be it proclaimed by the Mayor and Village
Board of Trustees of the Village of Deerfield, that Susan Garrett is hereby
honored and recognized for her outstanding service to the Village of Deerfield
during her tenure as State Senator between 2002 and 2012;

      FURTHER, be it proclaimed that the week of December 16th through
December 23rd 2012 be declared as Susan Garrett Week in the Village of
Deerfield.

      PROCLAIMED this 17th day of December, 2012.

                                        ______________________________
                                        HARRIET E. ROSENTHAL, Mayor
                                        December 3, 2012

The regular meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Village of Deerfield was called to order by
Mayor Rosenthal in the Council Chambers of the Village Hall on December 3, 2012 at 7:30 p.m.
The Clerk called the roll and announced that the following were:

               Present:               Harriet Rosenthal, Mayor
                                      Robert Benton
                                      Alan Farkas
                                      Thomas Jester
                                      Mary Oppenheim
                                      William Seiden
                                      Barbara Struthers

and that a quorum was present and in attendance. Also present were Village Attorney Peter
Coblentz and Kent Street, Village Manager.

PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE                        Members of Cub Scout Pack 50 led those in
                                            attendance in reciting the Pledge of Allegiance.
The scouts introduced themselves and noted they are working on their citizenship badge and are
looking to volunteer for community service in the Village.

PROCLAMATION                                Mayor Rosenthal read a proclamation honoring
                                            Karen May, State Representative of the 58th
District. Representative May has served as State Representative for Deerfield since 2001 and
has been instrumental in attaining improvements for the electric distribution system in the
Village as well as made numerous other contributions to the Village. Mayor Rosenthal declared
December 2, 2012 – December 9, 2012 as Karen May Week in Deerfield. Trustee Oppenheim
made a motion to approve the Proclamation. Trustee Benton seconded the motion. The motion
passed unanimously.

Representative May stated it has been delightful working with the Village. The Trustees are very
active in representing the citizens of Deerfield. Throughout her year’s of service she has been
able to meet many residents in Deerfield and thanked them for the opportunity to serve.

NOVA HP                                     Zack Kovack, Co-Executive Director of Nova HP
                                            stated their mission is to get students involved in the
community. They have held a number of events and fundraisers throughout the years. Danny
Goldberg, Student President, encouraged the public to listen to Nova live radio. He stated that
Nova HP is for both Deerfield and Highland Park students and encouraged Deerfield students to
get involved. They started a Nova flag football league this fall and had 120 players in the league.
They will be expanding the sports programs because they have been very well received. Mr.
Kovack reported that Nova is sending students to volunteer for social service projects throughout
the community. Nova is a privately funded organization.

MINUTES OF PREVIOUS MEETINGS                 Trustee Oppenheim made a motion to approve the
Board of Trustees Meeting
December 3, 2012
Page 2 of 7

                                           minutes from the November 19, 2012 Board of
Trustees meeting. Trustee Struthers seconded the motion. The motion passed unanimously with
Trustee Farkas abstaining.

Trustee Benton made a motion to approve the minutes from the November 19, 2012 Committee
of the Whole meeting. Trustee Struthers seconded the motion. The motion passed unanimously
with Trustee Farkas abstaining.

BILLS AND PAYROLL                         Trustee Seiden made a motion to approve the Bills
                                          and Payroll dated December 3, 2012. Trustee
Struthers seconded the motion. The motion passed by the following vote:

AYES: Benton, Farkas, Jester, Oppenheim, Seiden, Struthers (6)
NAYS: None (0)

PUBLIC COMMENT                            There was no Public Comment.


                                         REPORTS

There were no Reports.


                                   CONSENT AGENDA

ORDINANCE O-12-39 PROHIBITING             An Ordinance prohibiting the use of groundwater as
THE USE OF GROUNDWATER AS A               a potable water supply by the installation or use of
POTABLE WATER SUPPLY BY THE               potable water supply wells or by any other method
INSTALLATION OR USE OF                    within a certain area of Deerfield, Illinois.
POTABLE WATER SUPPLY WELLS OR             Trustee Seiden made a motion to adopt the
BY ANY OTHER METHOD WITHIN A              Ordinance. Trustee Oppenheim seconded the
CERTAIN AREA OF DEERFIELD, IL             motion. The motion passed by the following vote:
MERIT CLEANERS – 2R

AYES: Benton, Farkas, Jester, Oppenheim, Seiden, Struthers (6)
NAYS: None (0)


                                      OLD BUSINESS

There was no Old Business.


                                     NEW BUSINESS
Board of Trustees Meeting
December 3, 2012
Page 3 of 7


PUBLIC HEARING ON THE PROPOSED 2012 TAX LEVY

Trustee Benton made a motion to open the Public Hearing. Trustee Oppenheim seconded the
motion. The motion passed unanimously.

Acting Finance Director Erik Burk stated this is the property tax levy that was discussed at the
November 26, 2012 Committee of the Whole meeting. The Village levy was $6,034,965 and the
library levy was $4,105,867. The total levy of $10,140,832 is more than 5% increase.
Therefore, it is necessary to hold a Truth in Taxation Hearing. Notice of the Public Hearing was
published in the November 22, 2012 Deerfield Review. Mr. Burk suggested abating the Build
America Bonds rebate and all the non-treatment plant debt service, totaling $1,361,226. This
would bring the Village levy down to $4,673,739 or 5.49% increase over 2011 tax levy. Mr.
Burk noted this does not include the proposed bond service for this year, which will be discussed
later tonight.

Manager Street noted that if the General Fund levy was reduced by an additional $26,000, the
increase would be 4.9%. The additional bonds being considered tonight are exclusively for the
Wastewater Reclamation Facility and add an additional amount to $454,000 to the 2012 levy.
Trustee Farkas questioned the positives and negatives of taking additional amounts out of
General Fund rather than increasing the levy.

Mr. Street noted the Board has always been of the philosophy that the debt service from the
Wastewater Reclamation Facility should be paid for by the residents that benefit from its
improvements in the future.

Mr. Burk noted that $26,000 is being transferred form the General Fund to keep the levy under
5%. He reported that absorbing an additional $450,000, however, would be very difficult.

Trustee Farkas reported that he is very happy with the proposed bond issuance that is a result of
the Village’s aAA bond rating due to the Villages excellent financial health, conservative
approach and reserves. He understands that reducing the reserves by $26,000 would not have a
negative effect on the Village’s financial stability.

Trustee Seiden stated he perceives the debt service for the Wastewater Reclamation Facility as a
separate assessment. Trustee Seiden does not believe the Village should look at reducing the
reserve to abate debt service associated with the Wastewater Treatment Plant.

Mayor Rosenthal added that the Village has received very favorable Federal financing support,
such as the Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds that will greatly save the Village in interest
payments. Further she recommended the Board perform a line-by-line budget review for the
upcoming fiscal year.

Marshall Hechter, 1524 Central Avenue and 44 year resident of the Village, stated has seen a lot
of improvements in the Village. He is concerned because every taxing body feels they need to
Board of Trustees Meeting
December 3, 2012
Page 4 of 7

increase the taxes. Although 5% does not seem like a lot, the school districts and townships are
also increasing their taxes. He thanked the Board for taking into consideration fiscal
conservation in the Village. Mr. Hechter prefers to see the Village freeze their property tax levy.
Mr. Hechter asked the Board to look further at debt obligations and would like to see the levy
reduced in the future.

Trustee Benton made a motion to close the Public Hearing. Trustee Oppenheim seconded the
motion. The motion passed unanimously.

ORDINANCE LEVYING TAXES FOR                  An Ordinance levying taxes for corporate purposes
CORPORATE PURPOSES FOR THE                   for the current fiscal year, commencing on the first
CURRENT FISCAL YEAR,                         day of May, 2012 and ending on the thirtieth day of
COMMENCING ON THE FIRST DAY                  April, 2013 for the Village of Deerfield, Lake and
OF MAY, 2012, AND ENDING ON THE              Cook Counties. First Reading.
THIRTIETY DAY OF APRIL, 2013, FOR
THE VILLAGE OF DEERFIELD, LAKE
AND COOK COUNTIES – 1R

ORDINANCE ABATING ALL OF THE An Ordinance abating all of the 2012 tax levy
2012 TAX LEVY REQUIREMENTS FOR requirements for the Series 2008 general obligation
SERIES 2008 GENERAL OBLIGATION bonds. First Reading.
BONDS – 1R

ORDINANCE ABATING ALL OF THE An Ordinance abating all of the 2012 tax levy
2012 TAX LEVY REQUIREMENTS FOR requirements for the Series 2010 general obligation
SERIES 2010 GENERAL OBLIGATION bonds. First Reading.
BONDS – 1R

ORDINANCE ABATING ALL OF THE An Ordinance abating all of the 2012 tax levy
2012 TAX LEVY REQUIREMENTS FOR requirements for the Series 2011B general
SERIES 2011B GENERAL OBLIGATION obligation bonds. First Reading.
BONDS – 1R

ORDINANCE ABATING ALL OF THE An Ordinance abating all of the 2012 tax levy
2012 TAX LEVY REQUIREMENTS FOR requirements for the Series 2011A general
SERIES 2011A GENERAL OBLIGATION obligation bonds. First Reading.
BONDS – 1R

ORDINANCE O-12-40 AUTHORIZING                An Ordinance authorizing the issuance of
THE ISSUANCE OF GENERAL                      general obligation bonds, Series 2013, of the
OBLIGATION BONDS, SERIES 2013,               Village of Deerfield, Illinois.
OF THE VILLAGE OF DEERFIELD,
ILLINOIS                                     Mr. Burk stated the Village has maintained their
Board of Trustees Meeting
December 3, 2012
Page 5 of 7

                                           Aaa bond rating and has received an interest rate of
1.82%. The Village received five bids. The low bidder was Piper Jaffray. Mr. Burk requested a
waiver of the First Reading.

Financial Consultant Mr. Chris Shih of Northern Trust stated the five bids were received and
were very competitive. The overall true interest cost was 2.241% for the four series of bonds
that are funding the WRF project. The Village took advantage of the Build America Bonds and
Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds and received very low financing costs for the Wastewater
Reclamation Facility.

Trustee Seiden made a motion to waive the First Reading of the Ordinance. Trustee Oppenheim
seconded the motion. The motion passed by the following vote:

AYES: Benton, Farkas, Jester, Oppenheim, Seiden, Struthers (6)
NAYS: None (0)

Trustee Seiden made a motion to adopt the Ordinance. Trustee Oppenheim seconded the motion.
The motion passed by the following vote:

AYES: Benton, Farkas, Jester, Oppenheim, Seiden, Struthers (6)
NAYS: None (0)

Mayor Rosenthal thanked Northern Trust and Mr. Burk for their outstanding efforts in support of
the WRF financing results.

ORDINANCE O-12-41 ADOPTING                   Assistant to the Village Manager, Jenny Maltas,
RESIDENTIAL COMPOSTING                       reported staff made changes to the proposed
REGULATIONS – 2R                             Ordinance based on the feedback provided by the
                                             Trustees during the First Reading. The most
significant changes included the elimination of the compost bin size, number and setback
requirements.

Trustee Oppenheim noted that Item G in the Ordinance states that food waste is permitted in
closed compost bins, but not compost piles. She noted that a properly maintained compost pile
would not have a problem if food scraps were added. Ms. Maltas noted the restriction is to help
alleviate potential animal issues.

Trustee Oppenheim made a motion to adopt the Ordinance. Trustee Struthers seconded the
motion. The motion passed by the following vote:

AYES: Benton, Farkas, Jester, Oppenheim, Seiden, Struthers (6)
NAYS: None (0)

AUTHORIZATION FOR                           Director of Public Works and Engineering, Barbara
INSTALLATION OF ENERGY                      Little, recommended installing LED lighting in the
Board of Trustees Meeting
December 3, 2012
Page 6 of 7

EFFICIENT EXTERIOR AND                         garage bays at the Public Works Facility and
INTERIOR LIGHTING AT THE PUBLIC around the building’s exterior.
WORKS GARAGE
                                               Ms. Little noted that two years ago, the office
spaces were converted to LED lighting and it has worked well. The Village has received a grant
in the amount of $22,080 to offset the proposed cost supplied by Twin Supplies Limited in the
amount of $32,724.62. Twin Supplies Limited has done work for many municipalities and has
facilitated the grants received by the Village. Ms. Little requested the Board waive the
competitive bidding process and authorize the installation of energy efficient exterior and interior
lighting at the public works garage by Twin Supplies Limited in an amount not to exceed
$32,724.62.

Trustee Oppenheim made a motion to waive the competitive bidding process and authorize the
installation in an amount not to exceed $32,724.62. Trustee Benton seconded the motion. The
motion passed by the following vote:

AYES: Benton, Farkas, Jester, Oppenheim, Seiden, Struthers (6)
NAYS: None (0)

Mr. Street noted that all of the Village’s main facilities have been converted to LED lighting.

APPROVAL OF WASTEWATER                        Ms. Little reported change order number 15,
RECLAMATION FACILITY                          in the amount of $52,401.30, brings the total
IMPROVEMENT PROJECT CHANGE                    change orders to $338,150.70 or 1.1% of the
ORDER NUMBER 15                               original contract value. She noted the contractor
                                              has not requested any additional time to complete
the items in change order 15.

Trustee Jester made a motion to approve Wastewater Reclamation Facility Improvement Project
change order number 15 in an amount not to exceed $52,401.30. Trustee Struthers seconded the
motion. The motion passed by the following vote:

AYES: Benton, Farkas, Jester, Oppenheim, Seiden, Struthers (6)
NAYS: None (0)


                                          DISCUSSION

A GUY, A GIRL AND A BENCH                  Mayor Rosenthal stated the event at Kevin’s Place
                                           in support of the West Deerfield Township Food
Pantry was very well received. She noted that all four major news channels came out to report
on the event.

WINTER CELEBRATION                            Mayor Rosenthal reported that the Winter
                                              Celebration took place this past weekend. Members
Board of Trustees Meeting
December 3, 2012
Page 7 of 7

of the Board served dinner to residents, courtesy of Bobby’s restaurant. She thanked the many
businesses that contributed to the festivities over the weekend, as well as police, public works
and administrative personnel. Mayor Rosenthal noted that more residents participated this year
than ever before.

BELL RINGERS                              Trustee Struthers thanked those that rang bells
                                          for the West Deerfield Township Food Pantry and
Deerfield Emergency Fund. The Village raised $650.

ADJOURNMENT                                There being no further business or discussion,
                                           Trustee Seiden made a motion to adjourn the
meeting. Trustee Struthers seconded the motion. The motion passed unanimously. The meeting
was adjourned at 8:48 pm.


                                             APPROVED:


                                                                   Mayor




ATTEST:


               Village Clerk
     BILLS FOR THE
   DECEMBER 17, 2012
VILLAGE BOARD MEETING
December 17, 2012 Board Meeting

Vendor                                  Invoice #       Description                             Org      Obj                 Total Invoice

303 TAXI, L.L.C.                        19913           SENIOR TAXI PROGRAM                     101111   5384                         3,495.00
3D BRICK PAVING INC                     373250          DEPOSIT REFUND - 938 WARRINGTON         910000   2423                           500.00
3M                                      TP74053         STREET SIGN SUPPLIES                    102050   5421                           621.00

A LAMP CONCRETE CONTRACTORS             14086           2012 MFT STREET REHAB PROJECT           222082   5910    25,257.54
A LAMP CONCRETE CONTRACTORS             14087           LINDEN AVE REHAB/PMT #4/110712-113012   222082   5910    37,018.65
                                                                                                                                      62,276.19

ALLDATA                                 S1058366-2013   REPAIR SUBSCRIPTION RENEWAL             702050   5440                         1,500.00
AMERICAN CHARGE SERVICE                 3633112712      SENIOR TAXI PROGRAM                     101111   5384                           400.00
ANDERSON, DAVID OR RITA                 387564          TREE APPLICATION REFUND                 100001   4232                            75.00
ASHLAND / HERCULES INC                  130134138       FOUR (4) DRUMS OF POLYMER               542052   5422                         2,700.00

BADE PAPER PRODUCTS INC                 187063-00       PAPER SUPPLIES - PW/ENG                 102010   5460      230.73
BADE PAPER PRODUCTS INC                 187063-00       PAPER SUPPLIES - PW/ENG                 102110   5460      230.72
BADE PAPER PRODUCTS INC                 187063-00       PAPER SUPPLIES - PW/ENG                 502010   5460      230.73
BADE PAPER PRODUCTS INC                 187063-00       PAPER SUPPLIES - PW/ENG                 542010   5460      230.72
                                                                                                                                        922.90

BANNER PLUMBING SUPPLY CO INC           1762235         PVC PIPE                                102050   5421                            86.90
BETA TECH SCIENTIFIC INC                N50237          CALIBRATION OF PORTABLE GAS METER       542052   5322                            80.00
BLUE SKY MARKETING GROUP LTD            75721           BOARD AND COMMISSION GIFTS - 12/02/12   101210   5387                         1,900.32
BRIGHT ELECTRICAL SUPPLY                977204          ELECTRICAL WIRE                         102050   5421                           316.80

CDW   GOVERNMENT INC                    T877620         FIBER PATCH CABLE                       542052   5810        50.03
CDW   GOVERNMENT INC                    T616319         LAPTOP COMPUTERS & DOCKS                101210   5810     1,716.28
CDW   GOVERNMENT INC                    T616319         LAPTOP COMPUTERS & DOCKS                102110   5810     1,575.50
CDW   GOVERNMENT INC                    T616319         LAPTOP COMPUTERS & DOCKS                502010   5810     1,575.50
CDW   GOVERNMENT INC                    T629052         SERVER O/S LICENSE                      101111   5370       115.16
CDW   GOVERNMENT INC                    T629052         SERVER O/S LICENSE                      101210   5370       115.16
CDW   GOVERNMENT INC                    T629052         SERVER O/S LICENSE                      101330   5370       115.16
CDW   GOVERNMENT INC                    T629052         SERVER O/S LICENSE                      102010   5370        34.49
CDW   GOVERNMENT INC                    T629052         SERVER O/S LICENSE                      102110   5370        68.98
CDW   GOVERNMENT INC                    T629052         SERVER O/S LICENSE                      106010   5370       115.16
CDW   GOVERNMENT INC                    T629052         SERVER O/S LICENSE                      502010   5370        10.73
CDW   GOVERNMENT INC                    T724257         SQUAD LAPTOP HARD DRIVE REPLACEMENT     106034   5810        69.77
                                                                                                                                       5,561.92

CHICAGO INTERNATIONAL TRUCKS, LLC       10111182        BATTERY/FILTER                          702050   5470                           385.20

CHICAGO OFFICE TECHNOLOGY GROUP         175275          COPIER MAINT/CD/NOV12                   101330   5460       20.22
CHICAGO OFFICE TECHNOLOGY GROUP         175242          COPIER MAINT/FIN/NOV12                  101111   5460       93.41
CHICAGO OFFICE TECHNOLOGY GROUP         174026          COPIER MAINT/STREETS/OCT12              102010   5335       14.41
CHICAGO OFFICE TECHNOLOGY GROUP         175252          COPIER MAINT/STREETS/NOV12              102010   5335       17.38
                                                                                                                                        145.42

CHRISTOPHER B. BURKE ENGINEERING LTD    108546          DRFLD RD RECON/PH II/102812-112412      222082   5362                         8,194.27

CINTAS                                  022503790       CLOTHING - ANDERSEN                     542052   5130       24.00
CINTAS                                  022503789       MATS - PW/TRAIN STATION                 102010   5320       36.46
CINTAS                                  022503789       MATS - PW/TRAIN STATION                 102038   5320       36.46
CINTAS                                  022503789       MATS - PW/TRAIN STATION                 502010   5320       36.46
CINTAS                                  022503789       MATS - PW/TRAIN STATION                 542010   5320       36.46
CINTAS                                  022503788       MATS - WRF                              542052   5320       36.91
                                                                                                                                        206.75

CITY OF HIGHLAND PARK                   009530-113012   WATER PURCHASES - NOV 12                502031   5423     8,112.00
CITY OF HIGHLAND PARK                   020587-113012   WATER PURCHASES - NOV 12                502031   5423    40,326.78
CITY OF HIGHLAND PARK                   009155-113012   WATER PURCHASES - NOV 12                502031   5423   108,004.52
                                                                                                                                   156,443.30

COMMUNICATIONS REVOLVING FUND           T1314892        COMMUNICATION SERVICES - OCT 12         176020   5550                           675.00
CREATIVE PRODUCT SOURCING, INC - DARE   53992           DARE SUPPLIES                           106033   5415                           328.26
CROSSBOW WATER AND CROSSLINK MFG        2095408         DEIONIZED WATER SYSTEM - NEW LAB        542052   5810                           641.50

CSG INTERNATIONAL                       723737          U/B STMTS & LATE NOTICES: NOV 12        502010   5335       31.74
CSG INTERNATIONAL                       723737          U/B STMTS & LATE NOTICES: NOV 12        502010   5335      238.24
CSG INTERNATIONAL                       723737          U/B STMTS & LATE NOTICES: NOV 12        502010   5337       79.24
CSG INTERNATIONAL                       723737          U/B STMTS & LATE NOTICES: NOV 12        502010   5337      491.13
CSG INTERNATIONAL                       723737          U/B STMTS & LATE NOTICES: NOV 12        542010   5335       14.34
CSG INTERNATIONAL                       723737          U/B STMTS & LATE NOTICES: NOV 12        542010   5335      107.59
CSG INTERNATIONAL                       723737          U/B STMTS & LATE NOTICES: NOV 12        542010   5337       35.78
CSG INTERNATIONAL                       723737          U/B STMTS & LATE NOTICES: NOV 12        542010   5337      221.80
CSG INTERNATIONAL                       723737          U/B STMTS & LATE NOTICES: NOV 12        582030   5337       12.78
CSG INTERNATIONAL                       723737          U/B STMTS & LATE NOTICES: NOV 12        582030   5337       79.22
CSG INTERNATIONAL                       723737          U/B STMTS & LATE NOTICES: NOV 12        582030   5390        5.12
CSG INTERNATIONAL                       723737          U/B STMTS & LATE NOTICES: NOV 12        582030   5390       38.43
                                                                                                                                       1,355.41




                                                                                                                        Page 1 of 5
December 17, 2012 Board Meeting

Vendor                                     Invoice #         Description                                  Org      Obj                 Total Invoice


DBR CHAMBER OF COMMERCE                    11510             2013 LUNCHEON FEES & MEMBERSHIP DUES         101210   5330                          730.00
DEERFIELD GOLF CLUB                        102555120212      BOARD AND COMMISSIONS RECEPTION - 12/02/12   101210   5387                        4,370.35
DEERFIELDS BAKERY                          1545479           PROMOTION CAKE                               106010   5460                           58.25
ENRICO MOSCONI LANDSCAPE CONTRACTORS,INC   T29527            TREE PLANTING                                102037   5365                        3,080.00
ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCE ASSOCIATES          670045            QUALITY CONTROL STANDARDS - LABORATORY       542052   5460                           87.72
FEDERAL EXPRESS CORP                       2-088-80654       MAILING - WRF                                102110   5337                           33.54
FIELDS CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE                 60396             MIRROR - U-2                                 702050   5470                          108.80
FILTER SERVICES ILLINOIS                   INV65727          HVAC FILTERS - NEW ADMIN BLDG                542052   5470                          263.70
FRIEDMAN, JOHN                             387595            TREE APPLICATION REFUND                      100001   4232                           75.00

GALLS, AN ARAMARK CO, LLC                  000190091         APPAREL                                      106033   5130      23.48
GALLS, AN ARAMARK CO, LLC                  000156005         APPAREL                                      106034   5130      88.99
                                                                                                                                                 112.47

GHA TECHNOLOGIES, INC                      742872            LAPTOP MEMORY UPGRADES                       101111   5810      23.00
GHA TECHNOLOGIES, INC                      742875            LAPTOP MEMORY UPGRADES                       101210   5810      23.00
GHA TECHNOLOGIES, INC                      742872            LAPTOP MEMORY UPGRADES                       101210   5810      69.00
GHA TECHNOLOGIES, INC                      742875            LAPTOP MEMORY UPGRADES                       102110   5810      23.00
GHA TECHNOLOGIES, INC                      742875            LAPTOP MEMORY UPGRADES                       502010   5810      23.00
                                                                                                                                                 161.00

GOLDBERG, MARK                             387892            TREE APPLICATION REFUND                      100001   4232                           75.00

GRAINGER INC                               9008208267        BOOT DRYER/GLOVE DRYER                       502050   5421     283.76
GRAINGER INC                               9006610308        CHEMICAL RESISTANT GLOVES - STREET DEPT      102036   5421      43.32
GRAINGER INC                               9007666200        SPRAYER                                      542031   5421     227.03
                                                                                                                                                 554.11

GUY SCOPELLITI ORIGINAL LANDSCAPING CO.    21098             REPLACE SHRUBS/REAR YARD - 716 CONSTANCE     102037   5365    1,835.17
GUY SCOPELLITI ORIGINAL LANDSCAPING CO.    21099             TREE REMOVAL/PLANT - 312 BURR OAK            102037   5365      176.75
                                                                                                                                                2,011.92

H & H ELECTRIC CO.                         20696             CONTROL BOX REPAIR - CARLISLE                102050   5365    1,256.56
H & H ELECTRIC CO.                         20744             LIGHTING SYSTEM UPGRADES                     222082   5362   22,454.10
                                                                                                                                               23,710.66

HD SUPPLY WATERWORKS                       5829859           FLANGES/BUSHINGS - WATER DEPT                502050   5421     142.38
HD SUPPLY WATERWORKS                       5789487           FLANGES/CAPS/PLUGS - WATER DEPT              502050   5421     625.00
HD SUPPLY WATERWORKS                       5787733           SEWER PIPE/SUPPLIES                          542031   5421     868.46
                                                                                                                                                1,635.84

HIGHLAND PARK FORD                         57730             TPMS ANTENNA - SQUAD #3                      702050   5470      96.39
HIGHLAND PARK FORD                         21227             VEHICLE MAINT                                106034   5326     383.31
                                                                                                                                                 479.70

HOME DEPOT CREDIT SERVICES                 4109130           BRASS FITTINGS                               502050   5421      42.08
HOME DEPOT CREDIT SERVICES                 9204170           CREDIT MEMO/REFUND SALES TAX                 102036   5421     (19.84)
HOME DEPOT CREDIT SERVICES                 2106503           DRILL BITS                                   102038   5320      17.30
HOME DEPOT CREDIT SERVICES                 9022344           MAILBOXES/POSTS                              102036   5421     234.31
HOME DEPOT CREDIT SERVICES                 2161307           PADLOCK/KEY                                  542010   5320     100.38
HOME DEPOT CREDIT SERVICES                 4090955           PAINT - GARAGE                               702050   5470       9.25
HOME DEPOT CREDIT SERVICES                 5108526           TUBE CONNECTOR                               102050   5421       3.76
                                                                                                                                                 387.24

IDLEWOOD ELECTRIC SUPPLY INC               010092            CREDIT - RETURN                              102050   5421     (270.33)
IDLEWOOD ELECTRIC SUPPLY INC               010086            SUPPLIES - STREET DEPT                       102050   5421      296.93
                                                                                                                                                  26.60

IL FORNOS PIZZA                            413362            DARE GRADUATION                              106033   5415                           90.00
ILLINOIS GFOA                              5612516/2531936   SEMINAR - BURK                               101111   5210                           30.00
IMAGISTICS INTERNATIONAL, INC.             736647804         COPIER MAINT/POL/OCT12                       106010   5322                          364.68
INSITUFORM TECHNOLOGIES USA, INC           360217            WATER METER DEPOSIT REFUND                   910000   2425                          750.00
INTERNATIONAL CODE COUNCIL, INC            INV0205803        2012 CODES                                   101330   5460                        1,139.94

JG UNIFORMS, INC                           28898             APPAREL                                      106034   5130     236.00
JG UNIFORMS, INC                           28897             APPAREL                                      106034   5130     558.43
                                                                                                                                                 794.43

KALE UNIFORMS                              812294            APPAREL                                      106034   5130      35.84
KALE UNIFORMS                              810127            APPAREL                                      106034   5130      62.96
KALE UNIFORMS                              812482            APPAREL                                      106034   5130     192.00
KALE UNIFORMS                              812481            APPAREL                                      106034   5130     264.25
                                                                                                                                                 555.05

KARSTROM, JOHN                             137               BOARD MEETING VIDEO PRODUCTION - NOV 12      101210   5364                          230.00
KONICA MINOLTA BUSINESS SOLUTIONS          222914038         COPIER MAINT/ENG/NOV 12                      102110   5450                          134.66
KONKE ELECTRIC INC                         1296              REPAIR CAN LIGHTS ON BRIDGE DECK             602019   5320                          650.00
KRONE, MICHAEL AND REYNA SANDOVAL          387563            DEPOSIT REFUND - 925 CASTLEWOOD              910000   2423                          500.00

KUCEBA, DESIRAE                            111512            TRAINING TRAVEL EXPENSE REIMBURSEMENT        106020   5211     227.88
KUCEBA, DESIRAE                            111512            TRAINING TRAVEL EXPENSE REIMBURSEMENT        106020   5212      50.00
                                                                                                                                                 277.88




                                                                                                                                 Page 2 of 5
December 17, 2012 Board Meeting

Vendor                                     Invoice #            Description                                        Org      Obj                Total Invoice


KUSTOM SIGNALS INC                         473006               EQUIPMENT REPAIR                                   106010   5322     18.00
KUSTOM SIGNALS INC                         473008               EQUIPMENT REPAIR                                   106010   5322     76.00
                                                                                                                                                          94.00

LAKE COUNTY LEPC                           2012-002             REGISTRATION FEE - BUDNY                           106034   5212                          25.00
LAKE COUNTY RECORDER                       2012-00062075        TITLE POLICY RE: SLACK                             101210   5365                          16.00
LENZ, JASON                                52310112612          CDL RENEWAL - LENZ                                 102010   5210                          65.00
LEW, LAURA AND VICTOR                      321977/48869/FINAL   DEPOSIT REFUND - 826 WOODWARD                      910000   2423                       5,000.00

LICHTERMAN, ANDREW                         103340113012         AWARD FOR KAREN MAY                                101210   5387    141.00
LICHTERMAN, ANDREW                         81026/80354          EXP REIMB - SUSAN GARRETT PLAQUES                  101210   5387    349.40
LICHTERMAN, ANDREW                         103340121012         EXP REIMB - SUSAN GARRETT RECEPTION                101210   5387    106.31
                                                                                                                                                         596.71

LINTECH ENGINEERING LLC                    1608                 PFINGSTEN RD LIFT STN - PLANS/SPECS/BID PKG PREP   222082   5362                       8,536.00
LITTLE TOMMY'S PLUMBING SHOP               1190-6734            BOILER START UP/CLEANING                           102038   5320                         346.00
MAG CONSTRUCTION                           5-12                 REPAIR ROOF - HAWTHORN RESERVOIR                   502031   5320                       1,880.00

MANEVAL CONSTRUCTION CO                    368527               WATER METER DEPOSIT REFUND LESS USAGE              910000   2425     800.00
MANEVAL CONSTRUCTION CO                    368527               WATER METER DEPOSIT REFUND LESS USAGE              500001   4452    (100.00)
                                                                                                                                                         700.00

MCCUMBER, BRADLEY                          387642               TREE APP REFUND - 933 KENTON                       100001   4232                          75.00
MCHENRY ANALYTICAL WATER LABORATORY, INC   309666               INDEPENDENT LAB TESTING                            542052   5365                         131.60
MENACKER, NADINE                           56600121112          HOME GREETER - NOV 12                              101210   5387                         200.00

MOORE LANDSCAPES INC.                      16706                CEMETERY MAINTENANCE - TREE WORK                   101111   5324   2,525.00
MOORE LANDSCAPES INC.                      16626                LANDSCAPE MAINT - DEC 12 / #10 OF 10               101111   5324   1,651.08
MOORE LANDSCAPES INC.                      16626                LANDSCAPE MAINT - DEC 12 / #10 OF 10               101210   5914   3,850.87
MOORE LANDSCAPES INC.                      16626                LANDSCAPE MAINT - DEC 12 / #10 OF 10               102038   5321   1,651.08
MOORE LANDSCAPES INC.                      16626                LANDSCAPE MAINT - DEC 12 / #10 OF 10               602019   5320   1,100.39
MOORE LANDSCAPES INC.                      16626                LANDSCAPE MAINT - DEC 12 / #10 OF 10               602038   5390   1,651.08
MOORE LANDSCAPES INC.                      16598                STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS                           102037   5914     325.00
MOORE LANDSCAPES INC.                      16597                STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS                           102037   5914   1,372.00
                                                                                                                                                       14,126.50

MURRIN, MICHAEL                            NOV12                PLUMBING INSPECTIONS                               101330   5365                       2,145.00
MUTUAL SERVICES OF HIGHLAND PARK           455410               PLUMBING PARTS - BLDG #40                          542052   5470                          19.66
NAT'L PUB EMPLYR LABOR RELATIONS ASSN      27825/30848          2013 MEMBERSHIP DUES - STREET/MALTAS               101210   5330                         380.00
NORTH CENTRAL LABORATORIES                 313334               LAB STANDARDS & SUPPLIES                           542052   5460                         144.92

NORTHSHORE UNIVERSITY HEALTHSYSTEM         202957908-111712     NIPAS TEAM ANNUAL PHYS EXAM - CETNAROWICZ          106010   5363     83.00
NORTHSHORE UNIVERSITY HEALTHSYSTEM         202957908-111912     NIPAS TEAM ANNUAL PHYS EXAM - CETNAROWICZ          106010   5363    204.00
                                                                                                                                                         287.00

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY                    29149                SPRVSN OF POLICE PERSONNEL - JCM                   106034   5212                         900.00

OTIS ELEVATOR COMPANY                      387763/51193         REFUND FEES PAID IN DUPLICATE                      100001   4220     50.00
OTIS ELEVATOR COMPANY                      387763/51193         REFUND FEES PAID IN DUPLICATE                      100001   4220    986.80
OTIS ELEVATOR COMPANY                      387763/51193         REFUND FEES PAID IN DUPLICATE                      220001   4830    270.00
                                                                                                                                                        1,306.80

PRECISION SERVICE & PARTS INC              30FC9770             REAR SHOCKS - SQUAD CAR #7                         702050   5470     98.76
PRECISION SERVICE & PARTS INC              30FD2363             WINDOW SWITCH - #704                               702050   5470     60.37
                                                                                                                                                         159.13

QUILL CORPORATION                          7552381              OFFICE SUPPLIES                                    102110   5450     52.35
QUILL CORPORATION                          7589574              OFFICE SUPPLIES                                    102110   5450     55.06
QUILL CORPORATION                          7171132              OFFICE SUPPLIES - ENG/WRF                          102110   5450     39.77
QUILL CORPORATION                          7037166              OFFICE SUPPLIES - ENG/WRF                          102110   5450     52.18
QUILL CORPORATION                          7171132              OFFICE SUPPLIES - ENG/WRF                          542052   5450      6.99
QUILL CORPORATION                          7037166              OFFICE SUPPLIES - ENG/WRF                          542052   5450     41.38
QUILL CORPORATION                          7106430              OFFICE SUPPLIES - ENG/WRF                          542052   5450    460.44
QUILL CORPORATION                          7372932              SUPPLIES - PW                                      102010   5450     12.29
QUILL CORPORATION                          7501027              SUPPLIES - PW                                      102010   5450     20.97
QUILL CORPORATION                          7372932              SUPPLIES - PW                                      502010   5450     12.29
QUILL CORPORATION                          7501027              SUPPLIES - PW                                      502010   5450     20.98
QUILL CORPORATION                          7372932              SUPPLIES - PW                                      542010   5450     12.29
QUILL CORPORATION                          7501027              SUPPLIES - PW                                      542010   5450     20.97
QUILL CORPORATION                          7372932              SUPPLIES - PW                                      542052   5450     12.30
                                                                                                                                                         820.26

REPRINTS DESK INC                          RD2016407            2012 WINTER CELEBRATION BROCHURE                   101210   5335                       1,395.00
ROBBINS, TODD E                            112912               FITNESS ROOM - REPAIR DRYWALL/PAINT                106010   5320                         315.00
ROTARY CLUB OF DEERFIELD                   545                  2ND QTR MEALS/DUES 2012-13                         101210   5330                         216.00

SACCENTE, PATRICK                          103365121012         COMMUTERS CHOICE PROGRAM REIMBURSEMENT             100000   2040     40.52
SACCENTE, PATRICK                          103365112812         COMMUTERS CHOICE PROGRAM REIMBURSEMENT             100000   2040    125.00
                                                                                                                                                         165.52




                                                                                                                                         Page 3 of 5
December 17, 2012 Board Meeting

Vendor                                   Invoice #          Description                                     Org      Obj                  Total Invoice


SHERIDAN AUTO PARTS & MACHINE            764837             STOCK AUTO PARTS                                702050   5470       37.70
SHERIDAN AUTO PARTS & MACHINE            764099             STOCK AUTO PARTS                                702050   5470       44.06
SHERIDAN AUTO PARTS & MACHINE            764748             STOCK AUTO PARTS                                702050   5470       56.22
SHERIDAN AUTO PARTS & MACHINE            763823             STOCK AUTO PARTS                                702050   5470       76.24
SHERIDAN AUTO PARTS & MACHINE            764100             STOCK AUTO PARTS                                702050   5470       88.12
SHERIDAN AUTO PARTS & MACHINE            764964             STOCK AUTO PARTS                                702050   5470      170.46
SHERIDAN AUTO PARTS & MACHINE            764992             STOCK AUTO PARTS                                702050   5470      182.59
SHERIDAN AUTO PARTS & MACHINE            763316             STOCK AUTO PARTS                                702050   5470      568.73
                                                                                                                                                   1,224.12

SINGLEWIRE SOFTWARE                      10112              VILLAGE PHONE PAGING SYSTEM LICENSE MAINT       101111   5370      105.00
SINGLEWIRE SOFTWARE                      10112              VILLAGE PHONE PAGING SYSTEM LICENSE MAINT       101210   5370      105.00
SINGLEWIRE SOFTWARE                      10112              VILLAGE PHONE PAGING SYSTEM LICENSE MAINT       101330   5370      105.00
SINGLEWIRE SOFTWARE                      10112              VILLAGE PHONE PAGING SYSTEM LICENSE MAINT       102010   5370      105.00
SINGLEWIRE SOFTWARE                      10112              VILLAGE PHONE PAGING SYSTEM LICENSE MAINT       102110   5370      105.00
SINGLEWIRE SOFTWARE                      10112              VILLAGE PHONE PAGING SYSTEM LICENSE MAINT       106010   5370      787.50
                                                                                                                                                   1,312.50

STANDARD EQUIPMENT CO                    C79491             LEAF VAC PARTS                                  702050   5470                           264.27
STREET, KENT                             102651112812       WINTER CELEBRATION - CHESTNUTS                  101210   5387                           349.43
SUN-TIMES MEDIA                          I0000431532-1101   LEGAL NOTICE - TREASURER'S REPORT               101111   5336                           729.60
SWANSONS BLOSSOM SHOP LTD                223214             FIVE (5) POINSETTIAS FOR WINTER CELEBRATION     101210   5387                           261.95
SWC INC                                  37889/50913        DEPOSIT REFUND - 228 GLADYS CT                  910000   2423                           200.00

THELEN MATERIALS LLC                     289555             CLEAN FILL DUMP                                 502050   5421       994.33
THELEN MATERIALS LLC                     289277             TRENCH BACKFILL/CLEAN FILL DUMP                 502050   5421     1,001.17
                                                                                                                                                   1,995.50

THEODORE POLYGRAPH SERVICE               3489               TWO (2) PRE-EMPLOYMENT SCREENINGS               106010   5387                           270.00

THOMPSON ELEVATOR INSPECTION SRVC, INC   12-3951            ELEVATOR INSPECTIONS                            101330   5365       688.00
THOMPSON ELEVATOR INSPECTION SRVC, INC   12-3839            ELEVATOR INSPECTIONS                            101330   5365     2,967.00
THOMPSON ELEVATOR INSPECTION SRVC, INC   12-3939            ELEVATOR INSPECTIONS                            101330   5365     3,225.00
                                                                                                                                                   6,880.00

TREASURER OF LAKE COUNTY/LCDOT           T9878              ROUTINE TRAFFIC SIGNAL MAINT: SEP 12 - NOV 12   102050   5611                         2,125.20

UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE             89100121012        D-TALES MAILING - JAN/FEB 2013                  101210   5337     1,100.00
UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE             89100112012        FIRST CLASS PRESORT & STANDARD MAIL FEES        101210   5337       380.00
                                                                                                                                                   1,480.00

US BANK                                  3271055            FILING AGENT FEES - GOB 2010A (BAB)             357073   5760                           700.00

VERIZON WIRELESS                         2832423762         CELLULAR TELECOM SERVICES                       101111   5540       73.68
VERIZON WIRELESS                         2832423762         CELLULAR TELECOM SERVICES                       101210   5540      299.95
VERIZON WIRELESS                         2832423762         CELLULAR TELECOM SERVICES                       101330   5540      230.40
VERIZON WIRELESS                         2832423762         CELLULAR TELECOM SERVICES                       102010   5540      272.60
VERIZON WIRELESS                         2832423762         CELLULAR TELECOM SERVICES                       102110   5540      268.79
VERIZON WIRELESS                         2832423762         CELLULAR TELECOM SERVICES                       106010   5550      517.50
VERIZON WIRELESS                         2832423762         CELLULAR TELECOM SERVICES                       106034   5550      235.72
VERIZON WIRELESS                         2832423762         CELLULAR TELECOM SERVICES                       176020   5550      722.19
VERIZON WIRELESS                         2832423762         CELLULAR TELECOM SERVICES                       502010   5540      168.22
VERIZON WIRELESS                         2832423762         CELLULAR TELECOM SERVICES                       542010   5540      158.43
VERIZON WIRELESS                         2832423762         CELLULAR TELECOM SERVICES                       542052   5540      175.90
VERIZON WIRELESS                         2832423762         CELLULAR TELECOM SERVICES                       702050   5540       93.90
                                                                                                                                                   3,217.28

VERSINO, JAMES P.                        389037             TREE APPLICATION REFUND                         100001   4232                            75.00

VISU-SEWER CLEAN & SEAL, INC.            387026             WATER METER DEPOSIT REFUND LESS USAGE           910000   2425       750.00
VISU-SEWER CLEAN & SEAL, INC.            387026             WATER METER DEPOSIT REFUND LESS USAGE           500001   4452      (100.00)
                                                                                                                                                    650.00

WALGREEN NATIONAL CORP                   SEP12              SALES TAX REBATE - SEP 12 SALES                 101111   5395                       413,893.80
WAREHOUSE DIRECT OFFICE PRODUCTS         1764298-0          OFFICE SUPPLIES                                 106010   5450                           314.24

WASTE MANAGEMENT                         4765803-2008-5     COMMERCIAL SERVICE - NOV 12                     582030   5391       255.20
WASTE MANAGEMENT                         4761989-2008-6     COMMERCIAL SERVICE - NOV 12                     582030   5391       261.00
WASTE MANAGEMENT                         4761992-2008-0     COMMERCIAL SERVICE - NOV 12                     582030   5391       456.75
WASTE MANAGEMENT                         4761990-2008-4     COMMERCIAL SERVICE - NOV 12                     582030   5391       580.00
WASTE MANAGEMENT                         4765804-2008-3     COMMERCIAL SERVICE - NOV 12                     582030   5391     1,084.60
WASTE MANAGEMENT                         4761991-2008-2     COMMERCIAL SERVICE - NOV 12                     582030   5391     2,291.00
WASTE MANAGEMENT                         4765802-2008-7     RESIDENTIAL SERVICE - NOV 12                    582030   5391    90,596.00
                                                                                                                                                  95,524.55

WEST CENTRAL MUNICIPAL CONFERENCE        0230211-IN         50/50 TREE                                      102037   5365       85.00
WEST CENTRAL MUNICIPAL CONFERENCE        0005796-IN         TREE CONSORTIUM FEE                             102037   5365       85.00
                                                                                                                                                    170.00

WEST GROUP PAYMENT CENTER                825987646          CLEAR PLUS INVESTIGATIVE SUITE - OCT 12         106010   5370                           137.45
WHOLESALE DIRECT INC                     000196570          WIPER BLADES                                    702050   5470                           108.10
ZIEBELL WATER SERVICE PRODUCTS           218651-000         REPAIR CLAMPS/B-BOX LIDS                        502050   5421                         1,274.10

                                                                                                            Total Invoices                $     865,492.87




                                                                                                                                    Page 4 of 5
December 17, 2012 Board Meeting

Vendor                            Invoice #           Description                                 Org      Obj                         Total Invoice


Pre-Paid Wire Transactions

AMALGAMATED BANK OF CHICAGO       1853708006-120112   PRINCIPAL & INTEREST - SERIES 2003          502010   5710            8,137.50
AMALGAMATED BANK OF CHICAGO       1853708006-120112   PRINCIPAL & INTEREST - SERIES 2003          502010   5730          465,000.00
AMALGAMATED BANK OF CHICAGO       1853938008-120112   PRINCIPAL & INTEREST - SERIES 2008          357071   5710           87,800.02
AMALGAMATED BANK OF CHICAGO       1853938008-120112   PRINCIPAL & INTEREST - SERIES 2008          357071   5730          190,000.00
                                                                                                                                             750,937.52

DEERFIELD POLICE PENSION          POLPEN11302012      POLPEN CONTRIBS 11/30/2012 PR               730000   2066           13,400.48
DEERFIELD POLICE PENSION          POLPEN12072012      POLPEN CONTRIBS 12/07/2012 PR               730000   2066            5,963.44
                                                                                                                                               19,363.92

FEDERAL TAXES                     PR11302012          FICA/MC/FIT 11/30/2012 PR                   730000   2011           50,623.17
FEDERAL TAXES                     PR11302012          FICA/MC/FIT 11/30/2012 PR                   730000   2031           21,359.26
FEDERAL TAXES                     PR11302012          FICA/MC/FIT 11/30/2012 PR                   730000   2032            6,484.62
FEDERAL TAXES                     PR11302012          FICA/MC/FIT 11/30/2012 PR                   730000   2033            4,048.24
FEDERAL TAXES                     PR12072012          FICA/MC/FIT 12/07/2012 PR                   730000   2011           13,553.09
FEDERAL TAXES                     PR12072012          FICA/MC/FIT 12/07/2012 PR                   730000   2033            1,568.82
                                                                                                                                               97,637.20

ICMA                              ICMAREG11302012     ICMA REG 11/30/2012 PR                      730000   2042           18,910.14
ICMA                              ICMARHS11302012     ICMA RHS 11/30/2012 PR                      730000   2016            2,170.08
ICMA                              ICMAROTH11302012    ICMA ROTH 11/30/2012 PR                     730000   2042            2,690.46
                                                                                                                                               23,770.68

ILLINOIS DEPT OF REVENUE          PR11302012          SIT 11/30/2012 PR                           730000   2051           15,921.02
ILLINOIS DEPT OF REVENUE          PR12072012          SIT 12/07/2012 PR                           730000   2051            2,515.16
                                                                                                                                               18,436.18

IMRF                              IMRFNOV12           IMRF NOV 2012                               101111   5140               (0.03)
IMRF                              IMRFNOV12           IMRF NOV 2012                               730000   2030          122,667.91
IMRF                              IMRFNOV12           IMRF NOV 2012                               730000   2092           26,937.02
                                                                                                                                             149,604.90

IPBC                              NOV12               MED/LIFE INS: NOV 12                        100000   1613            6,510.63
IPBC                              NOV12               MED/LIFE INS: NOV 12                        100000   2437              550.00
IPBC                              NOV12               MED/LIFE INS: NOV 12                        100000   2437            1,841.62
IPBC                              NOV12               MED/LIFE INS: NOV 12                        100000   2437            1,969.65
IPBC                              NOV12               MED/LIFE INS: NOV 12                        100000   2437           32,723.33
IPBC                              NOV12               MED/LIFE INS: NOV 12                        100000   2438               45.43
IPBC                              NOV12               MED/LIFE INS: NOV 12                        100000   2438               94.68
IPBC                              NOV12               MED/LIFE INS: NOV 12                        100000   2438           19,231.69
IPBC                              NOV12               MED/LIFE INS: NOV 12                        100000   2439              279.81
IPBC                              NOV12               MED/LIFE INS: NOV 12                        100000   2439           54,644.25
IPBC                              NOV12               MED/LIFE INS: NOV 12                        101111   5120              700.00
IPBC                              NOV12               MED/LIFE INS: NOV 12                        730000   2054              769.86
IPBC                              NOV12               MED/LIFE INS: NOV 12                        730000   2054              820.06
IPBC                              NOV12               MED/LIFE INS: NOV 12                        730000   2060          152,679.16
                                                                                                                                             272,860.17

US BANK                           BAF1010NOV12        BANK ANALYSIS FEE/1010/NOV12                730000   2051              236.80
US BANK                           BAF1190NOV12        BANK ANALYSIS FEE/1190/NOV12                730000   2801              176.36
US BANK                           803264300-120112    INTEREST - SERIES 2011B (QECB)              357072   5710          250,000.00
US BANK                           803340500-120112    INTEREST - SERIES 2012                      357070   5710          117,381.25
US BANK                           803022800-120112    PRINCIPAL & INTEREST - SERIES 2010A (BAB)   357073   5710          232,401.25
US BANK                           803022800-120112    PRINCIPAL & INTEREST - SERIES 2010A (BAB)   357073   5730          540,000.00
US BANK                           803264200-120112    PRINCIPAL & INTEREST - SERIES 2011A         357072   5710          120,082.50
US BANK                           803264200-120112    PRINCIPAL & INTEREST - SERIES 2011A         357072   5730          625,000.00
US BANK                           TRUSTNOV12          TRUST FEES/VILL ACCT/NOV12                  730000   2801               52.99
                                                                                                                                           1,885,331.15

                                                                                                  Total Pre-Paid Wire Transactions     $   3,217,941.72

                                                                                                  Grand Total                          $   4,083,434.59




                                                                                                                                 Page 5 of 5
To the Finance Director:

      The payment of the above listed accounts has been approved
by the Board of Trustees at their meeting held on December 17, 2012
and you are hereby authorized to pay them from the appropriate
funds.




     (Treasurer)
TREASURER’S REPORT
  November 30, 2012
                                         HIGHLIGHT REPORT
                                         NOVEMBER 30, 2012

SALES TAX (non home-rule)*
                                                               % CHANGE TOTAL 12 % CHANGE
  SALES        RECEIPT       FY 10/11 FY 11/12 FY 12/13        PRIOR YR. MONTHS      ANNUAL
  MONTH         MONTH        ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL               PERIOD    RUNNING    TOTALS
                                                                           3,687,996
February     May               280,873    249,554    271,280         8.7% 3,730,339      1.1%
March        June              281,316    324,937    270,536       -16.7% 3,722,500     -0.2%
April        July              286,389    309,447    273,240       -11.7% 3,754,958      0.9%
May          August            295,531    286,890    340,185        18.6% 3,850,933      2.6%
June         September         317,289    331,526    307,356        -7.3% 3,856,116      0.1%
July         October           325,890    297,924    362,457        21.7% 3,877,842      0.6%
August       November          285,767    345,482    330,467        -4.3% 3,823,441     -1.4%
September    December          298,627    340,970                   14.2% 3,787,234     -0.9%
October      January           295,193    287,354                   -2.7% 3,840,529      1.4%
November     February          304,816    337,274                   10.6% 3,816,359     -0.6%
December     March             352,780    448,755                   27.2% 3,880,892      1.7%
January      April             290,820    296,003                    1.8% 3,865,877     -0.4%
YTD TOTAL                    3,615,291 3,856,116 2,155,521                                      4.8%
*net of Walgreen's rebate
MAJOR REVENUE SOURCES                                         Projected                   FY     Current FY
Revenue Items               November           Fiscal YTD       YTD       Variance      Budget   Projection
Sales Tax (non-HR)                438,512          3,208,514 2,654,167     554,347     4,550,000 4,550,000
Home Rule Sales Tax               362,555          2,795,355 2,070,833     724,522     3,550,000 3,550,000
Water Sales                       359,299          2,920,885 2,391,667     529,218     4,100,000 4,100,000
Interest*                            8,593             86,058    86,713        (655)     148,650   148,650
Sewer Use Charge                  242,867          1,851,334 1,556,042     295,292     2,667,500 2,667,500
Hotel Tax                         174,682          1,204,154 1,050,000     154,154     1,800,000 1,800,000
Electric Utility Tax                87,315           767,948    729,167     38,781     1,250,000 1,250,000
State Income Tax                    97,019         1,144,633    841,983    302,650     1,443,400 1,443,400
Building Permits                    84,473           819,217    306,250    512,967       525,000   900,000
*All budgeted funds (excluding police pension)
OPERATING FUNDS (GENERAL, WATER, SEWER, GARAGE) SUMMARY
Revenues               2,169,667    19,223,292 15,017,683 4,205,609 25,744,600 25,744,600
Expenditures           4,074,704    15,948,279 16,568,880  (620,601) 28,403,794 28,403,794

REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES

Report for the 58% of the fiscal year. Sales tax net of rebate decreased from the prior month and the same
period prior year. However, it is still up year to date and for a running 12 month period. Water and Sewer
revenues have decreased from previous month and are consistent with same period of the prior year.
Building permit revenue continues to exceed the budgeted amount. Infrastructure impact fees have
generated approximately $146,000 for the Infrastructure Replacement Fund. Operating expenditures
exceeded operating revenue for November due mainly to planned debt service payments. In addition,
November had 3 pay periods.

CASH AND INVESTMENTS

As of November 30, 2012, 100% of available cash was invested at an estimated average annualized interest
rate of 0.46 compared to an average rate of 0.09% for the 90-day Treasury bill.


                                                    -1-
                    CASH POSITION ANALYSIS
                    November 30, 2012

                        TOTAL CASH AND INVESTMENTS

                                  CURRENT MONTH       PRIOR MONTH      CHANGE                    EXPLANATION
OPERATING FUNDS
GENERAL                                 19,133,703      20,484,784    (1,351,081)   Transfer to Debt Service Fund
ENHANCED 911                             1,259,135       1,270,258       (11,123)
WATER                                   (1,038,907)       (592,874)     (446,033)          Debt Service Payment
SEWER                                      207,989         206,030         1,959
REFUSE                                     361,806         496,740      (134,934)                 Leaf Collection
PARKING LOTS                               383,585         416,726       (33,141)
GARAGE                                      77,697          91,902       (14,205)
VEH & EQUIP                              4,656,704       4,611,164        45,540
DEBT SERVICE                               831,548       1,198,402      (366,854)         Debt Service Payments
TOTAL ALL OPERATING                     25,873,260      28,183,132    (2,309,872)

CAPITAL FUNDS
INFRASTRUCT REPLACE.                     1,548,689       1,726,081      (177,392)
BOND PROCEEDS                            3,316,539       5,043,531    (1,726,992)                   Project Costs
MOTOR FUEL TAX                             418,940         375,766        43,174
TOTAL ALL CAPITAL                        5,284,168       7,145,378    (1,861,210)

TOTAL CAP. AND OPER.                    31,157,428      35,328,510    (4,171,082)

OTHER FUNDS
POLICE PENSION                          34,646,195      34,544,859      101,336
EAST SHORE RADIO                            73,062          77,735       (4,673)




                                                       Page 2
                                             Village of Deerfield
                              Expenditure Report - November 30, 2012 - 58% of FY
FUND/DEPARTMENT              November      Projected     Actual                  Budget       % of     Prior
   (function)               Expenditures     Y-T-D       Y-T-D      Variance     2012-13     Budget   Year %
10 GENERAL FUND
   Finance                    1,729,783     3,288,624  3,553,647    (265,023) 5,858,963       60.7%     45.4%
   Administration               183,210       756,367    742,457      13,910  1,296,629       57.3%     64.0%
   Comm. Development            118,787       673,826    632,174      41,652  1,155,131       54.7%     51.9%
   Engineering                   47,771       315,345    348,624     (33,279)   540,591       64.5%     60.6%
   Street                       155,291     1,521,289  1,288,480     232,809  2,607,924       49.4%     56.8%
   Police                       741,769     4,858,158  4,622,037     236,121  9,188,270       50.3%     49.6%
   TOTAL GENERAL              2,976,611    11,413,609 11,187,419     226,190 20,647,508       54.2%     50.9%

54 SEWER
   Administration                34,394       316,415     376,710     (60,295)     542,426    69.4%     69.5%
   Cleaning & Maint.             23,054       142,500     147,708      (5,208)     244,285    60.5%     39.2%
   Construction                  20,848       211,138     144,565      66,573      361,950    39.9%     60.4%
   Treatment Plant              191,870     1,041,707   1,016,742      24,965    1,785,783    56.9%     54.1%
   TOTAL SEWER                  270,166     1,711,759   1,685,725      26,034    2,934,444    57.4%     56.1%

50 WATER
   Administration               514,744       821,150     866,139    (44,990)    1,075,542    80.5%     80.5%
   Main & Hydrant Maint.         50,468       359,042     375,592    (16,550)      615,500    61.0%     55.0%
   Distribution                 207,810     1,348,025   1,565,207   (217,182)    2,310,900    67.7%     59.9%
   Meter Maintenance             20,694       250,600     225,200     25,400       429,600    52.4%     75.9%
   TOTAL WATER                  793,716     2,778,816   3,032,138   (253,322)    4,431,542    68.4%     65.6%

70 GARAGE                        34,212      227,675     222,558       5,117      390,300     57.0%     56.4%

   TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS         1,253,385     6,239,539   6,228,901     10,638 10,364,210       60.1%     60.3%

17 ENHANCED 9-1-1                37,836      327,875     194,973     132,902      562,071     34.7%     32.8%

58 REFUSE                       186,455      794,253     722,967      71,286     1,361,577    53.1%     52.7%

60 PARKING LOT (village)         13,086      140,807      99,037      41,770      241,384     41.0%     17.5%

60 PARKING LOT (combined)        11,813      102,454     112,785      (10,331)    175,635     64.2%     17.2%

22 INFRAS. REPLACE.           1,660,888    11,489,333 10,727,132     762,201 19,696,000       54.5%     61.5%

14 MFT                                0      490,000     490,000            0     490,000    100.0%      0.0%

80 POLICE PENSION               180,040     1,217,738   1,192,282     25,456     2,087,550    57.1%     75.1%

21 VEH/EQUIP REPLACE.                 0      344,167     252,549      91,618      590,000     42.8%     62.7%

35 DEBT SERVICE               1,477,075     2,246,653   2,246,653           0    2,897,046    77.5%     99.9%




                                                                                                                3
                              Village of Deerfield
                           Revenues vs Expenditures
                              November 30, 2012
                                    (Amounts x 1,000)

  FUND:                  ACTUAL      PROJECTED ACTUAL             VARIANCE
                          Month        Y-T-D    Y-T-D
10 GENERAL
    Revenues:
    Property Taxes              6           2,000        2,042
    St Income Tax              97             842        1,145
    Sales Tax (non HR)        439           2,654        3,209
    Electricity Tax            87             729          768
    Telecomm Tax              117             875          979
    HR Sales Tax              272           1,546        2,096
    Hotel Tax                 175           1,050        1,205
    Interest Earnings           5              61           50
    Fees & Fines               53             157          238
    Vehicle Licenses            1             325          325
    Building Permits           84             306          819
    Other Rev                 190           1,087        1,285
    REVENUE                 1,526          11,632       14,161
    EXPENDITURES            2,977          11,414       11,187
   Contribution to
   Fund Balance            (1,451)             218       2,974        2,756
54 SEWER
    REVENUES                 248             1,584       1,877
    EXPENDITURES             270             1,712       1,686
   Contribution to
   Fund Balance               (22)            (128)       191          319
50 WATER
    REVENUES                 369             2,452       2,992
    EXPENDITURES             794             2,779       3,032
   Contribution to
   Fund Balance              (425)            (327)        (40)        287
70 GARAGE
     REVENUES                 27               230        192
     EXPENDITURES             34               228        223
   Contribution to
   Fund Balance                (7)                2        (31)         (33)
22 REPLACEMENT
 (Infrastructure)
     REVENUES               1,842           7,951        7,139
     EXPENDITURES           1,661          11,489       10,727
   Contribution to
   Fund Balance              181            (3,538)     (3,588)         (50)
14 MFT
    REVENUES                  43               266        344
    EXPENDITURES               0               490        490
   Contribution to
   Fund Balance               43              (224)       (146)         78
80 POLICE PENSION
    REVENUES                 281             1,464       1,987
    EXPENDITURES             180             1,218       1,192
   Contribution to
   Fund Balance              101               246        795          549




                                                                               4
   FUND:               ACTUAL      PROJECTED ACTUAL               VARIANCE
                        Month        Y-T-D    Y-T-D
58 REFUSE
    REVENUES                49         1,164    1,153
    EXPENDITURES           186           794      723
   Contribution to
   Fund Balance            (137)        370       430                       60

35 DEBT SERVICE
    REVENUES              1,110        2,719    2,719
    EXPENDITURES          1,477        2,247    2,247
   Contribution to
   Fund Balance            (367)        472       472                           0
60 PARKING
    REVENUES                16          118       129
    EXPENDITURES            25          243       212
   Contribution to
   Fund Balance              (9)        (125)     (83)                      42
17 ENHANCED 9-1-1
    REVENUES                26          208       266
    EXPENDITURES            38          328       195
   Contribution to
   Fund Balance             (12)        (120)      71                      191

21 VEH/EQUIP REPLACE
    REVENUES                46          327       323
    EXPENDITURES             0          344       253
   Contribution to
   Fund Balance             46           (17)      70                       87

                            GENERAL FUND OPERATING RESULTS      Projected YTD       Actual YTD

             16,000
             14,000
             12,000
             10,000
  $ (,000)




              8,000
              6,000
              4,000
              2,000
                  0
                       REVENUE                           EXPENDITURES




                                                                                                 5
                                                                     Memorandum
DATE:                  December 17, 2012
TO:                    Village President and Board of Trustees
FROM:                  Jennifer Maltas, Assistant to the Village Manager

SUBJECT:               Administration 6-Month Objectives Report


Background

The memo below outlines the major projects and tasks undertaken by the Administration
Department in the last 6 months. Administration includes 5 positions – Village Manager,
Assistant to the Village Manager, Management Analyst, Computer Systems Coordinator, and
Computer Technician.

Manager’s Office

In addition to supporting the Mayor, Village Board, Village Attorney, Boards and Commissions,
and Departments, the Manager’s Office undertook and completed a number of significant projects
over the 6 months. They are:

       Comprehensive Fee Schedule – The Village’s first fee schedule was approved by the
        Village Board during this period. The new fee schedule will allow elected officials, staff,
        and the public to easily determine the fees associated with projects as well as review the
        fees more easily during budget preparations. The Village’s codifier is working on making
        the change as many sections of the code must be modified.

       Municipal Aggregation – Power began flowing from the Village’s electric supplier, mc2,
        to the Village’s residential and commercial aggregation participants in June and July. A
        second opt-out mailing was done in October/November to those residents and businesses
        that are new to Deerfield – this will be done approximately every six months moving
        forward. It is estimated that Deerfield’s participants will save $2.3 million dollars through
        May of 2013. A Consortium Subcommittee is currently negotiating with mc2 on the rate
        and program that will start in June 2013. The Committee is also working on a program
        that the Consortium can offer to businesses that do not qualify for the Consortium’s rate
        but may not know they can purchase their electricity from an alternative supplier. Finally,
        the Consortium is also exploring other partnership opportunities in the area of
        sustainability and more information will be coming out about this in the next few months.

       Sustainability – Staff worked with SWALCO and the DBR Chamber of Commerce to
        review the potential to offer a commercial waste and recycling franchise for Deerfield
    businesses. Staff gave presentations to the Sustainability Commission and the Chamber
    Board to get their feedback. The information was presented last month to the Village
    Board at a Committee of the Whole meeting where the Board gave staff the go ahead to
    work with a committee of chamber members on development and issuance of an RFP. The
    first meeting is expected to take place in January. It is likely that Bannockburn will be
    joining the committee and the RFP process. Jenny Maltas worked with departments on
    creating a comprehensive list of sustainable projects that were completed in Deerfield
    based on the US Conference of Mayors Climate Protection Agreement and has drafted a
    Sustainability Plan. This plan is under staff review and will be presented to the
    Sustainability Commission in the first part of 2013. The intent is to guide the Village and
    set priorities regarding sustainability moving forward. The Sustainability Commission
    worked on a composting ordinance that was approved by the Village Board at the first
    meeting in December. The Commission has also been working on a construction
    recycling ordinance that is expected to be before the Village Board for a first review in
    January.

   Economic Development – Manager’s Office staff has worked with staff and local
    businesses on several major economic development projects. Staff has met with and
    continues to stay in contact with Mondelez about their move to Deerfield. Additionally,
    staff has continued meeting with the owners of Deerbrook Mall on proposed
    redevelopment plans for the site. Finally, staff continues the business retention visit
    program with the Director of the DBR Chamber of Commerce. All business participants
    in the visits thought the meeting was worthwhile and were happy that the Village and
    Chamber reached out to meet with them. Management Analyst Lichterman also prepared a
    business/retail occupancy report that is presented along with the Plan Commission’s C-2
    District recommendations.

   Electronic Newsletter – Manager’s Office staff continues utilization of the Village’s
    Connect CTY system to send out information via e-mail to residents who sign up for the
    service. The intent is to use the system to notify residents of special events, construction
    projects, and other important issues impacting residents. Since the first e-mail 6 months
    ago the Village’s total subscribers has doubled with over 1,000 e-mails registered with the
    service. Bi-monthly D-Tales have been published and distributed on schedule throughout
    the Village.

   Cable and Telecommunications – Staff and the CTC presented a 10 year renewal of the
    Village’s Franchise Agreement with Comcast which was approved over the summer.
    Additionally, the CTC and staff negotiated with Crown Castle on an extension of their
    lease agreement for the tower at Reservoir 29A which was also approved by the Village
    Board this summer. The Commission is on stand-by until new business presents itself.

   Purchasing Manual – Staff presented a new Purchasing Manual for the Village Board to
    review and approve through resolution this fall. As a result of the new process, staff has
    been working with the Finance Department on implementing a paperless approval process
    for purchasing using the Village’s software system. It is expected that we will be
    paperless by the end of January.
   Personnel – Due to the healthcare law, staff has been working with the Finance
    Department, Labor Attorney, and our insurance pool to update the healthcare eligibility
    section of the personnel manual. Staff also took this opportunity to update some other
    sections as necessary. This update is on the December 17th agenda for approval.
    Additionally, Jenny Maltas and Eric Burk began working with the Village’s Labor
    Attorney to negotiate a new contract with Local 150. The current contract expires on May
    31, 2013.

   Document Management – In the next few months, staff will be evaluating and bringing
    to the Village Board a software proposal for document management. This project is
    budgeted and is intended to digitize and store all of our files electronically – especially
    clerk’s files and agreements. This system will allow staff to easily retrieve important
    documents and make complying with the Freedom of Information Act Laws easier and
    more efficient.

   Fine Arts Commission – Staff has been working with the Fine Arts Commission and the
    DBR Chamber of Commerce to host another Fine Arts Festival. This year 100 artists are
    expected to participate and once again local restaurants will be invited to sell their food at
    the event. The Fine Arts Commission successfully oversaw the relocation of the
    "Aggripine" sculpture from in front of the Library to the Public Works Facility. The
    sculpture will remain on display at Public Works while the Library is under constructions.
    The Commission is actively in discussions with other municipalities to determine ways to
    display more public art (i.e. sculptures and public murals) in the Village. The Fine Arts
    Commission continues to participate on the One Book One Zip Code Committee in order
    to promote the literary arts. Recently the Commission hosted Adam Schwartz, Senior
    Counsel of the ACLU to speak about individuals' rights and their connection to this year's
    reading selection, Little Brother by Cory Doctorow.

   Family Days Commission – The Family Days Commission solicited $15,000 in sponsors
    this past year and successfully partnered with the Deerfield Rotary Club to host on the
    annual Deerfield Rotary Club Race. This was the first year that finances for the event
    were administered by the Village, while the Rotary Club provided the logistics and
    staffing for the event. This was also the first year the race was certified by the Chicago
    Area Runners Association (CARA) and over 200 runners/walkers participated. This past
    year, the Family Days Commission was able to offer the same great entertainment on July
    3 and July 4th while reducing the net cost by 48% from 2011. The Commission is working
    to enhance the event even further next year since it will be the 50th anniversary of Family
    Days.

   Community Relations Commission – In addition to seeking applicants and awarding
    student and community volunteer of the year awards, the Community Relations
    Commission is preparing a resource guide for adults and families with adults that have
    special needs. This follows last year’s production of a resource guide for seniors over 65
    years of age.
Information Technology

      Village Hall Departments Support – IT configured and deployed seven new desktop
       computers for the Finance department and one new laptop for the Administration
       department. IT also replaced the large display in the Village Hall lobby. Additionally, IT
       worked with the Community Development Department on a pilot program for tablet
       computers for field input into the Village’s ERP software from inspection sites. IT
       configured and provided to the department two different tablet models for testing.
       Lastly, IT developed a database program for the Finance Department to combine county
       sales tax data sets into a usable format, and upgraded PDF software.

      Public Works Department Support – IT configured and deployed two new Toughbook
       laptops and docks for Street Department vehicles, configured and deployed two new staff
       laptops, and provided a repurposed computer for the department’s new software weather
       subscription. IT installed a new cellular repeater system for the Water Department. IT
       also coordinated the installation and configuration of the RedZone sewer line database
       software on multiple department computers, making network reconfigurations as
       necessary to support the data link to the software vendor. Further, IT reviewed and made
       recommendations on the Public Works keycard access system specifications and quote.
       Lastly, IT configured and deployed a new workstation computer for the Village’s GIS
       program, migrated services hosted by the old workstation to other servers, configured a
       new backup scheme for the workstation, and configured the network for compatibility
       with the GIS consultant’s new software requirements.

      Police Department Support – IT has continued its support of the Police Department’s
       dispatch and records software suite, installing and configuring mapping components on
       servers, desktops, and squad laptops, and working with the software vendor to implement
       and configure the In-Car Mapping functionality purchased by the department. IT then
       deployed this functionality and met with department representatives to tweak it to match
       their needs. IT also consulted with said software vendor and coordinated with its
       compatible equipment vendors to receive competitive quotes for a new LiveScan
       fingerprinting system after meeting with the department to review and confirm its
       requirements. Additionally, IT coordinated the termination of leases and buyouts on the
       department’s two copy machines. IT coordinated the receipt of competitive equipment
       and maintenance quotes for new machines from multiple copier vendors, providing them
       to the department and making a recommendation therein. IT also supported the
       Department by configuring and installing eight new desktop computers, a new ID card
       printing system and software, a tablet device for the FTO program, and a new mugshot
       camera for booking, as well as by upgrading PDF software.

      Wastewater Reclamation Facility Support – IT has continued its support of the WRF
       reconstruction project. IT performed reviews of technology-related plans, specifications,
       systems, equipment, and facilities and advised Public Works staff and plant engineers. IT
       also selected and coordinated the purchasing of firewall, telephone, networking, optics,
       and printing equipment for the new plant. To facilitate IT services at the new plant, IT, in
       conjunction with the Engineering Department, coordinated the installation of a fiber link
       between the Treatment Plant and the Public Works facility and prepared for use of the link
       by selecting appropriate optics and components and performing network reconfiguration.
       IT also coordinated scheduling of telecommunications utility providers for plant site visits
       and work quotes, and facilitated agreement executions and/or installation services. IT also
       proposed an alternate wireless solution for Wastewater SCADA telematics transmission to
       avoid problems encountered by Building and Code Enforcement with regards to the
       construction of radio towers. IT met with Verizon specialists and pertinent Village staff
       and engineering consultants to review the feasibility of this cellular option which, having
       been selected, will eliminate the need and cost of building private radio towers and should
       lower ongoing maintenance costs.

      General Support – IT has worked to improve the information systems backup and
       recovery processes for the Village. To this end, IT selected and configured new backup
       software for increased functionality and efficiency and implemented a disk-based backup
       archive solution. IT also pushed forward on a vision to use the Public Works facility as a
       disaster recovery and business continuity site by coordinating with vendors to receive
       quotes for the electrical, low-voltage, and HVAC work that would be required. IT also
       began the process of upgrading the Village’s Microsoft Office software. IT consulted
       with Microsoft licensing specialists to select the most effective software licensing model,
       facilitated Board approval and execution of the agreement, and purchased the licenses. IT
       coordinated training sessions on the new software for approximately seventy users and
       prepared a lab of computers for use during training. Users will receive the new software
       shortly following their training. IT also switched the Village’s Internet service provider,
       facilitating termination of the expiring contract and execution of the service agreement
       with the new vendor, and managing the processes involved in the cutover. The new
       Internet connection offers approximately fifteen-times faster download speed and three-
       times faster upload speed at approximately one-third the monthly cost as compared to the
       old service. Lastly, IT handled the Village’s migration from cell phone carrier
       Sprint/Nextel to Verizon due to Sprint/Nextel’s shutdown of a local cell tower and
       declining service quality. After confirming carrier suitability and email system
       compatibility, IT analyzed Village cellular usage patterns to determine the appropriate
       new cellular service plans and provided Administration with a quote and a report and
       recommendation on the matter. IT also handled the device and accessory swap and
       activation for all Village cellular telephone users

Conclusion

Jennifer Maltas, Assistant to the Village Manager, will be present at the meeting to provide the
report and answer any questions that the Board may have.
                              REQUEST FOR BOARD ACTION

                                                                 Agenda Item: 12-124


Subject:       Report and Recommendation of the Plan Commission re: Text Amendments to
               C-2 Outlying Commercial District to Strengthen Retail

Action Requested:            Approval for Recommendation

Originated by:               Plan Commission

Referred to:                 Mayor and Board of Trustees



Summary of Background and Reason for Request:

At the directional of the Mayor and Board of Trustees, the Plan Commission held a public
hearing and workshop meetings in order to discuss possible Text Amendment to the C-2
Outlying Commercial zoning district to help support retail. The Plan Commission’s
recommendations are contained in the attached report.

Reports and Documents Attached:

Recommendation
Public Hearing Minutes 11/8/12
Workshop Minutes 11/8/12
Prefiling Conference Minutes, 10/9/12 & 9/13/12
Air Photos of the C-2 District Properties
Comprehensive Plan Sections on Commercial Areas and on the Lake Cook/Waukegan District
Current Lists of Permitted Uses from Article 5.02-B and Special Uses
Letter from C-2 Property Owners, David Dresdner and Sherwood Blitstein, Deerfield Park Plaza




Date Referred to Board:      December 17, 2012

Action Taken: __________________________________________
                                                                              APPROVED


                                  RECOMMENDATION

TO: Mayor and Board of Trustees

FROM: Plan Commission

DATE: November 8, 2012

RE: Text Amendments to the C-2 Outlying Commercial District to Strengthen Retail

We transmit for your consideration a recommendation adopted by the Plan Commission on
the request for Text Amendments to the C-2 Outlying Commercial District. The Plan
Commission held a two workshop meetings (on September 13 and October 9, 2012) and a
public hearing on November 8, 2012 where testimony and documentary evidence were
presented in support of the request. A copy of the public hearing and workshop minutes
are attached.

In support of its request, the Plan Commission makes the following findings of fact and
conclusions:

                                 FINDINGS OF FACT

Background

With the recent replacement of retail with medical office at the former Borders Books
(replaced by a 25,000 square foot medical office for NorthShore University Health System)
and the former George’s What’s Cooking (replaced by a 20,582 square foot medical office
for Northwestern Memorial Hospital Physicians Group), the Mayor and Board of Trustees
asked the Plan Commission to consider possible zoning amendments to the C-2 Outlying
Commercial District to further support and strengthen retail. The C-2 Outlying Commercial
District contains Deerbrook Mall, Deerfield Park Plaza, Cadwells Corners, the Home Depot
PUD, and other various parcels (see attached aerial photos of the C-2 Outlying Commercial
District).

The Plan Commission realizes there are some benefits to medical uses such as: Deerfield
residents have the convenience of large medical groups such as NorthShore University and
Northwestern Memorial Hospital Group within the Village; the employees of medical uses
patronize local restaurants and businesses; medical uses have a regional draw bringing
people to the Village (unknown if their customers patronize other businesses, but some
probably do), and medical uses are stable uses which benefit landlords that do not have
look for new tenants for the space, and the Village does not have a vacancy.

The Plan Commission also realizes that certain larger shopping centers in Deerfield, such
as Deerfield Park Plaza and Cadwells Corners, suffer from the lack of visibility for the
stores. Retailers often want visible store locations (along with a certain amount of traffic
on the roadway, and the correct demographic for their stores.)

The Commissioners reviewed various articles that explain how the retail world is changing.
They also reviewed a non-sales tax survey from Northwest Municipal Conference (NWMC)
that was conducted in 2010. These documents are available on the Village’s website at
www.deerfield.il.us, click on Departments  Community Development  Upcoming Public
Hearings. Based on 2010 NWMC survey, when a non-sales tax business is restricted to
where it can locate, the restriction has been put in place in downtowns, which is what
Deerfield currently does. For more than 20 years, Deerfield has maintained a downtown
first floor retail ordinance. The first floor retail ordinance allows retail uses as a Permitted
Use on the first floor. Service uses such as dry cleaners, beauty shops, medical offices,
and real estate offices have to obtain a Special Use when located on the first floor in the
downtown. The purpose of the first floor retail ordinance is to create a shopping district in
the downtown where patrons could walk from store to store, and not create a situation
where the non-retail uses takes over the first floor in the downtown. An added benefit of
the downtown first floor retail ordinance is the sales tax it generates for the Village.

Aerial of C-2 Outlying Commercial Zoning District

Aerial photographs of all of the C-2 properties are attached. There are approximately 30
properties in the C-2 Outlying Commercial District. Most of the C-2 properties are located
around the intersection of Lake Cook Road and Waukegan Road and west of this
intersection, with a small portion of the C-2 District located at the north end of the Village
on Waukegan Road.

Comprehensive Plan

The appropriate sections of the Comprehensive Plan that address the C-2 Outlying
Commercial District are attached. The Comprehensive Plan recognizes the importance of
keeping the C-2 District a vibrant shopping area for the Village.

Recent Data Obtained from the International Council of Shopping Centers
(ICSC)

Staff has obtained some recent data from an ICSC event held on August 22, 2012 where
valuable information was shared. Retailers usually have brokers that represent them, and
the retail brokerage industry shared what they are seeking in potential locations at this
event. The Plan Commission was provided with data from the August 22, 2012 event
booklet that indicate the size of the store needed (along with the geographic area
preferred, population density, desired income, etc). Many of the stores such as Saks Fifth
Avenue Off 5th, TJ Maxx/Marshall’s/Homegoods are around 25,000 square feet in typical
size, while stores such as Staples, Office Max and Office Depot are a typical size of around
15,000 square feet. Many of the restaurants such as Potbelly’s, Five Guys, Roti
Mediterranean Grill, and Noodles & Co., indicate a size of 3,000 square or less in area.

                                               2
September 13 and October 9, 2012 Workshop Meetings and November 8, 2012
Public Hearing

In order to formulate their recommendation on possible Text Amendments to the C-2
District to strengthen retail, the Plan Commission held two workshop meetings on
September 13 and October 9, before holding the public hearing. The workshop meeting
minutes are attached. For the November 8 public hearing, all of the property owners were
notified of the public hearing by mail (a detailed explanation of the proposed Text
Amendments were included in the mailings) and a legal notice was published in The
Deerfield Review. All of the past background information was placed on the Village’s
website for any property owner who wished to review this information and the mailing
explained where this information was located on the Village’s website. A list of various
businesses in the C-2 District and their size in square feet was also placed on the Village’s
website to help someone to understand and visualize the size of various square footages
of various size businesses.

Proposed Text Amendments to the C-2 Outlying Commercial District

Based on Plan Commission’s discussions at the September 13 and October 9 Plan
Commission workshop meetings, and the November 8 public hearing, below are the
proposed Text Amendments to this zoning district to help strengthen retail in the C-2
Outlying Commercial District.

Proposed Text Amendment #1

Require a Special Use for any future service use, office use, medical office use, and
recreational use listed in Article 5.02-B, 2, 3, and 4 which is between 10,000 square feet
and 20,000 square feet in size when located on the ground floor, with the exception of a
couple of areas in the Deerfield Park Plaza shopping center (formerly known as Lake Cook
Plaza) where Text Amendment #1 would not apply. The areas include the 16,000 square
foot Barking Lot building at 495 Lake Cook Road, and the 13,100 square foot area toward
the rear of the shopping center addressed 405 Lake Cook Road, Suites A18 through A22
which is occupied by California Tan and the former Diplomat Pharmacy, as these area are
more suited for non-retail uses.

Currently, uses in Article 5.02-B, 2, 3, and 4 are all Permitted Uses in the C-2 Outlying
Commercial District.

Proposed Text Amendment #2

Do not allow future large non-retail service uses, office uses, medical office uses, and
recreational uses listed in Article 5.02-B, 2, 3, and 4 of 20,001 square feet and over in size
located on the ground floor in the C-2 District with the exception of the three (3) buildings
at the rear of Deerbrook Mall which are Joy of the Game, Brunswick, and National Tire and


                                              3
Battery, and in Deerfield Park Plaza the Sachs Recreation Center as the Plan Commission
believes these areas noted above are not conducive to retail use.

Currently, uses in Article 5.02-B, 2, 3, and 4 are all Permitted Uses in the C-2 Outlying
Commercial District.

Below are the current Permitted Uses in Article 5.02-B,2,3,and 4 in the
C-2 Outlying Commercial District that would be impacted by the Proposed
Text Amendments #1 and #2

In summary, based on proposed Text Amendments #1 and #2 the uses below
become Special Uses if they are between 10,000 square feet and 20,000
square feet in size with the exception of a couple of geographic areas,
not allowed if over 20,001 square feet in size with the exception of a
couple of geographic areas, and they remain Permitted Uses if they are
less than 10,000 square feet in size.

2.     Service Uses

     a. Artists' Studios.
     b. Banks, Savings and Loan Associations and other Financial
         Institutions, not including drive-in facilities.
     c. Barber Shops.
     d. Beauty Shops.
     e. Blueprinting and Photocopying Establishments.
     f. Dry Cleaning and Laundry Establishments, including self-service,
         coin-operated equipment, provided that the floor area devoted to
         any one such establishment (including floor area devoted to
         accessory uses as well as the principal use) shall not exceed
         2,750 square feet.
      g. Food Catering Establishments.
      h. Interior Decorating Shops, including upholstery and making of
          draperies, slip covers and other similar articles, when conducted
          as part of retail operations and secondary to the principal use.
      i. Photographic Studios.
      j. Radio and Television Service and Repair Shops.
      k. Shoe, Clothing and Hat Repair Shops.
      l. Tailor and Dressmaking shops, employing not more than five
          persons.
      m. Travel Agencies and Transportation Ticket offices.

3.     Office Uses

     a.   Accounting, Auditing and Bookkeeping offices.
     b.   Business, Professional and Government offices.
     c.   Employment Agencies.
     d.   Insurance Agencies.
     e.   Medical and Dental Facilities.
     f.   Medical and Dental Laboratories.
     g.   Newspaper Offices, provided that there is no print or
          distribution in connection therewith.


                                              4
      h. Real Estate Offices.
      i. Secretarial Services.
      j. Security and Commodity Brokers.

 4.    Recreation and Social Facilities (Ord.0-81-57)

      a. Clubs and Lodges, not-for-profit.
      b. Philanthropic or Charitable Organizations.
      c. Self Improvement Facilities, including physical exercise and
         sports training schools, but not including those uses
         specifically provided for in Article 5.02-C.

Proposed Text Amendment #3

Currently, retail stores of 10,000 square feet in area or more are Special Uses in the C-2
Outlying Commercial District. The Plan Commission wants to loosen up this requirement
for the area south of Lake Cook Road. The Plan Commission is recommending that retail
uses listed in Article 5.02-B,1 up to 30,000 square feet in area be a Permitted Use in the
C-2 District south of Lake Cook Road. Retail stores 30,001 square feet and over in this
specific geographic area south of Lake Cook Road would need to obtain a Special Use.
The rest of the C-2 District north of Lake Cook Road would remain with the Special Use
requirement for retail stores of 10,000 square feet in size or more.

Proposed Text Amendment #4

Currently, there is a requirement that not less than 50% of the leasable square footage
within a commercial planned unit development shopping center shall be devoted to retail
use. The Plan Commission would like to keep the 50% retail use restriction in the
commercial planned unit development shopping centers. The Plan Commission is
recommending the exclusion of the square footage of the three buildings at the back of
Deerbrook Mall which include Joy of the Game, Brunswick, and National Tire and Battery
from the 50% retail calculation. In Deerfield Park Plaza, the Plan Commission is
recommending the exclusion of the Sachs Recreation Center and the Barking Lot building
from being counted in the 50% retail calculation.

The Plan Commission also does not want to allow future non-retail service uses, office
uses, medical office uses, or recreational uses listed in Article 5.02-B, 2, 3, and 4 larger
than 20,001 square feet on the ground floor in the commercial planned unit developments
with the exception of the three (3) buildings in the rear of Deerbrook Mall, and in the
Sachs Recreation Center in Deerfield Park Plaza.

Text Amendments to Update the Permitted Uses and Special Uses in the C-2
District

The Plan Commission reviewed the list of Permitted Uses and Special Uses in the C-2
District and updated the list. Based on the Plan Commission’s comments at the two


                                             5
workshop meetings and the public hearing regarding the proposed changes to the
Permitted Uses and Special Uses, below are the proposed changes to the current list of
uses.

Staff looked through the current list of Permitted and Special Uses in the C-2 Outlying
Commercial District to determine what uses might be missing from the Village’s Zoning
Ordinance and also what uses are out of date. Staff also looked at the lists of uses in the
surrounding communities of Northbrook, Highland Park, Vernon Hills, and Skokie. The
lists below also include uses that business and property owners often inquire about. This
topic was discussed at the September 13 and October 9, 2012 Plan Commission workshop
meetings and the November 8 public hearing and the Plan Commission provided feedback
on the proposed Permitted and Special Uses.

Below are the revised lists of proposed Permitted and Special Uses, to replace the current
lists of Permitted and Special Uses in the C-2 Outlying Commercial Zoning District. The
new uses to be added to the C-2 District are highlighted below in yellow. The current lists
of Permitted and Special Uses are provided as an attachment to this memo.

Permitted Uses in the C-2 Outlying Commercial District

Article 5.02-B, 1 (Permitted Uses, Retail Business Uses):

   a.     Antique Shops.
   b.     Apparel and Accessories Stores.
   c.     Art Galleries.
   d.     Art and School Supply Stores.
   e.     Automobile Accessory and Parts Shops, specifically prohibiting servicing and
          installation of products (Ord. 0-88-50).
   f.     Baby and Children’s Products and Apparel Stores.
   g.     Beauty Products, Cosmetics, Perfumes and Soaps Stores.
   h.     Bedding and Mattress Stores.
   i.     Bridal and Formalwear Stores.
   j.     Bakeries.
   k.     Bicycle Stores, Sales, Rental and Repair.
   l.     Book and Stationery Stores.
   m.     Business Equipment Sales and Service.
   n.     Cabinet, Kitchen and Bathroom Furnishings Sales Establishments (not including
          cutting, assembling, or manufacturing on premises).
   o.     Camera and Photographic Supply Stores.
   p.     Candle and Wax Stores.
   q.     Candy and Confectionery Stores.
   r.     Carpet, Rug, and Floor Covering Stores, but not including carpet and rug
          cleaning.
   s.     Catalog Sales Stores.
   t.     Cellular Phone and Mobile Device Stores.

                                             6
u.     China, Glassware and Metalware Stores.
v.     Comic Book Stores.
w.     Costume, Clothing and Theater Prop Sales and Rental Stores.
x.     Craft Stores.
y.     Dancing and Gymnastics Supplies and Apparel Stores.
z.     Delicatessens.
aa.    Department Stores.
bb.    Drug Stores and Pharmacies.
cc.    Electronics Stores, including ancillary electronics repair.
dd.    Exercise Equipment Sales.
ee.    Furriers and Fur Apparel Stores.
ff.    Home Decorating and Home Goods Retail Stores.
gg.    Fabric and Yarn Stores.
hh.    Florist Shops and Plant Stores, retail sales only.
ii.    Furniture and Household Appliance Stores.
jj.    Garden Supply Sales or Nursery, including lawn mower sales and repair, indoor
       only.
kk.    Gift Shops.
ll.    Hardware Stores, retail sales only.
mm.    Hobby Shops.
nn.    Household Appliance Sales.
oo.    Frozen Dessert Stores.
pp.    Jewelry Stores.
qq.    Leather Goods and Luggage Stores.
rr.    Magazine and Newspaper Stores.
ss.    Marine Stores, indoor only.
tt.    Meat and Fish Stores, retail sales only.
uu.    Medical Appliance and Supply Stores.
vv.    Musical Instrument Sales and Repair, Sheet Music, and Musical Recordings.
ww.    Office Supply Stores.
xx.    Opticians Sales, retail sales only.
yy.    Party Supply Stores.
zz.    Pool and Patio Stores, indoor only.
aaa.   Package Liquor Stores.
bbb.   Paint, Glass, and Wall Covering Stores.
ccc.   Pet Supply Stores.
ddd.   Picture Framing, including self-service when conducted for on-premises retail
       sale.
eee.   Restaurants, Cafes, Coffee Shops, Tea Shops, Bagel Shops, and Similar
       Operations of 3,000 square feet in area or less, including the square footage any
       outdoor seating area, and not including a drive-through.
fff.   Shoe Stores.
ggg.   Specialty Food Retail Stores of 3,000 square feet in area or less.
hhh.   Sporting Goods and Sportswear Stores.
iii.   Tanning Salons.

                                         7
   jjj. Tobacco Shops.
   kkk. Toy Stores.
   lll. Uniform Stores.
   mmm. Variety Stores.
   nnn. Vitamin and Supplement Stores.

Article 5.02-B, 2 (Permitted Uses, Service Uses):

   a.     Artists' Studios.
   b.     Barber Shops.
   c.     Beauty Shops.
   d.     Dry Cleaning and Laundry Establishments, including self-service, coin-operated
          equipment, provided that the floor area devoted to any one such establishment
          (including floor area devoted to accessory uses as well as the principal use) shall
          not exceed 2,750 square feet. (Ord. O-01-27)
   e.     Food Catering Establishments.
   f.     Interior Decorating Shops, including upholstery and making of draperies, slip
          covers and other similar articles, when conducted as part of retail operations
          and secondary to the principal use.
   g.     Locksmith and Key Making Establishments.
   h.     Photocopy, Print, Sign Making, and Mail Delivery Establishments.
   i.     Photographic Studios.
   j.     Shoe, Clothing and Hat Repair Shops.
   k.     Tailor and Dressmaking shops, employing not more than five persons.
   l.     Travel Agencies and Transportation Ticket Offices.

Special Uses in the C-2 Outlying Commercial District

Article 5.02-C, 1 (Special Uses, Retail Business Uses):

   a.     Automobile Accessory and Parts Shops, including servicing and installation of
          products.
   b.     Automobile Convenience Food Shop. (Ord.O-88-08)
   c.     Automobile Vehicle Sales - new cars only, with accessory servicing and repair
          facilities on a lot not less than 40,000 square feet in area.
   d.     Building Supply Store (including seasonal outdoor sales area and outdoor display
          of merchandise). (Ord.O-97-50)
   e.     Coins, stamps, precious metals, estate jewelry, antique flatware, sports cards,
          currency and related hobby items. (Ord. O-96-28)
   f.     Convenience Stores.
   g.     Furniture Stores. (Ord. O-87-58)
          (1)      Furniture stores which include as part of their operation the warehousing
                   of the goods being offered for sale. The warehousing area may be in the
                   same building as the main sales area and showrooms or in a separate
                   building. (See Art.8.02-E,2,n,).

                                              8
          (2)      Private parties for charities and non-profit organizations when accessory
                   to a retail furniture store of at least 20,000 square feet in area, provided
                   such parties and events are conducted inside the premises. (Ord. O-06-
                   27)
   h.     Food Stores, Grocery Stores and Supermarkets. (Ord.O-02-44)
   i.     Garden Supply Sales, including open sales and storage areas provided that each
          such area is located at least one hundred and fifty (150) feet from a residential
          district and is fenced and screened, as required below:
          (1)      Fencing
                   Fencing shall be provided around all outdoor sales areas. This fencing
                   must be at least seven (7) feet in height.
          (2)      Screening
                   Screening shall be provided as required by the Plan Commission to
                   ensure the enjoyment of surrounding properties and to provide for the
                   public safety in accordance with Article 13, Administration and
                   Enforcement - Special Use.
   j.     Massage Services Establishments.
   k.     Restaurants as defined in Article 14 (O-83-13), Cafes, Coffee Shops, Tea Shops,
          Bagel Shops, and Similar Operations of 3,001 square feet in area or greater,
          including the square footage any outdoor seating area. Also, drive-through
          facilities accessory to a restaurant which also has either direct signalized access
          to an existing right-of-way or (a) an Agreement has been executed which fully
          provides for the establishment of signalized access for the location and (b) the
          Illinois Department of Transportation has authorized said traffic signalization.
          (O-83-50)
   l.     Retail Uses listed in Article 5.02-B,1 with a gross floor area of 10,000 square
          feet or more when located north of Lake Cook Road. Retail Uses listed in Article
          5.02-B,1 with a gross floor area of 30,001 square feet or more when located
          south of Lake Cook Road.
   m.     Specialty food retail stores of 3,001 square feet in area or greater.
   n.     Video Rental Stores. (Ord. O-89-38)
   o.     Warehouse Retail Stores, including membership clubs.

Proposed Text Changes and Deletions to the C-2 Zoning District

The chart on the following page indicates currently listed uses in the C-2 District (the first
6 uses are Permitted Uses, the last 2 items are Special Uses). Suggested text changes are
listed in the right column of the chart and are also included above in the lists of Permitted
and Special Uses. Below in italics are notes explaining the suggested text changes.




                                              9
Current Text:                                      Suggested Text Change or Deletion:

Ice cream stores                                   Frozen dessert stores (includes ice cream, ice
                                                   cream cakes, frozen yogurt, Italian ice, and
                                                   other frozen desserts)
Musical instrument sales and repair                Musical instrument sales and repair, sheet
                                                   music, and musical recordings
Pet shops                                          Pet supply stores
Phonograph record, tape and sheet music            Delete (can be covered by “Musical instrument
stores                                             sales and repair, sheet music, and musical
                                                   recordings” listed above)
Radio and television sales                         Delete (can be covered by “Electronics stores”
                                                   suggested above as a Permitted Use)
Wearing apparel stores                             Apparel and accessories stores (“wearing
                                                   apparel stores” is awkwardly worded)
Radio and television service and repair shops      Delete (electronics repair is ancillary to retail
                                                   electronics stores)
Restaurants as defined in Article 14. (O-83-       Restaurants as defined in Article 14 (O-83-13),
13). Also, drive-through facilities accessory to   Cafes, Coffee Shops, Tea Shops, Bagel Shops,
a freestanding restaurant which existed as a       and Similar Operations of 3,001 square feet in
Special Use prior to the adoption of the Zoning    area or greater, including the square footage
Ordinance which also has either direct             any outdoor seating area. Also, drive-through
signalized access to an existing right-of-way or   facilities accessory to a restaurant which also
(a) an Agreement has been executed which           has either direct signalized access to an
fully provides for the establishment of            existing right-of-way or (a) an Agreement has
signalized access for the location and (b) the     been executed which fully provides for the
Illinois Department of Transportation has          establishment of signalized access for the
authorized said traffic signalization (O-83-50).   location and (b) the Illinois Department of
                                                   Transportation has authorized said traffic
                                                   signalization. (O-83-50)

                                                   The proposed language above cleans up the
                                                   restaurant use in the following ways:
                                                   1. It includes cafes, coffee shops, tea shops,
                                                   bagel shops, and similar operations of 3,001
                                                   square feet in area or greater, including the
                                                   square footage any outdoor seating area as a
                                                   Special Use.
                                                   2. It clarifies the wording regarding drive-
                                                   throughs as Special Uses.
                                                   3. It allows a non-freestanding restaurant to
                                                   have a drive-through as a Special Use.




                                                   10
Note: When a Proposed Use Is Not Specifically Listed in a Zoning District

According to Article 2.00-G of the Deerfield Zoning Ordinance, when a use is not
specifically listed as a Permitted or Special Use, then such use is not allowed and is
expressly prohibited in that zoning district. A petitioner can seek a Text Amendment to
allow a new use to be added to the zoning district. In the last few years, Text
Amendments have been granted to the C-2 District to allow dog day care facilities (The
Barking Lot) and grocery parcel pick-up centers (Peapod) as Special Uses in this zoning
district. The standard for a Text Amendment is that it must be in the public interest.

Proposed Definitions to Add to the Zoning Ordinance

The Plan Commission understands it would be helpful to staff to define certain uses so
that when property owners and business owners inquire about new uses, staff has a clear
definition. Below highlighted in blue are uses identified as needing a definition, along with
the proposed definition.

Add the following to Article 14.02 (Definitions):

BEAUTY SHOP: An establishment where hair is washed, cut, dyed, and/or styled. May
include ancillary services such as manicures, pedicures and massage.

CONVENIENCE STORE: A retail establishment which is designed for the sale of primarily
prepackaged products in low volumes per sale, that generally includes milk, bread, soda,
and snacks or similar convenience items.

MASSAGE SERVICES: Any method of massage, bodywork or somatic therapy which
consists of the manipulation of the muscular structure and soft tissue of the human body,
and includes the administration of pressure on or friction against or stroking, kneading,
rubbing, tapping, percussion, pounding, vibrating or stimulating the external soft tissue of
the body with the hands or with the aid of mechanical or electrical apparatus or appliance,
with or without such supplementary aids as rubbing alcohol, liniments, antiseptics, oils,
powder, creams, lotions, ointments or other similar preparations commonly used in this
practice by a massage therapist licensed by the State of Illinois.

TANNING SALON: Any establishment where a room or a booth, or group of rooms or
booths, houses ultraviolet lamps or products containing lamps intended for the irradiation
of any part of the living body for cosmetic or non-medical related purposes. Also includes
air brush spray tanning.

VARIETY STORE: A retail establishment that offers a wide assortment of inexpensive
merchandise, including health and personal care items, candy, toys, boxed or packaged
foods, gifts, and housewares, but excluding resale stores, secondhand stores,
consignments stores, close-out stores, liquidators, thrift stores, and flea markets.


                                              11
Current Food Store Definition in Article 14.02 to be Changed

The definition for “food store” currently exists in the Zoning Ordinance, but is in conflict
with the list of Permitted Uses in Article 5.02-B,1. In 2002, the Plan Commission
recommended that food stores, grocery stores, and supermarkets be moved from the list
of Permitted Uses to the list of Special Uses, and the Village Board approved this change.
However, at this time, the Village did not change the definition of a food store which
includes delicatessens, butcher shops, and fish markets - all of these food uses are listed
as Permitted Uses in 5.02-B,1. Staff looked at the 2002 Plan Commission recommendation
to see what the intent of the recommendation was. The type of stores mentioned in the
2002 recommendation are large grocery stores like Jewel and Whole Foods, not small
specialty operations such as delicatessens, butcher/meat stores or fish stores. This
conflict can be corrected by updating the definition of food stores. Below is the current
definition of food stores, and the proposed new definition.

Current definition:
FOOD STORES: Stores which sell foods and other items commonly sold in connection
therewith. The term "food store" shall include, but is not limited to, stores commonly
referred to as dairy stores, delicatessens, fruit and vegetable markets, butcher shops,
health food stores, nut shops, fish markets and supermarkets. This term shall not include
services for the consumption of food on the premises.

Proposed new definition:
FOOD STORES: Stores which sell a variety of foods and other items commonly sold in
connection therewith. The term "food store" shall include, but is not limited to, stores
commonly referred to as fruit and vegetable markets, health food stores, grocery stores,
and supermarkets. This term shall not include services for the consumption of food on the
premises.

Additional Issues that Arose at the Plan Commission Meetings:

Dry Cleaners

The Plan Commission inquired if dry cleaners can be restricted to the “green” non-perc
cleaners only. Village Attorney Peter Coblentz has researched the issue and indicated that
the State of Illinois recently passed a new law, Public Act 97-1057 which will become
effective in January 2013. P.A. 97-1057 regulates the way perchloroethylene (perc) is
used, requiring dry cleaners to use best management practices while using the solvent and
requiring improved control and containment systems, better training, and more
comprehensive reporting. Existing equipment that uses perc is grandfathered in with the
new law. This new law was supported by the dry cleaning industry.
Village Attorney Peter Coblentz has indicated that with respect to environmental
regulations, home rule communities can regulate concurrently with the State, but home
rule regulation cannot be inconsistent with State regulations. Home rule communities face
challenges with regulating environmental pollution because the rationale is that

                                            12
environmental pollution does not respect local boundaries and is therefore not solely a
matter pertaining to the government and affairs of the municipality. Therefore, statewide
environmental policy is generally given primacy, and home rule regulations that conflict
with state policy will be held invalid.

Peter Coblentz believes the Village of Deerfield could restrict new dry cleaners to “green”
or non-perc cleaners, but it would be difficult to require existing dry cleaners to change to
non-perc. He believes the Village may be able to require reporting and training for
existing dry cleaners using perc, so long as such regulations remain consistent with the
new State regulations. He also believes that with respect to zoning regulations, the Village
can restrict dry cleaners to the customer service portion only and not allow a dry cleaning
plant on the premises. Should the Village consider prohibiting on-site dry cleaning
operations in some or all zoning districts, the Village should also consider the need for
locating dry cleaning plants because the customer service portion of dry cleaning stores
still depend on the dry cleaning process being completed at an off-site location.

Rental Tax

Commissioner Nadler informed the Plan Commission that in the State of Florida,
communities can impose a rental tax on all leased commercial spaces. If a business
generates sales tax, that sales tax gets credited to cover the rental tax for that business.
For a business that does not generate sales tax, the rental tax serves to make up for lost
sales tax revenue to the community. Village Attorney Peter Coblentz has been looking into
the rental tax issue. He is not aware of any community in Illinois that has enacted this
type of tax. In Florida, it is considered a sales tax. Mr. Coblentz believes in Illinois it would
be looked at as a service occupation tax, and occupations are not permitted to be an
object of home rule taxation in Illinois under the Illinois Constitution.

                                       CONCLUSIONS

After studying the C-2 Outlying Commercial District over the last few months, the Plan
Commission is concerned that large non-retail uses are allowed in the C-2 Outlying
Commercial District as Permitted Uses. They are concerned about the strength and vitality
of the commercial district if too much of the space in this zoning district is taken over by
non-retail uses. The Plan Commission believes that it is important to strengthen retail so
the C-2 district remains a vibrant and viable shopping area. The Plan Commission
understands there is a great value to service uses, but they also believe that the
enhancement of retail is a very valuable to the strength and success of this commercial
area and the Village as a whole. Retail sales help the Village greatly, because retail
generates sales tax for the Village helping to pay for Village services.

The Plan Commission is recommending several Text Amendments to help support the C-2
District as a viable and vibrant retail district. The Plan Commission believes the proposed
Text Amendments help to promote and strengthen retail in the C-2 Outlying Commercial
District. Text Amendments #1 and #2 make it more difficult for larger non-retail uses to

                                               13
locate in the C-2 District. Text Amendment #3 lessens the existing requirement for retail
up to under 30,000 square feet in area in a geographic area that can handle larger retail
uses. Text Amendment #4 applies to the large commercial PUDs (Deerbrook Mall,
Deerfield Park Plaza, Cadwells Corners, and the Home Depot PUD) and keeps the 50%
retail requirement in place except in a few geographic areas in these commercial PUDs
that are not included in the 50% retail requirement because they are not conducive to
retail. The remainder of the Text Amendments is an update to the list of uses in the C-2
Outlying Commercial District. The proposed update to the list of C-2 uses will add more
retail uses to the list of Permitted Uses in the C-2 Outlying Commercial District.

The Plan Commission believes the proposed Text Amendments will help to strengthen and
enhance the C-2 Outlying Commercial Zoning District. They believe these regulations will
help to protect the character of the C-2 District as a major retail district that should not be
taken over by large service uses. The proposed Text Amendments will not impact the
smaller service, medical office, and office uses that wish to locate in the C-2 District. It is
only the larger service, medical office, and office uses between 10,000 square feet and
20,000 square feet that will require a Special Use. Proposed service, medical office, and
office uses 20,001 square feet and over will not be allowed in the C-2 District with the
exception of a few geographic areas toward the rear of the shopping centers where retail
uses would not well due to very low visibility.

The Plan Commission believes that the proposed Text Amendments are in the public
interest for the following reasons (these items were discussed in the Plan Commission’s
November 8 workshop meeting when they discussed their recommendation to the Board
of Trustees):
     The proposed Text Amendments address large non-retail uses currently allowed as
       Permitted Uses in the C-2 district. There is concern about the vitality and strength
       of the C-2 District if too much of the district is taken over by non-retail uses.
     Changing large non-retail uses from Permitted Uses to Special Uses will allow the
       Village to make sure that the proposed use is compatible with the C-2 District (one
       of the Special Use standards when analyzing a Special Use).
     By limiting non-retail uses, retail is allowed to be the preferred use in the C-2
       district, making it easier for retailers to locate in the C-2 District.
     The Text Amendments promote retail in areas that have been utilized for retail for
       many years.
     The Village’s Comprehensive Plan indicates a desire for a strong economic base and
       the proposed Text Amendments help to achieve this.
     Promoting retail will provide Deerfield’s citizens and also Deerfield’s large daytime
       work population with a variety of shopping opportunities where a large selection of
       merchandise is available.
     There is a shopping synergy when retailers can locate in close proximity to each
       other.




                                              14
                                   RECOMMENDATION

Accordingly, it is the recommendation of the Plan Commission that the following Text
Amendments to the C-2 Outlying Commercial District be adopted:

Text Amendment #1

Require a Special Use for any future service use, office use, medical office use, and
recreational use listed in Article 5.02-B, 2, 3, and 4 which is between 10,000 square feet
and 20,000 square feet in size when located on the ground floor, with the exception of a
couple of areas in the Deerfield Park Plaza shopping center (formerly known as Lake Cook
Plaza). The area excluded from Text Amendment #1 include the 16,000 square foot
Barking Lot building at 495 Lake Cook Road, and the 13,100 square foot area toward the
rear of the Deerfield Park Plaza shopping center addressed 405 Lake Cook Road, Suites
A18 through A22 which is occupied by California Tan and the former Diplomat Pharmacy
as these area are more suited for larger non-retail uses.

Text Amendment #2

Do not allow future large non-retail service uses, office uses, medical office uses, and
recreational uses listed in Article 5.02-B, 2, 3, and 4 of 20,001 square feet and over in size
located on the ground floor in the C-2 District with the exception of the three (3) buildings
at the rear of Deerbrook Mall which are Joy of the Game, Brunswick, and National Tire and
Battery, and the Sachs Recreation Center in Deerfield Park Plaza - as the Plan Commission
believes these areas noted above are not conducive to retail use.

Text Amendment #3

Allow retail uses listed in Article 5.02-B,1 up to 30,000 square feet in area a Permitted Use
in the C-2 District south of Lake Cook Road. Retail stores 30,001 square feet and over in
this specific geographic area south of Lake Cook Road would need to obtain a Special Use.
The rest of the C-2 District north of Lake Cook Road would remain with the Special Use
requirement for retail stores of 10,000 square feet in size or more.

Text Amendment #4

Keep the 50% retail use restriction in the commercial planned unit development shopping
centers but exclude the square footage of the three buildings at the back of Deerbrook
Mall which include Joy of the Game, Brunswick, and National Tire and Battery from being
counted in the 50% retail calculation. In Deerfield Park Plaza, the Plan Commission is
recommending the exclusion of the Sachs Recreation Center and the Barking Lot building
from the 50% retail calculation as these areas noted above are not conducive to retail use.

Do not allow future non-retail service uses, office uses, medical office uses, or recreational
uses listed in Article 5.02-B, 2, 3, and 4 larger than 20,001 square feet on the ground floor

                                             15
in the commercial planned unit developments with the exception of the three (3) buildings
in the rear of Deerbrook Mall, and in the Sachs Recreation Center in Deerfield Park Plaza.

Uses in the C-2 District and New Definitions

The Plan Commission also recommends that the uses highlighted in yellow in this
recommendation be added to the Permitted Use and Special Uses in the C-2 Outlying
Commercial District, and the revised language and new definitions highlighted in blue also
be added to the Zoning Ordinance.

Ayes (5): Berg, Bromberg, Moyer, Shayman, Shapiro
Nays (0): None

Respectfully submitted,
Dan Shapiro, Chairman
Deerfield Plan Commission




                                            16
                                                                                APPROVED


                                  PLAN COMMISSION
                                VILLAGE OF DEERFIELD

The Plan Commission of the Village of Deerfield held a Public Hearing at 7:30 P.M. on
November 8, 2012 at the Village Hall, 850 Waukegan Road, Deerfield, Illinois.

Chairman Shapiro called the hearing to order.

Present were:        Dan Shapiro, Chairman
                     Larry Berg
                     Alan Bromberg
                     Jim Moyer
                     Stuart Shayman

Absent:              Elaine Jacoby
                     Robert Nadler

Also present:        Jeff Ryckaert, Principal Planner
                     Kathleen LéVeque, Associate Planner

Public Hearing: Possible Changes to the C-2 Outlying Commercial Zoning District to
Further Support Retail.

Mr. Jeff Ryckaert, Principal Planner, said the legal notice for this public hearing was
published in The Deerfield Review on October 18, 2012. Each property owner in the C-
2 District received a certified mailing of the public hearing. Staff received one letter with
comments from the property owners of Deerfield Park Plaza.

Mr. Ryckaert provided an overview and background. He said the Mayor and Board
have asked the Plan Commission to look into strengthening the C-2 Outlying
Commercial District given the recent changes in the C-2 District with the replacement of
retail with medical office. The goal is to save the retail in the traditional retail areas.

Mr. Ryckaert referred to an aerial photograph showing all of the C-2 Outlying
Commercial District. There are approximately 30 properties that are zoned C-2, ranging
in size from 48 acres for Deerbrook Mall, to a 1/3 of an acre for Shell Gas station.
There is a total of approximately 1.3 million square feet of space in the C-2 District with
about 140 businesses and about 30 vacant spaces.

Based on detailed discussions at the September 13, 2012 and October 9, 2012 Plan
Commission workshop meetings, the following are proposed Text Amendments to the
C-2 Outlying Commercial District:
The first Text Amendment addresses the larger uses in the C-2 District. The proposed
Text Amendment would make any future service use, office use, medical office use, and
recreational use listed in Article 5.02-B, 2, 3, and 4 between 10,000 square feet and
20,000 square feet in size a Special Use when located on the ground floor. Currently,
Public Hearing: C-2 Text Amendments to Support Retail
November 8, 2012
Page 2

these uses are all Permitted Uses in the C-2 District. If these uses are less than 10,000
square feet in area, then the use will remain a Permitted Use.

The second Text Amendment is to not allow future large non-retail service uses, office
uses, medical office uses, and recreational uses (listed in Article 5.02-B, 2, 3, and 4)
of 20,001 square feet and over in size when located on the ground floor in the C-2
District, with the exception of the three (3) buildings at the rear of Deerbrook Mall (Joy of
the Game, Brunswick, and National Tire and Battery) and the Sachs Recreation Center
in Deerfield Park Plaza, as these three buildings are not conducive to retail use.

The third Text Amendment is to make retail uses listed in Article 5.02-B,1 up to 30,000
square feet in size as a Permitted Use in the C-2 District south of Lake Cook Road.
Retail stores 30,001 square feet and over in this specific geographic area south of Lake
Cook Road would need to obtain a Special Use. The rest of the C-2 District north of
Lake Cook Road would remain with the Special Use requirement for retail stores over
10,000 square feet in area. The proposed third Text Amendment makes it easier for a
middle size store (a junior box store) to locate here without the need for a Special Use.
These properties are larger and staff believes they can handle larger retail stores
without have an adverse impact on the area.

The fourth Text Amendment deals with the leasable area in a commercial PUD that has
to be retail. Currently, there is a requirement in the Zoning Ordinance that not less than
50% of the leasable square footage within a commercial planned unit development
shopping center shall be devoted to retail use. The Plan Commission would like to keep
the 50% retail use restriction for the commercial planned unit developments on the
ground floor, and also to not allow future non-retail service uses, office uses, medical
office uses, or recreational uses listed in Article 5.02-B, 2, 3, and 4 larger than 20,001
square feet on the ground floor with the exception for the three (3) buildings in the rear
of Deerbrook Mall and the Sachs Recreation Center in Deerfield Park Plaza.

Commissioner Bromberg asked if 2nd floor spaces are included in the 50% of retail use
restriction. Mr. Ryckaert explained that the current 50% retail restriction is for all the
space, either on the ground floor or above. Mr. Ryckaert said that the proposed Text
Amendment excludes 2nd floor spaces as the proposed amendment applies to the
ground floor only.

The Plan Commission would like to exclude the square footage of the three buildings at
the back of Deerbrook Mall (Joy of the Game, Brunswick, and National Tire and Battery)
and the Sachs Recreation Center from being counted in the 50% required retail
calculation.

Commissioner Shayman asked the size of the former Bally’s building and if it was
included or excluded from the 50% calculation. Mr. Ryckaert indicated that the former
Bally’s building is about 25,000 square feet in area and is not one of the exceptions
Public Hearing: C-2 Text Amendments to Support Retail
November 8, 2012
Page 3

from being counted in the 50% calculation. The exceptions are in the rear of Deerbrook
Mall, which are not conducive to retail.

Mr. Ryckaert noted that a health club is specifically listed as a Special Use and is not
impacted by this Text Amendment because this Text Amendment pertains to Permitted
Uses in Article 5.02-B, 2, 3, and 4 and the treatment of existing Special Uses will not
change.

The remainder of the proposed Text Amendments are an update to the current list of
Permitted and Special Uses in the C-2 District. Staff created a listing of proposed uses
to be added and deleted from the current list based on detailed discussions at the two
workshop meetings.

Chairman Shapiro acknowledged the hard work that Planning staff has put into updating
the list. Chairman Shapiro had a question on item k regarding restaurants on page 4 of
the proposed list. Mrs. LéVeque explained that restaurants were already listed as
Special Use in the C-2 District and staff updated this item accordingly based on the Plan
Commission’s discussions to indicate that it applies to cafes, coffee shops, tea shops,
bagel shops, and similar operations of 3,001 square feet in area or greater, including
the square footage any outdoor seating area. Also, the existing language referring to
drive-thrus for restaurants was confusing, so staff cleaned up the language. All
restaurant drive-thrus are Special Uses and a restaurant seeking a drive-thru must have
access to a traffic signal.

Chairman Shapiro noted the previous workshop meetings were valuable in focusing on
the proposed Text Amendments to attract and promote retail in the C-2 District while
looking at non-retail uses more closely.

Commissioner Moyer commented on the recently approved Peapod pick-up facility in
Deerfield. This online business allows customers to purchase grocery items online and
pick-up the groceries at a Peapod facility in Deerfield. Commissioner Moyer is
concerned about e-commerce businesses that are considered retail which do not
produce sales tax revenue for the Village.

Commissioner Bromberg asked if Peapod was considered a retail use. Mrs. LéVeque
said that Peapod is specifically listed as a Special Use, therefore the Village has some
control over the use through the Special Use process. Mr. Ryckaert commented that
Peapod was not classified as either a Permitted or a Special Use in the Zoning
Ordinance and Peapod received a Text Amendment to get their business allowed as a
Special Use. Commissioner Moyer pointed out that a retail use can have goods
purchased online and picked up at the store. Mr. Ryckaert explained that the sales tax
revenue from Peapod goes to the municipality at the point of sale (Lake Zurich) and not
at the pick-up point (Deerfield). Commissioner Shayman used the example of a person
purchasing a product online from Best Buy and picking up the product a Best Buy store.
Commissioner Shayman asked if anyone knew where the sales tax revenue goes in this
Public Hearing: C-2 Text Amendments to Support Retail
November 8, 2012
Page 4

case. Staff believes the sales tax goes where the point of sale/transaction is, which
might be out of state in some cases. Commissioner Moyer feels that this issue should
be addressed because e-commerce is not going away. A further discussion ensued
about sales tax being paid at the point of sale. This is the case for the Peapod pick-up
facility to be located in Deerfield in which sales tax for online purchases are paid to
another community. Commissioner Moyer would like to rectify this practice.

Mr. David Dresdner and his partner Mr. Sherwood Blitzstein have owned Deerfield Park
Plaza for the last 5 years. Mr. Dresdner noted that he is in favor of the intent and
concept of the proposed Text Amendments and wants to see a vibrant retail district.

Mr. Dresdner stated that he would like to distinguish the difference between Deerfield
Park Plaza and a traditional shopping center and is requesting that exceptions be made
for Deerfield Park Plaza. Mr. Dresdner is in favor of the Text Amendments, but would
like to discuss Text Amendments #1 and #4.

Deerfield Park Plaza has 412 feet of frontage along Lake Cook Road and no other
street frontage. The irregularly shaped site is over 1,100 feet deep. The view corridor
from Lake Cook Road is deceiving because the lot is set back at an 85 degree angle.
The PUD was originally designed as an approximately 220,000 square foot shopping
center which includes the 2nd floor space. Due to the configuration and lack of visibility,
Deerfield Park Plaza has historically been occupied by approximately 77% service uses
(including the Sachs Recreation Center). Traditional retail establishments, such as soft
goods stores and other stores that sell merchandise to the public occupy only 3 of the
23 tenant spaces in the center. The lack of visibility from Lake Cook Road is a deterrent
for many retail businesses. Mr. Dresdner commented that Deerfield Park Plaza is not a
traditional retail center and is not comparable to a shopping center with a lot of frontage
and visibility.

Mr. Dresdner commented that the process of getting zoning approval with a Special Use
is not looked upon favorably by prospective tenants. Many prospective tenants or their
broker representatives will pass over potential space and search for a location that they
believe will be less work, quicker to move forward with, and more certain. In an effort to
not dissuade potential non-retail tenants from looking at Deerfield Park Plaza, Mr.
Dresdner asks the Plan Commission to consider:

      Deerfield Park Plaza be excluded from the newly proposed Text Amendment #1
       in the October 22, 2012 correspondence, which is to obtain a Special Use permit
       for any service use, office use, medical use, and recreation use listed in Article
       5.02-B 2, 3, and 4 between 10,000 square feet and 20,000 square feet; and

      Exclude the building currently occupied by the Barking Lot from the 50% retail
       requirement calculation (proposed Text Amendment #4). The exclusion of The
       Barking Lot building would be in keeping with the exclusion of the Sach’s
       Recreation Center, Joy of the Game, Brunswick, and National Tire and Battery
Public Hearing: C-2 Text Amendments to Support Retail
November 8, 2012
Page 5

       buildings. This 16,000 square foot Barking Lot building with no visibility from the
       street is unlikely to ever attract a retail tenant. Excluding the Barking Lot building
       would allow Deerfield Park Plaza to comply with the 50% retail requirement,
       provided restaurants are included within that term and the Sachs Recreation
       Center is excluded.

Mr. Dresdner noted that without these above exclusions, these Text Amendments would
devalue Deerfield Park Plaza.

The Plan Commission discussed exclusion of the Barking Lot from the 50% retail
requirement for Deerfield Park Plaza. The Plan Commission agreed that the Barking
Lot building is comparable to the buildings at the rear of Deerbrook Mall (Joy of the
Game, Brunswick, and National Tire and Battery) and the Sachs Recreation Center in
Deerfield Park Plaza, as these areas are not conducive to retail use.

The Plan Commission discussed Mr. Dresdner’s suggestion of Deerfield Park Plaza
being excluded from the newly proposed requirement to gain a Special Use permit for
any service use, office use, medical use, and recreation use listed in Article 5.02-B 2, 3,
and 4 between 10,000 square feet and 20,000 square feet. Mr. Dresdner’s noted that
space previously occupied by Diplomat Pharmacy and the space currently occupied by
the tanning salon is a first floor 13,100 square feet space hidden in the rear of their
Center. The space is similar to The Barking Lot building in that there is no visibility or
frontage and unlikely to attract a retail tenant. Commissioner Berg commented that
there is uniqueness (lack of frontage and visibility) to Deerfield Park Plaza in that they
are not the type of retail Center that was envisioned when creating these Text
Amendments. Commissioner Berg feels additional consideration should be provided for
this Center because they do not fit into the objectives for which these Text Amendments
were intended.

Mr. Dresdner noted that the Tile Shop, the Barking Lot and this 13,100 square foot
space are the only spaces that are over 10,000 square feet in their center. The Tile
Shop and Barking Lot have been addressed and Mr. Dresdner commented that he
would be comfortable with this space being specifically excluded by its address in the
Text Amendment. Mr. Dresdner noted that prospective tenants view any extra
municipal process as a good reason to pass on a site, and this site is not likely to attract
a retail tenant. Commissioner Moyer commented that the frontage and visibility is a
drawback and adding a Special Use requirement makes it the space less attractive.
Commissioner Moyer feels that Mr. Dresdner’s suggestion should be considered.

Commissioner Bromberg suggested specifically listing the 13,100 square foot space as
an exclusion in Text Amendment #1. The Commission asked Mr. Dresdner to indicate
the specific location of the 13,100 square foot (tanning salon and Diplomat Pharmacy)
on the aerial photo. The 13,100 square foot space is next to the Sachs Recreation
Center. Chairman Shapiro said the exclusion of this space could be accomplished by
Public Hearing: C-2 Text Amendments to Support Retail
November 8, 2012
Page 6

listing its specific address. The Plan Commission agreed on excluding the Barking Lot
building and the 13,100 square foot space from Text Amendment #1.

The Plan Commission also agreed to also exclude The Barking Lot building and the
13,100 square foot space from the 50% retail requirement calculation for a commercial
PUD (Text Amendment #4).

The Plan Commission also clarified that all second floor space in the C-2 zoning district
is excluded from the proposed Text Amendments. This wording will be added to the
Text Amendment language to indicate the first floor only.

A motion was made and seconded to close the public hearing.

Respectfully submitted,
Daniel Nakahara
Workshop Meeting
November 08, 2012
Page 4

Discussion of Recommendation for Possible Changes to the C-2 Outlying Commercial
Zoning District to Further Support Retail.

Chairman Shapiro asked the Plan Commission to discuss why these Text Amendments
would be in the public interest. Commissioner Moyer stated:
   The Text Amendments address large non-retail uses currently allowed as
      Permitted Uses in this district. There is concern about vitality and strength of the
      C-2 District if too much of the district is taken over by non-retail uses.
   Changing large non-retail uses from Permitted Uses to Special Uses will allow
      the Village to make sure that the use is compatible with the C-2 District.
   By limiting non-retail uses, retail is allowed to be the preferred use in the C-2
      district, making it easier for retailers to locate in the C-2 District.
   The Text Amendments promote retail in the traditional retail area.
   The Village’s Comprehensive Plan indicates a desire for a strong economic base
      and the proposed Text Amendments help to achieve this.
   Promoting retail will provide Deerfield’s citizens and Deerfield’s large daytime
      work population with a variety of shopping opportunities where a large selection
      of merchandise is available.
   There is a shopping synergy when retailers can locate in close proximity to each
      other.

Commissioner Bromberg commented that there was productive and constructive
discussion on the Text Amendments and feels that the Text Amendments will meet the
objective but not unduly do burden to the property owners.

Chairman Shapiro stated that the Village Board gave the Plan Commission a charge to
look at the Zoning Ordinance to help promote retail in the Village. With the help of staff,
Chairman Shapiro feels that the Text Amendments slightly loosen up the Zoning
Ordinance to promote retail by allowing certain Permitted Uses, under certain
circumstances whereas before they were Special Uses. Chairman Shapiro noted
testimony from the public hearing that the Special Use process dissuades uses from
coming into the Village. In the last year, there has been a lot of office building
development. Commissioner Shapiro feels that the Text Amendments will promote the
public interest in that they don’t discourage office building but promote retail at a higher
priority than office and service uses in the C-2 Outlying Commercial Zoning District.

Commissioner Berg noted that the goals have been met and the Text Amendments will
establish a viable retail community. Commissioner Berg commented that initially he
was torn with the prospect of increasing zoning requirements during hard economic
times but with the exclusions, the Text Amendments will accomplish the retail
community that is envisioned. The Text Amendments will make it easier to maintain
retail in the district without being a detriment to the property owners.

Commissioner Shayman noted that these Text Amendments loosened the requirements
for larger uses in an appropriate area so that they are no longer a Special Use.


                                             4
Workshop Meeting
November 08, 2012
Page 5

A discussion arose about the little response from the property owners in the C-2
Outlying Commercial Zoning District. Mr. Ryckaert noted all property owners in the C-2
District were notified. He said most of the Text Amendments deal with larger service
uses over 10,000 square feet in size so the Text Amendments don’t impact the smaller
uses in the C-2 District.

Mr. Ryckaert also noted that Village Attorney, Peter Coblentz thought that the Village
could limit dry cleaners to using non-perc cleaners. This was an issue Commissioner
Nadler brought up, but he is not present tonight. Mr. Coblentz also feels that the Village
can also prohibit dry cleaning plants on the premises.

Mrs. LéVeque noted that Mr. Coblentz is still looking into the rental tax questions that
were raised in an earlier workshop meeting. Mr. Coblentz believes that a rental tax will
be perceived as an occupation tax. Occupation taxes are not allowed in Illinois and no
Illinois community has instituted a rental tax. Staff noted that the rental tax is more of a
policy issue rather than a zoning issue and will be a Board decision.

Chairman Shapiro called for a vote on the Text Amendments as proposed in the
November 1, 2012 staff memo and modified by the discussion in the public hearing that
pertains to:

      Excludes the 13,100 square foot space and the 16,000 square foot Barking Lot
       building, both in Deerfield Park Plaza in Text Amendment #1.
      Inserting the word “only” before “ground floor” in Text Amendments #2 and #4.
      Excluding The Barking Lot building in Deerfield Park Plaza from the 50%
       calculation in Text Amendment #4.

Commissioner Bromberg made a motion to approve the proposed Text Amendments to
the C-2 Outlying Commercial District as modified. The motion was seconded by
Commissioner Berg and the vote was as follows:

Ayes (5): Berg, Bromberg, Moyer, Shayman, Shapiro
Nays (0): None

The recommendation will be sent to the Village Board for December 17, 2012 meeting.




                                             5
Workshop Meeting
October 9, 2012
Page 3

asked if the property owner could sell the subject property to someone who is only
interested in occupying the existing home even if the 2 lot resubdivision is approved. Mr.
Ryckaert indicated that this matter is in the purview of the Building Department, but in the
past if 2 lots were side by side and under unified control, the Building Department has
considered the 2 lots as a single lot.

There being no further business to discuss on this matter, the petitioner is scheduled for a
public hearing on November 8, 2012.

(2) Continued Prefiling Conference: Possible changes to the C-2 Outlying Commercial
Zoning District to Further Support Retail (continued from September 13, 2012.

Chairman Shapiro complimented staff on creating a reader friendly staff report on this
issue. Chairman Shapiro realizes the complexity of this issue and appreciates staff’s
efforts.

Principal Planner Jeff Ryckaert indicated that if tonight’s workshop meeting goes well, the
public hearing would be on November 8, 2012. For the public hearing, all owners within
the C-2 District would be notified. There are approximately 35 owners. Notification would
be done by certified mail and published in the Deerfield Review. Chairman Shapiro asked
if notification will be posted on the Village of Deerfield’s website. Associate Planner Kathy
LéVeque stated that legal notice will be put on the website along with the staff memo.

Mr. Ryckaert shared comments from the Village attorney, Peter Coblentz regarding the
proposed Text Amendments. Mr. Ryckaert stated that Mr. Coblentz thought that the Plan
Commission was on the right track with the proposed Text Amendments.

Mr. Ryckaert explained in Text Amendment #2, the Text Amendment would not allow any
service uses, office uses, medical uses, and recreational uses of 20,000 square feet or
more. Mr. Coblentz believed that the proposed limit was a reasonable way to handle the
Village’s concerns about large non-retail uses in this district.

Mr. Ryckaert explained that there was a carve out for the buildings behind Deerbrook Mall
to allow larger non-retail uses here, and Mr. Coblentz was fine with that carve out because
the character of this area is different than from the rest of the C-2 District. Mr. Coblentz
believes these Text Amendments are highly defensible given the land uses in the Village.
There are choices in the Village where these uses can locate (for example, the larger
office uses can go into the I-1 District.).

Mr. Coblentz said that the Plan Commission’s written recommendation to the Board needs
to clearly spell out the rationale and reasoning for the Text Amendments. Mr. Ryckaert
commented that the Plan Commission always put this level of detail into any
recommendation and that meeting minutes will also reflect this reasoning and rationale.
Workshop Meeting
October 9, 2012
Page 4

Commissioner Shayman asked if a health club was a recreational use. Mrs. LéVeque
pointed out that a health club is a Special Use.

Chairman Shapiro acknowledged Commissioner Nadler’s insight and expertise on this
issue before proceeding with the discussion.

Based on the September 13 workshop meeting, the Plan Commission expressed a desire
to accomplish the following Text Amendments.

The 1st proposed Text Amendment would require a Special Use for any future service use,
office use, medical office use, and recreational uses listed in Article 5.02-B, 2, 3, and 4
between 10,000 square feet and 20,000 square feet in size. Currently, all of these uses
are Permitted Uses in the C-2 District. These uses typically do not generate sales tax
except if they have some ancillary sales.

Mr. Ryckaert explained that under the proposed Text Amendments, future service uses,
office uses, medical office uses, and recreational uses less than 10,000 square feet, would
be Permitted Uses. Commissioner Bromberg believed the Text Amendments should state
that the uses have to start at 10,001 square feet. Mr. Ryckaert noted the change.
Commissioner Nadler suggested that possibly lowering the 10,001 square feet minimum to
7,000 square feet. Commissioner Nadler noted that larger service uses are substantial
and suggested that uses between 7,000-20,000 square feet require a Special Use.
Commissioner Nadler believes that most of these future uses will probably be around
5,000 square feet, but feels that 7,000 square feet is reasonable. Mr. Ryckaert pointed out
that the 10,000 square foot number to trigger a Special Use was chosen as a starting point
for the discussion and represented half of the square footage of both of the two medical
office uses that recently went into the former Borders and former George’s What’s Cooking
spaces. Mr. Ryckaert noted that 10,000 square feet is the threshold for retail that requires
a Special Use.

Chairman Shapiro asked Commissioner Nadler if the goal is to get more control with these
types of uses by requiring a Special Use when they are over 7,000 square feet.
Commissioner Nadler commented that it is hard to reject a Special Use for non-retail uses
because the applicant ends up complying, for the most part, with the Special Use criteria.
Commissioner Nadler noted, from the previous workshop meeting, that this discussion led
to existing uses over 20,000 square feet in size to be non-conforming. Now the discussion
becomes what square footage maximum to allow before requiring a Special Use.

Chairman Shapiro is not sure if there is a problem that warrants this Text Amendment. A
discussion arose that the issue is that these uses are not retail. Commissioner Berg
wonders if this is the right way to fix this problem. Commissioner Nadler stated he
believes the Village wants to preserve retail use as the primary use in the C-2 District.
Commissioner Berg sees that the objectives are there, but getting to these objectives
doesn’t seem effective. Commissioner Nadler commented that one way to make it harder
for non-retail uses is to require a Text Amendment for a non-retail use over 20,000 square
Workshop Meeting
October 9, 2012
Page 5

feet. Chairman Shapiro asked if the goal is to get more control over certain uses or is the
goal to somehow get more retail though this Text Amendment. Chairman Shapiro added
that these businesses would apply for a Special Use and mostly likely pass the criteria
(parking, traffic, compatibility, etc.). Chairman Shapiro is not convinced that Text
Amendment #1 will successfully achieve the goal of attracting more retail to this area.
Commissioner Bromberg reiterated from the last meeting that the Special Use process
itself is sometimes the deterrent. Mr. Ryckaert noted that the Special Use approval
process in the C-1 Village Center District where there is a first floor retail ordinance is
sometimes a deterrent to service uses that wish to locate on the first floor and often these
businesses ask where else could they go within the Village. These businesses are
normally directed to the C-2 Outlying District.

Commissioner Nadler commented that by not allowing non-retail uses over 20,000 square
feet it would give this Text Amendment the teeth it needs, otherwise these uses will more
than likely get through the Special Use process. Commissioner Nadler also noted that
there has to be some balance because the economy is really struggling and a tenant in a
building is better than a vacancy. Still the C-2 District is a key district that has to be
generating sales while offering goods and services. Commissioner Nadler commented
that if this Text Amendment was written prior to the medical office going into the Borders
building it would have required a Text Amendment. Instead because the medical office
use was permitted in the C-2 District, no approval for the medical use was needed.

Chairman Shapiro stated that Text Amendment #1 is probably the most challenging Text
Amendment and suggested that the Commission look at the other Text Amendments and
then revisit Text Amendment #1. Commissioner Bromberg wondered how the property
owners will respond to these Text Amendments. Mr. Ryckaert said that, generally, when
there are additional restrictions, the property owners are concerned because it will take
longer to lease their property. A good example is the first floor retail restriction in the
Village Center. It was also noted that if business over 20,000 square feet in size goes out
of business, it has one year to be replaced with a substantially similar use.

Commissioner Bromberg commented that there is a fine line between trying to encourage
retail in the Village and not having properties sit vacant. Commissioner Nadler commented
that an applicant can ask for a Text Amendment for a use over 20,000 square feet in size.
Mr. Ryckaert noted that getting a Text Amendment will probably be more difficult because
the Village is now making a record that it doesn’t want larger service, office, medical and
recreational uses in this zoning district. Increasing the square footage of a non-retail
service use, office use, medical office use, and recreational use can be asked for by a Text
Amendment, but increasing beyond 20,000 square feet will be more difficult to obtain
approval for. Commissioner Bromberg noted that if a Text Amendment is added in a
zoning district it changes the use for the entire district. Mr. Ryckaert said that sometimes
the Text Amendment can be written specifically for a property.

Chairman Shapiro does not think it will be easy for a petitioner to succeed with a Text
Amendment. Commissioner Shayman commented that he would not have a problem with
Workshop Meeting
October 9, 2012
Page 6

a second floor non-retail use in a shopping center like Deerbrook Mall. Commissioner
Nadler commented that this was a thoughtful suggestion especially if the shopping center
wanted to expand. Chairman Shapiro asked why are the carve outs necessary for the Joy
of the Game and bowling alley properties. Commissioner Nadler commented that these
properties are not truly retail properties because of their location at the back of the
Deerbrook shopping center and their highest and best use is not retail.

The Commissioners further discussed the 2nd Text Amendment under consideration which
does not allow future large non-retail service uses, office uses, medical office uses, and
recreational uses of 20,000 square feet and over in size in the C-2 District, except in the
two buildings at the rear of Deerbrook Mall.

Regarding the second proposed Text Amendment Chairman Shapiro would like the
recreational uses in Deerfield Park Plaza (Sachs Rec Center) to be excluded from the limit
of 20,000 square feet in area. Commissioner Bromberg commented that NTB should be
included in the carve out with Joy of the Game and Brunswick because they are all in the
same area. Staff agreed that the area would include the NTB property. Commissioner
Bromberg also asked if the temporary library location at Caldwell Corner’s would have
been allowed under this Text Amendment. Staff clarified that this Text Amendment affects
only the list of Permitted Uses listed in Article 5.02-B, 2, 3, and 4 that are over 20,000
square feet. The library is considered a Special Use listed in #6 of Article 5.02-B under
public and governmental land and buildings. Therefore, under the proposed Text
Amendment, the library would still be able to occupy the space.

Commissioner Nadler commented that under the Text Amendment, this would limit the
size of health clubs. Staff noted that health clubs are listed specifically as a Special Use.
Chairman Shapiro asked for clarification. Commissioner Nadler noted that this Text
Amendment is suggesting that any non-retail service use, office use, medical office use,
and recreational uses over 20,000 square feet would not be allowed. If an applicant
wished to go over 20,000 square feet for a Special Use, they would need a Text
Amendment to be allowed in the C-2 District. This would not pertain to the carve out area
behind Deerbrook Mall which includes Joy of the Game, Brunswick and NTB.
Commissioner Jacoby asked how long is the process to get a Text Amendment. Mr.
Ryckaert noted that the Special Use process is approximately 3 to 4 months on average.
The Text Amendment and the Special Use can be done at the same time. Chairman
Shapiro commented that there has to be a balance because retail is not coming into this
area and we don’t want to exclude uses that may fit into this district.

Commissioner Nadler asked if this Text Amendment would apply to a health club even
though it is listed as a Special Use. Health clubs do not generate sales tax but it is a traffic
generating use. Mr. Ryckaert commented that recreational facilities such health clubs,
bowling alleys, skating rinks, etc. are listed as Special Uses under Article 5.02-C, 3. The
proposed Text Amendment only applies to Article 5.02-B, 2, 3, and 4 (Permitted Uses in
the C-2 District). Chairman Shapiro felt that most of the Commissioners’ concerns are
Workshop Meeting
October 9, 2012
Page 7

addressed in Article 5.02-B, 2, 3, and 4 and doesn’t want to be so exclusive so that it
discourages other uses.

The Commission received consensus on Text Amendment #2 that would not allow future
large non-retail service uses, office uses, medical office uses, and recreational uses of
20,000 square feet and over in size on ground level/first floor in the C-2 District, except in
the three buildings at the rear of Deerbrook Mall.

Commissioner Berg asked if some of the buildings in the rear of Deerfield Park Plaza
should also be carved out to be excluded from this Text Amendment, in particular the
Sachs Center and The Barking Lot. Mr. Ryckaert commented that these buildings are not
hidden behind another building like the buildings behind Deerbrook Mall. A discussion
ensued about the Sachs Center building being a destination use. The Commission
decided that the footprint of the Sachs Center should be carved out to be excluded from
this Text Amendment.

Commissioner Berg indicated that Deerfield Park Plaza is a PUD, and asked if it conforms
to having no than 50% retail use. Mr. Ryckaert thought that Deerfield Park Plaza is close
to the 50% requirement. Commissioner Nadler suggested that since the Sachs Center
would be excluded from this Text Amendment, the gross leasable area (GLA) of the Sachs
Center and the second floor non-retail uses should not be counted in the 50% calculation.
Commissioner Nadler is suggesting that ground floor use, excluding the Sachs Center, has
to be at least 50% retail use under the commercial PUD requirement. Commissioner
Nadler and Commissioner Berg thought that eliminating the GLA of the Sachs Center and
the second floor office uses would make it easier for the Deerfield Park Plaza property
owner to meet the 50% requirement for retail.

The Commission discussed different scenarios for different buildings within the C-2
District. Commissioner Nadler asked if an overlay district should be proposed for areas
where retail would not be feasible such as the Marriott hotel area. The reasoning being
that if the Marriott hotel were torn down it would most likely become office use rather than
used for retail. A discussion on the pros and cons of an overlay district ensued. In the
case of the Marriott hotel becoming an office building, Mr. Ryckaert pointed out that the
area would probably have to be rezoned as I-1 because this zone is for larger
administrative office use. Examples of uses in the I-1 District include Walgreens, Takeda
and Parkway North buildings.

The Commission revisited Text Amendment #1. Chairman Shapiro and Commissioner
Jacoby both agreed that they do not want to deter businesses from coming into this area.
They are concerned about decreasing the minimum size making future service, office or
medical uses over 10,000 square feet a Special Use. Mr. Ryckaert noted that at 10,000
square feet, the use reaches a size where parking and traffic impacts that could be more
closely examined. Commissioner Shayman asked if the parking requirement for medical
uses greater than retail uses. Mr. Ryckaert noted that parking requirements for medical
Workshop Meeting
October 9, 2012
Page 8

uses depend on the number of employees and physicians, but generally it is a little greater
than retail.

Chairman Shapiro is in favor of promoting retail uses but doesn’t think Text Amendment #1
is necessary. Chairman Shapiro doesn’t feel that there is a problem which calls for Text
Amendment #1 to be implemented. Chairman Shapiro is not sure if there is something
that Text Amendment #1 is fixing or if there is a perceived problem that needs to be fixed.
The approval of the two medical office buildings in the C-2 District is not enough to
convince Chairman Shapiro that anything between 10,000 and 20,000 square feet will
require a Special Use on a service, office or medical use. Commissioner Berg asked what
Text Amendment #1 would curtail. Commissioner Nadler and Mr. Ryckaert commented
that these uses can be sizable operations and it does offer the Commission to be involved
in the approval process which is not currently available. The Special Use process itself
can discourage the use because of the time involved; the landlord may try to find retail
uses that can go into the space faster. Still Commissioner Nadler can see Chairman
Shapiro’s point.

Commissioner Berg asked with proposed Text Amendment #2, if a non-retail use over
20,000 square feet receives a Text Amendment, would it open up this C-2 District to a
flood of non-service uses. Mr. Ryckaert said that this Text Amendment is setting a specific
size limit and indciates that the Village does not want to go above the 20,000 square feet
on these specified Permitted Uses. The petitioner would have to make a compelling case
for the increased size. Mr. Ryckaert commented that he could write the Text Amendment
for a certain geographical area which is sometimes possible.

The Commission began discussion on Text Amendment #3.

This proposed Text Amendment under consideration is to lessen the current regulations
for permitted retail uses to make it easier for retail to go into certain properties. Currently,
retail stores 10,000 square feet and over are Special Uses. This Text Amendment would
allow a retail store up to 30,000 square feet to be a Permitted Use in the area south of
Lake Cook Road and east of the railroad tracks. Retail Stores over 30,001 square feet in
this geographic area would need to obtain the Special Use.

Commissioner Nadler asked if there was consideration of including Caldwell Corners in the
geographic area. Mr. Ryckaert noted that this area was not included. Mr. Ryckaert
commented that this shopping center borders a residential district so retail uses are closely
examined. Commissioner Nadler doesn’t think this is fair because the home owners next
to the shopping bought their properties knowing that there was an existing shopping
center. Chairman Shapiro thinks that Caldwell Corners is different from the shopping
centers south of Lake Cook Road because of the residential component.

Commissioner Nadler is concerned that with Text Amendment #3 that going from 10,000
square feet to 30,000 square feet opens up the geographical area to unwanted uses such
as second hand stores or liquidators, and closeout retail stores. Commissioner Nadler
Workshop Meeting
October 9, 2012
Page 9

realizes that the Permitted Use has be listed otherwise it is prohibited but he would like
some wording so that it is clear that these unwanted uses are not able to come into the C-
2 District. Commissioner Nadler suggested adding language prohibiting liquidators,
closeout operators, etc. such as a Big Lots store or Salvation Army or Goodwill Stores.
These types of stores should require a Text Amendment to be able to come into the area.
Mr. Ryckaert noted that if the use is not specifically listed, it is not allowed in the district.
Commissioner Nadler suggested that the wording under the Permitted Uses for a variety
store should say something to the extent that it excludes closeout, liquidator, consignment
and thrift stores. Commissioner Nadler noted that a TJ Maxx is considered an off-price
store which means that it is department store merchandise at an off-price. A Big Lots store
is closeout store.

Commissioner Berg suggested the Home Depot property be included in the geographical
area in Text Amendment #3. The Commission and staff agreed that the Home Depot PUD
should be included.

The Commission discussed Text Amendment #4 regarding the requirement that not less
than 50% of the leasable square footage within a commercial planned unit development
shopping center shall be devoted to retail use. The Plan Commission would like to keep
the 50% retail use restriction in the commercial planned unit developments, and also to not
allow future non-retail service uses, office uses, medical office uses, or recreational uses
listed in Article 5.02-B, 2, 3, and 4 larger than 20,001 square feet on the ground floor with
the exception for the three (3) buildings in the rear of Deerbrook Mall and the Sachs
Recreation Center in Deerfield Park Plaza. The Commission agreed that this Text
Amendment should only apply to the first floor/ground level area of each building in the I-1
District. Commissioner Nadler added that the GLA for the carved out properties (Joy of the
Game, Brunswick, NTB and Sachs Center) should not be included in the PUD non-service
calculation requirement for their respective PUDs.

Chairman Shapiro commented that there should be some level of comfort when looking at
the proposed Text Amendments together, rather than looking at each individual situation.
It would be very hard to imagine each and every scenario for each building.

The Commission discussed the Moratorium. Mr. Ryckaert stated, after discussing with the
Village’s legal counsel, that the process to establish a moratorium includes a public
hearing where all of the property owners would need to be notified. In this case, it really
doesn’t make sense to enact a moratorium because the proposed Text Amendments
would get to the Board of Trustees at the same time as the request for a moratorium.
Commissioner Berg commented that if the Text Amendments get delayed, a moratorium
would help.

Mr. Ryckaert stated, after discussing this issue with Village Attorney Peter Coblentz, that
the process to establish a moratorium includes a public hearing where all of the property
owners would need to be notified. In this case, it really doesn’t make sense to enact a
Workshop Meeting
October 9, 2012
Page 10

moratorium because the proposed Text Amendments would get to the Board of Trustees
at the same time as the request for a moratorium.

Commissioner Berg commented that if the Text Amendments get delayed a moratorium
might help and asked if there were future items coming up in the next few months that may
be affected by the proposed Text Amendments.

The Commission discussed a rental tax. Mr. Ryckaert stated that the Village Attorney
Peter Coblentz is not aware of any community in Illinois that has enacted this type of tax.
Mr. Coblentz will continue to look into a rental tax further but thought that it may be viewed
by the Illinois Supreme Court as a service occupation tax. Occupations are not taxable by
municipalities in Illinois.

The Commission discussed dry cleaners. Mr. Ryckaert reported Village Attorney Peter
Coblentz needs to research whether restricting dry cleaners to the use of “green” non-perc
cleaners is within home rule powers. Legal counsel noted that state and federal
environmental statutes often preempt local regulations (including home rule regulations).

The Commission discussed Special and Permitted Uses in the C-2 District outlined in the
staff memo to the Commission dated October 4, 2012. Mrs. LéVeque noted that staff
reviewed the current list of Permitted and Special Uses in the C-2 District to determine
what uses might be missing from the Village’s Zoning Ordinance. Permitted and Special
Uses from surrounding communities were reviewed in this analysis. Chairman Shapiro
wants to make sure that restaurants with drive-thrus and outdoor seating remain Special
Uses. Mrs. LéVeque stated that drive-thrus are currently listed as a Special Use. Mr.
Ryckaert asked for clarification on whether the Plan Commission wants restaurants under
3,000 square feet with outdoor seating would need a Special Use, or if it is just the outdoor
seating component that would need the Special Use. Chairman Shapiro clarified that it is
just the outdoor seating component that would require the Special Use. It was agreed that
a restaurant under 3,000 square feet with no outdoor seating (and no drive-thru) would be
a Permitted Use. Commissioner Nadler noted that adding outdoor seating as a Special
Use for restaurants less than 3,000 square feet could be a deterrent to these small
restaurant uses. Restaurants at this size range are more like a Subway, Noodles or
Chipolte and will not have the same impact as a Rosebud or Abruzzo restaurant.
Chairman Shapiro agreed and dropped his request to make outdoor seating a Special Use
for restaurants under 3,000 square feet. Pertaining to restaurants under 3,000 square
feet, Chairman Shapiro suggested adding to the text “excluding restaurants with drive-
thrus which will need a Special Use”.

Commissioner Nadler submitted to staff a standard industrial classification (SIC) list of
different retail uses to help in brainstorming uses for the district.

Chairman Shapiro would like to see Massage Service Establishments deleted from the
Permitted and Special Uses list. A discussion ensued about beauty salons that offered
massage services. Massage services are currently allowed when ancillary to a
Workshop Meeting
October 9, 2012
Page 11

chiropractor, physical therapy facility, or beauty shop. The Commission agreed that
“massage parlors” would not be allowed as a Permitted or a Special Use, but a massage
service establishment would be allowed as a Special Use. Ms. LéVeque suggested that
the definition for massage services establishment include language that the massage
therapist must be licensed by the State of Illinois as a way of excluding massage parlors.
The Commissioners agreed that a use such as Massage Envy is an appropriate use for
the C-2 District.

The Commission agreed to continue to exclude freestanding nail salons as either a
Permitted or a Special Use in the C-2 District. They felt a petitioner can go through the
zoning approval process and make the case for a freestanding nail salon if they wish to
establish one. Nail salons are currently allowed as ancillary to a beauty shop.

Commissioner Nadler suggested adding the following Permitted Uses and suggestions:
     vitamin shop – Permitted Use
     mattress shop – Permitted Use
     uniform shop – Permitted Use
     warehouse clubs –Special Use
     add wording to exclude thrift, consignment, flea markets, second hand, closeout,
        liquidator stores to the variety store category
The Commission agreed to add a convenience store as a Special Use. The
Commissioners discussed adding cash for gold stores to the list of uses in the C-2 District.
Mr. Ryckaert and Mrs. LéVeque indicated that over the past couple of years there have
been several inquiries for cash for gold stores to locate in the C-2 District and the
applicants have been told they would need to seek zoning approval and have not gone
forward with their request. The Commissioners discussed this use and believe this use
should not be listed in the C-2 District as a permitted or Special Use. If an applicant wants
to seek such a use they would have to ask for a Text Amendment to allow the use in this
district and make the case to the Village to put this use in the C-2 District.

The Commission approved both the suggested text changes and deletions in the chart on
page 3 and the proposed definitions to add to Chapter 14 of the Zoning Ordinance from
the October 4, 2012 staff memo.

There being no further business to discuss the meeting adjourned.

Respectfully submitted,
Daniel Nakahara
                                                                             APPROVED


                                 PLAN COMMISSION
                               VILLAGE OF DEERFIELD

The Plan Commission of the Village of Deerfield held a Workshop Meeting at 7:30P.M.
on September 13, 2012 at the Village Hall, 850 Waukegan Road, Deerfield, Illinois.

Chairman ProTem Berg called the hearing to order.

Present were:       Larry Berg, Chairman Pro-Tem
                    Alan Bromberg
                    Jim Moyer
                    Robert Nadler
                    Stuart Shayman

Absent:             Dan Shapiro, Chairman
                    Elaine Jacoby

Also present:       Jeff Ryckaert, Principal Planner
                    Kathleen LéVeque, Associate Planner

Public Comment on a Non-Agenda Item

There was no one who wished to comment.

(1) Prefiling Conference: Possible changes to the C-2 Outlying Commercial Zoning
District to Further Support Retail.

Village of Deerfield Principal Planner, Jeff Ryckaert explained that the Mayor and the
Village Board of Trustees has requested that the Plan Commission consider changes to
the C-2 Outlying Commercial District given the recent replacement of retail, specifically
the medical office uses in the previously occupied 25,000 square foot Borders Book
retail space, and former George’s What’s Cooking building which will be increased in
size and used for 20,000 square feet of medical office.

Referring to an aerial photograph of the C-2 District, Mr. Ryckaert pointed out that this
district is not a homogeneous area with approximately 30 different properties ranging in
size from a 1/3 acre (Shell gas station) to approximately 48 acres (Deerbrook Shopping
Center). Various sections of the Comprehensive Plan were provided for Plan
Commission which state the Village’s goals for the commercial districts. Mr. Ryckaert
stated from the Comprehensive Plan that the goals for the commercial district are to
offer shopping and services and provide revenue and a sound economic base.

Commissioner Moyer asked when the Comprehensive Plan was last updated. Mr.
Ryckaert stated that the last update to the Comprehensive Plan was completed in early
2005 with the process taking about two and a half years to complete. Mr. Moyer asked
if it made sense to think about an update to the Comprehensive Plan. Mr. Ryckaert
Workshop Meeting
September 13, 2012
Page 2

believes there is adequate language in the current Comprehensive Plan that speaks to
the need for a sound economic base and revenue. Mr. Ryckaert noted that an update
to the Comprehensive Plan will probably happen in the next few years.

Mr. Ryckaert summarized possible changes to the C-2 District as outlined in a memo
that was sent to the Plan Commission dated September 6, 2012. The following text
amendments are being suggested by staff and up for discussion.

The 1st Text Amendment would be to make any future service use, office use, medical
office use, and recreational uses listed in Article 5.02-B, 2, 3, and 4 over 10,000 square
feet to be a Special Use. Currently, all of these uses are Permitted Uses in the C-2
District. These uses do not generate sales tax except if they have some ancillary sales.

Mr. Ryckaert explained that if the Village changed the zoning ordinance so that any
future service use, office use, or medical over 10,000 square were to be a Special Use,
the existing uses over 10,000 square feet would become a Special Use because of a
provision in the Zoning Ordinance. For example, an existing beauty shop or barber
shop in the C-2 District over 10,000 square feet would be now become a Special Use in
the C-2 District. An office use such as an insurance agency or real estate office over
10,000 square feet, would now become a Special Use in this C-2 zoning district.
Recreational, social or self-improvement facilities over 10,000 square feet such as a
yoga studio would become a Special Use. Mr. Ryckaert commented that the 10,000
square foot number is up for discussion. He noted that the 10,000 square foot number
currently triggers a Special Use for a retail store in this district. There are impacts such
as parking and traffic with a larger uses that can be addressed in the Special Use
process. He also noted that 10,000 square feet is half the size of both of the recently
permitted medical uses that replaced a retail use and a restaurant in this C-2 district.

The 2nd Text Amendment under consideration is to lessen the current regulations for
permitted retail uses to make it easier for retail to go into a certain area/properties.
Currently, retail stores 10,000 square feet and over are Special Uses. This proposed
text amendment would allow a retail store up to 25,000 square feet to be a Permitted
Use in the area south of Lake Cook Road and east of the railroad tracks. Retail Stores
over 25,001 square feet in this geographic area would need to obtain the Special Use.

The area south of the Lake Cook Road and east of the railroad tracks includes the
following properties: Deerbrook Mall, Deerfield Park Plaza, former Borders, former
Office Depot, former George’s What’s Cooking, and Prairie Point shopping center. The
proposed change makes it easier for a middle size store (a junior box store) to locate
here without the need for a Special Use. These properties are larger and they can
handle larger retail stores without having an adverse impact on the area. This text
amendment lessens the zoning control in one geographical area of the C-2 Outlying
Commercial zoning district where a larger retail stores could go in as a permitted use.
Workshop Meeting
September 13, 2012
Page 3

The 3rd possible Text Amendment suggested by staff is to guide some of the medical
office uses into the I-1 Office, Research, and Restricted Industrial Office by loosening
up the zoning. This change would make it a little easier for medical offices to go into the
I-1 District - this would be done by allowing up to 10% of the area of each building in the
I-1 District for medical office use (currently, all medical office in the I-1 District is a
Special Use).

Commissioner Shayman asked for clarification on the zoning district located behind the
Whitehall facility. Mr. Ryckaert stated that the area is mostly zoned as I-1 Zoning
District (Corporate 500 Center) but there is also a portion of the area zoned I-2 Limited
Industrial (Industraplex). The I-2 District has limited parking and is more of a
manufacturing and warehousing district. The most recent approved Special Use in the
I-2 Limited Industrial District was for a martial arts use at 151 South Pfingsten and
parking was examined very carefully with that petition.

Mr. Ryckaert said data was provided in the Plan Commission distribution that lists the
available commercial space in Deerfield. This information is also available on the
Village website as part of its economic development initiatives. Other data that was
provided to the Plan Commission included recent fact sheets with retailer criteria from
the International Council of Shopping Centers (ICSC) that indicated the size of stores
and demographics that various retailers are looking for when searching for new stores.
He provided the Plan Commission with fact sheets from stores that would fit Deerfield’s
demographics. Mr. Ryckaert noted that stores such as TJ Maxx, Marshalls and Sak’s
are looking for store sizes of approximately 25,000 square feet. Data sheets for office
supply stores such as Office Max and Staples indicate a desired store space of 15,000
square feet.

Data was also provided that lists the gross leasable area (GLA) of the stores in
Deerbrook Mall and office sizes in the 400 and 420 Lake Cook Road Buildings - these
office uses range in size from 500 to 2,000 square feet with quite a few small medical
offices that work well. Mr. Ryckaert pointed out that there is quite a range of sizes of
businesses in the C-2 District.

Mr. Ryckaert said that recent articles on the retail industry were provided to the Plan
Commission. Staff has also noted benefits that medical uses bring to a community.
Staff also provided the Plan Commission with general observations regarding the C-2
District and he commented that many times businesses that cannot find a space in
downtown Deerfield because of the first floor retail ordinance often ask staff where they
can locate in Deerfield as a Permitted Use? Staff often refers these non-retail
businesses to the C-2 District.

Mr. Ryckaert said the meeting is a workshop and staff is looking for feedback and
comments on the proposed text amendments to the C-2 District. A public hearing date
has not been set.
Workshop Meeting
September 13, 2012
Page 4

Associate Planner Kathy LéVeque commented on overlay districts as a topic for
discussion for the Plan Commission. Mrs. LéVeque noted that Village Attorney Peter
Coblentz indicated an overlay district is something that could be considered in this
discussion. Currently there are no overlay districts in the Village of Deerfield. She
explained an overlay district is a geographical area that is determined by a municipality
whereby additional restrictions are applied – so both the underlying zoning regulations
and the overlay district regulation apply. Mrs. LéVeque noted the neighboring
communities of Northbrook and Highland Park have overlay districts in their commercial
zoning districts. She explained a pedestrian overlay district, where only retail is
allowed, was established in downtown the Highland Park and recent discussions have
arisen in the last few years whether this overlay districts is too restrictive. A couple
properties have been removed from the overlay district and a couple uses have been
added so that they can be established in the overlay district.

Commissioner Nadler wanted clarification on a text amendment and whether they
create a permanent change to the zoning ordinance, and if a variance would be
required for proposed uses that are not currently allowed. Mr. Ryckaert stated that the
Zoning Ordinance does not allow variations for “uses” – he said there is a provision in
the Zoning Ordinance that states that if a use is not listed then that use is not allowed in
that district. For example, 2 recent petitions for uses that were not allowed in the C-2
District were the Peapod Pick-up grocery pick up facility and the dog daycare facility.
The applicant had to seek a Text Amendment to get these uses allowed in the C-2
District and also seek the Special Use. Mr. Ryckaert clarified that if a Text Amendment
is approved in the C-2 district it is allowed in that entire district and is not site specific.
The Special Use is site specific and the applicant to go through the Special Use process
for the proposed use at a specific location. Mr. Ryckaert noted that the Special Use
must be appropriate for the location and the criteria must be met, and conditions can be
put on a Special Use if necessary.

Commissioner Bromberg raised the point that time seems to be a deterrent with the
Special Use process and supposes that these text amendment changes would help
ease the lengthy time process. Mr. Ryckaert believes the 2nd proposed text amendment
would make it easier for retailers to locate in an area that could handle a larger size
store. Commissioner Nadler commented that junior anchor stores are getting smaller,
especially office supply stores. Commissioner Nadler sees stores such as Office Max
and Office Depot going from 25,000 square feet to 15,000 square feet.

Regarding the 1st proposed text amendment, Commissioner Nadler asked the
Commission if they should consider strengthening it by making service uses over
10,000 square feet a non-conforming use instead of a Special Use. Commissioner
Nadler believed that a Special Use for large medical office use is hard to deny because,
depending on where they are located, they will normally meet the Special Use criteria
even though the use is non-retail. In the Borders building scenario, the non-retail use
would be a non-conforming use rather than a Special Use. This would make it more
Workshop Meeting
September 13, 2012
Page 5

difficult to allow a large non-retail use in the C-2 zoning district. As a Special Use, a
non-retail use cannot be denied if it meets the Special Use criteria.

Commissioner Nadler trusts that the Plan Commission will have thorough discussion
and feels that another workshop meeting is warranted to feel comfortable about any
recommendations. Commissioner Berg agreed and believes some more discussion is
needed.

Commissioner Nadler noted that currently, commercial PUDs have a stipulation that up
to 50% of the GLA for a PUD can be used for non-retail uses. Mr. Nadler suggested
that this percentage should be up for discussion. Under this stipulation, half of
Deerbrook Mall could be used for non-retail uses. This would affect the three large
PUDs in the C-2 district (Cadwell’s Corner’s, Deerbrook Mall, and Deerfield Park Plaza).
Commissioner Nadler noted that the property owners must be taken into consideration
during this conversation because increased restrictions can adversely affect the
property value and be detrimental to the property. Commissioner Nadler suggests that
at a minimum the 50% non-retail stipulation could continue as long as no single non-
retail user is greater than 20,000 square feet. This stipulation would alleviate an anchor
retail space becoming a single non-retail user.

Commissioner Bromberg wanted clarification of the protections that are suggested with
the 1st text amendment to make service uses, office uses, and medical office over
10,000 square feet a Special Use. Mr. Ryckaert explained that the Zoning Ordinance
allows for Permitted Uses and Special Uses in each zoning district. The key question
with a Special Use is if the proposed use is appropriate at a particular location. The
Special Use standards are applied to determine this. The Special Use approach
contemplates that a certain use is appropriate for the zoning district, but it will not be
known if the proposed Special Use is appropriate until the exact location in the C-2
district is chosen by the applicant. Just because a proposed use is a larger non-retail
use and the Plan Commission is not in favor of this use because a retail use is preferred
for the space is not a reason to deny a Special Use. Special Uses are evaluated on the
Special Use standards in the Zoning Ordinance.

Commissioner Berg asked staff whether a text amendment or an overlay district is the
best way to proceed. Mr. Ryckaert believes that supporting retail could be
accomplished by text amendments. Mrs. LéVeque commented that the overlay districts
were brought up by the village attorney and was provided as information for the
Commission to discuss. Mrs. LéVeque believes that text amendments can handle the
encouragement of retail in the C-2 District. Commissioner Nadler added that overlay
districts are usually used when the zoning district covers a large region and the overlay
district serves to address one particular area within that larger region. Commissioner
Nadler also agreed that text amendments should be adequate to address retail
concerns.
Workshop Meeting
September 13, 2012
Page 6

Commissioner Nadler asked if the main objective of this discussion was to avoid this
area of the Village becoming a non-retail/non-sales tax generating area. Mr. Ryckaert
commented that even though medical uses have been in the forefront there is concern
about non-retail uses taking up prime retail space. Commissioner Nadler suggested
that service uses between 10,000-20,000 square feet would be required to obtain a
Special Use permit while service uses larger than 20,000 square feet would not be
allowed in the C-2 District. Regarding PUDs, Commissioner Nadler suggested that the
Commission think about increasing the 50% retail requirement or suggesting that there
cannot be a single non-retail user over 20,000 square feet. Commissioner Nadler noted
that the 20,000 square foot number is also up for discussion but this condition would
restrict large non-service users from locating in a shopping center.

Commissioner Berg brought up the Joy of the Game facility in the Deerbrook Mall and
asked if an office use could occupy that space. Mr. Ryckaert noted that currently an
office use is Permitted Use in the C-2 District, but the office use could necessitate major
changes to the site plan and the building which would require an amendment to the
PUD (much like the George’s What’s Cooking where they made major site changes but
medical office is a Permitted Use). Commission Nadler suggested that the Joy of the
Game facility and the bowling alley in Deerbrook Mall be the exception to the PUD
requirement of a single non-retail user being over 20,000 square feet as the 20,000
square foot cap on a non-retail use would greatly reduce the value of these particular
buildings.

Commissioner Bromberg does not want something so restrictive that it would make it
difficult for a business to go into a shopping center that has a vacancy history.
Commissioner Nadler also recognized that Deerfield currently has vacancies and for the
Plan Commission to be cognizant of not restricting businesses into the community.
Commissioner Moyer agreed and that is why he suggested looking at the
Comprehensive Plan. Commissioner Moyer asked if the Village would consider a
consultant to help formulate updates for the Comprehensive Plan. Commissioner
Moyer believes the dynamics have changed since the last Comprehensive Plan update
especially with internet shopping and the economic downturn both locally and nationally.
Mr. Ryckaert noted that a consultant was brought in to help with the last update to the
Comprehensive Plan. Mr. Ryckaert commented that the Comprehensive Plan
adequately addresses these areas and referred to these sections of the Comprehensive
Plan. He believes the current goals for the commercial areas clearly indicate the
Village’s goals and a strong economic base and revenue.

Commissioner Moyer asked if there is someone on staff or if there is a consultant that
actively pursues business to come into the Village. Mr. Moyer feels that this is an area
that the Village is constantly grappling with and could use assistance.

Mr. Ryckaert stated that there is not an economic development staff person and
commented that the economic development initiatives that the Village has pursued have
been split between the Village Manager’s Office, Community Development Department,
Workshop Meeting
September 13, 2012
Page 7

and the Finance Department. The Village offers incentives where it can but does not
actively recruit businesses. From time to time the Village has suggested businesses for
vacancies. For example, staff recently suggested to Deerfield Village Centre ownership
that Urban Outfitters or North Face would be a good fit for the vacant former Baker’s
Furniture space on Deerfield and Waukegan Roads. Ownership responded thanking
staff for the suggestions and explaining these retailers are looking for certain co-
tenancy. Mr. Ryckaert feels that the property owners who own the shopping centers
and lease them are the experts and staff doesn’t have this expertise.

Commissioner Moyer feels that the loss of sales tax revenue is a good incentive
opportunity to acquire an economic development staff person or consultant to attract
new businesses into the Village. The right person attracting new business would pay
for itself.

Mr. Ryckaert noted that staff reaches out to talk to property owners. Mr. Ryckaert
added that larger communities have a dedicated economic development person on
staff. Commissioner Moyer is a proponent of the proactive approach and thinks it would
help to have someone on staff to generate economic development in the Village.
Commissioner Nadler agreed that the Village should be proactive about having a
person on staff to promote business in the Village. Given the situation, Commissioner
Nadler feels that there is an economic hardship that exists in the Village and it is likely
to get worse. Commissioner Nadler believes that it is necessary to talk to the Mayor
and the Trustees to hire an economic development person on staff or consultant.
Commissioner Bromberg asked if property owners would look favorably on a Village
economic development person. Commissioner Nadler feels that property owners would
be favorable especially if there is a vacancy. Commissioner Moyer also commented
that compensation could be tied to progress and that the Village does need to be
proactive in economic development.

Commissioner Nadler reiterated and supported adding an economic development staff
person and believes it is a good recommendation coming out of the Workshop meeting.
Commissioner Moyer added that an economic development person would recognize the
zoning districts and be able to direct business to the corresponding zoning districts.
Commissioner Nadler also added that the Comprehensive Plan is a guide and the detail
will be in the ordinances.

The commissioners discussed the proposed text amendment 2 further. Commissioner
Nadler suggested a text amendment for a non-retail businesses between10,000-20,000
square feet would require a Special Use permit, and non-retail use over 20,000 square
feet would not be allowed in the district. Regarding PUDs, Commissioner Nadler
suggests increasing the 50% retail condition, or limiting the size of any non-retail user to
20,000 square feet within the 50% non-retail restriction. Commissioner Nadler added
that the Joy of the Game facility and the bowling alley at Deerbrook Mall would be
excluded from this 20,000 square foot maximum restriction.
Workshop Meeting
September 13, 2012
Page 8

A discussion arose on how the medical office use occurred in the former Borders
building and the former George’s What’s Cooking building. In the case of the former
Border’s building, a medical office use was permitted in the district while in the case of
the George’s What’s Cooking building where changes to the building (adding a second
floor) required an amendment to the commercial PUD but the medical office use is a
Permitted Use.

Regarding the 2nd text amendment, Commissioner Nadler suggested that the Plan
Commission consider increasing the 25,000 square foot restriction to 30,000 square
feet because retailers such as TJ Maxx or Ross will be between 25,000 to 30,000
square feet. Commissioner Nadler also added that in the list of categories that are
allowed in the C-2 District, he wanted to know how the Village can protect themselves
from retailers that are not desirable such as a Goodwill or Big Lots store. Mr. Ryckaert
referred to Article 2 in the C-2 Zoning Ordinance which states that if a use is not listed
as a Permitted or Special Use, it is not allowed in that district. Commissioner Nadler
suggested that the Commission review the permitted uses item by item because the list
is outdated and categories have evolved and changed by current standards.

This discussion brought up the size of signage and whether signage should be revisited
so as not to open the door for any signage concerns. Mr. Ryckaert pointed out that
signage is limited to 250 square feet and Mrs. LéVeque added that any signage or
exterior improvement for a permitted use goes before the Appearance Review
Commission. Commissioner Berg asked if by raising the square footage to 25,000
square feet, will it jeopardize what was being accomplished by the previous 10,000
square foot size restriction. Commissioner Berg does not see a problem with the size
increase but wanted to ask the question to staff. Staff does not see a problem with the
size increase since the specified geographical area has larger properties that can
handle these larger retail uses. This text amendment will make the review process
easier for business to go into these areas.

Referring to the recent Deerbrook Mall redevelopment proposal, Commissioner
Shayman asked if the 2nd text amendment were to go into affect, would it mean that the
Plan Commission would not be involved with the previously proposed changes to TJ
Maxx earlier this year if the gross leasable area was under 30,000 square feet. Mr.
Ryckaert noted that if TJ Maxx used the space the way it was, there would not be any
involvement with the Plan Commission but once there are changes to the PUD such as
site improvements there is a provision in the zoning ordinance that requires Village
approval for changes to a PUD.

Regarding the I-1 District and allowing 10% of the area of each building to be medical
office use, staff noted that there is approximately 5 million square feet of office space
along Lake Cook Road, including the Parkway North Center and Corporate 500
buildings. This provision would encourage medical office uses in the I-1 District. Staff
commented that medical has more parking needs and this would mix corporate users
who have their vehicles parked all day with medical office users who have vehicles
Workshop Meeting
September 13, 2012
Page 9

coming and going throughout the business day. Currently medical office use in this
district is a Special Use and there are not too many medical office uses in this district.
Staff noted that some of the larger buildings are approximately 250,000 square feet and
this would allow a (10%) or a 25,000 square foot medical office in this size building.
Commissioner Shayman suggested restricting the size of the medical office uses to
alleviate parking concerns. Commissioner Nadler wondered if relaxing the zoning for
medical uses is necessary in the I-1 District.

Commissioner Nadler asked if the larger office buildings have cafeterias and if so, how
the sales tax is handled. Mr. Ryckaert stated that if the cafeteria is selling food, the
Village is collecting sales tax revenue. Mr. Ryckaert also noted that the daytime
population in Deerfield is about 25,000 due to the office corridor, which helps our
restaurants and retailers. There was no strong consensus from the Commission to add
I-1 District text amendment.

Commissioner Nadler suggested staff research putting restrictions on dry cleaners to
only use non-polluting equipment. Commissioner Nadler noted that this would be an
environmental initiative for the Village and gives the Village the opportunity go further
than state law further by authorizing only environmentally friendly equipment.

Commissioner Nadler again suggested that the Commission examine the permitted
uses in the C-2 District and be prepared to make any additions or deletions to the
current list.

Commissioner Nadler suggested a moratorium on new non-retail uses in the C-2 District
taking over a space that was formerly retail while the Commission is studying proposed
text amendments. The Commission is concerned on how this could impact desirable
businesses that want to locate in the C-2 District and want staff to discuss this with the
Village Attorney.

A discussion ensued about how non-retail business over 20,000 square feet would be
grandfathered in if the text amendments are eventually approved. The example used
was the 25,000 square foot medical offices going into the Borders building. Would the
owner of the medical offices be able to sell the business to another medical office user
or would the use not be permitted. Mr. Ryckaert stated that the medical offices greater
than 20,000 square feet would become legal non-conforming. The medical office use
could be replaced by another similar medical office user within a certain time period
before that use expires on that property.

Commissioner Nadler mentioned that in Florida communities can impose a rental tax on
all leased commercial spaces. If a business generates sales tax, that sales tax gets
credited to cover the rental tax for that business. For a business that does not generate
sales tax, the rental tax serves to make up for lost sales tax revenue to the community.
Rob asked staff to run this idea past the Village Attorney to see if a rental tax could work
in Deerfield.
Workshop Meeting
September 13, 2012
Page 10

Commissioner Nadler can’t make the next two Plan Commission meetings (September
27 and October 11) and wants to be part of these discussions. The Plan Commission
would like to hold a special meeting in early October to continue this discussion.

There being no further business to discuss the meeting adjourned.

Respectfully submitted,
Daniel Nakahara
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Village of Deerfield
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Commercial C-2 Zoning

                                                                                               K E L B U RN R D
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                                R
                                W                                                                                                                                                                                          W ST ANDREW S LN
            F O UNTAIN V E                                                                                    KATES RD
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                          I
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RIVER




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                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      10 - BP Food Shop & Just Tires




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                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      11 - Shell Gas Station




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                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      MULBERRY RD             M UL B E
                                                                                          24                                                                 20              10
                                                                                                                                                                  19 11
                          LAKE COOK RD                                                                                                                                      LAKE COOK RD                                                                                              12 - Parkway Bank & Trust
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      13 - McDonald's Restaurant
                                                                                                                                                                                    4                                                                                                 14 - Firestone
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      15 - Deerfield Animal Hospital
                                           S PFINGSTEN RD




                                                                                                                                                                                          5                                                                                           16 - Shoppes of Deerfield (Panera
                                                                                                                                       2
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Bread)
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                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      17 - Carson's Ribs Restaurant
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      18 - Whitehall Nursing Home
                                                                                                                                                                               3                                                                                                      19 - Luna Carpet
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      20 - Ifergen Property (Rainbow
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Cleaners & Beauty Shop)
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      21 - 400 Center
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                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      24 - Demetri's & Egg Shell Cafe




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                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        0        300             600                   1,200   1,800

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          1 inch = 300 feet
                                                                                           Village of Deerfield
                                                                                            NORTH AVE
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                                                                                                  Commercial C-2 Zoning
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                                                                                           Viti Property and Zengeler Cleaners
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         WILLIAMS AVE




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                         GREENTREE AVE
             Comprehensive Plan

COMMERCIAL AREAS

The commercial areas within the Village are recognized as
beneficial, integral parts of the community structure. They
not only satisfy the need for close and convenient shopping
and services, but also provide sources of employment for
Village residents, and revenue in the form of property taxes
and sales taxes.


Goal: Seek to strengthen the commercial areas of the
Village in order to provide a sound economic base, while
maintaining a compatible relationship between the
commercial areas and other areas of the Village.



            Objectives                                    Policies

Preserve and strengthen the            Encourage the removal of blighted and
commercial areas of the Village.       deteriorated structures, the rehabilitation of
                                       those structures in marginal condition and the
                                       conversion of those not used to their highest
                                       potential.

                                       Cooperate with the Chamber of Commerce in
                                       their efforts to promote Deerfield businesses.


Ensure that the Village’s commercial   Encourage pedestrian and bicycle traffic to and
areas are accessible and have          within business areas by providing safe and
adequate parking facilities.           attractive walkways and bikeways separated,
                                       where possible, from vehicular traffic, and
                                       adequate and convenient bicycle facilities.

                                       Actively work with the business community to
                                       ensure that the number of parking spaces in the
                                       commercial areas is adequate so that all
                                       businesses might have the benefit of convenient
                                       nearby parking spaces for shoppers.

                                       Consider expansion of the available parking
                                       supply where needed to support existing
                                       business areas.




                                                                                         33
                Comprehensive Plan

Continued…
             Objectives                                        Policies

 Actively work toward the elimination of   Pursue opportunities to provide cross-access
 barriers between parking areas.           between commercial developments.


 Expand the range of shopping and          Work with the Chamber of Commerce to
 services available in the Village.        encourage new businesses to move into the
                                           Village.

 Ensure that commercial areas              Require adequate and attractive buffering or
 contribute to a positive community        screening of business uses from nearby
 image.                                    residential areas.

                                           Require adequate and attractive screening,
                                           landscaping and green areas in and around
                                           parking lots.

                                           Require adequate lighting which is attractive and
                                           complementary to commercial areas and parking
                                           lots, but does not cause an inconvenience to, or
                                           create a nuisance for surrounding properties.

                                           Encourage the business community through
                                           regulation and education to utilize signs which
                                           are appropriate in size and design and are
                                           limited in number.

                                           Encourage property owners and businesses to
                                           maintain their properties.

                                           Encourage local businesses to be an active
                                           component of the Village.

                                           Promote use of the revitalization incentives to
                                           improve the appearance of commercial
                                           properties in the Village Center.


 Promote unified development and           Encourage developments which allow more
 continuity in the Village’s commercial    efficient access and sufficient parking.
 areas.




                                                                                             34
           Comprehensive Plan


4.2   LAKE COOK/WAUKEGAN DISTRICT

Located on the boundary of Lake and Cook Counties, the
Lake Cook/Waukegan District includes the commercial and
office developments around the Lake Cook and Waukegan
Road intersection, extending west to the Metra tracks, and
north to Kates Road.

Access to individual properties and businesses is
accommodated through a system of private roads, internal
drives and parking lots. Private roads and access drives are
likely to remain the primary circulation routes. Because of
the importance of Waukegan and Lake Cook Roads to the
regional transportation system, it is unlikely that new traffic
signals to serve existing or future uses in the Lake Cook
Waukegan District will be approved. Consequently, shared
traffic signal access will be critical to the long term success of
the Lake Cook/Waukegan District as traffic volumes continue
to increase.

Some of the development in this subarea is relatively new,
representing a substantial investment and making a
significant contribution to the local property and sales tax
base. However, there are two areas where change is likely.
Immediately north and west of the Lake Cook/Waukegan
Road intersection is a mix of small-scale commercial and
industrial uses that are difficult to access given the current
level of traffic. The other portion of the subarea with
redevelopment potential is the northeast corner of the
intersection, which contains a gas station, tire store and the
Cadwell’s Corners shopping center.

The Lake Cook Waukegan District should be encouraged to
evolve in accordance with the following objectives and
development policies.

1.     Preferred Uses. Retail, service, commercial and office
      uses are the preferred land uses for the Lake
      Cook/Waukegan District. Existing limited industrial
      uses should be allowed to remain.

2.    Circulation System. The Village will work with private
      property owners to establish a circulation system and
      signage program to enable shoppers and other visitors
      to access primary and secondary destinations and to
      develop shared parking facilities that are oriented to
      the internal circulation system.


                                                               66
        Comprehensive Plan

3.   Traffic Flow. In order to accommodate regional traffic
     volumes and keep Lake Cook and Waukegan Roads
     traffic flowing smoothly, the Village will work with
     Cook County and IDOT to coordinate traffic
     movements and undertake needed intersection
     improvements. The Village supports Cook County’s
     plans to widen Lake Cook Road to three traffic lanes in
     each direction between Pfingsten and Waukegan
     Roads.

4.   Improve Access. Encouraging and/or requiring cross-
     access easements between individual properties will
     help to keep unnecessary local traffic off of Lake Cook
     and Waukegan Roads.

5.   Minimize Curb Cuts. Reducing the number of curb
     cuts along Lake Cook and Waukegan Roads will help to
     improve safety and traffic flow and should be
     incorporated into Cook County’s improvement plans.
     This may necessitate consolidation and redevelopment
     of existing parcels and improving cross-access
     between existing developments.

6.   High Quality Development. Recent office development
     in the Lake Cook/Waukegan Business District features
     high quality materials and attractive landscaping.
     Continuation of this type of development is strongly
     desired in order to enhance an attractive and positive
     community image. The Village will encourage
     reinvestment in or redevelopment of obsolete uses to
     improve the overall quality and development of the
     area. The Village will also work with private property
     owners to improve the image of the area as a regional
     shopping destination and employment center.

7.   Sufficient Parking. Because there are no adjacent
     areas suitable for absorbing overflow parking, each
     development proposal will be carefully considered to
     ensure that sufficient parking is provided.




                                                            67
As a reference, the following are the current lists of Permitted Uses from
Article 5.02-B and the current lists of Special Uses from Article 5.02-C
             Current List of Permitted and Special Uses in the C-2 District


5.02-B Permitted Uses

The following uses are permitted in the C-2 Outlying Commercial District:

1.    Retail Business Uses
      a.     Antique Shops.
      b.     Art Galleries.
      c.     Art and School Supply Stores.
      d.     Bakeries.
      e.     Bicycle Stores, sales, rental and repair.
      f.     Book and Stationery Stores.
      g.     Business Equipment Sales and Service.
      h.     Camera and Photographic Supply Stores.
      i.     Candy and Confectionery Stores.
      j. Carpet, Rug and Floor Covering Stores, but not including carpet and rug
          cleaning.
      k. Catalog Sales Stores.
      l. Delicatessens.
      m. Department Stores.
      n. Drug Stores and Pharmacies.
      o. Fabric and Yarn Stores.
      p. Florist Shops and Plant Stores, retail sales only.
      q. Deleted (Ord.0-02-44)
      r. Furniture and Household Appliance Stores.
      s. Garden Supply Sales or Nursery, including lawn mower sales and repair,
          indoor only.
      t. Gift Shops.
      u. Hardware stores, retail sales only.
      v. Hobby Shops.
      w. Household Appliance Sales.
      x. Ice Cream Stores.
      y. Jewelry Stores.
      z. Leather Goods and Luggage Stores.
      aa. Magazine and Newspaper Stores.
      bb. Meat and Fish Stores, retail sales only.
      cc. Musical Instrument Sales and Repair.
      dd. Office Supply Stores.
      ee. Opticians Sales, retail sales only.
      ff. Package Liquor Stores.
      gg. Paint, Glass, and Wall covering Stores.
      hh. Pet Shops.
      ii. Picture Framing, including self-service when conducted for on-premises
          retail sale.
      jj. Phonograph Record, Tape and Sheet Music Stores.
      kk. Radio and Television Sales.
      ll. Shoe Stores.



                                           1
                Current List of Permitted and Special Uses in the C-2 District


          mm. Sporting Goods and Sportswear Stores.
          nn. Tobacco Shops.
          oo. Toy Stores.
          pp. Variety Stores.
          qq. Wearing Apparel Stores.
          rr. Automobile Accessory and Parts Shops, specifically prohibiting servicing and
              installation of products (Ord. 0-88-50).

2.     Service Uses
     a. Artists' Studios.
     b. Banks, Savings and Loan Associations and other Financial Institutions, not
        including drive-in facilities. (Use deleted by Ord. O-05-50.)
     c. Barber Shops.
     d. Beauty Shops.
     e. Blueprinting and Photocopying Establishments.
     f. Dry Cleaning and Laundry Establishments, including self-service, coin-operated
        equipment, provided that the floor area devoted to any one such establishment
        (including floor area devoted to accessory uses as well as the principal use)
        shall not exceed 2,750 square feet. (Ord.0-01-27)
     g. Food catering Establishments.
     h. Interior Decorating Shops, including upholstery and making of draperies, slip
        covers and other similar articles, when conducted as part of retail operations
        and secondary to the principal use.
     i. Photographic Studios.
     j. Radio and Television Service and Repair Shops.
     k. Shoe, Clothing and Hat Repair Shops.
     l. Tailor and Dressmaking shops, employing not more than five persons.
     m. Travel Agencies and Transportation Ticket offices.

3.     Office Uses
     a. Accounting, Auditing and Bookkeeping offices.
     b. Business, Professional and Government offices.
     c. Employment Agencies.
     d. Insurance Agencies.
     e. Medical and Dental Facilities (Ord.0-85-09).
     f. Medical and Dental Laboratories.
     g. Newspaper Offices, provided that there is no print or distribution in connection
         therewith.
     h. Real Estate Offices.
     i. Secretarial Services.
     j. Security and Commodity Brokers.

4.     Recreation and Social Facilities (Ord.0-81-57)
     a. Clubs and Lodges, not-for-profit.
     b. Philanthropic or Charitable Organizations.




                                              2
              Current List of Permitted and Special Uses in the C-2 District


     c.   Self Improvement Facilities, including physical exercise and sports training
          schools, but not including those uses specifically provided for in Article 5.02-C.

5.02-C Special Uses

The following special uses are permitted in the C-2 Outlying Commercial District when
authorized in accordance with the provisions of Article 13, Administration and
Enforcement.

1.     Retail Business Uses
     a. Automobile Accessory and Parts Shops, including servicing and installation of
          products.
     b. Automobile Vehicle Sales - new cars only, with accessory servicing and
          repair facilities on a lot not less than 40,000 square feet in area.
     c. Garden Supply Sales, including open sales and storage areas provided that
          each such area is located at least one hundred and fifty (150) feet from a
          residential district and is fenced and screened, as required below:
        (1) Fencing
              Fencing shall be provided around all outdoor sales areas. This fencing
              must be at least seven (7) feet in height.
        (2) Screening
              Screening shall be provided as required by the Plan Commission to
              ensure the enjoyment of surrounding properties and to provide for the
              public safety in accordance with Article 13, Administration and
              Enforcement - Special Use.
     d. Restaurants as defined in Article 14. (O-83-13). Also, drive-through facilities
          accessory to a freestanding restaurant which existed as a Special Use prior to
          the adoption of the Zoning Ordinance which also has either direct signalized
          access to an existing right-of-way or (a) an Agreement has been executed
          which fully provides for the establishment of signalized access for the location
          and (b) the Illinois Department of Transportation has authorized said traffic
          signalization (O-83-50).
     e. Furniture Stores (Ord. O-87-58)
         (1) Furniture stores which include as part of their operation the warehousing
              of the goods being offered for sale. The warehousing area may be in the
              same building as the main sales area and showrooms or in a separate
              building. (See Art.8.02-E,2,n,).
         (2) Private parties for charities and non-profit organizations when accessory
              to a retail furniture store of at least 20,000 square feet in area, provided
              such parties and events are conducted inside the premises. (Ord. O-06-
              27).
     f. Automobile Convenience Food Shop (Ord.O-88-08).
     g. Video Rental Stores (Ord. O-89-38).
     h. Coins, stamps, precious metals, estate jewelry, antique flatware, sports cards,
         currency and related hobby items. (Ord. O-96-28)




                                             3
             Current List of Permitted and Special Uses in the C-2 District


     i. Building Supply Store (including seasonal outdoor sales area and outdoor
        display of merchandise). (Ord.O-97-50)
     j. Food Stores, Grocery Stores and Supermarkets.(Ord.O-02-44)
     k. Retail Stores with a gross floor area of 10,000 square feet or more. (Ord.O-02-
        44)

2.     Service Uses
     a. Automobile Service Stations on a lot not less than 40,000 square feet in area.
     b. Automobile Laundries or Car Wash Establishments on a lot not less than
         60,000 square feet in area, provided that sufficient on-site standing space is
         provided for cars awaiting entry to the washing operations and sufficient on-
         site space is provided for cars exiting from the washing operations.
     c. Banks, Savings and Loan Associations and other Financial Institutions, with
         or without a drive-through facility. (Ord. O-05-50)
     d. Undertaking and Funeral Establishments.
     e. Animal Hospital or Veterinary Services, indoor only.
     f. Drive through facility operated in connection with dry-cleaning and laundry
         establishments. (Ord. O-92-30)
     g. Pet Grooming Facility (Ord. O-95-02)
     h. Child Care Facility (Ord. O-98-12)
     i. Governmental Road Testing Facility, for vehicle inspections and drivers road
         tests, provided that only automobile driving road tests shall be conducted.
         (Ord. O-02-37)
     j. Drive-through automatic teller machine when operated in connection with a
         bank, savings and loan or other financial institution. (Ord. O-05-29)
     k. Domestic pet services including kenneling, dog day care, overnight boarding
         and obedience training. An outdoor exercise area may be provided when
         approved as part of the facility. (Ord. O-07-33)
     l. Grocery parcel pick-up centers including drive-through lanes. (Ord. O-12-34)

3.     Recreation and Social Facilities
     a. Bowling Alleys
     b. Health Clubs
     c. Skating Rinks, indoor
     d. Tennis Clubs, courts and building for indoor tennis
     e. Theaters, indoor only

4.     Public Service and Utility Uses
     a. Bus Passenger Shelters.
     b. Essential Services, provided that they are properly screened as set forth in
         Article 2, General Provisions.
     c. Railroad Rights-of-way.

5.     Educational Institutions
     a. Business or Professional Schools.
     b. Trade or Vocational Schools.



                                            4
              Current List of Permitted and Special Uses in the C-2 District


      c. Music and Dance Studios.

6.      Public and Governmental Land and Building
      a. Historical Buildings and Landmarks, preserved for public inspection, and
          operated not-for-profit.
      b. Museums, operated not for profit.
      c. Government Uses and Buildings.
      d. Public Parks, plazas, and arcades.

7.      Health, Medical and Care Institutions
      a. Nursing Homes.
      b. Convalescent Centers.

8.     Planned Unit Developments

9.     Shopping Center/Planned Unit Development (Ord. O-90-36).

10.    Multiple-Use Developments (Ord.O-79-48)
       Development containing two or more permitted or Special Uses on the same
       zoning lot in a single structure which existed prior to the adoption of this
       Ordinance. Such developments shall comply with all applicable provisions of this
       Ordinance except those provisions pertaining to district bulk requirements.

11.    Multiple-Use Developments - Enlargement of Existing Structures (Ord. O-79-48)
       Development containing two or more permitted or Special Uses on the same
       zoning lot in a single structure which existed prior to the adoption of this
       Ordinance and which may be subsequently expanded provided that all applicable
       provisions of the Ordinance are met.

12.    Open Sales or Storage Areas, provided that each such area is located at least
       one hundred and fifty (150) feet from a residential district and is adequately
       screened as required.

13.    Hotels (Ord. O-84-40)
       Hotels if included in a Planned Unit Development, provided that any such
       Planned Unit Development is located both not less than 1,300 feet from a single
       family district and not closer than 2,640 feet from another hotel.




                                            5
                                          Lake Cook Plaza, LLC
                                 c/o Mosaic Properties and Development
                                       555 Skokie Blvd., Suite 204
                                         Northbrook, IL 60062




                                                                                    October 31, 2012
Mr. Jeffrey Ryckaert
Deerfield Village Hall
850 Waukegan Road
Deerfield, IL 60015

        Re: Deerfield Park Plaza. Proposed Changes to C-2 Outlving Commercial District

Dear Jeffrey,

        Thank you for providing us notice of the upcoming Plan Commission Public hearing, scheduled
for November 8th, in connection to potential changes to the zoning code which will impact the subject
property. We share the village's concern for maintaining and improving the retail district, particularly in
the area surrounding our property.

        In keeping with the goals of improving the district, and maintaining our occupancy level, we
would like to point out several facts that differentiate Deerfield Park Plaza from Deerbrook Mall and the
other retail properties that are situated at, or very near, the intersection of Lake Cook Road and
Waukegan Road.

        •   Configuration I Lack of Visibility - Deerfield Park Plaza has only 412 feet of frontage along
            Lake Cook Road, and no other street frontage. The irregularly shaped site is over 1,100 feet
            deep. Consequently the vast majority of the spaces have minimal, if any, street visibility.

        •    Due to the configuration and resulting lack of visibility, Deerfield Park Plaza has historically
             been occupied (including the Recreation Center) by approximately 77% service-related
             users. Excluding the Recreation Center this figure is approximately 56%.

        •    Traditional retail establishments, such as soft goods stores and other stores that sell
             merchandise to the public (this just excludes restaurants from the "Retail" classification)
             occupy only three of the 23 tenant spaces within the Center: Churchill Downs (a cigar
             store), 71st Place (a clothing store, vacant for over 5 years), and the Tile Shop.

         Enclosed please find an analysis of the "Retail" and "Non-Retail" Space. This exhibit lists the
current and, if vacant, most recent tenants occupying the first floor spaces, their respective square
footages, and illustrates the calculations for the above cited statistics. If a space is currently vacant, the
prior use was used for calculation purposes. if a Non-Retail tenant space uses a portion of its store for
retail purposes, an estimated "Retail" area was included as "Retail" for calculation purposes.

       If this asset functioned for traditional retail (non-restaurant) tenants, then over the years it
would have attracted, and maintained, such tenants. In fact such tenants that have occupied space in
the center have not been successful (e.g. 71st Place - clothing store, H. Marion - a frame store). We
think it is clear that Deerfield Park Plaza is inherently not a traditional retail property, and is unique
within this zoning district. As opposed to a more traditional retail-oriented center, which could comply
with the proposed zoning, Deerfield Park Plaza due to its physical nature is a destination-oriented center
which lends itself to service, entertainment and restaurant users. Special consideration therefore
should be granted to the property.

        In our experience, when a Special Use permit is required many tenants, or their broker
representatives, simply pass over such a potential space and search for a location that they believe will
be less work, quicker to move forward with, and more certain. They view any extra municipal process,
and ANY potential to derail their plan (or commission) as a good reason to pass on a site. In effort to not
dissuade potential non-retail tenants from looking at the Center we suggest:

        1. Deerfield Park Plaza be excluded from the newly proposed requirement (item #1 in the
           October 22, 2012 correspondence) to gain a special use permit for any service use, office
           use, medical office use, and recreation use listed in Article 5.02-B, 2, 3 and 4, between
           10,000 square feet and 20,000 square feet; and,

        2. That either the entire Center be excluded from the 11 50% Retail Requirement" (item #3 in
           the October 22, 2012 correspondence) or, at a minimum, exclude the building currently
           occupied by the Barking Lot. The exclusion of this building would be in keeping with the
           planned exclusion of the Sach's Recreation Center, Joy of the Game, Brunswick and National
           Tire and Battery buildings. This 16,000 square foot building, with no visibility from the
           street, is very unlikely to ever attract a 11 Retail" tenant. With no street frontage, it is far
           more comparable to the National Tire and Battery Building than it is to, say, the former
           Office Depot. By excluding the "Barking Lot" building Deerfield Park Plaza would likely
           comply with the 50% Retail requirement (provided restaurants are included within that
           term) and the Sachs Recreation Center is excluded.

        We thank you for your consideration of unique impact which this re-zoning would have on our
Center, and we look forward to the opportunity to address the Commission to offer any assistance we
can to help achieve the objectives we share.




        David Dresdner
                  Deerfield Park Plaza, Deerfield, II

                "Retail" and "Non-Retail" Space Analysis
                                  as of 1013012012



                                             Total     "Non-Retail"      "Retail"
Tenants - Ground Floor onl't                  SF         Net* SF           SF*
The Tile Shop                               21,486                       21,486
Dunnkin Donuts                               4,100                        4,100
National City Bank                           3,475       3,475
Barking Lot (pet grooming/boarding)         16,009       15,609            400
State of IL (drivers license facility)       8,000       8,000
Boston Blackies                              5,500                        5,500
Vacant (Diplomat Pharmacy)                   7,670        7,670
California Tan                               5,650        5,450            200
Thai Thai                                    3,600                        3,600
Stand-up MRI                                 3,400        3,400
Doyle Opticians                              2,400        1,800            600
Vacant (Jim Dandy's Cleaners)                2,000        2,000
Blades Inc (Salon)                           1,710        1,610            100
Fresinius Medical                            7,500        7,500
Churchill Downs (tobacconist)                2,000                        2,000
Robert Marc (cosmetics and sundries)         1,573        1,323            250
Country Companies                            1,600        1,600
Cookers Red Hots                             1,530                        1,530
Sign a rama                                  1,023         423             600
Abbruzzo Ristorante                          6,700                        6,700
Vacant-71stplace                             2,000                        2,000
Vacant - Health south                        3,200       3,200
Totals                                      112,126      63,060          49,066
Percentage of Center w/o Rec. Center                      56%             44%


Recreation Center                            100,000     100,000
Totals w/Rec Center                          212,126     163,060
Percentage of Center w/Rec. Center                        76.9%            23%




* For "Non-Retail" tenants we have estimated the portion of the store which is used for retail sales .
  That area is deducted from the "Non-Retail" SF figures and has been included in the "Retail" SF figure.
                                  REQUEST FOR BOARD ACTION
                                                                            Agenda Item: 12-105-1


 Subject:       Approval of Wastewater Reclamation Facility (WRF) Improvement Project Change
                Order No. 16
 Action Requested:    Authorize Change Order No. 16 (Excess Flow Pond Cleaning) for $174,317
 Originated By: Director of Public Works and Engineering
 Referred To:    Mayor and Board of Trustees

Summary of Background and Reason for Request:

                               ----- Please see attached memorandum -----




 Reports and Documents Attached:

 Strand Associates Inc. Owner Summary and Change Order Request No. 16
 Excess Flow Pond Photos

 Date Referred to Board:       December 17, 2012


                                   Action Taken: __________________________________________
                                                                    Memorandum
                                                                                  Agenda 12-105-1
DATE:         December 12, 2012
TO:           Mayor and Board of Trustees
FROM:         Barbara K. Little, P.E. Director of Public Works and Engineering BKL
SUBJECT:      Approval of Wastewater Reclamation Facility (WRF) Improvement Project Change
              Order No. 16

This change order request was previously presented to the Board as part of Change Order No. 13.
Approval of this item (the old 13g) was deferred until additional information was obtained. Subsequent
to that request, the engineer and staff met with the pond cleaning subcontractor. A request was made for
the subcontractor to consider a reduction in the cost of the hauling since the actual quantity was
significantly higher than the allowance. The hope was that economy of scale would be a benefit to all
parties. The subcontractor has offered a 10 percent reduction in the unit price for the quantity hauled
after the allowance was reached. The value of the allowance was $170,000.

The change order request has been summarized in the attached letter from Strand Associates, including
the Change Order No. 16 document. The amount of the contract price adjustment requested with Change
Order No. 16 is $174,317. The original request with Change Order 13g was 193,686.60 yielding a
savings of $19,368.66. This compares to previously approved change order adjustments in the
aggregate amount of $338,150.70 yielding an overall increase to the contact price to date of $512,467.70
or 1.7 percent (0.017) of the original contract value.

The contractor has not requested any contract completion date adjustments with the items in Change
Order No. 16.

As described on the attached document, the engineer arranged for testing of the sludge layer in the
excess flow pond during the design phase. A total of 26 samples were taken from the layer under water.
These measurements were used to determine the depth of the biosolids as well as the amount of solids in
the product. The insertion of the soil sampler is an inexact process since differentiating between
biosolids and soils can be done only by touch or resistance and not observation (underwater). Based on
this quantity, an allowance of $170,000 was entered into the bidding documents.

The pond has never been emptied or cleaned. For at least 15 years we had a capital improvement project
in the 5- year plan to empty and clean the pond. The estimated cost at that time was $500,000.
This was dropped as plans developed for treatment plant improvements.
The cleaning of the excess flow pond began with a decanting of the liquid on top. This product was
returned to the head of the plant for treatment. The wet biosolids were then collected with a front end
loader on rubber tires and gently moved to the vacuum tube which loaded the product into the waiting
tanker truck. This operation is similar to a swimming pool cleaning system but on a different scale.

                                       Please see the attached photos.

Originally stiff clay was used to line the pond. After 50 years it is very possible that the interface
between the clay and the biosolids became loose. The clay layer would have been deep to prevent
leaking from the pond.

The amount of material removed from the pond in excess of the design calculations is equivalent to 1.5
inches of dirt over the pond bottom. Though the biosolids were at variable depth throughout the pond, if
that quantity were spread over the whole pond, it would be a depth of 1.4 inches. It is difficult for a front
end loader to skim 1.4 inches uniformly. It is even more difficult for the machine operator to
differentiate between the 1.4 inches of biosolids and 2.9 inches of soft or loose clay. The biosolids
handling contractor has performed this type of work before and has a very good reputation.

We have given thought to how this operation may be handled differently in the future. One solution
would be to price the removal by volume (gallons) instead of weight (tons).

Strand Associates has reviewed all the materials and prices submitted by the contractor. They
recommend approval of these items as described on the attached documents.

The Director of Public Works and Engineering recommends that the Mayor and Board of Trustees
authorize the adjustment to the WRF construction contract price for the items described, in the amount
of $174,317, increasing the total contract amount from the current value of $29,788,150.70 to
$29,962,467.70.




                                               Agenda 12-105-1
~!1
                                                                                                            Strand Associates,    Inc~
                                                                                                                  910 West Wingra Dnve
                                                                                                                     Madison. Wl53715
                                                                                                                      (P) 608-251 -4843
                                                                                                                      (F) 600-251-8655
STRAND
A S S 0 C I A T E Se
                   December 12, 2012


                   Ms. Barbara K. Little, P.E.
                   Director of Public Works and Engineering
                   Village of Deerfield
                   465 Elm Street
                   Deerfield, IL 60015

                   Re:       Change Order No. 16
                             WRF Modifications
                             Village of Deerfield, Illinois

                   Dear Barbara,

                   Enclosed are three copies of Change Order No. 16 and documentation for the change order items
                   for your review and approval. If these are acceptable, please sign and return to
                   Strand Associates, Inc.®This Jette•· also summarizes the items included in Change Order No. 16.

                   I.        Item 16a-Adjust excess flow pond sludge hauling allowance

                  These costs are for removal of solids from the excess flow pond that exceed the allowance amount. The
                  solids concentration of the hauled material was determined by WRF staff and verified by independent
                  lab testing. The sampling procedure was witnessed by the resident project representative and appeared
                  to be well-mixed and representative of the material removed from the pond. The quantity claimed
                  appears to accurately reflect the amount removed by the hauling subcontractor. The allowance amount
                  was originally determined by measuring the sludge depth at 26 locations in the pond and by
                  determining the s ludge concentration of I 0 samples. The most plausible explanation for the increased
                  amount of hauled material is that the bottom of the pond was substantially disturbed by the method of
                  sludge removal causing the inadve1tent removal of some of the clay from the pond bottom. The amount
                  of excess material hauled would equate to approximately 1.5 inches of clay.

                  The amount for this item has been reduced from the amount previously presented by $19,369 after
                  discussion with representatives from the biosolids hauling contractor.

                  With the approval of the above items in Change Order No. 16, the total change order amount for the
                  project is $512,467.70, equal to 1. 7 percent of the bid price. Please call me if you have any questions.

                  Sincerely,

                  STRAND ASSOCIATES, INC.®


                   f/L{w~
                  Vernon C. Witthuhn, Jr., P.E.




                  VCW:cad\S:\MAD\ 1500-- 1599\ 1545\013\ Wrd\Changc Ordcr\C0-16\C0-16.0wner Snnunary.docx


                 Arizona     I   lllinors   I   Indiana   I   Kentucky      I   Ohio     I   Wisconsin             www.strand.com
~!1
                                                                                                                 Strand Associates, Inc:
                                                                                                                       910 West W1ngra Drive
                                                                                                                          Madison, Wl 53715
                                                                                                                           (P) 608-251-4843
                                                                                                                           (F) 608-251 -8655
STRAND
A S S 0 C I A T E S""




                    December 12, 2012


                    CHANGE ORD ER NO. 16


                   PROJECT:                          Wastewater Reclamation Facility Modifications
                   OWNER:                            Village of Deerfield, Illinois
                   CONTRACT:                         1-2009
                   CONTRACTOR:                       Joseph J. Henderson and Son, Inc.


                   Description of Change

                    16a      Adjustment to Excess Flow Pond solids removal                                 ADD        $     174,317.00
                             allowance.
                   TOTAL VALUE OF THIS CHANGE ORDER:                                                       ADD        $     174,317.00

                   Contract Price Adjustment

                   Original Contract Price                                                                            $29,450,000.00
                   Previous Change Order Adjustments                                                                  $     338, 150.70
                   Adjustment in Contract Price this Change Order                                                     $     174,317.00
                   Current Contract Price including this Change O rder                                                $29,962,467 .70

                   Contract Completion Date Adjustment

                   Original Contract Completion Date                                                                February 28, 20 13
                   Contract Completion Date Adjustments due to previous Change Orders                                          77 days
                   Contract Completion Date Adj ustments due to this Change Order                                               0 days
                   Current Contract Completion Dates including all Change Orders                                          May 16,2013




                   VCW:cadiS:\MAD\1500--15991154 510 131WrdiChange OrderiC0-1 61Change Order No. 16.docx


                   Arizona    I   Illinois   I   Indiana   I   Kentucky       I   Ohio    I   Wisconsin                   www.strand.com
                                                                                               Strand Associates, Inc:

Village of Deerfield, Illinois-Joseph J. Henderson and Son, Inc.
Contract 1-2009, Change Order No. 16
Page 2
December 12, 2012


This document shall become a supplement to the Contract and all provisions will apply hereto.

RECOMMENDED



                                                                                                I
                                                                                        Date


APPROVED



CONTRACTOR-Joseph J. Henderson and Son, Inc.                                            Date


APPROVED



OWNER-Village of Deerfield                                                              Date




VCW:cndiS;\MAD\ 1500--1599\154510 131WrdiChangc OrderiCO-l 61Change Order No. l6.docx


                                                                                                      www.strand.com
                           -
                               •




                                   --



               -- -.
                       -
--   -   ---   --
--
                                 REQUEST FOR BOARD ACTION

                                                                                12-118-1, 12-119-1,
                                                            Agenda Item: 12-120-1, 12-121-1, 12-122-1


Subject:       2012 Property Tax Levy and Abatement Ordinances
               ________________________________________________________________________

               ________________________________________________________________________

               ________________________________________________________________________

              ________________________________________________________________________
                    Approval
Action Requested: ____________________________________________________________________
                    Finance Department
Originated By: _______________________________________________________________________
                    Mayor and Board of Trustees
Referred To: _________________________________________________________________________

Summary of Background and Reason for Request
As discussed at the November 26 Committee of the Whole meeting and the December 3 Public Hearing,
the tax levy ordinances will be presented for final approval. The result of approving all the presented
ordinances is consistent with the Board’s direction made at the December 3 meeting to abate $1,361,226.

The Board is required to consider each ordinance separately:
     Ordinance Levying Taxes for FY 2012/13 (Tax Levy Year 2012)
     Ordinance Abating All of 2012 Tax Levy Requirements for Series 2008 GO Bonds
     Ordinance Abating a Portion of 2012 Tax Levy Requirements for Series 2010 GO Bonds
     Ordinance Abating a Portion of 2012 Tax Levy Requirements for Series 2011B GO Bonds
     Ordinance Abating All of 2012 Tax Levy Requirements for Series 2011A GO Bonds

Acting Finance Director Burk will be present to answer questions.

Reports and Documents Attached:

Letter from Acting Finance Director Burk to Village Manager Street (dated December 11, 2012)
Exhibits (A through D)
Ordinances (5)

                            12/17/2012
Date Referred to Board: ____________________

                                     Action Taken: _________________________________________
TO:            Kent Street, Village Manager

FROM:          Eric Burk, Acting Director of Finance

DATE:          December 11, 2012

SUBJECT:       2012 Property Tax Levy and Abatement


The amount of the Village levy was determined in the approved FY 2012/13 budget and
adjusted by bond ordinances. The total levy, as indicated in the budget, required by bond
ordinances, and requested and approved by the Library, is $10,609,768. This is the pre-
abatement number. The breakdown of the levy is indicated in the column marked “2012 Levy
Budget” in Exhibit A.

The accumulated increases amount to a proposed total levy increase from 2011 that is greater
than 5% -- it is therefore necessary to hold a Truth in Taxation hearing prior to approval of this
levy. The hearing notice was published in the November 22, 2012 edition of the Deerfield
Review and the hearing was held during the Board meeting on December 3, 2012.

There is a $26,000 decrease in the General Fund levy, no increase in the Infrastructure
Replacement Fund levy and a 2.5% increase in the Scavenger Fund levy. The increase in the
Scavenger Fund levy is to keep pace with increased contract and personnel costs.

The Debt Service levy reflects the issuance of GO Bond Series 2013. The debt service
abatements discussed at the Committee of the Whole meeting on November 26th and the Public
Hearing on December 3rd are shown in summary in Exhibit A and in detail in Exhibit C. Those
abatements total $1,361,226.

The total Village levy after abatements and General Fund decrease is $5,101,429.             This
amounts to approximately $607 for a $500,000 market value house.

The ordinances adopting the levy and abating the levy for non-WRF debt service payments are
attached. I recommend you seek Board approval for them.
                                             Village of Deerfield - Exhibit A
                                         2012 Property Tax Levy with comparison to 2011
                                                (with all non-WRF debt service abated)
                                           2011           2012        2012          2012      Percent       Dollar
                  Fund                     Levy            Levy    Abatements        Net      Change       Change
                  Purpose                Extended        Budget    (Reduction)       Levy    (11 g 12)    (11 g 12)

                  General Fund           $2,140,000   $2,140,000      $26,000   $2,114,000      -1.21%     -$26,000
                  Scavenger Fund            883,428      905,500            0      905,500       2.50%       22,072
                  Infrastructure             45,000       45,000            0       45,000       0.00%            0
                  Debt Service Fund       1,362,274    3,398,155    1,361,226    2,036,929      49.52%      674,655

                  Total Village Levies    4,430,702    6,488,655    1,387,226    5,101,429      15.14%      670,727

                  Library                 3,202,500    3,378,637           0     3,378,637        5.50%     176,137
                  Library Debt Service      763,572      742,476           0       742,476       -2.76%     -21,096

                  Total                   8,396,774   10,609,768    1,387,226    9,222,542       9.83%      825,768




2012_WORKSHEET_v3.2.xls
                                                                   Exhibit B
                                               2012 Property Tax Levy with Five Year Comparison
                                                                       .
                                                                                                                 Proposed
                                    Fund              2008          2009           2010            2011            2012



                          General                      1,984,950     1,984,950      2,140,000       2,140,000        2,114,000
                          Scavenger                      808,950       841,360        883,428         883,428          905,500
                          Infrastructure                  45,000        45,000         45,000          45,000           45,000
                          Debt Service (net)                  0        155,000        502,484       1,362,274        2,036,929
                          Total Village              2,838,900      3,026,310     3,570,912       4,430,702        5,101,429

                          Library                    2,756,250      2,903,250     3,050,000       3,966,072        4,121,113

                          Combined Levy              5,595,150      5,929,560     6,620,912       8,396,774        9,222,542

                          Tax Rate History
                                     EAV           1,577,953,846 1,586,409,629   1,501,605,590   1,392,522,439   1,400,000,000
                          Tax Rate( per $100)                                                                        (est)
                              Village (blended)            0.180         0.191          0.238           0.318              0.364
                              Library (blended)            0.175         0.183          0.203           0.285              0.294
                          Combined                         0.355         0.374          0.441           0.603              0.659
                          all non-WRF debt service abated in 2011
                          2009 EAV includes new EAV from TIF #2.                                                      12/10/2012




2012_WORKSHEET_v3.2.xls
         Exhibit C - Abatement Analysis - Debt Service - 2012 Levy
                          Corporate        Corporate   Corporate Corporate
                          Purpose           Purpose    Purpose   Purpose       QECB
                            2008             2010        2010      2011A       2011B       2012 GO     2013 GO
                                           non-WRF       WRF      (Village)     WRF          WRF         WRF         Total
 Debt Service Levies        $364,425          $401,437  $602,155   $116,685   $1,225,000    $234,763    $453,690   $3,398,155
 Abate from:
  General Fund                364,425         337,234               116,685                                          818,344
  BAB Rebate                                   64,203     96,304                                                     160,507
  QECB Rebate                                                                   382,375                              382,375

 Total Abatement              364,425         401,437     96,304    116,685     382,375           0           0     1,361,226


 Net Levy                             $0           $0   $505,851        $0     $842,625     $234,763    $453,690   $2,036,929
                                                                                                                      12/10/2012




2012_WORKSHEET_v3.2.xls
                                                                     Exhibit D
                                                2011 Property Tax Levy with Three Year Projection

                                                                     Proposed          Projected         Projected        Projected
                                    Fund                2011           2012              2013              2014             2015



                          General                       2,140,000        2,114,000         2,198,560         2,286,502        2,377,962
                          Scavenger                       883,428          905,500           941,720           979,389        1,018,564
                          Infrastructure                   45,000           45,000            45,000            45,000           45,000
                          Debt Service (net)            1,362,274        2,036,929         3,150,000         3,150,000        3,150,000
                          Total Village               4,430,702        5,101,429         6,335,280         6,460,891        6,591,527

                          Library                     3,966,072        4,121,113         4,327,169         4,500,255        4,680,266

                          Combined Levy               8,396,774        9,222,542       10,662,449        10,961,147       11,271,792

                          Tax Rate History
                                   EAV               1,392,522,439   1,400,000,000     1,428,000,000     1,470,840,000    1,514,965,200
                          Tax Rate( per $100)                            (est)             (est)            (est)            (est)
                            Village                         0.318              0.364             0.444            0.439            0.435
                            Library                         0.285              0.294             0.303            0.306            0.309
                          Combined                          0.603              0.659             0.747            0.745            0.744

                          Assumes 4% annual increase in GF and Refuse levies in 2013 and beyond.
                          Assumes $2.5 million additional bonds in 2013 with initial levy in 2013 tax.                         12/11/2012




2012_WORKSHEET_v3.2.xls
                                         ORDINANCE O-12-

    AN ORDINANCE LEVYING TAXES FOR CORPORATE PURPOSES FOR THE CURRENT FISCAL YEAR,
 COMMENCING ON THE FIRST DAY OF MAY, 2012, AND ENDING ON THE THIRTIETH DAY OF APRIL, 2013,
             FOR THE VILLAGE OF DEERFIELD, LAKE AND COOK COUNTIES, ILLINOIS

  BE IT ORDAINED by the Mayor and Board of Trustees of the Village of Deerfield, Lake and Cook
Counties, Illinois, that:

     SECTION 1. A tax for the following sums of money, or as much thereof as may be authorized by
law, to defray all expenses and liabilities of the Village, be and the same is hereby levied for the
purposes specified against all taxable property in the Village for the fiscal year commencing on the
first day of May, 2012, and ending on the thirtieth day of April, 2013.

                                                                  BUDGETED
GENERAL CORPORATE FUND                                             AMOUNT            LEVY AMOUNT
   ADMINISTRATIVE DEPARTMENT
      (Org. 101111, 101210, 101330, 102110)
      Personnel Services                                              $2,960,576                       0
      Other Services                                                      35,800                       0
      Contractual Services                                             3,122,624                       0
      Commodities                                                         89,451                       0
      Capital Outlay                                                     105,399                       0
      Transfers Out                                                    2,537,464
   ADMINISTRATIVE DEPARTMENT TOTAL                                     8,851,314                       0

    POLICE DEPARTMENT
       Personnel Services                                               8,052,225          $2,114,000
       Other Services                                                      61,050                   0
       Contractual Services                                               769,970                   0
       Commodities                                                        157,200                   0
       Capital Outlay                                                      33,600                   0
       Transfers Out                                                      114,225
    POLICE DEPARTMENT TOTAL                                             9,188,270           2,114,000

    STREET DIVISION – PUBLIC WORKS
       Personnel Services                                               1,111,550                      0
       Other Services                                                       1,900                      0
       Contractual Services                                               722,028                      0
       Commodities                                                        542,750                      0
       Capital Outlay                                                      71,325                      0
       Transfers Out                                                      158,371
    STREET DIVISION TOTAL                                               2,607,924                      0

TOTAL GENERAL CORPORATE FUND                                          20,647,508            2,114,000

WATER FUND
   WATER DIVISION – PUBLIC WORKS
      Personnel Services                                                1,043,200                      0
      Other Services                                                        2,100                      0
      Contractual Services                                                337,339                      0
      Commodities                                                       2,276,200                      0
      Capital Outlay/Debt Service                                         772,703                      0

TOTAL WATER FUND                                                        4,431,542                      0
                                                 BUDGETED
SEWER FUND                                        AMOUNT         LEVY AMOUNT
   SEWER DIVISION – PUBLIC WORKS
       Personnel Services                            1,790,520                 0
       Other Services                                    6,880                 0
       Contractual Services                            573,020                 0
       Commodities                                     480,300                 0
       Capital Outlay                                   83,724                 0

TOTAL SEWER FUND                                     2,934,444                 0

GARAGE FUND
   GARAGE DIVISION – PUBLIC WORKS
     Personnel Services                               233,700                  0
     Other Services                                       930                  0
     Contractual Services                              33,400                  0
     Commodities                                      117,100                  0
     Capital Outlay                                     5,170                  0

TOTAL GARAGE FUND                                     390,300                  0

ENHANCED 911 FUND
     Other Services                                         0                  0
     Contractual                                      122,000                  0
     Commodities                                       58,000                  0
     Capital Outlay                                   382,071                  0

TOTAL ENHANCED 911 FUND                               562,071                  0

VEHICLE & EQUIPMENT REPLACEMENT FUND
       Capital Outlay                                 590,000                  0

TOTAL VEHICLE & EQUIPMENT REPLACEMENT FUND            590,000                  0

INFRASTRUCTURE REPLACEMENT FUND
       Contractual Services                          2,540,000
       Capital Outlay                               17,156,000          45,000

TOTAL INFRASTRUCTURE REPLACEMENT FUND               19,696,000          45,000


PROJECT 29 FUND
      Commodities                                           0                  0

TOTAL PROJECT 29 FUND                                       0                  0




                                             2
                                                     BUDGETED
DEBT SERVICE FUND                                     AMOUNT         LEVY AMOUNT
       GO Refunding Series 2003                                  0                0
       GO Series 2008                                      364,425          364,425
       GO Series 2010                                    1,003,593        1,003,592
       GO Series 2011A – Village Portion*                  116,685          116,685
       GO Series 2011B – QECB                            1,225,000        1,225,000
       GO Series 2012                                      182,593          234,763
       GO Series 2013                                            0          453,690
       Fiscal Agent Fees                                     4,750                0

TOTAL DEBT SERVICE FUND                                  2,897,046        3,398,155

POLICE PENSION FUND
       Personnel Services (Benefit Payments)             2,055,000                 0
       Contractual Services                                 32,550                 0

TOTAL POLICE PENSION FUND                                2,087,550                 0

MOTOR FUEL TAX FUND
     Contractual Services                                       0                  0
     Capital Outlay                                       490,000                  0

TOTAL MOTOR FUEL TAX FUND                                 490,000                  0

REFUSE FUND
       Personnel Services                                   85,250               0
       Other Services                                            0               0
       Contractual Services                              1,245,400         905,500
       Commodities                                          21,750               0
       Capital Outlay                                        9,177               0

TOTAL REFUSE FUND                                        1,361,577         905,500

COMMUTER PARKING LOTS FUND
    Personnel Services                                     31,400                  0
    Other Services                                        200,000                  0
    Contractual Services                                  174,570                  0
    Commodities                                            11,050                  0
    Capital Outlay                                              0

TOTAL COMMUTER PARKING LOTS FUND                          417,020                  0

VILLAGE CENTER TAX INCREMENT DISTRICT (TIF #2)
       Contractual Services                                     0                  0
       Capital Outlay                                           0                  0
       Transfers Out                                            0                  0

TOTAL VILLAGE CENTER TIF DISTRICT                               0                  0




                                                 3
                                                  BUDGETED
DEERFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY FUNDS                     AMOUNT         LEVY AMOUNT
       Personnel Services                             2,291,484         2,291,000
       Other Services                                    26,500            26,500
       Contractual Services                             554,500           554,500
       Commodities                                      448,016           448,000
       Capital Outlay                                 4,027,000            58,637
       GO Series 2011A – Library Portion*                     0           362,230
       GO Series 2013 – Library Portion*                      0           380,246

TOTAL DEERFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY FUND                   7,347,500         4,121,113


                             2012                 BUDGETED
                      SUMMARY OF TAX LEVIES        AMOUNT         LEVY AMOUNT

       GENERAL CORPORATE FUND                        20,647,508         2,114,000
       WATER FUND                                     4,431,542                 0
       SEWER FUND                                     2,934,444                 0
       GARAGE FUND                                      390,300                 0
       ENHANCED 911 FUND                                562,071                 0
       VEHICLE & EQUIPMENT REPLACEMENT FUND             590,000                 0
       INFRASTRUCTURE REPLACEMENT FUND               19,696,000            45,000
       PROJECT 29 FUND                                        0                 0
       DEBT SERVICE FUND                              2,897,046         3,398,155
       POLICE PENSION FUND                            2,087,550                 0
       MOTOR FUEL TAX FUND                              490,000                 0
       REFUSE FUND                                    1,361,577           905,500
       COMMUTER PARKING LOTS FUND                       417,020                 0
       VILLAGE CENTER TIF DISTRICT (TIF #2)                   0                 0

    SUBTOTAL VILLAGE OF DEERFIELD FUNDS              56,505,058         6,462,655

       DEERFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY
       General Corporate Fund                         7,347,500         3,378,637
       Debt Service Fund – Series 2011A                       0           362,230
       Debt Service Fund – Series 2013                        0           380,246

    SUBTOTAL DEERFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY FUNDS           7,347,500         4,121,113


    TOTAL ALL FUNDS                                  63,852,558        10,583,768




                                              4
   SECTION 2. That the Village Clerk is hereby directed to file with the County Clerks of Lake and
Cook Counties, Illinois, on or before the last Tuesday in December, A.D. 2012, a copy of this ordinance
duly certified by said Village Clerk.

  SECTION 3. That this ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after its passage and
approval.


PASSED:                     2012


AYES:


NAYS:


ABSENT:




ATTEST:                                        APPROVED:




________________________________                _________________________________
    Village Clerk                                    Mayor




                                                   5
                                       ORDINANCE O-12-

                        Abating All of the 2012 Tax Levy Requirements
                         For the Series 2008 General Obligation Bonds

BE IT ORDAINED BY THE MAYOR AND BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE VILLAGE
OF DEERFIELD, LAKE AND COOK COUNTIES, ILLINOIS, AS FOLLOWS:

SECTION ONE: That the County Clerk of Lake County and the County Clerk of Cook County are
hereby authorized and directed to abate the amounts set forth below of the tax theretofore provided
for and levied in Ordinance O-08-26 passed July 21, 2008, copies of which have been filed with the
respective County Clerks, providing for a levy for the following accounts of the Debt Service Fund
of the Village of Deerfield, Lake and Cook Counties, Illinois:

       Bonds to be Abated                                         Amount of Abatement

General Obligation Bonds-Series 2008                                   $364,425

SECTION TWO: That the Village of Deerfield has on hand sufficient funds from reserves to pay
the total tax levied by the above described Ordinance for said purpose for the fiscal year
commencing May 1, 2012; therefore a reduced tax levy is appropriate.

SECTION THREE: That the Village Clerk is hereby directed to file certified copies of this
Ordinance with the County Clerks of Lake and Cook Counties.

SECTION FOUR: That this Ordinance shall be in full force and effect from its passage and
approval, as provided by law.


AYES:
NAYS:
ABSENT:
PASSED this _____ day of ___________, A. D. 2012
APPROVED this _____ day of __________, A. D. 2012




                                             _____________________________________
                                             MAYOR

ATTEST:


______________________________________
VILLAGE CLERK
                                        ORDINANCE O-12-

                     Abating a Portion of the 2012 Tax Levy Requirements
                        For the Series 2010 General Obligation Bonds

BE IT ORDAINED BY THE MAYOR AND BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE VILLAGE
OF DEERFIELD, LAKE AND COOK COUNTIES, ILLINOIS, AS FOLLOWS:

SECTION ONE: That the County Clerk of Lake County and the County Clerk of Cook County are
hereby authorized and directed to abate the amounts set forth below of the tax theretofore provided
for and levied in Ordinance O-10-35 passed November 1, 2010, copies of which have been filed
with the respective County Clerks, providing for a levy for the following accounts of the Debt
Service Fund of the Village of Deerfield, Lake and Cook Counties, Illinois:

       Bonds to be Abated                                         Amount of Abatement

General Obligation Bonds-Series 2010                                    $497,741

SECTION TWO: That the Village of Deerfield has on hand sufficient funds from reserves and the
Federal Build America Bonds credit to pay a portion of the total tax levied by the above described
Ordinance for said purpose for the fiscal year commencing May 1, 2012; therefore a reduced tax
levy is appropriate.

SECTION THREE: That the Village Clerk is hereby directed to file certified copies of this
Ordinance with the County Clerks of Lake and Cook Counties.

SECTION FOUR: That this Ordinance shall be in full force and effect from its passage and
approval, as provided by law.

AYES:
NAYS:
ABSENT:
PASSED this _____ day of ___________, A. D. 2012
APPROVED this _____ day of __________, A. D. 2012




                                             _____________________________________
                                             MAYOR

ATTEST:


______________________________________
VILLAGE CLERK
                                        ORDINANCE O-12-

                     Abating a Portion of the 2012 Tax Levy Requirements
                       For the Series 2011B General Obligation Bonds

BE IT ORDAINED BY THE MAYOR AND BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE VILLAGE
OF DEERFIELD, LAKE AND COOK COUNTIES, ILLINOIS, AS FOLLOWS:

SECTION ONE: That the County Clerk of Lake County and the County Clerk of Cook County are
hereby authorized and directed to abate the amounts set forth below of the tax theretofore provided
for and levied in Ordinance O-11-35 passed September 26, 2011, copies of which have been filed
with the respective County Clerks, providing for a levy for the following accounts of the Debt
Service Fund of the Village of Deerfield, Lake and Cook Counties, Illinois:

       Bonds to be Abated                                         Amount of Abatement

General Obligation Bonds-Series 2011B                                   $382,375

SECTION TWO: That the Village of Deerfield has on hand sufficient funds from reserves and the
Federal Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds credit to pay a portion of the total tax levied by the
above described Ordinance for said purpose for the fiscal year commencing May 1, 2012; therefore
a reduced tax levy is appropriate.

SECTION THREE: That the Village Clerk is hereby directed to file certified copies of this
Ordinance with the County Clerks of Lake and Cook Counties.

SECTION FOUR: That this Ordinance shall be in full force and effect from its passage and
approval, as provided by law.

AYES:
NAYS:
ABSENT:
PASSED this _____ day of ___________, A. D. 2012
APPROVED this _____ day of __________, A. D. 2012




                                             _____________________________________
                                             MAYOR

ATTEST:


______________________________________
VILLAGE CLERK
                                        ORDINANCE O-12-

                        Abating All of the 2012 Tax Levy Requirements
                        For the Series 2011A General Obligation Bonds

BE IT ORDAINED BY THE MAYOR AND BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE VILLAGE
OF DEERFIELD, LAKE AND COOK COUNTIES, ILLINOIS, AS FOLLOWS:

SECTION ONE: That the County Clerk of Lake County and the County Clerk of Cook County are
hereby authorized and directed to abate the amounts set forth below of the tax theretofore provided
for and levied in Ordinance O-11-35 passed September 26, 2011, copies of which have been filed
with the respective County Clerks, providing for a levy for the following accounts of the Debt
Service Fund of the Village of Deerfield, Lake and Cook Counties, Illinois:

       Bonds to be Abated                                          Amount of Abatement

General Obligation Bonds-Series 2011A                                    $116,685

SECTION TWO: That the Village of Deerfield has on hand sufficient funds from reserves to pay a
portion of the total tax levied by the above described Ordinance for said purpose for the fiscal year
commencing May 1, 2012; therefore a reduced tax levy is appropriate.

SECTION THREE: That the Village Clerk is hereby directed to file certified copies of this
Ordinance with the County Clerks of Lake and Cook Counties.

SECTION FOUR: That this Ordinance shall be in full force and effect from its passage and
approval, as provided by law.

AYES:
NAYS:
ABSENT:
PASSED this _____ day of ___________, A. D. 2012
APPROVED this _____ day of __________, A. D. 2012




                                              _____________________________________
                                              MAYOR

ATTEST:


______________________________________
VILLAGE CLERK
                                  REQUEST FOR BOARD ACTION

                                                                                     12-125
                                                                     Agenda Item: __________________


Subject:       Ordinance Establishing the Fiscal Year of the Village of Deerfield
               ________________________________________________________________________

               ________________________________________________________________________

               ________________________________________________________________________

              ________________________________________________________________________
                    First Reading
Action Requested: ____________________________________________________________________
                    Finance
Originated By: _______________________________________________________________________
                    Mayor and Board of Trustees
Referred To: _________________________________________________________________________

Summary of Background and Reason for Request

As directed by the Board at the November 26 Committee of the Whole meeting, Attorney Coblentz has
prepared an ordinance establishing a calendar year fiscal year for the Village to begin on January 1 of each
year, and to end on December 31 of the same year, commencing January 1, 2014.


Reports and Documents Attached:

Ordinance
Memorandum from Acting Finance Director Burk dated June 13, 2012 and November 12, 2012

                            12/17/2012
Date Referred to Board: ____________________

                                       Action Taken: _________________________________________
                           VILLAGE OF DEERFIELD
                      LAKE AND COOK COUNTIES, ILLINOIS

______________________________________________________________________________


                         ORDINANCE NO. _______________

                       AN ORDINANCE ESTABLISHING
              THE FISCAL YEAR OF THE VILLAGE OF DEERFIELD


______________________________________________________________________________




                                    PASSED AND APPROVED BY THE
                                    PRESIDENT AND BOARD OF TRUSTEES
                                    OF THE VILLAGE OF DEERFIELD, LAKE
                                    AND COOK COUNTIES, ILLINOIS, this

                                    _________ day of ________________, 2013.



Published in pamphlet form
by authority of the President
and Board of Trustees of the
Village of Deerfield, Lake and
Cook Counties, Illinois, this
_____ day of ____________, 2013.
                           VILLAGE OF DEERFIELD
                    LAKE AND COOK COUNTIES, ILLINOIS
______________________________________________________________________________

                                ORDINANCE NO. _____________

                           AN ORDINANCE ESTABLISHING
                  THE FISCAL YEAR OF THE VILLAGE OF DEERFIELD

______________________________________________________________________________

        WHEREAS, the Village of Deerfield is a home rule unit of government pursuant to the

provisions of Article VII, Section 6 of the Illinois Constitution; and

        WHEREAS, as a home rule unit of local government, the Village of Deerfield may exercise

any power and perform any function pertaining to its government and affairs, except as limited by

the provisions of Article VII, Section 6 of the Illinois Constitution; and

        WHEREAS, the corporate authorities of the Village of Deerfield have authority to establish,

by ordinance, the fiscal year of the Village of Deerfield; and

        WHEREAS, the corporate authorities of the Village of Deerfield have determined that it is

in the best interests of the Village of Deerfield to establish a calendar year fiscal year for the Village

to begin on January 1 of each year, and to end on December 31 of the same year, commencing

January 1, 2014; and

        WHEREAS, the corporate authorities of the Village of Deerfield have further determined

that it is in the best interests of the Village of Deerfield to provide that the fiscal year that will

commence on May 1, 2013 pursuant to Section 1-21 of the Municipal Code of the Village of

Deerfield, shall end on December 31, 2013 in order to provide for a transition to a calendar year

fiscal year commencing on January 1, 2014;




                                                   -1-
        NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE PRESIDENT AND BOARD OF

TRUSTEES OF THE VILLAGE OF DEERFIELD, LAKE AND COOK COUNTIES, ILLINOIS, in

the exercise of its home rule powers, as follows:

        SECTION 1: Fiscal Year Transition. That the period beginning on May 1, 2013 and

ending December 31, 2013 shall be deemed to be the 2013 fiscal year of the Village of Deerfield

commencing May 1, 2013.

        SECTION 2: Calendar Year Fiscal Year. That commencing on January 1, 2014, the

fiscal year of the Village shall begin on January 1 of each year and end on December 31 of the same

year.

        SECTION 3: Municipal Code Amended. That Section 1-21 (“Fiscal Year”) of Chapter 1

(“General Provisions”) of the Municipal Code of the Village of Deerfield be and the same is hereby

amended to read as follows:

        Sec. 1-21.     Fiscal Year.

        The fiscal year of the Village shall begin on May 1 of each year and end on April 30,
        of the following year; provided, however, that the fiscal year of the Village
        beginning on May 1, 2013 shall end on December 31, 2013.

        Commencing January 1, 2014, the fiscal year of the Village shall begin on January 1
        of each year and end on December 31 of the same year.

        SECTION 4: Savings Clause. Nothing contained in this Ordinance, or in the Municipal

Code of the Village of Deerfield as hereby amended, shall be construed as abating any action now

pending under or by virtue of any general ordinance of the Village of Deerfield, or as affecting the

liability of any person, firm or corporation under any ordinance, resolution or agreement of the

Village, or as a waiving any right of the Village under any ordinance, resolution, agreement or

provision thereof in force at the time of passage of this Ordinance.




                                                -2-
        SECTION 5: Severability. Subject to the savings clause contained in this Ordinance, all

ordinances of the Village of Deerfield in direct conflict with the provisions of this Ordinance are

hereby repealed to the extent of such conflict, excluding the following ordinances which are not

repealed: contract ordinances and ordinances authorizing the execution of a contract; bond

ordinances; tax levy ordinances; budget and appropriation ordinances; and all other ordinances,

resolutions and motions authorizing or providing for the expenditure of funds.

        SECTION 6: Home Rule Power. That this Ordinance, and each of its terms, shall be the

effective legislative act of a home rule municipality without regard to whether such Ordinance

should: (a) contain terms contrary to the provisions of current or subsequent non-preemptive state

law; or, (b) legislate in a manner or regarding a matter not delegated to municipalities by state law.

It is the intent of the corporate authorities of the Village of Deerfield that to the extent that the terms

of this Ordinance should be inconsistent with any non-preemptive state law, this Ordinance shall

supersede state law in that regard within its jurisdiction.

        SECTION 7: Effective Date. That this Ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and

after its passage, approval and publication in pamphlet form as provided by law.

        PASSED this _______ day of _______________________, 2013.
        AYES:
        NAYS:
        ABSENT:
        ABSTAIN:
        APPROVED this _________ day of _________________________, 2013.



                                                 ______________________________
                                                       Village President
ATTEST:



                                                   -3-
____________________________
      Village Clerk




                               -4-
TO:            Kent Street, Village Manager

FROM:          Eric Burk, Assistant Finance Director

DATE:          June 13,2012

SUBJECT:       Transition to a Calendar Year End

The Mayor and Board of Trustees have expressed an interest in changing the Village's
fiscal year end (April 30111) to a calendar year end (December 31 51 ). Listed below are
items to be considered during the transition to a calendar year end.

Current Leyy, Budget and Collection (Exhibit A)

The most recent tax levy, passed in December 2011, was linked to Fiscal Year 2012
(May 1, 2011 April 30, 20 12) as it was the most recent adopted budget available at the
time the levy was passed. This causes conf11sion because the budget is passed several
months (April 2011) before the levy to fund that year is passed.

In addition, the 2011 levy is primarily collected in June and September of calendar 2012
(Fiscal Year 2013) which is several months after the fiscal year it was intended to fund
(Fiscal Year 2012) has ended. The potential cash flow issue has been avoided as the
Village has a diverse revenue stream, reserves to cover the timing issues and the levy has
remained relatively consistent from year to year.

Transition to Calendar Year End (Exhibit B)

The transition to a calendar year end would require multiple steps. An eight month
"stub'' year would be required. (May 1 through December 31) Staff would prepare an
eight month budget for the "stub" year to be passed in April before the "stub" year
begins. In December of the "stub" year the Village would simultaneously pass a calendar
year budget and the tax levy. This would allow the tax levy to be linked to the year in
which the taxes are collected.

Adopting two budgets ("stub" year in April and calendar year in December) in an eight
month period would require significant staff time and create redundancy. A potential
solution is to prepare both budgets but only pass the "stub" year in ApriL The calendar
year budget could then be monitored and modified as necessary before adoption in
December.

The budget for fiscal year 2013 has already been passed. Therefore, the soonest it makes
sense to stmt the transition is May 1, 2013. The Village would have a "stub" year of May
1, 2013 through December 31, 2013. The calendar year 2014 budget would be passed in
December 2013. This allows the 2013 levy to be linked to calendar year 2014, which is
the year it will be collected.
The Library will need to make an independent decision regarding their year end. Ideally,
the Library would change its year end along with the Village. However, they could keep
their current fiscal year end or change at a different time.

If the Library keeps its current year end, they would most likely see increased audit fees.
The Library currently receives reduced audit fees as the auditors are able to gain
efficiencies by completing the Village and Library audits at the same time. The cunent
Library audit fees are approximately $3,200 per year.

Advantages

    •   Changing to a calendar year will make the tax levy and budget process easier to
        understand. The tax levy and budget would be reviewed at the same time. This
        would provide decision makers and interested parties with a better understanding
        of revenues and expenditures.
    •   Construction contracts could be competitively bid in the winter when construction
        companies are more aggressive with pricing. The Village may get better pricing
        since contracts are currently bid in the spring when contractors already have some
        of their work scheduled.
    •    A calendar year end would also provide better lead time for planning and
        managing construction projects. Pending weather conditions, projects could
        begin in early spring rather than early summer.
    •   Annual W-2 and 1099 tax forms, which are based on a calendar year, will
        coincide with the Village's year end.


Disadvantages

    •   Budget planning and discussion during the transition would be on a compressed
        schedule (1 51 qtr 2013 and again in the 4th qtr of 2013).
    •   The Village's union contracts and non-union salary schedule are based on a May
        1 to April 30 fiscal year. It may be beneficial to change them to align with the
        calendar year as the contracts expire; this is not a necessity.
    •   The Village will have to pay for an eight month audit. This is not an additional
        audit but moves up the next audit by 4 months.
    •   Audits in general may be billed at a higher rate as the work would be done during
        the accounting firm's "busy season."
    •   For the first year, it will be difficult to conduct an analysis comparing revenues
        and expenditures from one year to the next due to the shortened fiscal year.
    •   The Village may incur additional costs to transition our financial software.
    •   Budgets will not coincide with elected officials' terms of office.
                                                                                                          Agenda Item #3 - Page 2 of 3

                                                       Current Property Tax Cycle
                                                               (Exhibit A)
FY2012
Budget
         1/2 of the
           2010
                          1/2 of the
                            2010
                                         2011 Levy
                                        Passed for FY
                                                           I   FY 2013
                                                               Budget
                                                                           1/2 of the
                                                                             2011
                                                                                            112 of the
                                                                                              2011
                                                                                                            2012 Levy
                                                                                                           Passed for FY
                                                                                                                              FY2014
                                                                                                                              Budget
                            Levy                                                              Levy



                                                           ~
Passed     Levy                             2012                             Levy                              2013           Passed
         Collected        Collected                                        Collected        Collected

"",
Apr-11    Jun-11           Sep-11           Dec-11             Apr-12       Jun-12           Sep-12            Dec-12         Apr-13

                      Fiscal Year2012(Ma 1 -April30)                                    Fiscal Year 2013 Ma 1 -April 30)

                                          2011 Levy                                                           2012 Levy
                                        funds FY 2012                                                      funds FY 2013
                                        but is collected                                                   but is collected
                                          in FY2013                                                          in FY2014
                                                                                                         Agenda Item #3 - Page 3 of 3
                                     Transition and Proposed Property Tax Cycle
                                                      (Exhibit B)
FY13A    1/2 of the   1/2 ofthe    2014Budget                    1/2 of the        1/2 of the      2015 Budget
                        2012          Passed                       2013              2013             Passed
Budget     2012
                                    2013 Levy                                                       2014 Levy
Passed     Levy                   Passed for 2014                                                 Passed for 2015
         Collected


Apr-13    Jun-13       Sep-13        Dec-13         Jan-14        Jun-14            Sep-14           Dec-14                Jan-15

                                  Dec 31)                     Calendar Year 2014(Jan 1 -Dec 31)                     Calendar Year 2015

                                                                2013 Levy is      2013 Levy is
                                                                  for 2014          for 2014
TO:            Kent Street, Village Manager

FROM:          Eric Burk, Acting Director of Finance

DATE:          November 12, 2012

SUBJECT:       Update on the Transition to a Calendar Year End

During a Committee of the Whole on June 16th, the Village discussed changing its year
end from April 30th to December 31st. The advantages and disadvantages of the transition
were discussed and are listed on page 2 of this memo.

Two additional concerns were brought up during the meeting. The first concern was
whether the transition would affect the Village's Bond Rating for its upcoming issue and
going forward. The second concern was determining the appropriate time to change.

Bond Rating

After checking with the Village's Bond Counsel, Financial Advisor and other local
Finance Directors, the consensus was that changing the year end should not affect the
Village's Bond rating. It should be noted that no one knows for sure and that other
factors happening at the same time could cause a ratings downgrade. In addition, there is
only one way to go since the Village is rated Aaa. Finally, the transition will take place
after the Village issues debt in early January 20 13. This does not mean that the Village's
rating could never be lowered just that the transition will happen after the upcoming
ISSUe.


Appropriate Timing

After checking with other local Finance Directors and software providers, the Village
could transition to a calendar year end beginning May 1, 2013. I have settled into my
new role and the Finance Department is operating smoothly. There will be obstacles to
overcome throughout the process, but we will have obstacles whenever the change is
made. I believe the benefits of having a calendar year end sooner outweigh the
complications of transitioning now.
Advantages

   e   Changing to a calendar year will make the tax levy and budget process easier to
       understand. The tax levy and budget would be reviewed at the same time. This
       would provide decision makers and interested parties with a better understanding
       ofrevenues and expenditures.
   •   Construction contracts could be competitively bid in the winter when construction
       companies are more aggressive with pricing. The Village may get better pricing
       since contracts are currently bid in the spring when contractors already have some
       of their work scheduled.
   e    A calendar year end would also provide better lead time for planning and
       managing construction projects. Pending weather conditions, projects could
       begin in early spring rather than early summer.
   •   Annual W-2 and 1099 tax forms, which are based on a calendar year, will
       coincide with the Village's year end.


Disadvantages

   •   Budget planning and discussion during the transition would be on a compressed
       schedule (1st qtr 2013 and again in the 4th qtr of 20 13).
   e   The Village's union contracts and non-union salary schedule are based on a May
       1 to April 30 fiscal year. It may be beneficial to change them to align with the
       calendar year as the contracts expire; this is not a necessity.
   e   The Village will have to pay for an eight month audit. This is not an additional
       audit but moves up the next audit by 4 months.
   •   Audits in general may be billed at a higher rate as the work would be done during
       the accounting firm's "busy season."
   •   For the first year, it will be difficult to conduct an analysis comparing revenues
       and expenditures from one year to the next due to the shortened fiscal year.
   •   The Village may incur additional costs to transition our financial software.
   •   Budgets will not coincide with elected officials' terms of office.
                                    REQUEST FOR BOARD ACTION

                                                                      Agenda Item: 12-126___________



Subject                Revised Personnel Manual

Action Requested:      Approval of Resolution

Originated By:         Village Manager’s Office and Finance Department

Referred To:           Village President and Board of Trustees

Summary of Background and Reason for Request

As a result of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, staff has reviewed the Village’s
Personnel Manual to ensure it is in compliance with the Act. Staff took the opportunity to make changes to a
few other sections of the Personnel Manual as well. Attached is the Personnel Manual that staff is requesting
approval of through a Resolution. Some of the larger changes include:

   •   Language that addresses which employees are eligible for health coverage, as defined by federal law.
       The new standard is that employers must offer health insurance coverage to part-time employees
       working an average of 30 hours per week. The Village will be required to offer proper coverage
       according to the law starting January 1, 2014, thus we have to start evaluating our employee base
       starting January 1, 2013.
   •   Changed the military leave language to be consistent with what is in both union contracts. The
       language indicates we will follow state and federal law on the issue. This ensures we do not have to
       update our manual each time there is a change in the law.
   •   Added a section that allows the Village to complete fitness for duty testing.
   •   Added a Whistleblower section that gives employees protection from retaliation if they want to come
       forward about an issue in the Village.

Jennifer Maltas will be at the meeting to answer any questions that the Board might have.




Reports and Documents Attached:

Resolution
Exhibit A – Revised Personnel Manual

Date Referred to Board: December 17, 2012


                                      Action Taken: _________________________________________
                           VILLAGE OF DEERFIELD
                    LAKE AND COOK COUNTIES, ILLINOIS
______________________________________________________________________________


                             RESOLUTION NO. ______________

                    A RESOLUTION APPROVING AN AMENDMENT
                  TO THE PERSONNEL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
                         OF THE VILLAGE OF DEERFIELD

______________________________________________________________________________

       WHEREAS, the last comprehensive update of the Village’s Personnel Policy Manual was

approved in January 2011; and,

       WHEREAS, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 has necessitated

changes to the Personnel Policy Manual; and,

       WHEREAS, Village staff and the Village attorney have reviewed the current Personnel

Policy Manual and have recommended that the Village Board approve a revised Personnel Policy

Manual as provided herein;

       NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE PRESIDENT AND BOARD OF

TRUSTEES OF THE VILLAGE OF DEERFIELD, LAKE AND COOK COUNTIES, ILLINOIS, in

the exercise of its home rule powers, as follows:

       SECTION 1: That the “Village of Deerfield Personnel Policies and Procedures” manual

attached hereto as Exhibit A be and the same is hereby authorized and approved as the Personnel

Policy Manual of the Village of Deerfield.

       SECTION 2: That said Personnel Policy Manual shall be effective as of January 1, 2012,

and all prior Personnel Policy Manuals are hereby superseded.
        SECTION 3: That this Resolution, and each of its terms, shall be the effective legislative act

of a home rule municipality without regard to whether such Resolution should: (a) contain terms

contrary to the provisions of current or subsequent non-preemptive state law; or, (b) legislate in a

manner or regarding a matter not delegated to municipalities by state law. It is the intent of the

corporate authorities of the Village of Deerfield that to the extent that the terms of this Resolution

should be inconsistent with any non-preemptive state law, this Resolution shall supersede state law

in that regard within its jurisdiction.

        SECTION 4: That this Resolution shall be in full force and effect from and after its passage

and approval as provided by law.

        PASSED this 17 day of December, 2012.

        AYES:

        NAYS:

        ABSENT:

        ABSTAIN:

        APPROVED this 17 day of December, 2012.



                                               ________________________________
                                                     Village President
ATTEST:


_____________________________
      Village Clerk




                                                 -2-
   VILLAGE OF DEERFIELD

PERSONNEL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES




                  2012
         Approved by Village Board
             Resolution R-12-
Village of Deerfield
Personnel Policies and Procedures




                                      TABLE OF CONTENTS


ARTICLE I – INTRODUCTION......................................................................5
  1.1.0     GENERAL INTRODUCTION ............................................................................. 5
  1.2.0     ORGANIZATION ................................................................................................ 5

ARTICLE II – EMPLOYMENT POLICY ......................................................7
  2.1.0     AUTHORITY ....................................................................................................... 7
  2.2.0     EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY ....................................................... 7
  2.3.0     EMPLOYMENT PROCEDURES ........................................................................ 7
    2.3.1     RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION .............................................................. 8
  2.4.0     NEPOTISM........................................................................................................... 9
  2.5.0     SECONDARY EMPLOYMENT ......................................................................... 9
  2.6.0     RESIDENCY ...................................................................................................... 10

ARTICLE III - POSITION CLASSIFICATION ........................................11
  3.1.0     POSITION CLASSIFICATION PLAN ............................................................. 11
    3.1.1     POSITION COMPENSATION ...................................................................... 12
    3.1.2     GRADES OF PAY ......................................................................................... 12
    3.1.3     OVERTIME COMPENSATION.................................................................... 12
  3.2.0     PERFORMANCE EVALUATION .................................................................... 13
  3.3.0     PROBATIONARY PERIOD .............................................................................. 14
  3.4.0     TRANSFERS ...................................................................................................... 14
  3.5.0     PROMOTIONS................................................................................................... 14
  3.6.0     DEMOTIONS ..................................................................................................... 15

ARTICLE IV - HOURS OF WORK AND COMPENSATION ................17
  4.1.0     HOURS OF WORK............................................................................................ 17
    4.1.1    WORK WEEK DEFINED.............................................................................. 17
    4.1.2    WORK DAY DEFINED................................................................................. 17
    4.1.3    ATTENDANCE .............................................................................................. 17
    4.1.4    OVERTIME WORK....................................................................................... 17
    4.1.5    REST PERIODS ............................................................................................. 18
  4.2.0     COMPENSATION ............................................................................................. 18
    4.2.1    PAY PERIODS ............................................................................................... 18
    4.2.2    PAYROLL DEDUCTIONS............................................................................ 18

ARTICLE V - GROUP INSURANCE POLICIES .....................................19
  5.1.0     HEALTH INSURANCE ..................................................................................... 19
    5.1.1    ELIGIBILITY ................................................................................................. 19

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    5.1.2       INSURANCE COST ALLOCATION ............................................................ 20
    5.1.3       LIFE INSURANCE ........................................................................................ 20
    5.1.4       DISABILITY/RETIREE INSURANCE COVERAGE .................................. 21
    5.1.5       INSURANCE COVERAGE DURING UNPAID LEAVE ............................ 21
    5.1.6       COST OF MEDICAL EXAMS ...................................................................... 21
    5.1.7       CHANGES TO COVERAGE ........................................................................ 22
  5.2.0       COBRA GUIDELINES ...................................................................................... 22
  5.3.0       FLEXIBLE SPENDING ACCOUNT................................................................. 23
  5.4.0       EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM ......................................................... 24
  5.5.0       HIPAA PRIVACY RULE .................................................................................. 24

ARTICLE VI - HOLIDAYS WITH PAY ....................................................25
  6.1.0       HOLIDAYS ........................................................................................................ 25
    6.1.1      HOLIDAY PAY ............................................................................................. 25
    6.1.2      HOLIDAYS – PART TIME EMPLOYEES................................................... 25
    6.1.3      PERSONAL DAYS ........................................................................................ 26

ARTICLE VII - LEAVE POLICIES ............................................................27
  7.1.0       VACATION ........................................................................................................ 27
    7.1.1       ACCUMULATED VACATION AT SEPARATION .................................... 28
  7.2.0       PAID SICK LEAVE ........................................................................................... 28
    7.2.1       ACCRUAL ..................................................................................................... 28
    7.2.2       ACCRUAL FOR PART TIME EMPLOYEES .............................................. 28
    7.2.3       SICK LEAVE USAGE ................................................................................... 28
    7.2.4       PAYOUT OF SICK LEAVE AT RETIREMENT ......................................... 29
  7.3.0       OCCUPATIONAL INJURY LEAVE ................................................................ 30
  7.4.0       LEAVE OF ABSENCE WITHOUT PAY ......................................................... 31
  7.5.0       FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE .................................................................. 32
  7.6.0       ABSENCE WITHOUT LEAVE......................................................................... 33
  7.7.0       MILITARY LEAVE ........................................................................................... 33
  7.8.0       MISCELLANEOUS LEAVE ............................................................................. 33
    7.8.1       COURT LEAVE ............................................................................................. 33
    7.8.2       JURY DUTY LEAVE .................................................................................... 34
    7.8.3       BEREAVEMENT LEAVE............................................................................. 34
    7.8.4       SCHOOL VISITATION LEAVE ................................................................... 34
    7.8.5       VOTING LEAVE ........................................................................................... 35

ARTICLE VIII - SEPARATION, DISCIPLINE AND GRIEVANCE
PROCEDURES .................................................................................................36
  8.1.0       SEPARATION FROM EMPLOYMENT........................................................... 36
    8.1.1       RESIGNATION .............................................................................................. 36
    8.1.2       TERMINATION ............................................................................................. 36

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Personnel Policies and Procedures




    8.1.3      LAYOFFS/REDUCTION IN FORCE ........................................................... 36
    8.1.4      EXIT INTERVIEWS ...................................................................................... 36
    8.1.5      RETURN OF VILLAGE PROPERTY........................................................... 37
  8.2.0      REEMPLOYMENT ............................................................................................ 37
  8.3.0      DISCIPLINE ....................................................................................................... 37
  8.4.0      GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES .......................................................................... 39
  8.5.0      DISCIPLINARY ACTION APPEAL PROCESS .............................................. 40

ARTICLE IX - RETIREMENT ....................................................................41
  9.1.0      RETIREMENT ................................................................................................... 41
    9.1.1      DEFERRED COMPENSATION PLAN ........................................................ 41
    9.1.2      RETIREE HEALTH SAVINGS PLAN ......................................................... 41

ARTICLE X - GENERAL EMPLOYEE REGULATIONS ......................42
  10.1.0     ANTI – HARASSMENT POLICY .................................................................... 42
    10.1.1     SEXUAL HARASSMENT............................................................................. 42
  10.2.0     REPORT AND INVESTIGATION OF COMPLAINTS OF HARASSMENT . 43
  10.3.0     ETHICS............................................................................................................... 44
    10.3.1     CONFLICTS OF INTEREST ......................................................................... 45
    10.3.2     GIFT BAN ...................................................................................................... 46
    10.3.3     PROHIBITED POLITICAL ACTIVITIES .................................................... 48
    10.3.4     VIOLATION OF CODE OF ETHICS ........................................................... 48
  10.4.0     SAFETY POLICY .............................................................................................. 49
  10.5.0     PERSONAL USE OF VILLAGE VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ................. 50
    10.5.1     VEHICLE USAGE POLICY .......................................................................... 50
    10.5.2     COMPUTER USAGE POLICY ..................................................................... 51
    10.5.3     TELEPHONE USAGE POLICY.................................................................... 54
  10.6.0     DRESS CODE POLICY ..................................................................................... 56
  10.7.0     TRAVEL/TRAINING POLICY ......................................................................... 56
  10.8.0     CIVIL LITIGATION .......................................................................................... 62
  10.9.0     TUITION REIMBURSEMENT PROGRAM .................................................... 63
  10.10.0    DRUG FREE WORKPLACE............................................................................. 63
  10.11.0    NO SMOKING POLICY .................................................................................... 64
  10.12.0    MEDIA RELATIONS POLICY ......................................................................... 64




                                                                                                                                   4
Village of Deerfield
Personnel Policies and Procedures




ARTICLE I – INTRODUCTION

1.1.0 GENERAL INTRODUCTION

       This Personnel Manual describes the current personnel policies which apply to all
       employees as members of the Village’s work force. It is designed to introduce
       employees to the Village organization and structure and to serve as a guide to present
       Village policies, practices, and procedures. It is important to remember that the
       contents of this Manual are presented for information purposes only.

       This Manual does not create any contractual obligations between the Village and its
       employees. The information presented should not be interpreted as a contract,
       promise, or guarantee of future or continued employment, compensation, or benefits,
       or as stating contractual terms of employment. Likewise, this Manual discusses
       policies and procedures of general application to all employees, including employees
       covered by a union contract. To the extent a union contract covers a subject contained
       in or conflicts with a provision of this Manual, the union contract will control. Each
       rule of the Personnel Manual and each section thereof is an independent rule or section.
       The holding of any rule or section to be void, invalid or ineffective, for any reason, does
       not affect the validity of any other rule or section. Unless otherwise provided by the
       Board of Trustees, the rules, regulations and General Orders of the Police Department
       supersede the provisions of this Manual to the extent of any inconsistency.

       The Village reserves the right to change or make exceptions to its personnel
       guidelines, procedures, benefits (including those for retirees), and work rules at any
       time, for any reason, with or without notification.

       Unless otherwise provided in a written agreement signed by the Village Manager or
       Board of Trustees and the employee, both parties understand their mutual right to end
       the employment relationship at any time, for any reason, and acknowledge that the
       employment relationship can be terminated by either party, at any time, for any
       reason, with or without cause and with or without notice.

       No representative, employee, or agent has the authority to make any agreement
       contrary to the provisions of this document except the Village Manager or Board of
       Trustees, and then, only in writing.


1.2.0 ORGANIZATION

       The Mayor and the six Trustees comprise the Board of Trustees and govern the
       Village organization. The Board of Trustees establishes policy for the Village.

                                                                                                5
Village of Deerfield
Personnel Policies and Procedures




       Individuals serve on the Village’s many Boards and Commissions appointed by the
       Mayor, with the advice and consent of the Board of Trustees, and play an active role
       in the policy-making process by advising the Board of Trustees on issues within their
       purview.

       The Village Manager serves as the Chief Administrative Officer of the Village, and is
       appointed by the Mayor with advice and consent of the Board of Trustees. The
       Village Manager is responsible for directing the day-to-day operations of the Village
       organization and for implementing all directives and policies as determined by the
       Board of Trustees.

       Accordingly, all Departments within the Village report to the Village Manager.
       There are five main operating departments:         Administration, Community
       Development, Finance, Police and Public Works.

       Department Heads and Management Personnel have the responsibility of
       implementing policy as directed by the Board of Trustees within their respective
       Departments, and managing the day-to-day functions of their Departments.




                                                                                          6
Village of Deerfield
Personnel Policies and Procedures




ARTICLE II – EMPLOYMENT POLICY


2.1.0 AUTHORITY

       Authority to appoint individuals for all positions in the service of the Village, except
       offices appointed by the Mayor with the advice and consent of the Board of Trustees, is
       vested in the Village Manager.


2.2.0 EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

       It is the policy of the Village that all personnel activities shall be conducted in a manner
       that ensures equal employment opportunity for all persons on the basis of merit, without
       regard to religion, disability, race, gender, age, sexual preference or orientation, color,
       national origin, citizenship, military status, marital status, political affiliation, or any
       other legally protected status in accordance with applicable local, state and federal
       laws. This policy extends to all personnel practices related to the employment process,
       including hiring, promotion, demotion, transfer, lay-off, termination, compensation,
       benefits, training and general treatment of employees. It is the belief of the Village that
       an equal employment opportunity is necessary for the development and maintenance of
       an efficient work force and for the optimum utilization of human resources in this
       organization.

       An applicant or employee is considered on the basis of qualifications required for the
       available position relative to experience, training, personal abilities, skills and job
       knowledge.

       Any employee with questions or concerns about any type of discrimination in the
       workplace is encouraged to bring these to the attention of their immediate supervisor,
       any Department Head, the Assistant to the Village Manager, or the Village Manager.
       Employees can raise concerns and make reports without fear of reprisal. Any
       employee found to be engaging in any type of unlawful discrimination will be subject
       to disciplinary action, up to and including termination of employment.


2.3.0 EMPLOYMENT PROCEDURES

       The Village shall employ and fill vacancies on the basis of merit and, whenever it is
       in the best interests of the Village, promote current employees to higher positions
       when vacancies occur.


                                                                                                 7
Village of Deerfield
Personnel Policies and Procedures




        The Village will make every effort to provide reasonable accommodation to an
        otherwise qualified individual with a disability who can perform the essential
        functions of the employment position that the individual holds or desires.

        All persons seeking employment with the Village shall first make application on
        forms provided by the Village. Information provided shall be complete and certified
        by the signature of the applicant. No person will be employed and placed on the
        Village payroll until appropriate and satisfactory background, employment, and
        medical examinations have been completed and information necessary for pension
        plan, payroll deduction and other required data are determined.

        Once hired, all employees will be given a comprehensive orientation program which
        addresses pay and benefit issues, Village policies and procedures, safety issues,
        instruction in the proper use of equipment and any other factors necessary to enable
        the employee to perform the job.


2.3.1   RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION

        The selection of sworn Police Officers, as well as the promotion of the same to
        supervisory positions, shall be under the jurisdiction of the Board of Police
        Commissioners in accordance with applicable state law, (Illinois State Statutes 65
        ILCS 5/10-2.1) and in accordance with the Rules and Regulations of the Village of
        Deerfield Board of Police Commissioners.

        For all other positions, as vacancies occur in positions, every attempt will be made to
        fill them by transfer or promotion of present employees, when practical and
        appropriate. However, the Village reserves the right to solicit and hire non-current
        employee candidates as it deems necessary. Notice of such vacancies will be posted
        in each department. The Village will advertise position vacancies and will accept
        applications and conduct interviews, as necessary. The Department with the vacancy
        is responsible for preparing the job advertisement, advertising the position, and
        coordinating the hiring process. An Administration representative shall participate in
        the hiring process.

        The selection of a new employee is determined on merit, with consideration given to
        several factors including, but not limited to, education, skills and abilities, technical
        qualifications and experience, as applicable to the available position.

        All candidates are to supply the information requested on the proper employment
        application form, including references. Falsification of any information provided on
        an employment application or during the selection process, may result in immediate
        rejection or, if already hired, dismissal.

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Village of Deerfield
Personnel Policies and Procedures




       At its discretion, the Village may require that applicants submit to pre-employment
       examinations. These examinations shall relate to those matters which the Village
       believes fairly test the aptitude and fitness of applicants for a particular position.
       Examinations may include written, oral, or work simulation tests; ratings of experience
       and training; fingerprinting and background investigations; drug testing; credit check; or
       any combination of these. Applicants may also be required to submit to a post-offer
       physical and/or psychological examination.



2.4.0 NEPOTISM

       In this section of the policy, the term “family members” or “relatives” refers to:
       father, mother, son, daughter, brother, sister, uncle, aunt, first cousin, nephew, niece,
       husband, wife, father-in-law, mother-in-law, brother-in-law, sister-in-law, stepfather,
       stepmother, stepson, stepdaughter, stepsister, half-brother, half-sister, grandchild, or
       grandparent.

       With respect to appointments and reappointments to regular and temporary positions,
       not more than one family member or relative shall be hired within the same
       department unless authorized by the Village Manager. In no case shall relatives be
       appointed in the same division within a department.


2.5.0 SECONDARY EMPLOYMENT

       No regular full-time employee of the Village is permitted to engage in any outside
       work, business venture or other activity considered as secondary full-time or part-
       time employment without the Department Head's knowledge and prior written
       approval by the Village Manager or designee that will be placed in the personnel file.
       Such employment will not be acceptable under a number of conditions, including, but
       not limited to:

          •   Where secondary employment would extend beyond 20 hours a week, except
              during an employee's regular days off, holiday or vacation periods.
          •   Where the nature or place of employment might bring disfavor on the Village.
          •   Where secondary employment would involve the employee's appearance in
              Village uniform, involve use of Village equipment, or in any manner be
              considered as a conflict of interest with the employee's municipal position.
          •   Where it appears that secondary employment has an adverse effect on the
              employee's attendance, punctuality or sick leave record.


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Village of Deerfield
Personnel Policies and Procedures




          •   Where secondary employment impairs the employee's ability to discharge the
              duties and responsibilities of his/her Village job.
          •   Where an employee might be considered to be using his/her Village position
              to influence, to solicit business for the outside employment, or where there is
              any appearance of impropriety.

       Employees who engage in secondary employment shall do so only with the
       understanding and acceptance that their primary duty, obligation and responsibility is
       to the Village. All Village employees are subject to call at any time for emergencies,
       special assignment, or overtime duty, and no secondary employment may infringe on
       this obligation.


2.6.0 RESIDENCY

       While highly desirable, most employees are not required to maintain residence within
       the corporate limits if the Village. As directed by the Board of Trustees, only the
       Village Manager shall be required to reside within the corporate limits of the Village.




                                                                                           10
Village of Deerfield
Personnel Policies and Procedures




ARTICLE III - POSITION CLASSIFICATION


3.1.0 POSITION CLASSIFICATION PLAN

       The Village Manager, as chief administrative officer of the Village, shall be
       responsible for developing and maintaining a Position Classification Plan to provide a
       complete and continuous inventory of all permanent positions within the organization.

       The purpose of the Position Classification Plan is to:

           •   Provide like pay for like work.
           •   Establish educational and work experience qualifications for recruiting, testing,
               and other selection purposes.
           •   Provide departments with a means of analyzing work distribution, areas of
               responsibility, lines of authority, and other relevant relationships between
               individual and groups of positions.
           •   Assist departments in determining personnel service costs and projections for
               annual budget requirements.
           •   Provide a basis for developing standards of work performance.
           •   Establish lines of promotional opportunity.
           •   Indicate employee training needs and development potentials.
           •   Provide uniform and meaningful titles for all positions.
           •   Provide the fundamental basis of the compensation program and other aspects of
               the personnel program.

       In general, consideration for placement of a position into a class shall take into account
       the general duties, specific tasks, responsibilities, required educational and experience
       qualifications for each position, and the relationship to other classes.

       The class specifications are intended to indicate the kinds of positions that are assigned
       to the classes, as determined by their assigned duties, responsibilities, and specific tasks.
       They are not to be construed as declaring what the duties or responsibilities of any
       position may be, or as limiting or modifying the authority of any Department Head to
       assign, direct, and control the work of employees under his/her supervision.

       The Position Classification Plan is available in the Finance Department to all employees
       who wish to view it.




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3.1.1   POSITION COMPENSATION

        By Ordinance, the Board of Trustees will annually establish the amount of
        compensation for each position within the organization.

        Prior to the preparation of each annual budget, the Village Manager shall make such
        comparative salary studies as he/she deems necessary, or is instructed by the Board of
        Trustees to make, concerning factors affecting the levels of salaries throughout the
        organization. On the basis of the information gathered from any and all salary studies,
        the Village Manager shall recommend any changes to the Pay Plan to the Board of
        Trustees. If approved by the Board of Trustees, these amendments shall become part of
        the pay plan and shall become the official salary schedule applicable to the respective
        classes of positions as enumerated therein, and shall be used by all departments in
        connection with all payrolls, budget estimates, and official records and reports.


3.1.2   GRADES OF PAY

        There are three basic grades of pay for each position within the organization:

           •   Starting Rate: A newly hired employee shall start at 85 percent of the FQR for
               that position.

           •   Fully Qualified Rate (FQR): This is the rate of pay that applies to employees
               who have satisfied all of the job requirements in their job description and have
               applied knowledge of the specific characteristics of the Village to the job.
               Employees are expected to progress toward their FQR and achieve it within two
               years of their date of hire. If, at the end of two years, the employee has not
               achieved this status, his/her employment may be terminated or reclassified.

           •   Superior Performance Rate: After an employee has reached the FQR and
               continues to demonstrate progress and outstanding service to the Village, he/she
               may be eligible for further wage increases of up to 10 percent of the FQR.

        A newly hired employee will be reviewed on job performance according to the schedule
        as determined in section 3.2.0.


3.1.3   OVERTIME COMPENSATION

        Overtime must be specifically approved by the employee’s immediate supervisor, and is
        paid at the rate of one and one half times a non-exempt employee's hourly rate.

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       Overtime is not paid to exempt employees, with the exception of Police Department
       supervisors who must appear in court when off-duty.

       Regular non-exempt, non-law enforcement employees will be paid overtime when that
       employee is in an approved paid status for more than 40 hours within a work week.

       Provided the operational demands of the Department allow, and with the approval of the
       Department Head, an employee may elect to receive compensatory time off in lieu of
       monetary compensation for authorized overtime performed. Compensatory time off for
       authorized overtime performed shall be at the rate as paid overtime. Compensatory time
       off must be taken as soon after the overtime is performed as is consistent with good
       departmental operation.


3.2.0 PERFORMANCE EVALUATION

       Accurate and thoughtful performance evaluation is essential for the development and
       advancement of all Village employees. Evaluation should be a continuing process – not
       merely an annual exercise. Supervisors should offer advice and direction throughout the
       year so that an employee has the tools to progress in the service of the Village. It is
       important that specific goals be set between the supervisor and the employee during the
       evaluation process and that those goals be examined throughout the year. Only
       evaluation forms approved by the Village Manager are to be utilized. These forms are
       made available by the Finance Department.

       In addition to goal setting and feedback to the employee, performance evaluations are
       the basis for decisions regarding all salary increases. Salary increases are not automatic,
       but rather should be made primarily on the basis of performance. The Department Head
       may recommend to the Village Manager an increase for an employee in his/her
       Department. Salary increases must be within the limits set by an employee's job
       classification and are subject to the provisions of the Wage and Classification Plan
       adopted annually by the Board of Trustees.

       A newly hired employee will be reviewed for on-the-job performance at or about 75
       days, 6 months, 12 months, 18 months and 24 months after hire until the employee has
       achieved the FQR. After the 75 day review, a supervisor may recommend an increase to
       up to 90 percent of the FQR based on a new employee's progress in satisfying the
       requirements for the FQR. At the 6, 12 or 18 month review, a supervisor may
       recommend an increase to up to 100 percent of the FQR. By the time of the 24 month
       review, an employee must attain the FQR or his/her employment may be terminated or
       reclassified.



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       After attaining the FQR, each employee is evaluated annually before the end of the
       fiscal year.


3.3.0 PROBATIONARY PERIOD

       All persons hired by the Village to fill a position shall serve a probationary period,
       during which time they may be discharged at any time without being subject to the
       grievance procedure. The probationary period shall continue for 24 months. Such
       period may be extended not to exceed six additional months if, in the opinion of the
       Department Head or Village Manager, an extended period is necessary to fully
       evaluate the employee for regular appointment.

       During the probationary period, the employee must exhibit an ability to learn and
       handle the job for which he/she was hired. No employee shall be granted regular
       employee status without having first been thoroughly evaluated by his/her supervisor
       and having his/her performance discussed with him/her. The successful completion
       of the probationary period does not limit the Village’s disciplinary discretion as set
       forth in this policy.

       Contractual employees will be governed by the terms and conditions of their
       respective contracts.


3.4.0 TRANSFERS

       A transfer consists of a reassignment of an employee to another job of similar pay,
       status, and responsibility. Transfers may be made whenever deemed necessary to
       meet the needs of the Village. A transfer will not affect an employee’s seniority.

       Transfers of employees between Departments, on an indefinite or temporary basis,
       may be made upon the recommendation of the Department Heads of the affected
       Departments, with approval of the Village Manager.


3.5.0 PROMOTIONS

       Recommendations regarding promotions of employees are made by the Department
       Head to the Village Manager. The position must have been authorized in the annual
       budget and annual wage ordinance before a promotion can take place. Promotions
       will be based upon individual merit as evidenced by satisfactory performance



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        evaluations, anticipated future development and job related educational, technical,
        and personal qualifications.

        Sick leave, vacation time and emergency leave benefits of a promoted employee in a
        new position will be computed on the basis of his/her employment date time with the
        Village. A promoted employee will receive a semi-annual performance review in the
        new position until attaining 100 percent of the Fully Qualified Rate for that position.
        Compensation for the new position will be based on the person’s previous step

        If an employee is transferred or promoted, the rate of pay for the new position shall be
        determined as follows:

           •   If the rate of pay in the former class is less than the minimum rate established for
               the class of the new position, the rate of pay shall be advanced to the minimum
               for the new class.
           •   If the rate of pay in the former class is more than the minimum rate established
               for the new class, the pay shall be set at a level which matches the existing pay
               rate.

        If an employee is promoted and fails to meet the requirements of the position within
        the applicable new employee evaluation period, as described herein, the employee, by
        recommendation of the Department Head to the Village Manager, may be:

           •   Returned to his/her former position and salary if available;
           •   Placed in another position if mutually agreed upon;
           •   Laid off;
           •   Given a leave of absence; or
           •   Dismissed.


3.6.0 DEMOTIONS

        An employee may be demoted for failure to meet the requirements of his/her current
        position, as part of corrective disciplinary action, or at the employee’s request. An
        employee, exclusive of Police Officers, may be demoted by the Village Manager
        upon the recommendation of his or her Department Head. A written statement
        detailing the reasons for the demotion shall be furnished to the employee at least five
        calendar days prior to the effective date of the demotion.

3.6.1   FITNESS FOR DUTY




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       An employee may be required by his department head to go to a doctor chosen by the
       Village for a fitness for duty test to ensure the employee is still eligible to perform the
       essential duties of his job. Such fitness for duty examination shall be required when
       the Department Head reasonably concludes that the employee may not be able to
       perform his job duties in a manner which is safe for the employee himself, other
       employees, and the public.




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Personnel Policies and Procedures




ARTICLE IV - HOURS OF WORK AND COMPENSATION

4.1.0 HOURS OF WORK


4.1.1   WORK WEEK DEFINED

        The hours of work comprising full-time Village employment shall be either 37.5 or
        40 hours per week (dependent upon Departmental policy). The work week shall be
        defined as 12:00 a.m. Saturday to 11:59 p.m. Friday. Regular part-time employees are
        those employees in a position that is budgeted for less than 37.5 hours per week.


4.1.2   WORK DAY DEFINED

        The work day for each employee shall be the 24 hour period from the time that work
        is scheduled to begin until that time shall occur again.


4.1.3   ATTENDANCE

        Regular and punctual attendance at work is an absolute requirement of all employees.
        Employees who fail to observe attendance requirements and procedures for recording
        and reporting of attendance shall be subject to disciplinary action. It is the
        responsibility of each employee to be at his/her work station and fully prepared to
        begin work at the time the established Departmental shift/work day begins.


4.1.4   OVERTIME WORK

        It is the policy of the Village of Deerfield to keep work in excess of established
        schedules at a minimum and to permit such work only when it is necessary to meet
        operating requirements. All overtime must be approved by the employee's immediate
        supervisor prior to the overtime being worked.

        Whenever an emergency condition exists, as defined by the Village Manager, the
        Department Head(s) may structure departmental forces in such a way as to ensure the
        continued safe and efficient operation of Village services. He/she may direct a portion
        of the forces to rest and recuperate and return to duty at a specific time.




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4.1.5   REST PERIODS

        Department Heads are authorized to establish reasonable rest periods during each work
        day, not to exceed 30 minutes per working day. The granting of these periods and the
        determination of their time and length is entirely discretionary with the Department
        Head.


4.2.0 COMPENSATION


4.2.1   PAY PERIODS

        Employees shall be paid bi-weekly on Friday. When the Friday pay day is a holiday,
        checks shall be issued on the preceding Thursday.

        Upon employment with the Village of Deerfield, employees must register for direct
        deposit payments for bi-weekly compensation. This must be coordinated through the
        Finance Department.


4.2.2   PAYROLL DEDUCTIONS

        Automatic payroll deductions shall be made for federal and state income tax purposes,
        dependent health insurance coverage, employee pension contributions and Social
        Security, where applicable.

        The Village also makes available, at the employee's option and expense, a variety of
        payroll deductions for deferred compensation, savings plans, additional life insurance,
        and other benefits approved by the Village. This list of benefits can be added to or
        reduced by the Village Manager. See Article V, Group Insurance Policies, for additional
        information.




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Personnel Policies and Procedures




ARTICLE V - GROUP INSURANCE POLICIES


5.1.0 HEALTH INSURANCE

        The Village will provide group medical and dental insurance for all employees who
        normally work a minimum of 30 hours per week and their dependents as detailed in
        this section. The Village retains the right to change insurance carriers or to self-
        insure or to adopt additional coverage alternatives or join a health insurance pool for
        the provision of medical benefits, dental benefits or life insurance. The Village
        further reserves its right to institute, maintain and change cost containment, benefit
        and other provisions of the medical plan provided that such changes made shall only
        take effect on the plan anniversary date, currently July 1.


5.1.1   ELIGIBILITY

        For the purposes of health insurance determination under the Patient Protection and
        Affordable Care Act only, the following definitions shall apply:
               1. Full-time employee – A full-time employee works on average more than
                   30 hours per week over the Standard Measurement Period. Full-time
                   employees are eligible for the Village’s health insurance plans and subject
                   to the plan anniversary date, currently July 1.
               2. Part-time employee – A part-time employee works on average less than 30
                   hours per week over the Standard Measurement Period. Part-time
                   employees are not eligible for the Village’s health insurance plans.
               3. Seasonal employee – A seasonal employee is employed less than 120
                   consecutive days. Seasonal employees are not eligible for the Village’s
                   health insurance plans.
               4. New hire employee – A new hire employee will be subject to a 12 month
                   measurement period, two month measurement period and a 12 month
                   stability period based on their time of hire.

        In order to make the determinations above the following definitions apply:

        Standard Measurement Period (SMP)
        The SMP is the look back period to determine if the employee has worked an average
        of 30 hours per week. The Village’s SMP will be January 1 to December 31 of each
        year.

        Stability Period


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Personnel Policies and Procedures




        If an employee averages 30 hours per week, the employee is considered full-time for
        the stability period. If the employee averages less than 30 hours per week, the
        employee is considered part-time for the stability period. The Village’s stability
        period will be from February 1 through December 31 of each year.

        If an employee’s hours change such that their status changes from FT to PT or PT to
        FT during the stability period, no changes will occur in insurance designation either
        way. Example: An employee is determined to be full-time during the SMP and elects
        to enroll in the Village’s insurance. If his/her hours drop substantially and he/she
        essentially becomes part-time again, he/she will remain classified as a full-time
        employee, for the purpose of Health Care Reform and may remain enrolled in
        insurance until the stability period has ended; after such time he/she may be eligible
        for COBRA.

        Administrative Period
        The administrative period is the time allowed for eligible employee to decide whether
        or not to enroll in the Village’s insurance and time for Village staff to administer the
        enrollment. The Village’s administrative period is January 1 to January 31. .


        A new employee who is eligible for health insurance coverage as defined above must
        work without interruption for a period of 30 calendar days to be eligible for health
        and life insurance benefits and 90 days to be eligible for dental benefits. Employee
        co-payments will not begin until eligibility is reached.

        For employees represented by a collective bargaining unit, benefits and the cost of
        insurance premiums shall be outlined in their respective agreement.


5.1.2   INSURANCE COST ALLOCATION

        The Village will pay a pre-determined portion of the premium for employee-only
        medical and dental coverage. If desired, the employee may elect to extend coverage
        to his/her family. In such cases, the Village will contribute a pre-determined portion
        of the premium for dependant coverage.


5.1.3   LIFE INSURANCE

        The Village shall offer group life insurance with accidental death and dismemberment
        coverage to all employees. Additional supplemental life insurance is available for
        purchase at the employee’s discretion.


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5.1.4   DISABILITY/RETIREE INSURANCE COVERAGE

        Regular employees who retire or receive a disability pension from the Police Pension
        Fund or IMRF may continue to be covered by the Village’s group policy (including
        dental but excluding life insurance) provided they have worked for the Village for a
        minimum of 10 years immediately preceding their retirement and disability and are
        receiving a pension from the Police Pension Fund or IMRF upon their separation
        from service. Retirees and their dependents, if applicable, who opt for this benefit
        must participate in the Village’s health insurance program without interruption.
        Following their date of retirement, provided the employee elects to continue coverage
        under the Village health insurance program, the Village will pay $50.00 per month of
        the premium for individual health insurance for the retiree or disability pensioner.


5.1.5   INSURANCE COVERAGE DURING UNPAID LEAVE

        Employees who are unable to work due to disability or an approved absence without
        pay may continue to be covered by the group policy, excluding life and dental
        insurance, if they pay the full cost of the insurance monthly, in advance. Coverage
        may continue for the disabled employee until he/she is eligible for Medicare.


5.1.6   COST OF MEDICAL EXAMS

        To the extent not covered by insurance, the Village will pay 65 percent of the cost of
        a medical examination with the doctor of the employee’s choice at a maximum cost to
        the Village of $300.00 per exam. This examination will be at the option of the
        employee as follows:

               Between ages 25 and 30      - 1 exam
               Between ages 31 and 39      - 1 exam every three years
               Between ages 40 and 45      - 1 exam every other year
               After age 45                - 1 exam every year

               In addition, female employees are eligible to receive a Pap test every year.




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5.1.7   CHANGES TO COVERAGE

        The Finance Department should be notified immediately of any change in the marital
        status, number of dependents or address of an employee or the employee’s spouse
        which may affect insurance coverage in any way. Failure to do so within 30 days
        may result in loss or delay of coverage.


5.2.0 COBRA GUIDELINES

        Insurance coverage ceases on the date of termination for employees leaving the
        service of the Village. An employee or dependents may be eligible for continuation of
        coverage under COBRA provisions.

        Under federal law, health plan participants are allowed to continue participation under
        the Village's health insurance plans in certain instances where coverage would
        otherwise end. As allowed by law, COBRA continuation coverage is not available
        when the loss of coverage is due to gross misconduct.

        The employee or an eligible family member must notify the Finance Department
        when there is a divorce, legal separation, or a child losing dependent status under the
        plan. This notification must be made within 60 days of the date of the event or within
        60 days of the date on which coverage would end under the plan because of the event,
        whichever is later. After proper notification that a listed event has occurred, the
        employee will in turn be notified that he/she has the right to choose continuation
        coverage. Under the law, the employee has 60 days to inform the Finance
        Department that he/she wants continuation coverage. The 60 days runs from the
        latter of:

           •   the date coverage would have ordinarily been lost because of one of the events
               above, or
           •   the date of the notice of the right to elect continuation coverage.

        If an employee does not choose continuation coverage, group health insurance
        coverage under the plan will end. If an employee chooses continuation coverage,
        he/she is entitled to coverage that is identical to the coverage being provided under
        the plan to similarly situated employees (or their family members). COBRA
        participants pay the full premium for continuation coverage plus an administration
        charge as set by the Finance Department. Once continuation coverage terminates for
        any reason, it cannot be reinstated.

        This is an overview of some of the major provisions of the law and therefore is
        general in nature. The law itself and the actual plan provisions must be consulted with

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Personnel Policies and Procedures




       regard to the application of these provisions in any particular circumstances.
       Questions about the law should be directed to the Finance Department.


5.3.0 FLEXIBLE SPENDING ACCOUNT

       The Village offers a flexible spending account plan to all full-time employees. The
       flexible spending account can be used for eligible expenses that are not reimbursed by
       health or dental insurance. The plan allows employees to redirect part of their
       income to a non-taxable status.

       The Flexible Spending Account has three benefit components which employees may
       choose to utilize:

          •   Premium Conversion: Premium conversion allows the employee to avoid
              social security and federal (withholding) tax on employee monthly deductions
              for group health insurance. This portion of the plan is mandatory for all
              employees with dependent coverage.

          •   Health Care Reimbursement Account: This option allows the employee to
              be reimbursed for health and dental expenses not covered by the Village’s
              insurance providers. The maximum amount allowed to be sheltered will be
              determined by federal law.

          •   Dependent Care Assistance Benefit: This option allows the employee to pay
              eligible dependent care expenses with pre-tax dollars. The maximum amount
              allowed to be sheltered will be determined by federal law.

          •   Transportation Spending Account: For those employees using public
              transportation to get to work, this option allows the employee to pay eligible
              parking and transportation fees with pre-tax dollars. The maximum amount
              allowed to be sheltered will be determined by federal law.

       Earnings used for the above expenses are not subject to federal or state income tax,
       FICA, and pension, thereby providing a cost savings to employees who choose to
       participate. Participation in the flexible spending account plan is voluntary.

       A detailed explanation of these options is available in the Finance Department upon
       request.




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5.4.0 EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

       The Village has made arrangements with a counseling agency whereby employees
       and/or their family members can receive counseling. A family member is defined as
       a spouse, child or parents. The first 12 sessions will be paid entirely by the Village.
       The Village will pay 75 percent of the next 12 sessions. Should counseling continue
       past 24 sessions, the Village will pay 50 percent. The employee will be charged for
       the portion of the fee the Village does not pay (i.e., 25 percent and 50 percent) on the
       basis of ability to pay.

       When a period of time has elapsed between counseling sessions, the counseling
       agency may make a recommendation as to whether or not a request for additional
       services relates to a new condition or to a continuation of a previous condition for bill
       purposes. The Village Manager will make a final decision as to the level of payment.
       Information for contacting the counseling agency is posted in each Department.


5.5.0 HIPAA PRIVACY RULE

       The Village complies with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act
       (HIPAA) privacy rules in dealing with employees’ personal health information.




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ARTICLE VI - HOLIDAYS WITH PAY

6.1.0 HOLIDAYS

        All full time employees shall receive the following 12 holidays with pay:

                                        New Year's Day
                                         President's Day
                                         Memorial Day
                                       Independence Day
                                           Labor Day
                                         Columbus Day
                                       Thanksgiving Day
                                      Thanksgiving Friday
                                         Christmas Day
                                      Three Personal Days

        When a holiday falls on a Saturday, it will be observed on the preceding Friday. When a
        holiday falls on a Sunday, it will be observed on the following Monday.

        Employees must be in a paid status the day before and after a paid holiday in order to be
        compensated for that holiday. In the event an employee does not work the scheduled day
        before and after a holiday, and is not on an authorized vacation, he/she shall not receive
        holiday pay until proof of sickness or excusable absence is established to the satisfaction
        of the Department Head.


6.1.1   HOLIDAY PAY

        Holiday leave shall be paid as straight time and shall be considered a part of total work
        week hours for overtime purposes. Regular and probationary employees (except exempt
        personnel) required to work on holidays, shall be compensated (pay or compensatory
        time off) at time and one half.


6.1.2   HOLIDAYS – PART TIME EMPLOYEES

        Regular part-time employees shall receive all paid holidays falling within their
        regular work period and shall receive a holiday allowance equivalent to their standard
        day. Seasonal employees will not be provided with additional pay, even if they work
        on a holiday and the day before and after. Any work performed on a Village
        approved holiday will be paid at straight time subject to the 40 hour week limit.

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6.1.3   PERSONAL DAYS

        On May 1st of each year, all full time employees are given credit for three personal days
        which they may use at any time during the year, with the approval of the Department
        Head.

        Regular part time employees will receive credit for three personal days on May 1st of
        each year. The number of personal hours credited will be based on the average number
        of hours worked per day during the preceding 12 months or from the date of
        employment, if less than 12 months.

        New employees hired between May 1st and August 31st will be credited with one
        personal day on September 1st and a second personal day on January 1st.

        New employees hired between September 1st and December 31st will be credited with
        one personal day on January 1st.

        New employees hired between January 1st and April 30th will be credited with three
        personal days on May 1st.

        Temporary or seasonal employees do not receive personal days.

        Personal days must be used within the fiscal year in which they are earned and shall
        be granted in minimum of one hour blocks. Time remaining on April 30th will be
        deleted from the employee’s accruals unless special arrangements are made in
        advance with the employee’s Department Head.




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ARTICLE VII - LEAVE POLICIES

7.1.0 VACATION

       Vacations with pay will be granted to eligible employees as follows:

        Length of Continuous Service            Vacation Earned               Annual Accrual
                                                10
        0 through the 48 months                   / 12 days per month         10 days
                                                15
        49 through 108 months                     / 12 days per month         15 days
                                                20
        109 through 228 months                    / 12 days per month         20 days
                                                25
        229 months +                              / 12 days per month         25 days

       Upon completion of six month's employment, each employee shall be credited with five
       days vacation. No paid vacation will be granted prior to six months of employment.

       For every hour worked by a full time or regular part time employee, vacation time is
       earned.

       Vacation allowances are exclusive of Saturdays, Sundays and holidays. If a holiday
       falls immediately before, after or during a scheduled vacation period, the holiday is not
       counted as a vacation day. (The preceding does not apply to the Police Department.
       Police Officer's holidays are taken as manpower requirements permit.)

       Vacation leave should be taken on consecutive days and should be used in increments
       of one week or multiples thereof. Depending upon Departmental or personal
       circumstances, a period of vacation leave may be restricted to two weeks at any one
       period. In case of an emergency or where there would otherwise be a hardship, the
       Department Head may approve vacation leave requests for periods of less than one
       week.

       Every effort will be made to grant vacation during periods requested by employees,
       consistent with the operational needs of the various departments. The Village
       reserves the right, by action of the Department Head, to approve or disapprove
       vacation requests.

       Eligible leave should be taken during the fiscal year earned. No more than one year’s
       vacation leave may be carried over by an employee to the following year, unless
       authorized by the Village Manager. Up to one year’s equivalent accrued vacation may
       be sold back in any one year to the employer prior to April 30th at 80 percent of the
       employee’s regular rate.



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7.1.1   ACCUMULATED VACATION AT SEPARATION

        Upon separation, an employee shall be paid for all unused, accrued vacation time
        based on the employee’s current rate of pay.

        However, employees who are retiring from the Village’s employ and will be drawing
        a pension from IMRF or the Police Pension Fund will not receive a cash payout for
        unused, accrued vacation time. Rather, the Village will make a contribution equal to
        the amount designated above into a mandatory retirement health savings plan as
        designated by the Board of Trustees.


7.2.0 PAID SICK LEAVE

        Sick leave is granted to employees as a privilege. It shall be used only when necessary.
        Abuse of sick time will not be tolerated.


7.2.1   ACCRUAL

        Upon completion of six months of employment, each employee shall be credited with
        six days sick leave. No paid sick leave shall be granted before then. After the initial six
        month period, all regular full time employees accrue one day of sick leave for each
        month during which the employee is in the service of the Village.


7.2.2   ACCRUAL FOR PART TIME EMPLOYEES

        For regular part-time employees, a standard day for purposes of determining leave
        accrual shall be the result of dividing the budgeted hours of work per week for the
        employee’s position by five. Regular part time employees shall accrue sick time at
        the same rate as in Section 7.2.1 using their standard day. Sick leave will not be paid
        for days of the week that are not normally worked.


7.2.3   SICK LEAVE USAGE

        Sick leave shall be granted in minimum one hour blocks for any of the reasons listed
        below:

           •   Any bona fide personal illness, injury or pregnancy.
           •   Quarantine for contagious disease.

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           •   Doctor/dental appointments.
           •   Illness of immediate family member requiring the presence of the employee as
               the primary care giver. (includes parents, in-laws, children, spouse, siblings
               and grandparents or at the Department Head's discretion)

        If an employee is unable to report for work due to illness or other emergency, he/she
        must so inform his/her Department Head prior to the time set for beginning his/her
        regular duties. Failure to do so each day of absence, or at agreed intervals in the case of
        extended illness, shall result in a loss of that day’s pay.

        After three days of absence, or if there is repeated recurrence of illness, the Department
        Head may require a medical certificate. As a mutual protection for the employee and the
        Employer, the Village Manager or Department Head may require an employee to submit
        to a complete physical examination by a physician designated by the Employer when, in
        his/her opinion, the performance of the employee may have become seriously limited or
        weakened by virtue of impaired health.

        After an employee has taken sick leave on three occasions over a six month period, the
        Employer may require a physician’s certificate for subsequent sick leave used within the
        next year.

        In a case of very serious or prolonged personal illness or for family leave an
        employee who uses all accumulated sick leave may use all accumulated vacation and
        holiday leave for sick leave purposes before being removed from full pay status.
        However, regardless of any other Village policy or procedure, the time on leave for a
        prolonged personal illness may not exceed four months even if the employee has not
        exhausted all accumulated leave, unless an exception is made by the Village Manager
        or otherwise required by law.

        Employees who leave the Employer’s service as a result of disciplinary action do not
        qualify for accrued sick leave payment.


7.2.4   PAYOUT OF SICK LEAVE AT RETIREMENT

        To be eligible for accrued sick leave payment, an employee must have been employed
        by the Village for at least 15 consecutive years or must be retired and drawing a pension
        from the Illinois Municipal Retirement Fund (IMRF) or the Police Pension Fund. The
        employee must also be in good standing upon leaving the Village.

        Upon retirement, employees will be paid out 50% of their accumulated unused sick
        leave balance. The maximum payout is 80 days at a rate equal to the employee's
        normal pay at the time of retirement. A cash payout will not be provided to the

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       employee; rather the Village will make a contribution equal to the amount designated
       above into a mandatory retirement health savings plan as designated by the Board of
       Trustees. If an employee has more than 160 days accumulated, he/she shall only receive
       credit for 160 days, which will be equal to 80 days' full pay.


7.3.0 OCCUPATIONAL INJURY LEAVE

       Any employee who is injured in the course of duty shall be granted up to 15 days paid
       leave per 60 month period, without such leave being charged against any sick leave days
       which that employee may have accumulated.

       Upon exhaustion of all injury leave, an employee may use any accumulated sick leave to
       supplement the payment from Workers' Compensation. Any leave used for this purpose
       from any leave account shall be charged at the rate of one half day for every one day the
       employee has accumulated. (Example: If an employee has five sick days accumulated
       and elects to use one of them for injury leave, he/she will still have four and one half sick
       days accumulated.)

       All employees of the Village are covered by Workers Compensation insurance, as
       provided in State statutes, in the event of accident or death occurring while on the job.
       This protection is in force regardless of who is at fault in the accident. It is necessary
       that the employee notify his/her Department Head as soon as possible of the accident,
       and in no event shall he/she delay notification longer than 24 hours. In the event of loss
       of time caused by the accident, such loss of time will be reported to the Finance
       Department, which will prepare all necessary correspondence. An employee must
       report to the Finance Department when returning to work from a lost time injury so as to
       establish the employee's claim.

       In no case shall the total Workers' Compensation payments plus the supplemental
       payments charged to sick leave, injury leave, vacation or holidays be greater than the
       employee's regular wage.

       To receive any of the above mentioned injury leave benefits, an employee must submit a
       physician's certificate stating the injury and the suggested amount of time off needed to
       allow the injury to heal.

       During the period of disability, the injured employee shall not be employed in any other
       manner, with or without monetary compensation. Any person who is employed in
       violation of this provision forfeits the continuing compensation from the time such
       employment begins. Any salary compensation due the injured employee from Workers
       Compensation or any salary due him/her from any type of insurance which may be
       carried by the Village shall revert to the Village during the time such employment

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       continues. Any disabled employee receiving compensation under this provision shall
       not be entitled to any benefits for which he/she would qualify because of his/her
       disability under the provision of the Illinois Pension Code, as amended.

       An employee who is eligible for occupational injury leave may be required to return to
       work for an available temporary light duty assignment. Light duty work shall be
       determined by the Department Head in consultation with the employee and the
       employee's physician. An employee on light duty may be assigned to work in any
       Village Department, but that decision lies solely with the Village. It shall be at the sole
       discretion of the Village to make such light-duty work available and to allow an
       employee to perform such light duty work. In most cases, light duty assignments will
       not be made for employees who are injured off duty.

       Holidays occurring during an employee’s occupational injury leave shall be paid as a
       holiday and not injury leave.




7.4.0 LEAVE OF ABSENCE WITHOUT PAY

       Leave of absence without pay may be granted by the Village Manager when requested
       by an employee if such leave is deemed justified.

       An employee requesting a leave of absence for any reason must submit a written
       request. The request must be approved by the Department Head and forwarded to the
       Village Manager, who will make the final decision. Requests for a leave of absence
       must be made at least 30 days in advance of the requested leave to allow time to carry
       out this procedure.

       Sick leave and vacation benefits shall not be accrued while on leave of absence.

       An employee granted a leave of absence without pay may keep his/her life and health
       insurance and retirement plans in full force during the leave by arranging to pay the
       premiums during the period of his/her leave. Failure to make such arrangements, or
       regularly scheduled full premium payments, will result in cancellation of the benefits,
       subject to the policy of the health or retirement plan. If a benefit is cancelled, the rules
       and regulations of the carrier shall apply when the employee returns and seeks such
       coverage.

       If the leave is longer than 30 days, an employee's anniversary date shall be changed to
       reflect the amount of time of the leave. If the leave is less than 30 days, there will be no
       adjustment to the anniversary date.

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       Employees requesting a leave of absence without pay must be aware that any position
       may be eliminated or substantially changed; therefore, absolute assurance of
       reinstatement cannot be given. The Village will attempt to place the former employee in
       a suitable position at the first opportunity

       Failure of an employee to report for duty within three working days of the expiration of
       leave shall result in termination.


7.5.0 FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE

       Qualified employees shall be granted leave under the provisions of the Family and
       Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA). This leave will provide up to twelve weeks of job
       protected absence from work during a twelve month period for the following family and
       medical reasons:

          •   To care for the employee's child after birth, or placement for adoption or foster
              care.
          •   To care for the employee's immediate family member who has a serious health
              condition.
          •   To care for a serious health condition that makes the employee unable to
              perform his/her job.

       Employees who have been employed by the Village for at least one year and have 1,250
       hours of service during the twelve months immediately preceding the leave shall be
       granted family and medical leave.

       For purposes of this section, "serious health condition" means an illness, injury,
       impairment or mental condition that involves in-patient care in a hospital, hospice or
       residential medical care facility or continuing treatment by a health care provider.
       "Continuous treatment" means that the employee or family member is treated by a
       health care provider two or more times for the injury or illness, or the person is under
       continuing supervision for a chronic condition or disability that cannot be cured.

       Employees are entitled to 12 work weeks of FMLA leave during a 12 month period.
       The 12 month period is measured from the date the employee's first FMLA leave begins.

       An employee must provide the Village at least 30 days advance notice before FMLA
       leave is to begin. If the leave is not foreseeable due to lack of knowledge of
       approximately when leave will be required to begin, a change in circumstances or a
       medical emergency, notice must be given as soon as practicable. Failure to provide


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        notice without a reasonable explanation may result in a delay of the beginning of FMLA
        leave until at least 30 days after the date the employee does provide notice.

        An employee's health care benefits shall be maintained by the Village during the FMLA
        period under the same conditions as if he/she had been continuously employed during
        the leave period.

        An employee must first exhaust sick leave (if eligible) and vacation or other leave
        credits before he/she is eligible for FMLA leave.

        An employee returning from FMLA leave shall be entitled to reemployment in the same
        position he/she held when leave began, or to an equivalent position with equivalent
        benefits, pay and other terms and conditions of employment.


7.6.0 ABSENCE WITHOUT LEAVE

        An absence of any employee from duty, including any absence for a single day or part of
        a day for all non-exempt employees that are not authorized by a specific grant of leave
        of absence under provisions of these rules, shall be deemed absence without leave.

        Absences from duty may result in disciplinary action, including suspension or discharge.
        In addition, employees will not be paid for any period during which they are absent from
        duty.

        If absent for three consecutive work days without an authorized leave, it shall be
        automatically implied that the employee has resigned from employment with the
        Village. When warranted by exceptional circumstances, the Village Manager may
        rescind an automatic resignation and grant a retroactive leave.


7.7.0 MILITARY LEAVE

        Employees shall be granted Military Leave in accordance with State and Federal
        Law.


7.8.0 MISCELLANEOUS LEAVE


7.8.1   COURT LEAVE



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        Employees subpoenaed as a witness in a civil or criminal case related to their duties to
        the Village will be compensated for their court time. However, court time for an
        employee’s personal matters will not be compensated by the Village, and the employee
        must utilize vacation, personal, or compensatory time for this purpose.


7.8.2   JURY DUTY LEAVE

        Employees will be granted leaves of absence to cover the time needed to complete
        jury service, if called. However, to receive pay from the Village, the employee must
        sign over each jury check to the Finance Department, after which the Village will
        authorize payment of the employee’s regular pay. Employees on jury duty are
        required to contact their supervisor each day to keep them apprised of the potential
        length of jury service.


7.8.3   BEREAVEMENT LEAVE

        Employees may, upon the recommendation and at the discretion of the Department
        Head and with the approval of the Village Manager, be granted up to three days with
        pay to attend the funeral of any of the following relatives: spouse, parent, child,
        grandchild, stepchild, sibling, father/mother-in-law or grandparents, or any other
        relative living in the same household with the employee. This leave may be extended
        up to a total of five days with the approval of the Village Manager. Time allowed in
        each circumstance is governed by the immediacy of the relative and the distance to be
        traveled to attend the funeral, among other considerations. Requests for funeral leave
        will be considered as soon as possible following notice of the bereavement.


7.8.4   SCHOOL VISITATION LEAVE

        The Village complies with the Illinois School Visitation Rights Act by allowing
        employees to take up to eight hours of unpaid leave per school year, with no more
        than four hours being taken in one day. An employee requesting leave under this Act
        must provide a written request for the leave at least seven days in advance, except in
        the case of emergencies. This leave is intended to be used as a last resort by
        employees who have no other paid (vacation or personal) leave available and who
        have made every attempt to schedule the visit during non-working hours. The
        employee must provide his/her supervisor with documentation of the visit as provided
        by the school administrator within two working days of the school visitation. If
        notice is not provided within the required time frame, the employee is subject to the
        Village’s standard disciplinary procedures for unexcused absences.


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        This is unpaid leave; however, the Village will make every effort to accommodate an
        employee who wishes to make up the time, provided it is not disruptive to normal
        Village operations.


7.8.5   VOTING LEAVE

        The Village encourages employees to fulfill their civic responsibilities by
        participating in elections. Generally, employees should find time to vote either before
        or after their regular work schedule. If employees are unable to vote in an election
        during their non-working hours, the Village will grant up to two hours of unpaid time
        off to vote, in accordance with state law (10 ILCS 5/17-15).

        Employees should request time off to vote from their supervisor at least two working
        days prior to Election Day. Advance notice is required so that the necessary time off
        can be scheduled at the beginning or end of the work shift, whichever provides the
        least disruption to the normal work schedule.




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ARTICLE VIII - SEPARATION, DISCIPLINE AND GRIEVANCE
               PROCEDURES

8.1.0 SEPARATION FROM EMPLOYMENT


8.1.1   RESIGNATION

        Any employee who is in good standing may resign from service to the Village by
        presenting his/her resignation in writing. Department Heads should present notice of
        resignation not less than four weeks prior to its effective date. All other employees
        should present such notice of resignation not less than two weeks prior to its effective
        date. Resignations shall be promptly forwarded to the Village Manager. A resignation
        may be withdrawn by the employee at any time prior to the effective date with the
        approval of the Village Manager and Department Head.


8.1.2   TERMINATION

        The Village reserves the right to terminate employees whenever it is determined that
        termination is in the best interests of the Village. It shall be the policy of the Village that
        any employee may be terminated at any time, for any or no reason, with or without
        notice.


8.1.3   LAYOFFS/REDUCTION IN FORCE

        At the recommendation of a Department Head(s), the Village Manager may approve the
        separation of any employee without prejudice because of lack of funds or curtailment of
        work. The Department Head(s) may, with the approval of the Village Manager, appoint
        an employee who is to be laid off to any existing vacancy in a lower class for which
        he/she is qualified. All other factors being equal, employees shall be laid off in reverse
        order of their total service with the Village.


8.1.4   EXIT INTERVIEWS

        Exit interviews shall be conducted by the Village Manager or his/her designee prior to
        issuance of the final paycheck to employees who resign, retire, or are laid off. A report
        of the exit interview shall be reviewed with the Department Head and placed in the
        employee's personnel file.


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8.1.5   RETURN OF VILLAGE PROPERTY

        When an employee’s service to the Village has ended, whether voluntarily or
        involuntarily, that employee must return all Village-owned equipment and property in
        good repair and condition before receiving a final paycheck.


8.2.0 REEMPLOYMENT

        An employee who has resigned from Village service and is subsequently reemployed
        will not be credited with prior Village service for the purpose of computing vacation,
        sick leave benefits or other benefits that may be in effect.

        Any employee who resigns while disciplinary action is pending against him/her shall not
        be eligible for reemployment.


8.3.0 DISCIPLINE

        As directed by the Village Manager, Department Heads are responsible for the
        maintenance of a high standard of efficiency on the part of assigned employees, and
        for enforcement of good discipline, safety and proper personal conduct. They are
        authorized to use appropriate disciplinary measures as approved by the Village
        Manager. Such action may consist of a warning or the recommendation for
        demotion, suspension without pay or dismissal, even for a first offense, as defined
        below:

           •   Verbal Warning - A verbal warning to the employee from a supervisor that if
               his/her actions continue, a written reprimand will be issued.
           •   Written Reprimand - A written reprimand shall be transmitted through the
               appropriate Department Head to the employee and the Village Manager and
               shall state the specific actions leading to the reprimand. A copy of the written
               reprimand shall be placed in the employee's personnel file.
           •   Demotion - For serious misconduct, an employee may be moved to a position in
               a class with a lower maximum salary rate. Demotion shall be recommended by
               the Department Head and approved by the Village Manager.
           •   Suspension - Temporary removal of an employee without pay from duty status
               for a specified or indefinite period. Suspension may be recommended by the
               Department Head for approval of the Village Manager.
                   o An employee may be suspended by the Department Head only for a


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                      specific reason.
                  o When an employee has acted or is alleged to have acted in a manner
                      which would be reason for dismissal, the employee may be suspended
                      while such charges are investigated.
                  o When an employee is suspended pending trial or investigative outcomes
                      and is subsequently exonerated, the employee shall be reinstated without
                      loss of pay or benefits.
          •   Dismissal – Dismissal is defined as the permanent separation from service of
              the Village for causes including, but not limited to, serious misconduct (on or
              off duty); insubordination; unsatisfactory job performance; dishonesty;
              intoxication or drug use; carelessness, negligence or violence toward Village
              property or fellow employees; endangering other employees and/or the public
              through careless, negligent or substandard job performance; use or attempted
              use of political influence or bribery to secure advantage in an examination or
              promotion; unauthorized or excessive absences; habitual tardiness; or personal
              acceptance and appropriation of any fee, reward, gift, tip or other
              remuneration received solely for the performance of official duties or in
              connection with his/her municipal employment.

       The level of discipline to be applied in a specific circumstance will be determined
       solely by the Village. Department Heads and/or the Village Manager will consider
       the seriousness of the offense, the repetitive nature of the action, and the employee’s
       prior work and disciplinary record. Although it is not possible to list all forms of
       conduct that may result in disciplinary action, the following partial list generally
       describes conduct and inappropriate behavior which will typically result in discipline,
       up to and including immediate termination, as determined at the Department Head’s
       and/or the Village Manager’s discretion. This list is not all-inclusive. The fact that a
       violation or certain conduct is not identified in this list does not mean that the
       violation or conduct will not result in disciplinary action. The Village will take
       disciplinary action, up to and including immediate termination, as it deems warranted,
       regardless of whether the conduct is identified in this list.

          •   Failure to follow the orders of one's supervisor or a rule or regulation of one's
              department;
          •   Insubordination;
          •   Absence from work without permission or failure to report to one's supervisor
              or department head when absent;
          •   Continual and repeated absences or tardiness;
          •   Failure to perform assigned work in an efficient manner or unsatisfactory
              performance;
          •   Incompetence, nonfeasance, misfeasance, or malfeasance in office or in the
              performance of any job duties;


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          •   Inability to work with fellow employees, particularly when work is hindered
              and/or does not meet required levels;
          •   Continued and repeated failure to pay just debts, leading to the employee
              being subjected to repeated garnishments;
          •   Using, possessing, selling, or being under the influence of alcohol, illegal
              drugs, drugs without a prescription, cannabis, or any other controlled
              substance or narcotic when reporting to work, or while being on duty, or while
              performing any duties on behalf of the Village, or while driving a Village
              vehicle;
          •   Conduct which is unbecoming of an employee of the Village;
          •   Filing a false report, falsifying any Village records, and/or lying to a superior;
          •   Conviction of any criminal offense;
          •   Violation of any Departmental rule;
          •   Violation of any provision contained in the Personnel Manual;
          •   Failure to maintain required certifications or licenses;
          •   Failure to maintain one's physical condition and/or job-related skills required
              for the employee’s position;
          •   Nondisclosure of any fact or making a false statement that would have
              required or constituted a ground for disqualification from appointment or
              would have substantially affected the decision to appoint the applicant;
          •   Any act or occurrence, after appointment, that would have required or
              constituted cause for disqualification from appointment;
          •   Theft or unauthorized removal of any property not belonging to the employee;
          •   Violating the Village’s policies on discrimination or harassment;

       Whenever conduct of an employee falls below a desirable standard, it is the
       responsibility of his/her supervisor to make efforts to point out the deficiencies at the
       time they are observed. Corrections and suggestions should be made in a constructive
       and helpful manner in an effort to elicit the cooperation of the employee.


8.4.0 GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES

       If an employee has any complaint or grievance (excluding harassment) concerning
       his/her employment, working conditions or other matters relating to his or her job, the
       following steps may be taken:

       Step 1:
       The employee may request a "grievance interview" with his/her immediate
       supervisor. The Supervisor shall arrange for such an interview within 10 working
       days of said request, at which time the situation will be discussed and a resolution
       attempted. In the absence of the Supervisor, the employee should discuss the matter

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       with his/her Department Head. When the employee's Supervisor is a Department
       Head, the employee should proceed to the appeal to the Village Manager.

       Step 2:
       In the event that the grievance cannot be resolved by the supervisor, or if the
       employee is dissatisfied with the supervisor's decision, the employee must put the
       grievance in writing and submit it to his/her Department Head. The Department Head
       should attempt to resolve the grievance by means of an interview with the supervisor
       and within five working days of the request. Decisions will be put in writing within
       10 working days of the meeting and a copy given to the employee.

       If a satisfactory solution cannot be obtained through Step 1 and Step 2, the employee
       may appeal the matter, in writing, to the Village Manager. The Village Manager will
       schedule a meeting with the employee, his/her representative, and other necessary
       interested staff members within 10 working days and render a timely written decision
       within five working days of the meeting. The Village Manager's decision is final.

       An employee who has filed a grievance cannot refuse to work while the grievance is
       being settled.


8.5.0 DISCIPLINARY ACTION APPEAL PROCESS

       The appeal process is intended solely to help ensure fair and equitable personnel
       decisions and does not limit the right of the Village, through its Village Manager and/or
       his/her designee, to take any personnel action, including dismissal, that it deems
       appropriate.

       Notice of a suspension or dismissal by a Department Head shall be in writing and shall
       state the reasons for the disciplinary action. The notice shall be furnished to the
       employee within twenty-four hours of the decision to suspend or dismiss. A copy shall
       be filed with the Village Manager and in employee’s personnel file within that same
       period.

       No disciplinary action shall be final until the employee has been given the opportunity to
       appeal the action. Within twenty-four hours after being notified of the disciplinary
       action, the employee must submit, in writing, his/her reasons for appealing the decision.
       This memorandum shall be submitted to the Department Head who shall forward it to
       the Village Manager, with his/her comments, within two days of receipt.

       In the event of an appeal by an employee, the Village Manager shall have the final
       authority to sustain, increase or decrease the disciplinary action.


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ARTICLE IX - RETIREMENT


9.1.0 RETIREMENT

        Full time and regular part time employees are eligible for retirement benefits after
        reaching the age and length of service requirements specified by the retirement plan in
        which they are enrolled. Applicants for retirement shall contact the Finance Department
        to complete appropriate retirement plan procedures.

        Employees in a position scheduled to work more than 1,000 hours per year are included
        in one of two separate pension funds: Illinois Municipal Retirement Fund for general
        employees and Police Pension Fund for Police Officers. Detailed information
        concerning these pension funds can be obtained from the Finance Department or
        members of the Police Pension Board.


9.1.1   DEFERRED COMPENSATION PLAN

        Employees may choose to participate in a deferred compensation plan as authorized by
        the Village Board. Employees must enter into agreements with the applicable
        organization.


9.1.2   RETIREE HEALTH SAVINGS PLAN

        Upon retirement, mandatory eligible leave contributions will be made into an
        employee’s RHS account, including all remaining unpaid vacation leave,
        compensatory time, holiday time and eligible remaining sick leave, pursuant to the
        rules and regulations controlling said accounts in effect at that time.




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ARTICLE X - GENERAL EMPLOYEE REGULATIONS


10.1.0 ANTI – HARASSMENT POLICY

       The Village is concerned with fostering a work environment that is free of any form of
       discrimination or harassment. In keeping with this commitment, the Village will not
       tolerate harassment of any employee of the Village by anyone, including another
       employee, supervisor, elected or appointed official, vendor, client, customer or any other
       person within a Village-owned property.

       Harassment can be defined as any unwelcome behavior, whether verbal, physical, or
       of a visual nature, that is based upon a person’s protected status, including age, color,
       disability, ethnic or national origin, unfavorable discharge from the military, marital
       status, sexual orientation, race, religion, or sex. Improper interference with the ability
       of employees to perform their expected job duties, or that creates an intimidating,
       hostile or offensive working environment shall not be tolerated. Harassment also
       includes bullying.

       Every employee is responsible for creating an atmosphere free of discrimination and
       harassment, sexual or otherwise. All employees are expected to refrain from any act
       that could be described as discriminatory, harassing, inappropriate, or offensive, and
       to report any such conduct. All employees are subject to these rules and
       responsibilities.

       Employees should recognize that this anti-harassment policy is not intended to be
       used as a substitute for a grievance or workplace complaint of a general nature when
       the grievance or complaint is not based on that person’s protected status.


10.1.1 SEXUAL HARASSMENT

       This policy forbids harassment based on gender, regardless of whether the offensive
       conduct is sexual in nature and also prohibits expressions of hostility or dislike or
       other inappropriate conduct based on gender. Any unwelcome or unwanted conduct
       based on gender is also forbidden by this policy, regardless of whether the individual
       engaged in harassment and the individual being harassed are of the same or different
       genders.

       Sexual harassment includes any unwelcome or unwanted sexual advances, requests
       for sexual favors, or other verbal, physical, or visual conduct based on sex, gender or
       of a sexual nature when:


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          •   Submission to the conduct is an explicit or implicit term or condition of
              employment;
          •   Submission to or rejection of the conduct is used as the basis for an
              employment decision affecting the individual; or
          •   The conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an
              individual’s work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive
              working environment.

       This policy forbids harassment based on sex/gender regardless of whether it rises to
       the level of a legal violation.

       The Village of Deerfield considers the following conduct to represent some, but not
       all, of the types of acts that violate this policy:

          •   Physical assaults of a sexual nature, including, but not limited to, rape, sexual
              battery, molestation, or intentional physical conduct which is sexual in nature,
              such as touching, pinching, patting, grabbing, etc;
          •   Unwanted sexual advances, propositions or other sexual comments, including,
              but not limited to, sexually oriented gestures, noises, remarks, jokes,
              comments, or verbal abuse of a sexual nature;
          •   Preferential treatment and promises of preferential treatment to an employee
              for submitting to sexual conduct; and
          •   Sexual or discriminatory displays or publications anywhere in the Village
              work place by Village employees including, but not limited to, pictures,
              posters, calendars, graffiti, emails, objects, reading materials, or other
              materials that are sexually suggestive, demeaning, or pornographic.


10.2.0 REPORT AND INVESTIGATION OF COMPLAINTS OF HARASSMENT

       Any employee who believes he/she has been treated in an unlawful or discriminatory
       manner, based on protected status, should inform his or her supervisor, Department
       Head or the Assistant to the Village Manager. The complaint shall be kept
       confidential to the maximum extent possible. If an employee is uncomfortable or
       sensitive about discussing a complaint with an individual of the opposite sex, the
       employee may report the conduct to any Department Head of the same sex. This
       policy does not require that the employee report the conduct to any individual who is
       engaging in the conduct. If the employee believes that any person to whom such a
       report should be directed is involved in or associated in any way with the alleged
       conduct, then the report should be directed to another Department Head not involved
       in the conduct.



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       Any supervisor or manager who has knowledge of prohibited conduct, or to whom a
       complaint has been made, must promptly report the conduct both to the Department
       Head and to the Assistant to the Village Manager or to another member of the senior
       administrative staff who is not involved in the conduct.

       All complaints or reports of prohibited conduct will be investigated promptly. The
       Village may put in place reasonable interim measures, such as a leave of absence or a
       transfer, while the investigation takes place. The Village will take further appropriate
       action once the complaint or report has been investigated. That action may be a
       conclusion that a violation occurred. The Village might also conclude, depending on
       the circumstances, either that no violation of the policy occurred or that the Village
       cannot conclude whether or not a violation occurred.

       If it is found that a violation of this policy has occurred, the Village will take
       corrective action, up to and including immediate termination, as is appropriate under
       the circumstances as determined in the Village’s discretion, regardless of the job
       positions of the parties involved. The Village may discipline an employee for any
       inappropriate conduct, regardless of whether the conduct amounts to a violation of
       law or even a violation of policy. If the Village does not employ the person engaged
       in the conduct, then the Village will take whatever corrective action it deems
       reasonable and appropriate under the circumstances.


10.3.0 ETHICS

       Officers and employees of the Village have the obligation to maintain a consistently
       high standard of conduct in serving the public and in their relationships with their
       other officers and employees. Due to the nature and importance of the Village's
       activities, courtesy, honesty, and integrity are characteristics required of all Village
       officers and employees. With this in mind, the following must be understood and
       abided by:

          •   All services in the Village shall be performed in an impartial manner, free of
              personal and political considerations.
          •   Courteous and cooperative behavior between individuals and Departments is
              essential in order to effectively deliver Village services.
          •   Employees shall assume the responsibility to preserve and protect Village
              property.
          •   Subject to disclosure of the Freedom of Information Act and internal
              management requirements of the Village, all personal information will remain
              confidential.



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       In accordance with the State Employees and Officials Act (P.A. 93-615 as amended
       by PA 93-617; 5 ILCS 425/1 et seq.), and Village Ordinance 0-04-28, the Village
       shall regulate the solicitation and acceptance of gifts and political activities by any
       elected or appointed official or any employee and shall enforce those prohibitions in a
       manner substantially in accordance with the requirements of the Act and shall adopt
       provisions no less restrictive than the provisions of this Act.

       All complaints regarding violations of the Act and this Ordinance shall be filed with
       the State Legislative Ethics Commission (created by Section 45(a) (6) of the Act).


10.3.1 CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

       Except as provided by Illinois law, no Village official or employee may have a financial
       interest, directly or indirectly, in

          •   any contract with the Village,
          •   the sale to or purchase from the Village of any personal or real property, or
          •   the procurement or performance of any business or work for the Village.

       All employees and officers must further refrain from any other conduct that may
       reasonably create the appearance of a conflict of interest. This may include, but is not
       limited to, the following:

          •   No employee shall represent any private interest in any action or proceeding
              taken against the Village.
          •   Officers or employees who have a direct interest in any legislation before the
              Board of Trustees must publicly disclose this interest if he/she plans to
              participate in any discussion before the Board of Trustees.
          •   No employee shall solicit, negotiate for, or promise to accept, employment with
              any person, firm or corporation which is directly or indirectly involved with the
              performance of Village services, or that, in the judgment of the Village Manager,
              may affect his/her official actions.

       Accordingly, employees are strongly encouraged to obtain prior approval or guidance
       from their Department Head or the Village Manager concerning any matter that could
       create the appearance of a conflict of interest.




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10.3.2 GIFT BAN

       In accordance with the Village of Deerfield Municipal Code:

       Except as permitted by this article no officer or employee and no spouse of or
       immediate family member living with any officer or employee (collectively referred
       to herein as “recipients”), shall intentionally solicit or accept any gift from any
       “prohibited source,” as defined below, or which is otherwise prohibited by law or
       ordinance. No prohibited source shall intentionally offer or give a gift that violates
       this section.

       As stated in the Village Code, a “prohibited source” is any person or entity who:

          •   Is seeking official action: 1) by an officer or 2) in the case of an employee, by
              the employee or by the officer or other employee directing that employee;
          •   Does business or seeks to do business: 1) with the officer or 2) in the case of
              an employee, with the employee, or with officer or other employee directing
              that employee;
          •   Conducts activities regulated: 1) by the officer or 2) in the case of an
              employee, by the employee or by the officer or other employee directing that
              employee; or
          •   Has an interest that may be substantially affected by the performance or
              nonperformance of the official duties of the officer or employee.

       Exceptions:

          •   Opportunities, benefits, and services available on the same conditions as for
              the general public.
          •   Anything for which the officer or employee, or his or her spouse or immediate
              family member, pays the fair market value.
          •   Any:
                  o contribution that is lawfully made under the election code, or
                  o activities associated with a fundraising event in support of a political
                      organization or candidate.
          •   Educational materials and missions.
          •   Travel expenses for a meeting to discuss business.
          •   A gift from a relative, meaning those people related to the individual as father,
              mother, son, daughter, brother, sister, uncle, aunt, great aunt, great uncle, first
              cousin, nephew, niece, husband, wife, grandfather, grandmother, grandson,
              granddaughter, father-in-law, mother-in-law, son-in-law, daughter-in-law,
              brother-in-law, sister-in-law, stepfather, stepmother, stepson, stepdaughter,
              stepbrother, stepsister, half brother, half sister, and including the father,

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              mother, grandfather, or grandmother of the individual's spouse and the
              individual's fiancé or fiancée.
          •   Anything provided by an individual on the basis of a personal friendship
              unless the recipient has reason to believe that, under the circumstances, the
              gift was provided because of the official position or employment of the
              recipient or his or her spouse or immediate family member and not because of
              the personal friendship. In determining whether a gift is provided on the basis
              of personal friendship, the recipient shall consider the circumstances under
              which the gift was offered, such as:
                  o the history of the relationship between the individual giving the gift
                      and the recipient of the gift, including any previous exchange of gifts
                      between those individuals;
                  o whether, to the actual knowledge of the recipient, the individual who
                      gave the gift personally paid for the gift or sought a tax deduction or
                      business reimbursement for the gift; and
                  o whether, to the actual knowledge of the recipient, the individual who
                      gave the gift also at the same time gave the same or similar gifts to
                      other officers or employees, or to their spouses or immediate family
                      members.
          •   Food or refreshments not exceeding $75.00 per person in value on a single
              calendar day; provided that the food or refreshments are consumed on the
              premises from which they were purchased or prepared or catered.
          •   Food, refreshments, lodging, transportation, and other benefits resulting from
              outside business or employment activities (or outside activities that are not
              connected to the official duties of an officer or employee), if the benefits have
              not been offered or enhanced because of the official position or employment
              of the officer or employee, and are customarily provided to others in similar
              circumstances.
          •   Intragovernmental and intergovernmental gifts. For the purpose of this article,
              "intragovernmental gift" means any gift given to an officer or employee from
              another officer or employee, and "intergovernmental gift" means any gift
              given to an officer or employee by an officer or employee of another
              governmental entity.
          •   Bequests, inheritances, and other transfers at death.

       Officers and employees of the Village who receive gifts or gratuities in the course of
       carrying out their duties for the Village will return these gifts and/or gratuities with a
       courteous explanation that acceptance of such gifts or gratuities constitutes a violation
       of the Village’s gift policy.




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10.3.3 PROHIBITED POLITICAL ACTIVITIES

       In accordance with the Village of Deerfield Municipal Code:

       Employees shall not intentionally perform any prohibited political activity during any
       compensated time. Employees shall not intentionally misappropriate any property or
       resources of the Village by engaging in any prohibited political activity for the benefit
       of any campaign for elective office or any political organization.

       At no time shall any officer or employee intentionally misappropriate the services of
       any employee by requiring that employee to perform any prohibited political activity:

          •   as part of that employee’s duties,
          •   as a condition of employment, or
          •   during any compensated time off.

       No officer or employee shall require an employee at any time to participate in any
       prohibited political activity in consideration for that employee being awarded any
       additional compensation or employee benefit, whether in the form of a salary
       adjustment, bonus, compensatory time off, continued employment or otherwise, nor
       shall any employee be awarded any additional compensation or employee benefit in
       consideration for his or her participation in any prohibited political activity.

       Nothing in this section prohibits activities that are otherwise permissible for an officer
       or employee to engage in as part of his or her official duties, or activities that are
       undertaken by an officer or employee on a voluntary basis.


10.3.4 VIOLATION OF CODE OF ETHICS

       Any violation of the provisions of this Code shall result in one of the following actions:
       Written reprimand, suspension, or termination of employment.

10.3.5 WHISTLEBLOWER POLICY

       This policy is intended to encourage staff (paid and volunteer) and others to report
       suspected or actual occurrence(s) of illegal, unethical or inappropriate events (behaviors
       or practices) without retribution.

       The Reporting Individual should promptly report the suspected or actual event to his/her
       supervisor. If the Reporting Individual would be uncomfortable or otherwise reluctant to
       report to his/her supervisor, then the Reporting Individual could report the event to the


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       next highest or another level of management, including the Assistant to the Village
       Manager or Village Manager.

       The Reporting Individual can report the event with his/her identity or anonymously. The
       Village will not tolerate any retaliation or retribution against the Reporting Individual for
       a report that was provided in good faith. On the other hand, a Reporting Individual who
       makes a report that is not done in good faith is subject to discipline, including
       termination of the employee relationship, or other legal means to protect the reputation
       of the organization and members of its Board and staff.

       Anyone who retaliates against the Reporting Individual (who reported an event in good
       faith) will be subject to discipline, including termination of employee status. Crimes
       against person or property, such as assault, rape, burglary, etc., should immediately be
       reported to local law enforcement personnel.

       Supervisors and managers who receive the reports must promptly act to investigate
       and/or resolve the issue. If appropriate, the Supervisor must report the incident to the
       Assistant to the Village Manager and Village Manager.

       The Reporting Individual shall receive a report within a reasonable time of the initial
       report, or as soon as time allows depending on the nature of the investigation, the status
       of the investigation, disposition or resolution of the issue. If the investigation of a
       report, that was done in good faith and investigated by internal personnel, is not to the
       Reporting Individual’s satisfaction, then he/she has the right to report the event to the
       appropriate legal or investigative agency.

       The identity of the Reporting Individual, if known, shall remain confidential to those
       persons directly involved in applying this policy, unless the issue requires investigation
       by law enforcement.

10.4.0 SAFETY POLICY

       The Village recognizes the need for the development of safe working practices for
       every employee and desires to promote on-the-job safety by encouraging the proper
       design and use of buildings, equipment, tools, and other devices.

       Administration of the Village’s safety program is the job of each supervisor. It is the
       responsibility of each employee to assist in creating and maintaining a safe
       workplace. To this end, employees must:
           •   Be informed of and observe established safety practices;
           •   Notify supervisors of any unsafe conditions they discover;



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          •   Use personal protective equipment such as steel-toed shoes, safety vests,
              safety glasses, and hard hats where required;
          •   Not remove guards or other protective devices from machinery or equipment;
          •   Not engage in "horseplay”;
          •   Attend any required training or orientation to increase safety awareness;
          •   Not report to work under the influence of alcohol or drugs;
          •   Promptly report all job-related injuries or illnesses to their supervisor;
          •   Assist supervisors in the investigation of any accident of which they have
              knowledge;
          •   Refrain from operating, modifying, adjusting or using equipment in an
              unauthorized manner;
          •   Maintain clean and orderly work areas.


10.5.0 PERSONAL USE OF VILLAGE VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT

       Employees shall be responsible for the care and conservation of all vehicles, equipment,
       supplies or tools owned and operated by the Village. Any and all accidents, breakdowns
       or malfunctions of such property will be reported to the Department Head immediately
       in order that necessary repairs may be made. Carelessness or irresponsibility in the
       handling of Village vehicles, equipment, supplies or tools will not be tolerated and may
       be the subject of disciplinary action by the Department Head. No vehicles, equipment,
       supplies or tools are to be used for private and/or personal reasons.

       Any employee who damages or destroys municipal property, either through willfulness
       or neglect, may be required to repair or replace the lost or damaged equipment and, in
       addition, may suffer any disciplinary penalty imposed by the Department Head and/or
       the Village Manager.


10.5.1 VEHICLE USAGE POLICY

       All vehicles purchased by the Village are the property of the Village and are assigned to
       certain individuals and to certain Departments for use as directed by the Department
       Head. Vehicles are to be used only by Village employees, for business purposes only,
       and at all times are to be operated in a safe and proper manner. It will be the
       responsibility of each Department Head to make arrangements with the Village’s
       mechanic to ensure proper maintenance of each vehicle assigned to his/her Department.

       All employees, whether they are driving or are a passenger in a Village vehicle, shall at
       all times wear a properly adjusted and fastened seat safety belt and shall require all
       passengers to do likewise. The use of cellular telephones while driving a Village vehicle

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       is strictly prohibited. Except in cases of emergency, drivers should safely pull to the
       side of the road to receive a call.

       Certain employees required to make emergency responses may, at the Department
       Head's discretion, be allowed to take Village vehicles home at night. Individuals who
       are assigned a Village vehicle, but who reside outside the corporate boundaries of the
       Village, shall pay a mileage charge as set by the Village, for commuting purposes
       subject to IRS regulations with respect to personal use of the vehicle.


10.5.2 COMPUTER USAGE POLICY

       Security:
       Confidentiality of usernames and passwords is critical to the security of Village
       technology systems and data. All users must keep their computer and systems account
       credentials secret and not share them with any other staff or persons with the
       exception of the Village’s internal I.T. staff. If a user’s password is requested by
       anyone other than a member of the Village’s internal I.T. staff the request must be
       denied and the Computer Systems Coordinator must be notified. If a user feels any of
       their accounts has been compromised the Computer Systems Coordinator must be
       notified immediately. Any security concerns should also be communicated to the
       Computer Systems Coordinator. Attempts to subvert or compromise Village security
       systems, controls, or access rights will not be tolerated. No user is to allow any access
       to Village systems by unauthorized persons for any reason.

       Access Assignment:
       User accounts, access privileges, and security permissions are configured and
       maintained by internal Village I.T. staff at the discretion of the Computer Systems
       Coordinator. As such, any requests regarding creation/deletion of accounts, access
       rights, or privileges must be made to the Computer Systems Coordinator through the
       employee’s supervisor. The Computer Systems Coordinator reserves the right to
       restrict access and disable accounts without warning as is necessary to protect the
       security and integrity of Village technology systems and data.

       Use of Village Computer Hardware and Software:
       1. Village computer equipment (including, but not limited to desktop computers,
       laptop computers, server computers, printers, copy machines, handheld devices, and
       peripherals) is intended and available for business purposes. Village equipment shall
       not be used for any illegal, improper, unprofessional, or illicit purposes.
       2. The use of Village systems to access, attempt to access, transmit, store, display, or
       request obscene, pornographic, erotic, profane, racist, sexist, or other offensive
       material of any form is expressly prohibited.
       3. The Village reserves the right to monitor and log any or all usage of Village

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       technology systems and equipment at any time, with or without notice to employees.
       Privacy should not be expected when using Village computer systems.
       4. Only business-related files shall be stored on Village servers and networked
       storage. The Computer Systems Coordinator reserves the right to delete, without
       notice, any files not pertaining to Village business.
       5. No computer hardware or peripheral device shall be connected to any Village
       computer system unless performed or authorized by Village internal I.T. staff.
       6. All users must shut down their desktop computers at the end of each day.
       Exceptions to this will be noted to users by I.T. if required. Computer servers must
       never be shut off or rebooted by anyone other than Village I.T. staff.
       7. Software shall not be installed on any Village computer system unless performed
       or authorized by Village internal I.T. staff.
       8. No software, commercial, internally-developed, or otherwise, shall be duplicated
       and/or removed from the Village unless explicitly authorized by the Computer
       Systems Coordinator.
       9. Employees are to immediately contact Village internal I.T. staff if they suspect or
       are notified of any form of virus on their computer systems.
       10. Any employee aware of or observing misuse or abuse of Village technology
       systems is obligated to report it to their supervisor and/or the Computer Systems
       Coordinator.
       11. Use of Village computer equipment outside of business hours and/or outside of
       Village premises is covered by this policy.
       12. Employees may be held accountable for loss of or damage to Village computer
       equipment if found to be intentional in nature or due to negligence.

       Use of Village E-Mail:
       1. The Village e-mail system is intended and available for business purposes. The
       Village e-mail system shall not be used for any illegal, improper, unprofessional, or
       illicit purposes.
       2. Use of the Village e-mail system to transmit or receive obscene, pornographic,
       erotic, profane, racist, sexist, or other offensive material of any form is expressly
       prohibited.
       3. Use of the Village e-mail system to solicit support or to advocate for any political
       causes, outside organizations, or other non-job-related purpose is expressly
       prohibited.
       4. The Village reserves the right to monitor and log any or all usage of its e-mail
       system at any time, with or without notice to employees. Privacy should not be
       expected when using Village e-mail.
       5. The Computer Systems Coordinator reserves the right to filter all e-mail
       communication. Messages (incoming, outgoing, or internal) containing confidential
       or sensitive information, excessively-large attachments, files unrelated to Village
       business, Spam (unsolicited junk e-mail), or viruses of any type may be blocked
       and/or deleted, in whole or in part, with or without warning, at the discretion of the

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       Computer Systems Coordinator as is necessary to protect the security, integrity, and
       availability of Village systems.
       6. Employees are to immediately contact Village internal I.T. staff if they suspect or
       are notified of any form of virus in their e-mail.
       7. Broadcast messages (messages sent to all e-mail users or subset groups) should be
       limited and reserved for Village business only.
       8. Any employee aware of or observing misuse or abuse of the Village e-mail systems
       is obligated to report it to their supervisor and/or the Computer Systems Coordinator.
       9. Use of the Village e-mail system outside of business hours and/or outside of
       Village premises is covered by this policy.
       10. The use of Village e-mail on portable devices, including but not limited to cell
       phones, Blackberries, and PDAs, be they personal or Village-owned, is at the
       discretion of the Computer Systems Coordinator and is covered by this policy.

       Use of Internet:
       On Village time, with Village equipment, or through Village networks:
       1. Use of the Internet for any illegal, improper, unprofessional, or illicit purposes is
       expressly prohibited.
       2. Use of the Internet to transmit or receive obscene, pornographic, erotic, profane,
       racist, sexist, or other offensive material of any form is expressly prohibited.
       3. Use of the Internet to solicit support or to advocate for any political causes, outside
       organizations, or other non-job-related purpose is expressly prohibited.
       4. A wide variety of information is available on the Internet. Some individuals may
       find some information offensive or otherwise objectionable. The Village bears no
       responsibility for content available on the Internet which is not posted by the Village.
       5. Village credentials for Internet sites are subject to the security section of this
       policy.
       6. Departments may develop supplemental Internet policies which are still subject to
       this policy. Police Investigations staff may be exempt from some access restrictions
       and content-related policy as is required for performance of job duties and as is
       coordinated between Police Administration and the Computer Systems Coordinator.
       7. The Computer Systems Coordinator reserves the right to block access to Internet
       sites and content that may be detrimental to the Village network and systems
       including but not limited to viruses, malware, and spyware.
       8. The Computer Systems Coordinator reserves the right to block access to Internet
       sites that attempt to subvert this policy.
       9. The Computer Systems Coordinator reserves the right to block access to illegal
       content.
       10. The Computer Systems Coordinator reserves the right to limit or block Internet
       activity which may affect general availability of access to other staff and/or systems.
       11. The Village reserves the right to monitor and record any or all Internet activity
       through its systems or networks.


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       Data Backup:
       Data on Village servers and networked storage is protected by backup. Data stored by
       users on local computer hard drives or on removable media including but not limited
       to CD, DVD, and USB drives, is not protected by Village backup efforts and is the
       sole responsibility of the user. The Village bears no responsibility for data loss on
       these medium. Village e-mail is protected by backup. Village e-mail is archived for
       record and compliance purposes.

10.5.3 TELEPHONE USAGE POLICY

       Cellular telephones may be provided to employees of the Village of Deerfield to
       assist them in carrying out their duties more efficiently. Accordingly, this policy has
       been created to guide Village employees in the proper use of their Village-issued and
       personal cellular telephones.

       Village-Supplied Cellular Telephones:

       When using Village-supplied cellular telephones, employees are to adhere to the
       following rules:

       i. Cellular telephones are to be used when an employee is away from their office
          and not in lieu of land-line units. When making Village related telephone calls
          from the employee’s office, the employee is to use the assigned wired telephone
          unit provided at an employee’s work station. However, the employee may use a
          cellular telephone “push to talk” feature to allow for immediate access to an
          individual who uses the same type of cellular phone, but who may be away from
          their office.

      ii. Unless in an emergency, an employee shall not permit a non-Village employee to
          use a Village owned cellular telephone.

      iii. Under no circumstances are Village-supplied cellular phones to be used for any
           private commercial enterprise.

      iv. Employees are prohibited from using a cellular telephone while driving any
          vehicle for Village purposes. Employees are directed to pull off to the side of the
          road and stop the vehicle before placing or accepting a call. If acceptance of a call
          is unavoidable and pulling over is not an option, employees are expected to keep
          the call short and keep their eyes on the road. Safety must come before all other
          concerns.

       v. The Village cannot and does not imply, extend, or guarantee any “right to
          privacy” for voice calls and/or electronic communications placed over Village

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          provided wireless communications equipment, including but not limited to call
          detail records, logs, voice mail messages, data storage, text messages, emails, and
          address books. The Village reserves the right to use any call information in any
          way it deems necessary, including discipline of an employee.

      vi. Under no circumstances shall an employee utilize a Village owned cellular
          telephone to contact any telephone pay-per-minute or any other similar telephone
          service. Employees are not permitted to access or download online features such
          as ring tones or games or purchase accessories for wireless communication
          equipment.

     vii. Employees are responsible for the care and maintenance of cellular telephones
          assigned to them. Any damaged, malfunctioning, or lost cellular telephones must
          be reported immediately in order that the necessary repairs or replacement may be
          made. Employees are responsible for damage or loss of Village-owned cellular
          telephones and if found to be negligent, may be required to replace the telephone
          and/or may be subject to disciplinary action. Employees who work in the field
          (such as public works employees and police officers) are subject to a different
          standard due to the nature of their jobs. If the damage or loss is determined to be
          the result of a willful or wanton act by such employee, the employee may be
          subject to disciplinary action

     viii. Employees may be held personally and financially responsible for all damages
           and litigation in the event of an accident involving Village owned equipment
           resulting from employees’ use of personal cellular telephones. Use of personal
           cellular telephones during Village work hours is considered outside the
           employees’ scope of employment.

      ix. Departments may issue more restrictive guidelines for use of wireless
          communication equipment as deemed necessary. Likewise, this policy shall
          complement, rather than supersede, any applicable departmental or Village issued
          safety rules.

       x. Village cellular phones are issued to some employees who are reasonably
          expected to be contacted outside of work hours. Village issued phones shall be
          kept on and checked on a regular basis - especially in situations where there is an
          anticipated weather event or special event where they may be needed to come in
          or respond.


       Use of Personal Cellular Telephone on Village Time:



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       Employees are not to utilize personal cellular telephones while on Village time with
       the exception of an emergency. This includes use within Village owned buildings or
       at work sites or during the operation of Village owned vehicles or other equipment,
       unless work duties or emergency situations require the use of a personal cellular
       telephone. The employee is expected to keep all personal cellular phones out of view
       and turned off or on “silent” or “vibrate” mode during working time and in the
       working area.

       i. Employees may utilize personal cellular telephones only during lunch and break
          periods, so long as they are not used while at a work station. They may be utilized
          outside Village buildings or in designated break areas.

      ii. The Village assumes no liability for loss or damage to employees’ personal
          property, including personal cellular telephones and/or pagers, carried in Village
          vehicles or left on Village property. Employees assume the risk of loss or damage
          to personal cellular phones or other electronic devices carried by employees
          during their workday.


10.6.0 DRESS CODE POLICY

       Employees are to present a professional appearance at all times and are required to
       dress and groom themselves in a manner appropriate for their position and that will
       reflect a positive image on the Village.


10.7.0 TRAVEL/TRAINING POLICY

       Travel can play an important role in the Village’s efforts to provide superior and
       responsive governmental services to the residents of Deerfield. When conducting
       business on behalf of the Village, employees are expected to use good quality
       services and accommodations appropriate for the business to be conducted. Good
       judgment and ethical practices on the part of each traveler remain the most important
       factors in controlling travel expenses.

       Control of travel authorization is the responsibility of each department head. Travel
       authorization is a two-part process including: 1) approval of all travel in advance; and
       2) expense reporting following completion of the trip. Approval of travel expense
       forms is more than a formality. It indicates that expenses submitted have been
       reviewed and have been found to comply with Village regulations regarding travel
       and authorized business expenses.



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       All Village personnel traveling or incurring business expenses on behalf of the
       Village, and those responsible for the approval of these expenses, are expected to use
       these measures to assist in maintaining control over travel expenditures. The policies
       detailed here apply to all funds under Village control and are superseded only in those
       instances where funding agencies apply specific and more restrictive rules and rates.

       In addition, this policy is only effective for travel of less than seven (7) consecutive
       days. Reimbursement rates for any specialized training or travel longer than this shall
       be determined on a case-by-case basis prior to the start of the travel.

       1. Travel Authorization
       It is Village policy that all travel requiring an overnight stay must be approved in
       advance by the employee’s Department Head, and either the Director of Finance or
       Village Manager. This applies to all travel of this nature even in instances where the
       travel has been budgeted or a travel advance is not requested. Requests for travel
       authorization shall be submitted using the Village’s travel authorization form.

       2. Travel Arrangements
       To reduce travel costs, Village employees are encouraged to utilize an Internet
       website when purchasing air travel and reserving cars and hotel rooms. Whenever
       possible, travel should be arranged using the least expensive means possible.
       Employees should use good judgment when determining logical routes for arriving at
       the intended destination.

       3. Air Travel
       Employees are required to request flights according to approximate arrival and
       departure time, rather than by specific carrier or flight number, in order to obtain the
       lowest available fare with logical routing for all trips. In general, lowest available fare
       is defined as the least costly fare available at the time of ticketing, and may include
       one stopover or connecting flight. (This is not intended to limit travelers who may
       wish to arrange airfare using more than one stopover or connecting flight as savings
       and time permits.) In order to take advantage of available discounted fares, travelers
       are requested to make reasonable adjustments in their travel plans.

       Employees should make air travel arrangements as far in advance as possible to take
       advantage of special fare savings. Travelers should be aware that some discounts
       have travel restrictions and cancellation penalties, and therefore good business
       judgment should be exercised.

       All air travel at Village expense must be by coach or economy.

       4. Ground Transportation


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       It is expected that employees use the most effective ground transportation available,
       considering cost, time, availability and scheduling.

       The cost of public transportation, including tips, is reimbursable with a receipt unless
       one cannot be obtained.

       a. Village Owned Vehicles
       Village owned vehicles shall be used to travel to destinations of up to 200 miles from
       Deerfield, unless another form of travel is less expensive or more practical. Special
       approval for longer trips may be granted by the Department Head if there will be
       more than one employee making the trip or for some other practical reason.

       b. Taxi and Airport Transportation
       Whenever practical, airport or hotel ground transportation should be the preferred
       method of transportation to hotels or meeting sites. Taxis may be used as necessary
       taking into consideration the cost of other means of transportation. A receipt is
       required for reimbursement of these expenses. If a family member transports you
       to/from your home airport, mileage may be claimed for each round-trip made.

       c. Rental Passenger Automobiles
       Rental automobiles may be used as necessary but must be approved in advance by the
       Department Head and the Director of Finance or Village Manager. Receipts are
       required for reimbursement of all expenses related to rental automobile use.
       Arrangements for rental automobiles should be made through a travel agent or
       Internet website whenever possible and shall be made for the most economical
       vehicle that meets the practical needs.

       d. Personal Vehicles
       Expenses of travel by automobile are reimbursable at the IRS authorized rate in effect
       at the time the travel takes place. The mileage reimbursement allowance covers all
       automobile related costs; gasoline, insurance, maintenance, etc. Toll charges and
       parking are reimbursable in addition to mileage allowance. The total personal
       automobile expenses shall not exceed the lowest available airfare.

       Mileage shall be actual mileage traveled and shall be subject to review using readily
       available travel planners. Employees using personal vehicles on Village business
       must have adequate automobile insurance in compliance with State law. Damage to
       personal vehicles while on Village reimbursable travel is not the responsibility of the
       Village.

       5. Meals for Travel Requiring An Overnight Stay:



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       Employees engaged in travel necessitating an overnight stay will receive a per diem
       meal allowance. The per diem amount shall be equal to the average of the highest
       and lowest meals and incidental rate approved by the US GSA (regardless of the city
       to which the employee travels). The applicable rate shall be the rate in effect at the
       time of travel. The per diem amount shall include tax and tip and an allowance for
       incidental expenses. Receipts for meals are not required (except as otherwise
       required below). Any costs exceeding the per diem amount are the responsibility of
       the employee. Employees are not required to reimburse the village for per diem
       funds not spent unless the trip is shorter than originally anticipated or canceled
       altogether, or for meals that are provided as part of the conference attendance or paid
       for by a third party.

       Note: Employees will receive a pro-rated per diem stipend for partial days traveled or
       when meals are provided as part of the conference registration.

       Village Business Not Requiring an Overnight Stay:
       If employees are outside of the Village for a business purpose over the lunch period
       they may be reimbursed up to the per diem limits for lunch only, upon presentation of
       a receipt. Employees shall receive this amount for each meal not provided by a
       seminar or conference. Employees may request funds for these meals by submitting a
       petty cash reimbursement request with a copy of the seminar or conference
       registration form if applicable. Petty cash forms shall be signed by the employee’s
       Department Head or his or her designee. Receipts for meals are required in this
       circumstance.

       6. Hotels
       Employees are expected to use reasonably priced lodging. When making reservations
       or registering, the employee shall ask for and use the government or corporate rate.
       Whenever practical, hotel reservations should be made using an Internet website.
       Otherwise, good judgment should be used in selecting hotels which provide
       comfortable lodging at reasonable prices.

       Reimbursement for lodging shall be limited to the minimum number of nights
       required to conduct the assigned Village business. If a conference, for example,
       begins on Sunday morning and ends Thursday at noon, reimbursement for Saturday
       night through Wednesday night would be allowed. If an employee chooses to arrive
       earlier or stay later, the additional lodging and other expenses are his or her personal
       expense. However, if staying an extra night will result in an airfare discount in
       excess of the additional total expenses to be incurred, these expenses will be
       reimbursable – documentation is necessary for this reimbursement.

       7. Telephone Calls (personal and work related)


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       The Village recognizes that it may be necessary for employees traveling on Village
       business to check in with family members or work from time to time. Placing long
       distance calls using hotel phones is often prohibitively expensive. To avoid these
       high costs, employees should use their Village-provided phones or the Village will
       provide employees with a pre-paid phone card for business use while on the trip.
       Phone cards may be obtained from the Finance Department and should be returned
       with unused credits. The cost of personal calls shall be the employee’s responsibility.

       8. Accompaniment by an Immediate Family Member
       The Village will not reimburse employees for travel costs of immediate family
       members traveling with employees on official Village business. If a family member
       accompanies the employee for personal reasons, only those costs related to the
       employee’s travel will be reimbursed.

       9. Combined Business/Personal Travel
       Whenever an employee, for his/her convenience, travels by an indirect route or
       interrupts Village travel for personal travel, the additional expenses related to the
       personal travel are the responsibility of the employee.

       10. Non-Allowable Expenses
       The Village's policy is to reimburse its employees for all reasonable and necessary
       expenses incurred while transacting the affairs of the Village. However, there are
       specific types of expenses that are considered personal, and are therefore not
       reimbursable. These include but are not limited to:

          1) Cleaning, pressing, and laundry;

          2) Personal entertainment including movies, videos or pay per view services in a
             hotel room;

          3) Airline and other trip insurance;

          4) Beautician, barber, manicurist and shoe shine;

          5) Repairs on personal automobiles damaged while on company business;

          6) Traffic violations and court costs;

          7) Membership fees in airline clubs.

          8) Alcohol or drugs of any kind.

          9) Non-business related phone calls.

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          10) Incremental travel costs related to family accompanying the employee.

       Unless otherwise addressed by this policy, the Director of Finance shall have the
       authority to decide questions regarding whether or not a particular expense is
       reimbursable.

       11. Approved Forms of Payment
       Employees should use their personal credit card to book travel arranged on Internet
       sites. Reimbursement will be made as expeditiously as possible, in accordance with
       the Village’s accounts payable schedule, after a copy of the confirmation statement
       has been submitted to the Finance Department and payment has been authorized.
       Payment will not be made unless the Director of Finance and/or Village Manager has
       approved a travel authorization form.

       It is preferred that employees use a personal credit card to pay for travel related
       expenses. Employees shall be responsible for obtaining receipts as required and
       submitting a completed travel expense report to the Finance Department when the
       travel has been completed.

       12. Advances
       Travel advances may be issued to employees to cover travel expenses that cannot be
       prepaid. The advance will be established at an amount that is reasonable. All travel
       advances are issued and maintained subject to timely reporting of all travel expenses.
       A travel advance will be issued upon receipt of a completed travel authorization form
       containing the following information:

          1) Name, title and department of employee receiving the travel advance;

          2) Account number to which the expenses will be charged;

          3) Purpose of the trip;

          4) Destination;

          5) Beginning and ending dates of the trip;

          6) Estimate of all expenses including transportation, lodging, meals, registration
             and miscellaneous expenses including items paid directly;

          7) Copy of the conference schedule showing times, dates, and meals provided.



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       Advance requests require the signature of the applicable Department Head and either
       the Director of Finance or Village Manager. Travel advance forms must be
       completed and submitted to the Accounts Payable Clerk at least two (2) weeks before
       the date needed. The travel advance form must be filled out regardless of whether or
       not a travel advance is necessary. Employees are responsible for ensuring that the
       completed travel advance form is received by the Finance Department prior to the
       accounts payable deadline for the date the funds will be needed.

       Travel advances must be settled within ten (10) working days after completion of the
       travel. A travel advance will not be issued if any prior advance is outstanding.
       Completed travel expense forms are to be forwarded to the Department of Finance
       with all receipts attached. Any unused travel advance money must accompany this
       form.

       13. Expense Reporting
       The travel expense form should be filled out in accordance with the instructions noted
       on the form. Travelers should provide as much detailed information of all expenses
       on the statement as possible including the cost of registration, books, meal
       allowances, hotel, airfare, etc. regardless of whether it was paid directly to a vendor
       (e.g. registration fees) or by credit card (e.g. hotel bill). Original receipts must be
       included except when it is impractical to do so or when specifically exempt by this
       policy (e.g. certain meals, cost of public transportation, tips, parking meters, etc.). A
       completed expense report, with a copy of the travel authorization form, shall be
       submitted to the Finance Department within ten (10) working days following
       completion of the trip.

10.8.0 CIVIL LITIGATION

       Any employee of the Village who receives any summons, notice or complaint alleging
       any claim or cause of action arising as a result of the performance of his/her official
       duties as an employee of the Village shall immediately notify his/her Department Head
       and furnish to him/her a copy of said summons, notice or complaint, who shall thereafter
       forward said materials to the Village Manager and Finance Director.

       The Finance Director shall thereafter forward said summons, notice or complaint to the
       Village's insurance carrier, which shall make a determination whether it will undertake
       the defense of the employee and provide coverage for any damages resulting from the
       claim or cause of action under the terms of the Village's policy. If the Village's
       insurance carrier determines that the alleged claim or cause of action does not result in a
       circumstance included in the Village's coverage, then the Village Manager shall
       determine whether the claim or cause of action did, in fact, arise as the result of the
       legitimate and reasonable performance of official duties. If the Village Manager's
       determination is affirmative the Village shall undertake, with the consent of the

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       employee, the defense of the claim or cause of action at its expense. In the further event
       that a judgment is entered against said employee in the cause of action, the Village of
       Deerfield will indemnify the employee from any portion of the judgment not satisfied by
       the Village insurance carrier.


10.9.0 TUITION REIMBURSEMENT PROGRAM

       Employees enrolled in college or graduate level courses will receive tuition
       reimbursement and incentive pay, subject to the following conditions:

          •   Employees must complete one year of service with the Village prior to being
              eligible for participation in this program.
          •   The employee must complete the appropriate forms and obtain prior approval
              from the Department Head and Village Manager to take the course. The
              Manager's decision will be final.
          •   The course must be approved by the Department Head and must be related to the
              employee's work specialty. No more than three courses may be taken during any
              one semester.
          •   Upon completion of the course, the employee must complete the appropriate
              form and present satisfactory evidence that he has completed the course with a
              cumulative grade of “B” or better, and a receipted bill from the college for the
              cost of the course.
          •   Only tuition costs will be reimbursed. Books, supplies, travel expenses and
              meals are not eligible for reimbursement.
          •   In no case will the amount of tuition reimbursed by the Village exceed an
              amount per semester hour established by the Board of Trustees.
          •   In addition to tuition reimbursement, employees who successfully complete an
              approved course will be paid a stipend per month per course for a period of three
              years.
          •   Employees must agree to continue to work for the Village for at least one
              additional year for each year of college credit obtained under this program or
              refund to the Village a pro rata share of tuition payments.
          •   Information regarding stipends per month per course and current amount of
              tuition reimbursement per semester hour can be obtained from the Finance
              Department.


10.10.0       DRUG FREE WORKPLACE

       The use and misuse of alcohol and drugs by Village employees is contrary to a drug-
       free workforce and workplace. The use of these substances increases the potential for

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       accidents, absenteeism, substandard performance, turnover, misconduct, poor
       employee morale, damage to public and private property, injury to the public, self
       and/or other employees, or degradation of trust in the Village to effectively service its
       constituents. In addition, employees who are “drivers” as that term is defined
       pursuant to the Omnibus Transportation Employee Testing Act of 1992, and other
       employees in safety-sensitive positions, are subject to drug and alcohol testing as set
       forth in federal regulations and pursuant to procedures described in a Controlled
       Substance and Alcohol Testing Procedures Policy.


10.11.0       NO TOBACCO USE POLICY

       In recognition of the increasing evidence that tobacco smoke creates a danger to the
       health of persons who are present in a smoke-filled environment, and pursuant to
       Article 6 of the Municipal Code of the Village of Deerfield, smoking shall be
       prohibited in all Village-owned or leased buildings as well as within 25-feet of a
       publicly used entrance, or at any public event held on public or private property in the
       Village. In addition, tobacco use shall be prohibited in all Village-owned vehicles
       and while using Village equipment.


10.12.0       MEDIA RELATIONS POLICY

       The Village Manager shall serve as the primary media relations officer with respect to
       all general matters affecting the operations and management of Village government.
       The Village Manager may delegate responsibility for media relations to any person
       employed by the Village, and that person shall be designated the media relations
       officer.

       Department Heads shall serve as the media relations officers with respect to particular
       matters affecting the operations and management of their respective departments.
       Department Heads likewise may delegate responsibility for media relations to any
       person employed within their respective departments, and that person shall be
       designated the media relations officer for that department.

       All inquiries from representatives of any news medium shall be referred to the
       appropriate media relations officer. The media relations officer shall be responsible
       for clearing all public communications which may be considered an expression of
       Village or Department policy prior to dissemination to any news medium.

       No employee shall consent to be interviewed by or through, or appear as a guest in,
       any news medium concerning Village business except as authorized by the
       appropriate media relations officer.

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       No employee shall communicate with representatives of any news medium about
       Village business except as authorized by the appropriate media relations officer.

       No employee shall discuss or disclose to any news medium the internal confidential
       matters that involve the operations and management of the Village or its
       Departments.

       All press releases, publications, speeches or other official declarations concerning the
       operations and management of the Village and its departments must be approved in
       advance by the Village Manager and/or the media relations officer designated by the
       Village Manager.

       Department Heads may adopt additional media relations guidelines consistent with
       this policy as may be expedient in the management and operations of their respective
       Departments.




                                                                                            65
                                         REQUEST FOR BOARD ACTION
                                                                                        Agenda Item:      12-127
 Subject:                Additional Work for Linden Avenue Infrastructure Rehabilitation Project-Contract Final
 Action Requested:       Authorize additional expenditure to complete the project- for a total of $887,000
 Originated By:          Director of Public Works and Engineering
 Referred To:            Mayor and Board of Trustees

Summary of Background and Reason for Request:

 In June of 2012, the Village of Deerfield awarded the construction contract for the Linden Avenue Infrastructure
 Rehabilitation Project. Out of four bidders, A-Lamp Concrete Contractors, Inc. was the low bidder with a bid price of
 $828,012, the next lowest bid was $1,076,112. We believe that the competitive bidding environment, created by a
 strained economy, contributed to the favorable prices.

 The original roadway and utilities were built in the late 1960’s and had reached the end of their design life. The
 infrastructure was poor condition due age, unsuitable sub-grade conditions, and lesser quality of material and
 construction techniques. As such, the project included water main replacement, storm/sanitary sewer replacement, and
 roadway replacement. The limits of reconstruction for the project were Linden Avenue between 1400 Linden Avenue and
 Stratford Road, concrete patching was also be performed along Linden Avenue and Berkley Avenue west of the
 reconstruction project. The project began in September and was complete in mid-November.

 The nature of infrastructure reconstruction projects often consist of work items, or exact quantities, that are not easily
 identified during the design process. During construction complications were encountered with respect to the sanitary
 sewer system and a narrow roadway cross-section, which created difficulties maneuvering equipment and material. The
 narrow roadway cross-section caused additional landscape and driveway apron rehabilitation. Unforeseen sanitary sewer
 conditions required additional sanitary sewer main to be installed and caused the project limits to be increased, expanding
 the project to the west.

 The additional contract work totaling $59,000 is not expected to require a budget amendment. The Department originally
 budgeted $870,000 for construction and construction engineering for the project, leaving a difference of $42,000 between
 the budgeted amount and the contract awarded amount. In addition, remaining funds which were originally budgeted for
 Lake Cook Road water main design are being requested to cover the $17,000 overage. The Department originally
 budgeted $50,000 for the Lake Cook Road water main design, which was completed by the CCHD in-house at no cost to
 the Village.

 The Director of Public Works and Engineering recommends that the Mayor and Board of Trustees authorize the
 additional expenditure for the completion of the Linden Avenue Infrastructure Rehabilitation Project, increasing the total
 contract amount from the base bid of $828,000 to $887,000.


 Reports and Documents Attached:

 None

 Date Referred to Board:     December 17, 2012

                                          Action Taken: __________________________________________
                                      REQUEST FOR BOARD ACTION

                                                                    Agenda Item:          12-128

Subject:                Add Work Under 2012 MFT Street Rehabilitation Project-Contract Final

Action Requested:       Authorize Additional Work for the Project Total of $2,068,000

Originated By:          Department of Public Works and Engineering

Referred To:            Mayor and Board of Trustees

Summary of Background and Reason for Request:

In April of 2012 the Village entered into a contract with A-Lamp Concrete Contractors, Inc. for the 2012 Street
Rehabilitation Project. The amount of the Contractor’s bid was $1,928,127. The original streets that were to be
rehabilitated are as follows:

                            Street Name           Starting              Ending
                            Cumnor Court          Warrington Road       Carlisle Place
                            Carlisle Place        Cumnor Court          Warwick Road
                            Warwick Road          Carlisle Place        Oxford Road
                            Camille Avenue        Crowe Avenue          Chesnut Street
                            Rago Avenue           Crowe Avenue          Chesnut Street
                            Williams Avenue       Crowe Avenue          Chesnut Street
                            Davis Street          Crowe Avenue          Chesnut Street
                            Crowe Avenue          Camille Avenue        North Avenue
                            Elmwood Avenue        Stratford Road        Chestnut Street
                            Kenmore Avenue        Gordon Terrace        Rosewood Avenue

An additional street was requested to be added to the contract, Jonquil Terrace between Central Avenue and Deerfield
Road. The Board of Trustees approved the additional expenditure for Jonquil Terrace to bring the total amount of the
project in line with the 2012-2013 FY budgeted amount of $2,000,000. Upon completion, ten of the eleven streets that
made up the project underwent full pavement reconstruction as well as replacement of major portions of the storm sewer
system, fire-hydrants, water valves, sanitary sewer point repairs, and sidewalks. One of the eleven locations, Elmwood
Avenue between Stratford Road and Chestnut Street was patched and resurfaced, and included full curb replacement
and storm sewer repair.

The scope of work for the project also included substantial patching on Deerfield Road between Rosemary Terrace and
the east limit of the Village, various location curb/roadway patching, sidewalk replacement, and drainage repair.
Patching along Deerfield Road, and patching in various locations caused the project to go over the allotted amount by
$68,000. This additional expense is not expected to require a budget amendment. Rather, remaining funds from the
fiber optic connection between the Water Reclamation Facility and the Public Works Facility are being requested to
cover the expense. The Department originally budgeted $100,000 for the fiber optic connection, which was completed
by H&H Electric in the amount of $28,000, leaving $72,000 within the proposed budget.

The Director of Public Works and Engineering recommends that the Mayor and Board of Trustees authorize the additional
expenditure for the completion of the 2012 Street Rehabilitation Project, increasing the total contract amount from
$2,000,000 to $2,068,000.

Reports and Documents Attached: None

Date Referred to Board:        February 6, 2012
                                                         Action Taken: ______________________________
                                REQUEST FOR BOARD ACTION
                                                                                            Agenda Item: 12-129
Subject:        Sanitary Sewer Assessment System by RedZone Robotics
Action Requested:        Accept RedZone Robotics Professional Services Proposal (NTE $573,637.15)
Originated By:      Director of Public Works and Engineering
Referred To: Mayor and Board of Trustees
Summary of Background and Reason for Request:
The Village has never had a comprehensive review of the sanitary sewer condition. Portions have been
televised/ lined/ replaced, usually in combination with another capital improvement project. We view the
sanitary sewer collection and treatment system as a critical facility. The Village relies on a continuously
functioning sewer system that is clean and reliable.
The primary concerns about the Village controlled sanitary sewer system is whether there is capacity (how much
it can carry) and functionality, or integrity (reliability). The capacity is a function of pipe size and flow
characteristics. The capacity is reduced by extraneous rain water entering the system, blockages, tree roots etc.
The reliability is impacted by pipe condition, cracks, settlement, shape, sediment, service lateral connections,
etc. All of these features are called defects.
In order to efficiently maintain and repair our system we recommend that all the sanitary manholes and pipelines
be televised, defects identified and coded, and the data entered into a sewer management software program.
We reviewed the options and researched RedZone Robotics, Inc., a Pittsburgh, PA based company that focuses
on sewer condition assessment and data management.
RedZone provides asset and resource management with their ICOM3 Asset Management software. Utilizing this
ICOM3 product, populated with Village data, the department will be able to sort and query data for areas with
the worst defects, identify how many manholes need rehabilitation, etc. The software will aid in managing
multiple tasks including repairs, replacements, cleaning and contractual improvements.
The RedZone proposal specifies a total cost of $573,637.15. They are offering this contract with a five-year
program term vs. a 3-year term, a zero percent financing rate if we wish to finance the purchase ($114,727.43
per year), and concessions totaling more than $80,000. Non-appropriation language is included in the contract.
Staff has had the opportunity to observe the equipment deployment, utilize the Asset Management program and
observe the quality of the data and video. They have high regard for the product, the process and the results.
The current budget includes $125,000 for sewer lining from the Infrastructure Replacement Fund. We propose
that these monies be reallocated to initiate the program in this fiscal year. The source of funding in subsequent
years would be discussed as part of the annual budget process.
The Director of Public Works and Engineering recommends that the Mayor and Board of Trustees accept the
RedZone Robotics Professional Services Proposal in the amount of $573,637.15 and authorize the Mayor to
sign the contract.
Reports and Documents Attached:
Sanitary Sewer Assessment System Memorandum
RedZone Robotics Y.E.S. Your Entire System Professional Services Proposal
Date Referred to Board: December 17, 2012
                                          Action Taken: __________________________________________
                                                                             Memorandum
                                                                                         Agenda 12-129


DATE:           December 13, 2012
TO:             Mayor and Board of Trustees
FROM:           Barbara K. Little, P.E. Director of Public Works and Engineering BKL
SUBJECT:        Sanitary Sewer Assessment System RedZone Robotics


The Village has never had a comprehensive review of the sanitary sewer condition. Portions have been
televised/ lined/ replaced, usually in combination with another capital improvement project. We view the
sanitary sewer collection and treatment system as a critical facility. The Village relies on a continuously
functioning sewer system that is clean and reliable.
The primary concerns about the Village controlled sanitary sewer system is whether there is capacity (how much
it can carry) and functionality, or integrity (reliability). The capacity is a function of pipe size and flow
characteristics. The capacity is reduced by extraneous rain water entering the system, blockages, tree roots etc.
The reliability is impacted by pipe condition, cracks, settlement, shape, sediment, service lateral connections,
etc. All of these features are called defects. In order to have a uniform interpretation for all pipe and manhole
defects, the sewer industry developed a standard coding.
The Village is currently pursing private sanitary sewer problems with two programs, smoke testing and a pilot
program of home inspections. A draft report on the most recent activities is expected this December from the
consultant.
The Village is in the same position as homeowners when it comes to sewer problems. You don’t know you have
a problem until it erupts. There is no good way of knowing the sewer system integrity until you see it. The
department has sewer televising equipment which is mainly used to diagnose a specific problem or inspect the
system integrity/ condition in advance of a roadway project. There are 2 ½ maintenance operators and a foreman
in the sewer collection division. Therefore cleaning and televising of sewers are done by an outside company if
large quantities are needed.
In order to efficiently maintain and repair our system we recommend that all the sanitary manholes and pipelines
be televised, defects identified and coded, and the data entered into a sewer management software program.
Pictures and video should also be tied to the sewer pipe/manhole in the management program.
Sewer televising can be performed by a number of qualified companies. Many are familiar with standardized
pipeline coding. On a village wide scale however, the data would not be readily useable without data
management software. We reviewed the options and researched RedZone Robotics, Inc., a Pittsburgh, PA based
company that focuses on sewer condition assessment and data management. RedZone offers a turnkey solution.
They combine components of a utility televising service, a financing company, an engineering consultant to
review the TV footage and a software contractor to write the program.
RedZone Robotics, Inc. (RedZone) is a professional services company that started out televising difficult
pipelines, including nuclear power plant piping. They have evolved their products to include several different
types of camera devices including those with sonar, in order to “read” or “view” the submerged portions of the


                                                 Agenda 12-129
pipe. They efficiently perform small and large diameter pipe inspection. They will inspect every manhole and
locate it with GPS. The actual televising is done “looking ahead” down the pipe and simultaneously recording
where the camera has been or “looking back”. This is because some defects are better seen from a different
angle, like a settled joint between pipe sections. Inspection can be performed in the winter months because the
manhole covers are safely closed during the inspection.
RedZone provides asset and resource management with their ICOM3 Asset Management software. The manhole
and pipeline data is coded and recorded into the software. It is then accessed by the Village. We will know the
condition, the capacity and the risks. The video and photos of the underground system are a “click” away from
any point in the program. Utilizing this populated ICOM3 product, the department will be able to sort and
query data for areas with the worst defects, identify how many manholes need rehabilitation, etc. We will also
be able to identify where serious defects exist prior to cleaning and maintenance. This would also be a good
basis for sewer assessment prior to road construction. Sanitary sewer service lateral connections will also be
located along each pipe line.
This information would be the basis for a Public Sewer Management Plan. Deficiencies are characterized as
either operational (maintenance) or structural. Deficiencies can be ranked and prioritized. Corrective measures
can be addressed based on accurate facts. This will give the village a sound understanding of the public sanitary
sewer system condition. The software will aid in managing multiple tasks including repairs, replacements,
cleaning and contractual improvements.
We completed a RedZone pilot study earlier this year. We had RedZone study portions of the northeast
quadrant. This pilot allowed Village staff to familiarize themselves with the camera deployment procedure and
to review the software with our own data.
The RedZone proposal specifies a total cost of $573,637.15. The work included in this contract is listed in the
schedule of values. These include sewer condition assessment and asset characterization, software license and
support, manhole asset characterization, GIS discrepancy report and implementation, configuration, professional
services and financing. The Village GIS system indicates that there are 80 miles of sanitary sewer pipe in the
system, but only 78 miles have been identified by size. The two miles of pipe without a size are included in the
proposal at the pipe size most commonly found in our system (8”-12” diameter). We propose the project be
awarded at the proposal price of $573,637.15. However, we do recognize that a change order may be necessary
to compensate for a pipe size different than assumed. The unit prices are specified in the contract.
In comparison, we recently obtained a price quote from a company specializing in sewer cleaning and televising.
Their quote came to $520,000 for televising, without any heavy cleaning or root cutting. As previously
mentioned, RedZone is much more than a televising company.

RedZone is offering this proposal with a five-year program term vs. a 3-year term, a zero percent financing rate
if we wish to finance the purchase ($114,727.43 per year), and concessions totaling more than $80,000. In
exchange for these terms and conditions, RedZone is requesting commitment to be a reference client, set several
performance benchmarks, ongoing evaluations, publications and whitepapers, and that the Village endeavor to
enter into a contract by December 21, 2012. RedZone is offering this package through December 21, 2012 and
has confirmed that these terms will end this calendar year. The Village could choose to participate at a later time
but the terms and concessions would not be as favorable. By signing the agreement it guarantees Deerfield the
terms and conditions as outlined in the proposal. There are a limited number of these offers available from the
company and Illinois has been among the leaders in embracing this approach to sewer system asset
management.
The RedZone proposal is attached for your reference. In the Committee of the Whole there was some question
about the first appropriation. RedZone offers the following clarification:
Section 3 (e) under 'Fees and Payment' clearly states: "...if no funds or insufficient funds are appropriated and
budgeted in any fiscal period for Payments due under this Agreement, Client will immediately notify RedZone



                                                  Agenda 12-129
of such occurrence and this Agreement shall terminate on the last day of the fiscal period for which
appropriations were received without penalty or expense to Client."
RedZone’s intent, and interpretation of that language, is that it applies to all fiscal periods and appropriations,
including the first. This allows the Village to sign the agreement by the proposal expiration date, take advantage
of the terms and conditions, while at the same time continuing to work through our means to pay for the first
year with the understanding the in the event Deerfield is unable to appropriate any funds to the program, it will
come to an end thereafter. RedZone understands that the process of determining if/how Deerfield will fund the
first year's appropriations may take until May 1, 2013 and in the event funds are appropriated sooner (possibly
via reallocation) the Village will inform RedZone.
As previously stated, the contract is subject to Village appropriations for the program. The field work is
performed at the beginning of the contract period. Should the Village not appropriate in a future year, say year 3
for example, the Village would keep all its data and video. RedZone would reclaim their ICOM3 Asset
Management software. The Village would not have the benefit of the asset management software but would
have the data.
The pilot study provided the public works staff (Superintendent and Foreman) an opportunity to work with real
data in the actual ICOM3 Asset Management program. This was not just a demonstration but useful material to
work with hands-on. Much of the program functionality is already available to staff for queries and review. The
pictures and video are accessible. Staff is able to quickly grasp the ease of operation and derive results promptly.
RedZone is including a field computer in the concessions package so the sewer department can access the data
in the field. We will include Engineering in the training on the software as we move forward. They will be able
to assist in development of sewer focused capital improvement programs as well as utilize the information with
other projects. We do not envision the need for outside consultants to identify problem areas with the public
sewer system. Design engineers may be necessary to develop remediation and repair strategies if they are
beyond in-house capabilities. Primarily staff will be able to clearly identify priority maintenance and structural
defects in the public sewer system. Resources can then be applied to the highest priority assets whether the
resources remain stable, increase or decrease in any given year.
RedZone data collection and processing for the Village sanitary sewer system (all 80 miles of pipeline and 1200
manholes) would be completed within 12 to 15 months of contract signing. The cost of the project can be paid in
five annual installments with zero percent interest. With the RedZone information and management tools in one
place, we will be more knowledgeable about our sanitary sewer system and better able to make fact based
decisions about how to best use Village resources.
Municipal crews are able to televise 1000 feet per day on average. With RedZone’s rapid baseline
determination, they are able to perform in one day what the average municipal crew could do in one week.
Therefore rate of progress is tremendous. RedZone is also able to assess large diameter pipes, a capability few
companies offer. This is particularly important for the “transmission” or collection mains that get larger as they
approach the lift stations or the treatment plant. All pipe and manholes will receive a condition assessment
which will be coded based on the industry standard PACP (pipelines) and MACP (manholes). The manholes
will be located with Global Positioning System (GPS) at the mapping grade level which is + 1 meter. The
manhole locations and connecting pipe lines will be reconciled with the in-house GIS mapping. The Village will
essentially have a surveyed map of the entire public sanitary sewer system. The pipeline information will
contain pipe slope, sags and high points as well as locate every service line. Sewage should flow at a rate >
(greater than or equal to) 2 feet per second (fps) for self-cleaning velocities. Software licensing is included in
the package and includes unlimited support and unlimited users. The professional service allowance includes
140 hours of consultation and training services including professional engineer assistance with customizing the
software and prioritization of the assets. The interest free financing is not a reason to participate by itself, but it
is a valuable way to make this important program a reality. All of these features and more set RedZone apart
from any other company.




                                                    Agenda 12-129
The current budget includes $125,000 for sewer lining in fiscal year ending April 30, 2013 and $250,000 per
year for the following four years, all from the Infrastructure Replacement Fund. We propose that these monies
be reallocated to initiate the program in this fiscal year. The source of funding in subsequent years would be
discussed as part of the annual budget process.
The Director of Public Works and Engineering recommends that the Mayor and Board of Trustees accept the
RedZone Robotics Professional Services Proposal in the amount of $573,637.15 and authorize the Mayor to
sign the contract.




                                                 Agenda 12-129
RedZone Y.E.S. Your Entire System Contract




September 18, 2012

Ms. Barbara Little
Public Works DirectorNillage Engineer
The Village of Deerfield
465 Elm Street
Deerfield, IL 60015


RE:      Unsolicited professional services proposal for RedZone YES Your Entire System Program
         Special Case Study Client Offer

Dear Barbara:

Based on our discussions we are pleased to extend this offer for RedZone's unique 'Y.E.S. Your
Entire System' program with our special 'Case Study Client' promotional terms and conditions to
the Village of Deerfield, IL ("Client" or "Subscriber").

The Case Study Client program is a limited quantity offering that is well-suited when the YES
Program compliments key village-wide initiatives and when the leadership team is willing to
invest a modest amount of time to set performance baselines and monitor progress/measure
benefits over the term of the agreement.

The notable components & benefits of the Case Study Client program are as follows:
• Five (5) year term vs. standard three (3) year terms
• At-risk payment program with zero (0%) financing rate
• Allowance for field computer and video storage
• Concessions totaling $82,970 as outlined herein

In exchange for the special term & conditions as a Case Study Client, RedZone is requesting:
1. Commitment to a baseline setting workshop to establish performance benchmarks
2. Commitment to regular interval performance results review vs. initial benchmarks
3. Willingness to produce a mutually approved press release launching program
4 . Willingness to publish results in journal articles, white papers, etc.
5. Willingness to serve as a reference client.
6. Fully executed contract on or before December 21, 2012.

From our discussions, it is clear that you share many of the common challenges faced by
today's wastewater asset managers including the following:
   • Desire to set rates at proper levels
    • Avoiding surprises associated with unforeseen failures
   • Increasing demand for services & stringent regulatory requirements
   • Determining the optimal time and method for rehabilitation
   • Limited resources and funds

As we have discussed, the benefits of the Y.E.S . Your Entire System program include:
   • Establishing a centralized system of record, in a highly expedited manner, to document
      the system and its condition for today and for future managers.
   • Efficient and focused spending of capital and operations and maintenance dollars

RedZone Confidential
RedZone Y.E.S. Your Entire System Contract




      •   Easier meeting of service expectations and regulatory requirements. Avoid consent
          decree/orders
      •   Fact based rate setting based on sound operational planning

All of these challenges are compounded by a lack of facts pertaining to the current state of the
abundant, difficult to access collection system.

This proposal provides the most efficient and cost effective means to provide you with the
highest quality condition assessment and management tools and technologies to execute a
sustainable infrastructure management solution. RedZone will use advanced, autonomous data
collection technology to efficiently map and inspect the entire wastewater collection system.
This information will be paired with our ICOM3 software to manage the data in one centralized
location, and will include decision support tools to enable prioritization and planning. The
program will enable you to be proactive and make fact based decisions about how to best use
scarce financial and human resources.

A formal contract, executed by authorized individuals from both The Village and RedZone is
required prior to the commencement of any work related to This Proposal.

For more about RedZone, please visit our website at www.redzone.com

We thank you for considering our technology and services and welcome the opportunity to work
together.




Tim Graeb
Business Development Manager
RedZone Robotics, Inc.


Cc:       K. Wolf- RedZone




RedZone Confidential
                     ROSENTHAL, MURPHEY, COBLENTZ &                    DONAHUE
                                             LAW OFFICES

                                      30 NORTH LA SALLE STREET

                                              SUITE 1624

                                       CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602
PETER D. COBLENTZ                            (312) 541-1070
JOHN F. DONAHUE                            FAX (312) 541-9191
JUDITH N . KOLMAN

JOHN B. MURPHEY

JOY   A. ROBERTS                                                                    WRITER'S DIRECT LINE
                                         December 12, 2012
PETER M. ROSENTHAL
(1950-2010)
                                                                                        (312) 541-1073

YANCEY L . PINKSTON, JR.




Kent S. Street
Village Manager
Village of Deerfield
850 Waukegan Road
Deerfield, IL 60015-3206

          Re:      Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act

Dear Kent:

        As you are aware, Illinois House Bill 30 is nearing final approval in the Illinois General
Assembly. If adopted, HB 30 will authorize nonprofit medical cannabis organizations that are
registered with the Illinois Department of Public Health ("DPH") to cultivate, package, distribute
and sell medical cannabis from a registered location. There are many legal ramifications from
permitting the cultivation, sale and use of medical cannabis, but this letter will primarily address the
land use considerations raised by HB 30.

        Only one medical cannabis organization may be authorized to operate in each Illinois State
Senate District (as the Senate Districts were drawn on January 1, 2011). Consequently, it is quite
possible that there will never be a facility located within Deerfield. Secondly, DPH is required to
deny registration to a medical cannabis organization that is not in compliance with local zoning rules
established in accordance with Section 80 of HB 30. Section 80 would allow units of local
government to enact "reasonable" zoning ordinances or resolutions, not in conflict with this Act or
with department rules, regulating registered nonprofit medical cannabis organizations. However,
HB 30 would also preempt home rule power to regulate medical cannabis organizations except as
provided in HB 30.

        I have spoken with JeffRyckaert and with Chief John Sliozis about this legislation, and the
Village's zoning requirements. Right now there is no provision in the Deerfield zoning ordinance
allowing for the location of a medical cannabis organization in any of the Village's zoning districts.
That will probably need to be addressed at some time. As the ordinance currently stands, if a
medical cannabis organization were to submit an application to locate within the Village, the Village
would require them to submit a text amendment application to authorize such a use, together with
a likely special use application (if that was what the text amendment were to require). Another
                  ROSENTHAL, MURPHEY, COBLENTZ & DONAHUE
                                            LAW OFFICES




KentS. Street
Re: Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act
December 12, 2012
Page 2

option for the Village would be to initiate a proceeding to amend the zoning ordinance to specifically
permit a medical cannabis organization in one or more of the Village's non-residential zoning
districts.

         As currently written, HB 30 would allow a medical cannabis organization to cultivate,
process and sell medical cannabis from a single address. HB 30 would also authorize DPH to grant
a variance to this single address requirement that would allow a medical cannabis organization to
utilize a separate location where cannabis would be cultivated, harvested, packaged, labeled and
prepared for distribution. Any zoning regulation should accommodate the location of a single
facility for cannabis cultivation, processing and sale, and could also accommodate separate facilities
where a medical cannabis organization would cultivate and process medical cannabis, with sale
occurring at a separate sales facility. However, the Village will not be able to mandate that these
functions be separated under HB 30.

        HB 30 would prohibit medical cannabis organizations from being located within 2,500 feet
of the property line of any preexisting public or private pre-school, elementary school, secondary
school, day care center, day care home, group day care home or part day child care facility. It would
also prohibit any medical cannabis organization from being located in a house, apartment,
condominium or other residential dwelling. All cultivation of cannabis must take place in an
enclosed, locked location at the physical address or addresses provided to DPH during the
registration process. Cultivation locations can only be accessed by agents working for the medical
cannabis organization, DPH inspection staff, law enforcement personnel, emergency personnel and
contractors working on jobs related to the facility. A medical cannabis organization can only market
cannabis that is cultivated in Illinois.

        There is much more in the Act concerning criminal laws, employment relationships and
patient-physician relationships, etc.




PDC:kew
cc: Chief John J. Sliozis

				
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