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2011-2012 Catalog _pdf_ - Pacifica Graduate Institute

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          PACIFICA
           G R A D U A T E         I N S T I T U T E




    M . A . & P H . D . P R O G R A M S I N P S YC H O L O G Y,
T H E H U M A N I T I E S , A N D M Y T H O LO G I C A L ST U D I E S



            TABLE OF CONTENTS | KEYWORD SEARCH
                            TABLE OF CONTENTS | KEYWORD SEARCH




PACIFICA
G R A D U A T E   I N S T I T U T E
                                                                      TABLE OF CONTENTS | KEYWORD SEARCH



  PACIFICA GRADUATE INSTITUTE is an accredited graduate school offering master’ s
  and doctoral programs framed in the tradition of depth psychology . The Institute respects cultural
                                                                                       .
  diversity and individual differences, and encourages a spirit of free and open inquiryStudents access
  a wide array of academic resources on Pacifica’s two campuses, nestled between the Pacific Ocean
  and the coastal California mountains a few miles south of Santa Barbara. www.pacifica.edu

  2011–2012 GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
  Pacifica’s Unique Approach ........................... 2–3     M.A./Ph.D. in Depth Psychology ............... 50-73
  The Tradition of Depth Psychology ............... 4–5          M.A. in Engaged Humanities
                                                                 and the Creative Life ............................... 74–79
  An Engaging and Supportive Environment..... 6–7
                                                                 M.A./Ph.D. in Mythological Studies .......... 80-85
  Selected Faculty Profiles .............................. 8–9
                                                                 M.A. in Leadership and Organizational
  Degree Program Overviews ...................... 10–15
                                                                 Psychology.................................................. 86-88
  Pacifica’s History and Campuses .............. 16-21
                                                                 Administration and Faculty ....................... 90–95
  The Graduate Research Library ...................... 22
                                                                 Admission Requirements
  OPUS Archives and Research Center ............. 23             and Procedures ........................................ 96–97
  Public Programs and Conferences .................. 24          2011-2012 Tuition and Fees ........................... 98
  Academic Formats and Schedules ............ 26-27              Financial Aid ............................................99–102
  Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology ....................... 28-37     Administrative Information .................... 102-103
  M.A. in Counseling Psychology ................. 38-43          Applying to Pacifica ...................................... 104
  Ph.D. in Depth Psychology                                      0ne-Day Introductions to Pacifica ................ 105
  with Emphasis in Psychotherapy ............... 44-49




FOR THE SAKE OF TENDING THE SOUL OF TH E WORLD
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         The residential
         sessions are great,
         kind of like a little
         retreat. You get
away from your own hectic
life. This is a calming and
wonderful place to think
about things.”
         —PACIFICA STUDENT




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       Pacifica Students Take Advantage of a
       Unique Approach to Graduate Studies
               THE COHORT SYSTEM                                   to Pacifica’s Ladera Lane campus each quarter for a four -day
                                                                   residential session. The work is ongoing and academically
When students begin their studies at Pacifi ca Graduate Insti-
                                                                   rigorous, yet fl exible enough to allow students to participate
tute, they join a cohort of like-minded students who are also
                                                                   in the program in a way that suits their personal schedules.
enrolling in that particular degree program. The majority of
                                                                   In the online format, community forms quickly, as all students
students remain with the same cohort throughout their aca-
                                                                   contribute their voices, engaging in inquiry and discussion.
demic journey. A very real sense of community is soon estab-
                                                                   That bond is strengthened when students gather on campus in
lished as students collaborate within their cohorts and share
                                                                   residential sessions, meeting in person with faculty, staff, and
the intense experiences that are part of graduate-level work
                                                                   student services representatives. These intensive on-campus
at Pacifica. Close personal and professional bonds are formed,
                                                                   sessions include classroom presentations, guest speakers, ex-
often lasting long after studies are completed and extending
                                                                   periential activities, social interaction, and give students the
into graduates’ new careers.
                                                                   opportunity to make hands-on use of Pacifica’s research librar-
                                                                   ies and archives, while relaxing in the retreat-like setting of
                                                                   the Ladera Lane campus.
      The cohort system is very interesting because
      our classes are full of so many diverse ages,                     INTERDISCIPLINARY COURSEWORK
      walks of life, and cultural and geographical                 One of Pacifi ca’s core beliefs is that human experience is
backgrounds. It is fascinating because we are taught               diverse and multi-faceted. Consequently , the Institute has
as much by our fellow students, as by our professors.”             worked to ensure that its degree programs are interdisciplin-
                               — PACIFICA STUDENT                  ary both in orientation and in practice. In Pacifi ca’s academic
                                                                   environment the study of literature, religion, art, and mythol-
                                                                   ogy enhance the study of the science of psychology . In much
        MONTHLY LEARNING SESSIONS                                  the same way, scholarship in mythological studies and the hu-
Pacifica has developed educational formats that are particularly    manities is enlivened by the development of an understanding
well suited to individuals who wish to pursue graduate educa-      and appreciation of the tradition of depth psychology and the
tion while continuing their existing professional and personal     recurring archetypal motifs that move through the human heart
commitments. In most of the degree programs, students join         and soul.
their classmates once a month for three or four -day learning           DEGREES WITH A WIDE VARIETY
sessions on campus. Between sessions, they continue course-               OF CAREER APPLICATIONS
work through reading, research, and practicum experiences in
                                                                   Students enroll at Pacifi ca Graduate Institute with many
                                ,
their home settings. In this way students participate in classes
                                                                   different goals in mind. Some come to develop individual
and interact with professors as they would in a traditional de-
                                                                   research goals or to obtain clinical training from a depth
gree program. This format makes it possible for students from
                                                                   psychological perspective. Others want to enhance an exist-
throughout the country and around the world to participate in
                                                                   ing vocation, prepare for a career change, or become part
Pacifica’s graduate degree programs. See pages 26 and 27 for
                                                                   of a learning community . They all share the desire to earn
an overview of the specific academic formats and schedules.
                                                                   graduate degrees from an institution of academic excel-
BLENDED ONLINE/ RESIDENTIAL FORMATS                                lence. Pacifica graduates have brought the visions of depth
                                                                   psychology, the humanities, and mythological studies to bear
Students in the blended online/residential degree programs
                                                                   on such diverse disciplines as psychotherapy, business, edu-
utilize online-learning technology to work primarily from their
                                                                   cation, medicine, architecture, the performing arts, politics,
home environments, viewing presentations, taking part in
                                                                   journalism, cinematography, and environmental studies.
interactive discussions with classmates and faculty, and com-
pleting regular written assignments. Additionally , they travel


Pacifica Graduate Institute is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC).

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    What Is
Depth Psychology?
The modern field of depth psychology originated
in the work of Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud, who
called attention to the importance of what lies
“below the surface” of conscious awareness.
This dimension of psychic reality is revealed in
many ways…in the literature and expressive
arts of a culture, in dreams, and in the symptoms
of both individuals and communities.




The resulting concepts of depth psychology
are at the core of Pacifi ca’s orientation. These
ideas—such as the importance of symbol and
metaphor in personal and cultural imagery or the
recognition of the dynamic interplay between the
natural world and the human psyche—are artic-
ulated in all of the Institute’s programs. Pacifi ca
has a distinct sense of purpose in sustaining and                     What is it,
developing this rich body of knowledge about the       then that inexorably tips
intricacies of human imagination.                      the scales in favor of the
Pacifica works to extend psychology , mytho-            extraordinary? It is what is
logical studies, and the humanities beyond the         commonly called vocation:
personal and beyond the consulting room or the         an irrational factor that
classroom. We see psychological life as an evo-        destines a person to
lutionary development within nature, alive in all      emancipate himself from
the phenomena and systems of our world, and            the herd and from its
feel that academic pursuits can no longer remain       well-worn paths.”
isolated. Rather, psychology, the humanities, and
mythological studies must be open to multicul-                   — C.G. JUNG
tural voices and bring their insights to bear on
the challenges of the age.

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 Pacifica Builds on a Long and Rich Tradition
 Pacifica Graduate Institute traces many of its central ideas to the heritage of ancient storytellers, dramatists, and phi-
 losophers from all walks of life who recorded the workings of the imagination. Their legacies have evolved in multiple
 contexts and perspectives, including the explorations of the unconscious by the scholars and theorists who came after
 them. We are proud to continue and expand upon their work.
 THE MISSION OF PACIFICA GRADUATE INSTITUTE is to foster creative learning and research in the fields of
 psychology and mythological studies, framed in the traditions of depth psychology. The Institute seeks to create an
 educational environment which nourishes respect for cultural diversity and individual differences, and an academic
 community which fosters a spirit of free and openinquiry consistent with recognized values of academic freedom.




                                                                          When you follow your bliss, and by
                                                                          bliss I mean the deep sense of being
                                                                          in it and doing what the push is out of
                                                       your own existence…doors will open where you would
                                                       not have thought there were going to be doors.”
                                                                                             —JOSEPH CAMPBELL
                                                        The renowned mythologist, writer , and lecturer—Joseph
                                                        Campbell—was an early supporter and respected elder at
                                                        Pacifica. In the school’s formative years he was a frequent guest
                                                        lecturer. His ground-breaking work and insights inform Pacifica’s
                                                        degree programs to this day , and his generosity helped make
                                                                                  s
the growth of the Institute possible. After his death in 1987, Joseph Campbell’ personal papers and collections were
placed at Pacifi ca to be preserved and made available to scholars. That was the origin of the OPUS Archives and
Research Center, a non-profit organization on the campuses of Pacifica Graduate Institute (see page 23).




             Many students come to Pacifica in
             search of a community of colleagues
and a challenging academic curriculum that values
the animating presence of the deep psyche. At its
core, Pacifica is firmly rooted in its vision: animae
mundi colendae gratia (for the sake of tending the
soul of the world). Each student enters graduate
work carrying within his or her own dreams the
seed impulse that, when cultivated, opens to per-
sonal fulfillment and contributes back to the depth
psychological tradition. Working in these fields, students develop their innate talents of critical think-
ing, curiosity, intuition, and aesthetic sensitivity. At Pacifica, the intelligence inherent to the images
of the soul is listened to with care and regard.”
                                  — STEPHEN AIZENSTAT, PH.D. Founding President of Pacifica Graduate Institute


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          Pacifica’s value and place as a community of thinkers and scholars
          depends upon the presence of a variety of perspectives. Creativity
and generativity of ideas arises from the way in which our Institute nurtures
diversity in people, sensibilities, and opinions. Our collective orientation in-
vites us to connect to a larger community, and as a group of people we have
agreed to tend to the soul of and in the world. Concurrently, we have allowed
ourselves the freedom to question what may have silenced the voices of
underrepresented groups. Toward the end of inclusion and free discourse,
Pacifica welcomes that which and those who cultivate peace, freedom, and
tolerance.”
                       — ALEX MIRANDA, PH.D. Chief Administrative Officer
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            I feel that I’ve found a home here,
            with a faculty who are guiding me,
            and helping me to make a real
      contribution to humanity.”
                            —PACIFICA STUDENT




  An Engaging and
Supportive Academic
   Environment
The Pacifica Community is made up of individuals with a
wide variety of life experiences and geographic, ethnic,
and cultural backgrounds. Although depth psychology
developed as an academic discipline within the context
of late 19th and early 20th century Europe, its insights
and wisdom also draw on and resonate with indigenous
psychologies and spiritualities from all corners of the
globe. Pacifica is enlivened by students from across
the United States, Canada, Central and South America,
Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia. They bring the rich-
ness of varied ethnicities, religious and spiritual paths,
racial identities, age, gender, and personal experiences.
This diversity is central to the hosting of the multiple
perspectives that Pacifica strives to foster in the class-
room. The Institute encourages an environment that is
culturally sensitive, values racial and ethnic unique-
ness, and affirms individual lifestyles. The appreciation
of a multiplicity of voices is central to the depth psycho-
logical tradition.


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The members of Pacifica’s faculty                         Distinguished Scholars,
bring a passion for education and a
wealth of real world experience into                     Original Thinkers,
the classroom.

As leaders in the fields of depth psychology,
                                                         Leaders in Their Fields
the humanities, and mythological studies,                                         EDWARD CASEY, PH.D.

they include authors of international acclaim,                                     Core faculty member in Pacifica’s
                                                                                   Depth Psychology Program. Ed is the
renowned lecturers, practicing psychologists,
                                                                                   current President of the American
active psychotherapists, nurses, theologians,
                                                                                   Philosophical Association, Eastern
and philosophers. They share a devotion to                                         Division and serves as Distinguished
education and a dedication to working with                                         Professor of Philosophy at State
adult learners.                                                                    University of New York, Stony Brook.
                                                         His writings range from in-depth studies of imagination and
At Pacifica, students are able to develop close           memory to essays on spirit and soul.
relationships with their instructors. The com-
mitment of these talented educators is appar-
                                                                                  NURIA CIOFALO, PH.D.
ent in the time they spend with each student.
                                                                                   Associate Chair in the Community
More than simply guiding students through the                                      Psychology, Liberation Psychology,
curriculum, they share experiences that make                                       and Ecopsychology specialization.
a difference in the lives of those they teach.                                     Nuria has worked in a wide variety
                                                                                   of community-based projects in the
                                                                                   U.S. and Mexico, training others to
                                                                                   do participatory action research. Her
                                                         philanthropic work deals with youth involvement in community
                                                         research and action, community empowerment, program
                                                         evaluation, and the application of depth psychological methods
                                                         in community building and development.




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Distinguished Scholars,                                               These are Some of the Talented
Original Thinkers,                                                    Professors You Can Expect to Meet
                                                                      at Pacifica Graduate Institute
Leaders in Their Fields
                          CHRISTINE DOWNING, PH.D.                                        CAROL PEARSON, PH.D.
                          Core faculty member in the                                      Executive Vice President and
                          Mythological Studies Program.                                   Provost of Pacifica Graduate
                          Christine was the first woman                                    Institute. Carol is an internationally
                          president of the American                                       recognized scholar and a leader in
                          Academy of Religion, and is an                                  the application of Depth Psychology
                          internationally acclaimed scholar                               concepts to human, leadership and
                          in feminist studies, religious                                  organizational development. Her
thought, depth psychology, and classical mythology. Her         best-known books—The Hero Within and Awakening the
book, The Goddess: Mythological Images of the Feminine,         Heroes Within—have been widely translated. Others, such
was a ground-breaking fusion of academic scholarship with       as Mapping the Organizational Psyche and The Hero and the
personal reflection, and one of the first explorations of the     Outlaw, have been instrumental in furthering soul-friendly
relevance of Greek mythology to the self-understanding of       workplace environments, as have her innovative companion
contemporary women. She is the author of 13 other books,        pieces, which identify archetypes active in individuals and
and has taught at Pacifica since 1987.                           organizational cultures.

                          DENNIS SLATTERY, PH.D.                                          ROBERT ROMANYSHYN, PH.D.
                            Core faculty member in the                                     Core faculty member in the Clinical
                            Mythological Studies Program.                                  Psychology Programs. Robert was
                            A teacher for over 40 years as                                 one of the first non-analysts elected
                            well as a prolific writer and                                   to the Inter-Regional Society of
                            poet, Dennis has developed a                                   Jungian Analysts for scholarly
                            program in which participants use                              contributions to Jungian studies. He
                            writing and drawing to uncover                                 has authored six books, contributed
the characteristics of their personal myth. He has recently     chapters to 25 more, and been published in dozens of
adapted this program in order to work with black male youth     professional journals. His writings have been recognized
through Alchemy, Inc., a non-profit organization in Ohio         internationally for the ways in which they explore research,
dedicated to helping teens stay on the path to college.         psychotherapy and cultural-historical issues.

                          MARY WATKINS, PH.D.
                                                                                          AVEDIS PANAJIAN, PH.D.
                            Co-founder of the Depth
                                                                                            Core faculty member in the
                            Psychology Program and its
                                                                                            Clinical Psychology Program.
                            degree specialization
                                                                                            Avedis was named a Distinguished
                            in community psychology,
                                                                                            Educator by the California State
                            liberation psychology, and
                                                                                            Psychological Association. He
                            ecopsychology. Mary has
                                                                                            served as Examiner for the Board of
                            participated in human rights
                                                                                            Psychology for 10 years, and was
delegations to the U.S./Mexico border, and has brought
                                                                Chair of the Ethics Committee for the Psychoanalytic Center
attention to the borders within her home community. She
                                                                of California. He is a Training and Supervising Psychoanalyst
was a member of a participatory research team at PUEBLO,
                                                                for three major Institutes in Los Angeles and is frequently
a local Latino rights grass roots organization, that created
                                                                lectures to professionals across the United States. Avedis
a book for community education from testimonios of
                                                                was also one of the founders of the Los Angeles Free Clinic.
immigrants without documents in Santa Barbara.
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                     I came to Pacifica because of the faculty—I’m so impressed by them. There
                     are people here who are doing some really original thinking. As a student,
                     I feel very supported, and I also feel that I’m being given the opportunity to
                     develop my own voice.”
                                                                             — PACIFICA       STUDENT




    Ph.D. Program in Clinical Psychology
                       WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY
                      See Pages 28-37 for Curriculum & Course Descriptions

The Ph.D. Clinical Psychology Program prepares students for the independent general
practice of professional clinical psychology in the 21st century.

A unique emphasis of this program is a commitment to honoring the full complexity of psychological
life in society. Toward this end, the program provides advanced training in depth psychological and
human science traditions. Guided by a scholar -practitioner model, the program provides foundational
education in clinical psychology in order to prepare students to become skilled professional psycholo-
gists. The program integrates theory, practice, cultural competency, and ethics. The curriculum offers
a broad range of perspectives in psychopathology , assessment, intervention, and research. Pacifi ca
provides the unique opportunity for the developing clinical psychologist to study unconscious processes
in clinical practice.



STUDENTS IN THE DOCTORAL PROGRAM IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY:
•   Obtain a foundational education in clinical psychology in preparation for licensure and
    independent practice
•   Obtain specialized training in depth psychological and human science traditions, as well as
    interdisciplinary studies in mythology, religion, and literature
•   Acquire understanding of the importance of evidence-based, best practices in clinical psychology
    through a cutting-edge curriculum that contains the most recent developments in psychopathology,
    assessment, clinical intervention, and research
•   Participate in extended instruction beyond the four-day learning sessions through; continuing inter-
    action and mentorship from faculty advisors, student cohort support groups, supervision of licensed
    clinical psychologists in training sites, electronic access to the Pacifica Graduate Research Library,
    and support from research coordinators
•   Learn research skills in quantitative and qualitative methodologies in order to develop and com-
    plete a dissertation that provides an original contribution to professional psychology—with the
    goal of the continuation of research activities in clinical practice after graduation
•   Experience strong clinical training through practicum and internship settings coordinated by a
    full-time director of clinical training
•   Acquire the accredited doctoral training necessary for licensure as a clinical psychologist in the
    State of California (requirements for other states, provinces, and countries may vary.)



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                M.A. Program in
              Counseling Psychology
              WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY
             See Pages 38-43 for Curriculum & Course Descriptions

The M.A. Counseling Psychology Program with Emphasis in Depth
Psychology is dedicated to offering students unique and comprehensive
training in the art of marriage, family, and individual psychotherapy.

The depth psychology emphasis invites a curiosity about the psyche and respect for
the full range of human experience. Interdisciplinary courses in literature, mythology ,
religion, and culture deepen students’ ability to link archetypal themes to socio-
political issues in the lives of individuals, families, and communities. As preparation
for professional licensure, theoretical understanding is integrated with experiential
training in clinical skills. Research studies prepare students to explore and contribute
to the legacy of scholarship within the depth psycho    logical tradition to further Pacifica’s
mission of tending the soul of the world.




STUDENTS IN THE M.A. PROGRAM IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY:

•   Integrate marriage and family counseling training, and theory and praxis courses,
    with depth psychology traditions and the humanities
•   Recognize pertinent relationships between counseling psychology and interdisci-
    plinary cultural studies including mythology, religion, and literature
•   Acquire an appreciation of the inherent multicultural dimensions in counseling and
    depth psychology
•   Receive individualized attention in small interactive class sessions integrating
    lecture and experiential discussions and exercises
•   Develop competence in research, the scholarly preparation of papers, and the
    writing of a master’s thesis
•   Gain the foundational theory and training skills in counseling psychology
    necessary to sit for California’s Marriage and Family Therapy licensure after
    completing the appropriate supervised experience (Requirements for other states,
    provinces, and countries may vary.)



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                Once I discovered the Depth Psychology Program, I was very happy
                to realize that there was actually an educational program that spoke
                so directly to me.”
                                                                       —PACIFICA STUDENT




             Ph.D. Program in
             Depth Psychology
        WITH EMPHASIS IN PSYCHOTHERAPY
     See Pages 44-49 for Curriculum & Course Descriptions

The Ph.D. Program in Depth Psychology with Emphasis
in Psychotherapy has been designed for practicing ther-
apists, social workers, mental health professionals, and
others in the field who wish to pursue doctoral studies
with an intensive focus on Depth Psychotherapy.

This is a specialized training program based on applied clinical skills,
innovative approaches to research, and depth psychological teachings.
The goal is to develop and articulate practices and contemporary
applications of psychotherapy as informed by the traditions of Depth
Psychology.


THE PH.D. PROGRAM IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY
WITH EMPHASIS IN PSYCHOTHERAPY FEATURES:

•    An approach to psychotherapy from a depth perspective which
     emphasizes work with the unconscious and the imagination
•    The weaving together of theory from Jungian, psychoanalytic,
     and archetypal traditions along with cultural phenomena
     including myth, literature, religion, and philosophy
•    A curriculum designed for therapists practicing at the master’s
     level, and who seek to enrich and deepen their therapeutic
     practices in the context of a doctoral program
•    A thorough grounding in the theory and traditions of depth
     psychology
•    An understanding of psychotherapy as informed by the study of
     the humanities and an interdisciplinary curriculum
•    An integrated praxis, involving both research and casework




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                          M.A./Ph.D. Program
                          in Depth Psychology
             See Pages 50-73 for Curriculum Overviews and Course Descriptions

Now in its fifteenth year, the M.A./Ph.D. Program in Depth Psychology is creating
a 21st century depth psychology whose practice extends beyond the consulting
room to engage the personal, community, cultural, and ecological issues of our time.
The curriculum grounds students in the Jungian, psychoanalytic, archetypal, and phenomenological
lineages of depth psychology, while exploring contemporary innovations in depth psychological theory
and practice. The interface between psyche, body , culture, and nature is highlighted, as students and
faculty seek to understand the interdependent relations between somatic, psychological, community ,
cultural, and environmental well-being.
All students in the program share a common course of study across the breadth of depth psychological
theory, as well as learn depth psychological approaches to research. Unconscious and symbolic
dimensions of existence are experientially explored through imaginal, somatic, and dialogical
practices.
In addition to foundational coursework, students have a choice of three areas of specialization, each
offering a distinctive direction to the overall project of deepening depth psychology’ s contribution to
our time:
•   Emphasis in Jungian and Archetypal Studies— A Blended Online/Low-Residency Program
•   Combined Emphasis in Community Psychology, Liberation Psychology, and Ecopsychology
•   Emphasis in Somatic Studies
This program is profoundly interdisciplinary, following C. G. Jung’s belief that “Psychology, of its very
nature, is the intermediary between the disciplines, for the psyche is the mother of all the sciences and
arts. Anyone who wishes to paint her portrait must mingle many colours on his palette.”



STUDENTS IN THE M.A./PH.D. PROGRAM IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY:

•   Develop the capacity to teach depth psychological insights and practices in a wide array of
    educational venues
•   Apply insights gained to a variety of professions and leadership positions
•   Study the origins and development of depth psychology in historical and cultural context
•   Learn to deeply explore and contribute to areas of interest through research,
    scholarship, and publication
•   Strengthen written expression in scholarly and creative writing
•   Learn to listen deeply to self and others through transformative inquiry
•   Receive mentorship for their particular vocational interests and commitments




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      M.A. Program in Engaged
    Humanities and the Creative Life
                 WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY
                See Pages 74-79 for Curriculum & Course Descriptions

Pacifica’s M.A. Program in Engaged Humanities and the Creative Life
has been designed for individuals in the visual, performing, narrative, stu-
dio, and media arts; the creative side of advertising, marketing, and product devel-
opment; teachers of art, literature, and the humanities;          professionals in creative
fields such as architecture, interior design, fashion, fi        lm, television, and music;
and all those who want to live and work more creatively, or foster creativity in others.
At Pacifica Graduate Institute, we believe the wisdom traditions of the humanities and
depth psychology influence the arts and new media, and this influence and confluence help
inform and enrich the creative life. In keeping with Pacifica’s mission to tend soul in and of
the world, this program suggests there is no fundamental difference between engaging in
art-making and in soul-making. The world itself has a creative life, manifested in the arche-
types of the collective unconscious, whose symbols, images, metaphors, and movements
are all the prima materia for the creative movement of humanity.

A BLENDED ONLINE, LOW-RESIDENCY PROGRAM
This degree program takes advantage of online technology that allows students to work and
learn in their home environments. Additionally, once each quarter, students gather on the Paci-
fica campus for a four-day weekend in residence. During these on-campus sessions, students
have access to the Institute’s extensive resources and are able to collaborate with classmates
and faculty from around the world. This convenient format brings the program to global citi-
zens and life-long learners who otherwise might not be able to fulfill their educational calling.



STUDENTS IN THE ENGAGED HUMANITIES AND THE CREATIVE LIFE PROGRAM :
•    Discover strategies for tapping the deep well of the collective unconscious as a source
     of creativity, including the study of imagery, symbolism, and the archetypal patterns and
     stories that underpin our everyday lives
•    Study how people working in any creative capacity inspire and influence each other, and
     experience that same inspiration and influence within their cohort
•    Increase their generativity and cultivate their aesthetic sensibility and sensitivity by being
     in constant conversation about the creative life with faculty and peers, with great literature,
     classic films, and works of art spanning diverse genres, cultures, and periods of time
•    Find rich sources of inspiration in the study of mythology, philosophy, psychology, history,
     literature, and ecology
•    Participate and collaborate with a community of creative individuals from across a wide
     variety of artistic disciplines, educational backgrounds, and life experiences

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The roots that I am able to set down in mythology, literature, psychology, sociology, and
history are invaluable. Coming from a math and science background, I now have a broader
understanding of the people I supervise and the other disciplines that were not my specialty.”
                                                                        — PACIFICA       STUDENT




                                     M.A./Ph.D. Program
                                   in Mythological Studies
                                   WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY
                                  See Pages 80-85 for Curriculum & Course Descriptions

                       The M.A./Ph.D. Program in Mythological Studies is a humanities pro-
                       gram that offers students a strong grounding in a wide variety of
                       mythic narratives and religious traditions.
                       It emphasizes theoretical approaches to myth and a foundation in the hermeneutical
                       perspectives of depth psychology. The interdisciplinary study of belief systems, ritu-
                       als, images, symbolic and mythopoetic meanings illuminates the dynamics working
                       through culture. Fostering the confl uence of scholarship and imagination, the pro-
                       gram invites students into the art of writing. The Master of Arts degree is awarded
                       after the fi rst two years and successful passage of a comprehensive examination.
                       The program continues with a third year of classes including a series of research
                       courses and development of an acceptable concept paper for the disser tation. The
                       fourth and fifth years of study focus on dissertation writing and research.



                        THE M.A./PH.D. PROGRAM IN MYTHOLOGICAL STUDIES OFFERS:

                        •   The distinction of being the only interdisciplinary doctoral degree program in the
                            country devoted to the study of mythology
                        •   A unique emphasis on understanding how the stories of the past are understood
                            in the modern and postmodern world—recognizing the mythic aspects of
                            contemporary culture
                        •   The close study of C.G. Jung, Sigmund Freud, James Hillman, and other depth
                            psychologists, through which the program seeks to understand the relevance of
                            the mythic to our lives and culture at present—instead of seeing myth solely as a
                            treasure of indigenous others or a glory of the Western past
                        •   Interdisciplinary studies drawing not only on the tradition of depth psychology
                            but also on such fields as religious studies, literature, communications, folklore,
                            anthropology, and art history
                        •   A grounding in one’s personal mythology as well as the tradition of mythic ex-
                            pression that sharpens vision, assisting the student in oral and written articula-
                            tion of the deep layers of both personal and collective consciousness
                        •   Classical, multicultural, and interdisciplinary curricula that are relevant
                            to virtually every vocation. A variety of applications include education,
                            psychotherapy, business, human services, and the arts, as well as religious,
                            political, corporate, community, and environmental leadership

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   The Story of an Educational
   Institution with a Unique Vision
  Pacifica Graduate Institute’s motto—Animae Mundi Colen-              After his death, Campbell’s estate chose Pacifica to house
  dae Gratia, (for the sake of tending soul in and of the world)—     his 3,000-volume library and personal papers. The Joseph
  sets the tone for this unique school. It speaks to Pacifi    ca’s    Campbell Library was established on campus, making his
  insightful approach to the study and the practice of psychology,    collected books, manuscripts, and handwritten notes avail-
  and to the caring restoration of the Institute’ s two campuses      able to students and scholars. Additional collections were
  which are located between the Pacifi c Ocean and the coastal         added to house and preserve the work of James Hillman,
  mountains just south of Santa Barbara, California.                  Marija Gimbutas, Marion Woodman, Jane Hollister Wheel-
  From its beginnings under the guidance of founding President        wright, Joseph Wheelwright, and Christine         Downing.
  Stephen Aizenstat, Pacifi ca has placed a strong emphasis on         These collections are overseen by a non-profit organization
  depth psychology. Based on the work of Carl Jung and Sigmund        dedicated to continuing this important work—the OPUS
  Freud, depth psychology calls attention to the importance of        Archives and Research Center on the campuses of Pacifica
  what lies below the surface of conscious awareness. The im-         Graduate Institute, (see page 23).
  portance of symbol and metaphor in personal and cultural im-        In 1989, Pacifica acquired and renovated the first of its cam-
  agery, and the recognition of the dynamic interplay between         puses, the former estate of early 20th Century philanthropist
  the natural world and the human psyche, remain at the core of       Max Fleischmann. The 13-acre Lambert Road Campus sits
  Pacifica’s mission as an educational institution.                    on a verdant coastal plain less than a mile from the beach.
  Pacifica traces its roots to a counseling skills certifi program
                                                       cate           It is a quiet, protected, and beautiful spot…an ideal haven
  established during the cultural upheaval of the early 1970s,        for academic pursuits. Long before it was fashionable, Pa-
  when new ideas about society, education, and the individual         cifica’s Lambert Road Campus emphasized environmental
  questioned the established paradigm. The school’s progressive       sustainability. Plantings and structures blend with the en-
  approach put it at the vanguard of psychology. This attracted the   vironment. Gardens and pathways invite birds, insects, and
  attention of Joseph Campbell, the world-renowned scholar, au-       other animals to make their homes in these places. Existing
  thor, and mythologist. He offered guidance and was a frequent       orchards were converted to organic gardens that now pro-
  speaker in the school’s public conference series.                   duce fresh fruits, herbs, and vegetables.
                                                                      Offering a unique and challenging academic environment
                                                                      in a beautiful and contemplative setting, Pacifi ca’s popu-
          Modern culture often prioritizes efficiency over            larity and standing continued to grow . In 1997, the Insti-
          aesthetics. Government policies often dissuade              tute received accreditation from the W estern Association
graduate schools from investing in campus grounds                     of Schools and Colleges (WASC).
and landscapes. Pacifica continues to offer and value
                                                                      By the late 1990s Pacifi ca was running out of space on
a ‘green’ campus environment, with the beauty of its
                                                                      its Lambert Road Campus, and the search for a second
gardens, the sustainability of its organic orchards, and              campus began. Some of the degree programs moved tem-
animal-friendly plantings. The soul of place feeds the                porarily to leased facilities at a nearby retreat center. In
soul of being…and learning.”                                          2005, Pacifica purchased that 35-acre retreat center site
                       —STEPHEN AIZENSTAT, PH.D.



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                                                                    Pacifica’s Ladera Lane and
                                                                     Lambert Road Campuses




                                                                       Ladera Lane Campus




                                                                                         Pacifica’s Ladera
                                                                                          Lane Campus



                                                                     Santa Barbara
                                                                     8 Miles
                                                                                           Pacifica’s Lambert
                                                                                             Road Campus
                                                                                                                  Los Angeles
                                                                                                                      90 Miles

                                                                         ONE MILE


and became a two-campus educational institution. Located in
the coastal foothills near the Lambert Road Campus, the Ladera
Lane Campus gave Pacifi ca room to grow. It is another beauti-
ful academic setting with classrooms and administrative offi ces,
residence halls, dining facilities, and sweeping views of the
Santa Barbara coastline. Both campuses have libraries, book-
stores, and acres of open space.
Students come from all over the world to pursue graduate
degrees at Pacifi ca, either through three or four -day monthly
learning sessions, or in a blended distance-learning and low
residency format. More than 3,000 Pacifi ca alumni incorporate
                                                                         Lambert Road Campus
the vision of depth psychology into their lives and vocations.
The Institute’s Public Programs Department offers a full slate of
events featuring some of the top thinkers of our time, and help-
                                                                    Pacifica’s Ladera Lane and Lambert Road
ing to bring Pacifica’s vision to the world at large.
                                                                    Campuses are nestled in the coastal California
Above all, Pacifi ca offers a sense of community to those who        foothills between the Pacific Ocean and the Santa
seek a life that looks beyond daily concerns to consider soul       Ynez Mountains. Santa Barbara, with its myriad
and spirit. Students often say the most valuable part of their      cultural, recreational, and dining options is just ten
association with Pacifi ca is the sense that they have found a       minutes away. Los Angeles is a 90-minute drive to
place where their inner lives matter , where their chosen paths     the south. Both campuses are close to miles of
to self-knowledge are honored and encouraged.                       open beaches and beautiful backcountry hiking
                                                                    trails that offer magnificent vistas of the southern
ABOVE: Pacifica’s Founding President, Stephen Aizenstat, Ph.D.,
leads an orientation in 1995.
                                                                    Califormia coast.

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18   PA C I F I C A G R A D U AT E I N S T I T U T E
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           Pacifica’s Lambert
             Road Campus
The Lambert Road Campus was originally the site of a
private estate dating from the 1920s. As the campus devel-
oped with new buildings and facilities being added, special
efforts were made to enhance and maintain the property in
a manner appropriate to its history and geographic location.

The 13-acre campus is located less than a mile from the Pacifi c Ocean.
Blessed with great natural beauty , the property affords magnifi cent
views of the nearby Santa Ynez Mountains. In addition to classrooms
and lecture halls, Pacifica’s Lambert Road Campus houses faculty and ad-
ministrative offices, as well as branches of Pacifica’s Graduate Research
Library and the Pacifica Bookstore. An organic farm and gardens are also
located on the Lambert Road Campus grounds.




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                                                                Pacifica’s
                                                               Ladera Lane
                                                                 Campus
                                                         The Ladera Lane Campus is a 35-acre
                                                         educational and retreat center nestled
                                                         in the coastal foothills. It is a perfect
                                                         complement to the Lambert Road
                                                         Campus, which is located a few miles
                                                         away.

                                                         Facilities on the campus include an adminis-
                                                         tration center, 2,500-square-foot conference
                                                         center, classrooms, computer resource center ,
                                                         and branches of the Graduate Research Library
                                                         and Pacifica Bookstore. A separate residential
                                                         building offers retreat-style lodgings for stu-
                                                         dents. Fresh and healthful meals are served to
                                                         students, faculty, and staff in a large commu-
                                                         nal dining hall.
                                                         Spacious lawns throughout the property have
                                                         sweeping vistas of the Pacific Ocean, the Santa
                                                         Barbara Channel Islands, and the Santa Ynez
                                                         Mountains. Beautiful gardens afford spots for
                                                         quiet contemplation. Hiking trails lead off into
                                                         the wilderness. At night, deer and coyotes can
                                                         often be seen wandering across the grounds.


20   PA C I F I C A G R A D U AT E I N S T I T U T E
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            One of the reasons I chose Pacifica
            was to pursue my own original
research. In making great use of the Graduate
Research Library, I have found it to be
extremely useful. I think it has to be one of the
finest private libraries anywhere in the world.”
                           —PACIFICA        STUDENT




         Pacifica’s Graduate Research Library
         Pacifica’s Graduate Research Library has special concentrations in Jungian, archetypal, and
         psychoanalytical psychology, as well as mythology, the humanities, and religious studies. The
         library works diligently to acquire rare materials specific to Pacifica’s degree programs and
         related fields.

         The Library has branches on both Pacifica campuses, and is home to approximately 16,000 books, roughly 3,000
         theses and dissertations, audio and video source materials, and print and electronic journals. Special reference
         collections include course reserves, student papers, fac ulty publications and archives, rare and hard-to-fi nd
         titles, and multimedia materials. The library belongs to consortia throughout California and to the Online Computer
         Library Center, the world’s largest inter-library loan network. It participates in resource sharing around the globe.
         Through the library, Pacifica students have access to 17 academic databases featuring thousands of full-text journal
         titles, and a large selection of e-books and digital resources.
         Pacifica students are offered one-on-one research assistance from reference librarians. The library also responds
         to requests received by phone, fax, and email. Learn more about Pacifica’s library at www.pacifica.edu




22   PA C I F I C A G R A D U AT E I N S T I T U T E
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OPUS                                   A R C H I V E S AND
                                       RESEARCH CENTER
ON THE CAMPUSES OF PACIFICA GRADUATE INSTITUTE



An active site for wonder and participation in the great questions of our time


OPUS Archives and Research Center is a non-profit                             OPUS holds the
living archive on Pacifica’s campuses whose work
                                                                           personal papers,
includes the initiation and support of interdisciplin-
                                                                                   manuscript
ary dialogue, education, grants, research opportuni-
                                                                                  collections,
ties, and public programs.
                                                                            private libraries,
As a dynamic center for the study of depth/archetypal
                                                                             and artifacts of
psychology, mythology and the humanities, and their par       -
                                                                               these eminent
ticipation on the world platform, OPUS forms a nucleus for the
exploration of psyche and myth in the world. Borrowing Joseph                          scholars
Campbell’s words, it provides a “secret opening through which                (partial listing).
the inexhaustible energies of the cosmos pour into human                            From top:
cultural manifestation.”                                                  Joseph Campbell,
The archives are a repository for rare and significant collections          Marija Gimbutas,
in the fi elds of mythology , archetypal psych ology, and world                James Hillman,
culture. OPUS extends the availability of these collections to           Marion Woodman,
students and scholars who want to utilize them in contempo-              Christine Downing,
rary research, as well as facilitating grants to further research
                                                                               Jane Hollister
in these fields and the dissemination of scholarly work into the
                                                                                Wheelwright,
culture-at-large. In addition, OPUS sponsors interdisciplinary
dialogues, community networks, forums, and creative conver -                      and Joseph
sation among researchers, scholars, students, and members of                    Wheelwright
the public.

CURRENT PROGRAMS AND INITIATIVES:

•   Engaging dialogues include a monthly JCF Mythological RoundTable® Group at OPUS
    that focuses on Joseph Campbell’s work
•   Sharing the stories and voices contained in the collections with the world at large
    through the web
•   Offering grants to seekers from extended disciplines and engaging in social
    entrepreneurial efforts to encourage use of the archives for research and publication in
    the broader cultural domain
•   Digitizing the archives and collections to facilitate wider research and public availability

OPUS Invites Your Curiosity
For more information, please contact Dr. Safron Rossi, Ph.D., Director
OPUS Archives and Research Center
801 Ladera Lane, Santa Barbara, CA 93108 | 805.969.5750 | www.opusarchives.org

                                                                                                   2 0 1 1 – 2 0 1 2 C O U R S E C ATA L O G   23
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                  There are a lot of good public programs around the country, but I’ve found nothing anywhere
                  quite like the conferences I have attended here. The people and the environment contribute
                  so much to the outstanding quality of experience.”
                                                        — PACIFICA CONFERENCE PARTICIPANT




                            Public Programs at Pacifica
                            In addition to offering graduate degree programs, Pacifica
                            hosts a variety of public programs each year. Like the degree
                            programs, these conferences, workshops, and lectures explore the fi elds of
                            psychology, the humanities, and mythological studies through the lens of
                            depth psychology. The programs feature Pacifica faculty and leading scholars
                            in the field, provide continuing education credit for mental health profession-
                            als, and offer Pacifica students and alumni reduced admission. Visiting schol-
                            ars often extend their stays to lecture in the graduate degree programs.
                            For more information on Pacifica’s Public Programs, please call 805.969.3626
                            ext.103, or email the department at publicprograms@ pacifica.edu. For the
                            latest information on upcoming public programs and conferences at Pacifica
                            Graduate Institute visit www.pacifica.edu




24   PA C I F I C A G R A D U AT E I N S T I T U T E
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PACIFICA
G R A D U A T E                     I N S T I T U T E


Graduate Degree Programs

Academic Formats and Schedules ................26–27

Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology ...........................28–37

M.A. in Counseling Psychology .................... 38–43

Ph.D. in Depth Psychology
with Emphasis in Psychotherapy ................. 44–49

M.A./Ph.D. in Depth Psychology ...................50–73

    • with Emphasis in Jungian
      and Archetypal Studies ........................... 52–57

    • with Combined Emphasis in
      Community Psychology, Liberation
      Psychology, and Ecopsychology............. 58–65

    • with Emphasis in Somatic Studies ........ 66–72

M.A. in Engaged Humanities
and the Creative Life .......................................74–79

M.A./Ph.D. in Mythological Studies ..............80–85

M.A. in Leadership and
Organizational Psychology ............................ 86–88




Administrative Information

Administration, Faculty, and Staff ............... 90–95

Admission Requirements and Procedures.... 96–97

2011-2012 Tuition and Fees ..................................98

Financial Aid ...................................................99–102

Administrative Information ........................ 102–103

Applying to Pacifica Graduate Institute .......... 104

One-day Introductions to Pacifica .................. 105




                  2 0 1 1 – 2 0 1 2 C O U R S E C ATA L O G     25
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Pacifica’s Degree Programs Offer
a Variety of Formats and Schedules
Ph.D. Program in                                                       Ph.D. Program in
Clinical Psychology                                                    Depth Psychology
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY                                      WITH EMPHASIS IN PSYCHOTHERAPY
Three years of coursework take place in four -day, on-campus           Three years of coursework take place during three-day,
residential sessions (Thursday evening through Sunday af-              on-campus residential sessions (Friday, Saturday, Sunday)
ternoon) once each month during the fall, winter , and spring          approximately once each month during the fall, winter, and
quarters. There is also a seven-day summer session each year.          spring quarters. Summer quarter coursework takes place
* See Dissertation Note below.                                         during a five-day residential session each year.
                                                                       * See Dissertation Note below.
M.A. Program in
Counseling Psychology                                                  M.A./Ph.D. Program in
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY                                      Mythological Studies
Two years of coursework take place in three-day,                       WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY
on-campus residential sessions approximately once each                 Three years of coursework take place in three-day, on-
month during the fall, winter, and spring quarters. (Two               campus residential sessions (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday)
tracks meet Friday, Saturday, Sunday; one track meets                  approximately once each month during the fall, winter, and
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday.) There is also a seven-day                 spring quarters. There is a five-day residential session
summer session each year. Students complete their master’s             during the summer quarter each year.
thesis after the two years of coursework.                              * See Dissertation Note below.




                                                       * Dissertation Note: All of Pacifica’s doctoral students are also required to engage in research and
26   PA C I F I C A G R A D U AT E I N S T I T U T E     complete two-year dissertation projects according to the requirements of their chosen degree programs.
                                                         See program descriptions and specific Dissertation Handbooks for additional information.
                                                                                                   TABLE OF CONTENTS | KEYWORD SEARCH




 M.A./Ph.D. Program in                                                                M.A. Program in
 Depth Psychology                                                                     Engaged Humanities
 WITH COMBINED EMPHASIS IN COMMUNITY                                                  and the Creative Life
 PSYCHOLOGY, LIBERATION PSYCHOLOGY,                                                   WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY
 AND ECOPSYCHOLOGY
                                                                                        A Blended Online/Low-Residency Program
 Three years of coursework take place in nine three-day, on-
 campus residential sessions (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday),                            Two years of coursework take advantage of distance learning
 approximately once each month during the fall, winter, and                           technology to allow students to work and learn in their home
 spring quarters. During the first and second summer quarters,                         environments. Students meet at the Pacifi ca campus for
 students complete fieldwork and research in their home                                quarterly four-day sessions (Thursday through Sunday) in
 communities or other off-campus sites. In the third summer                           residence.
 quarter, students complete research and write a dissertation
 concept paper in their home communities.
 * See Dissertation Note below.                                                       M.A./Ph.D. Program in
 M.A./Ph.D. Program in                                                                Depth Psychology
                                                                                      WITH EMPHASIS IN JUNGIAN
 Depth Psychology                                                                     AND ARCHETYPAL STUDIES
 WITH EMPHASIS IN SOMATIC STUDIES
                                                                                        A Blended Online/Low-Residency Program
 Three years of coursework take place during
 three-day, on-campus residential sessions (Friday,                                   Two years of coursework take advantage of distance learning
 Saturday, Sunday) approximately once each                                            technology allowing students to work and learn in their home
 month during the fall, winter, and spring                                            environments in conjunction with on-campus residential
 quarters. Summer quarter coursework                                                  sessions. Classes begin online and meet during four-day
 takes place during a five-day                                                         on-campus residential sessions (Thursday, Friday, Saturday,
 residential session each year.                                                       Sunday) once each quarter.
 * See Dissertation Note below.                                                       * See Dissertation Note below.




                                                                                      M.A. Program in
                                                                                      Leadership and
                                                                                      Organizational Psychology
                                                                                      WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY

                                                                                        A Blended Online/Low-Residency Program

                                                                                      Two years of coursework are tentatively scheduled to begin
                                                                                      in spring 2012. The program will take advantage of distance
                                                                                      learning technology to allow students to work and learn in
                                                                                      their home environments. Additionally, students meet at the
                                                                                      Pacifica campus for quarterly four-day sessions (Thursday
                                                                                      through Sunday) in residence.




* Dissertation Note: All of Pacifica’s doctoral students are also required to engage in research and
  complete two-year dissertation projects according to the requirements of their chosen degree programs.   2 0 1 1 – 2 0 1 2 C O U R S E C ATA L O G   27
  See program descriptions and specific Dissertation Handbooks for additional information.
                                                                            TABLE OF CONTENTS | KEYWORD SEARCH




Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY




Pacifica Graduate Institute’s
Ph.D. Program in Clinical                                                I believe our education in clinical psychology
                                                       is extraordinary. Besides providing a high quality foundational
Psychology offers a course of study
                                                       academic and clinical program, I believe we offer students a
situated within the depth psychological
                                                       more complete picture of the human experience because of our
tradition. It is designed to prepare students
                                                       depth psychology emphasis. Students travel here from all over the
for the independent general practice of
                                                       country to experience this special place which provides a setting
professional clinical psychology in the 21st
                                                       that awakens the deeper dimensions of the human psyche in an
century. Guided by a scholar-practitioner              intellectually stimulating academic environment.”
model, the program integrates theory,
                                                                                 —JAMES L. BRODERICK, PROGRAM CHAIR
practice, and ethics, and stresses a broad
range of perspectives on psychopathology,
assessment, intervention, and research. A unique emphasis of
the program is our commitment to honoring the full complexity of
psychological life in a diverse society.
Toward this end, the program provides advanced training in depth
psychological and human science traditions, as well as a focus on
the humanities. Cultural competency is a core value of the program
and comprises an important dimension in all courses. Clinical
Psychology courses draw from four areas of study:

  PRACTICUM SEMINARS
  CLINICAL PRACTICE
  DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY AND HUMANITIES
  RESEARCH AND SCHOLARLY INQUIRY




28   PA C I F I C A G R A D U AT E I N S T I T U T E
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FIRST YEAR
             PRACTICUM         Professional Development Seminar I, II, III – CL 755, CL 756, CL 757, 1 Unit each          CURRICULUM
              SEMINARS
                               Diagnostic Practicum Readiness Assessment Module – CL 758, 0 Units                         OVERVIEW
   CLINICAL PRACTICE           History and Systems of Psychology – CP 700, 2 Units
            COURSES
                               Psychological Assessment I, II – CP 930, CP 931, 2 Units each                              Clinical Psychology Classes
                               Legal, Ethical, & Professional Practice – CP 832, 2 Units                                  take place in four-day sessions
                               Advanced Psychopathology I – CP 730, 2 Units
                               Biological Foundations of Human Behavior – CP 735, 2 Units
                                                                                                                          (Thursday evening through
                               Comparative Approaches to Psychotherapy – CP 770, 2 Units                                  Sunday afternoon) once each
                               Evidence-Based Best Practices – CL 912, 2 Units                                            month during fall, winter, and
                               Social Foundations of Human Behavior – CL 800, 2 Units                                     spring. There is also a seven-
  DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY             Intro to Depth Psychology and the Human Science Traditions – CL 819, 1 Unit                day summer session each year.
     AND HUMANITIES
           COURSES
                               Myth, Literature, & Religious Studies – CL 820, 1 Unit
                               Jungian-Based Psychotherapy I – CP 810, 2 Units
                                                                                                                          Between learning sessions,
                                                                                                                          study and instruction continues
      RESEARCH AND             Research Designs & Methodology I: Overview – CP 932, 2 Units
  SCHOLARLY INQUIRY
                               Research Designs & Methodology II: Qualitative Methods – CP 933, 2 Units                   through individual mentorship
           COURSES
                               Quantitative Design and Univariate Statistical Analysis – CP 926, 2 Units                  from faculty, online learning,
SECOND YEAR                                                                                                               and cohort support groups.
             PRACTICUM         Diagnostic Practicum Seminar I, II, III, – CL 759, CL 760, CL 761, 1 Unit each
              SEMINARS
                               Psychotherapy Practicum Readiness Assessment Module – CL 762, 0 Units
   CLINICAL PRACTICE           Principles of Psychopharmacology – CP 873, 2 Units
            COURSES
                               Cognitive-Behavioral Psychology – CL 835, 2 Units
                               Cognitive-Affective Foundations of Human Behavior – CL 836, 3 Units
                               Developmental Psychology Through the Lifespan – CP 830, 3 Units
                               Advanced Psychopathology II – CP 731, 2 Units
                               Alcohol, Chemical Dependency, and Addictive Behaviors – CL 900, 2 Units
                               Principles of Group Dynamics – CL 751, 2 Units
                               Psychological Assessment III – CL 938, 2 Units
  DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY             Psychoanalytic-Based Psychotherapy I – CP 711, 2 Units
           COURSES
                               Psychoanalytic-Based Psychotherapy II – CP 712, 2 Units
                               Archetypal Psychology: Theory and Practice – CP 840, 2 Units
      RESEARCH AND             Research Designs & Methodology III: Advanced Quantitative Analysis
  SCHOLARLY INQUIRY
           COURSES
                                   and Scale Development – CL 939, 2 Units
                               Depth Psychological Methods I – CL 928, 2 Units
                               Dissertation Development I – CP 961, 1 Unit

THIRD YEAR                                                                                                              JAMES L. BRODERICK, PH.D.
             PRACTICUM         Psychotherapy Practicum Seminar I, II, III – CL 763, CL 764, CL 765, 1 Unit each         Chair, Ph.D. Program in Clinical
              SEMINARS
                               Internship Readiness Assessment Module – CL 766, 0 Units                                 Psychology with Emphasis in
   CLINICAL PRACTICE           Psychotherapy with Diverse Populations – CP 845, 2 Units                                 Depth Psychology
            COURSES
                               Principles of Clinical Supervision and Consultation – CL 752, 2 Units
                                                                                                                        Dr. Jim Broderick, a licensed clinical
  DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY             Depth Psychology & Contemporary Culture I – CL 920, 1 Unit
     AND HUMANITIES                                                                                                     psychologist, became Chair of the Clinical
           COURSES
                               Jungian-Based Psychotherapy II – CP 811, 2 Units
                               Post-Jungian Psychotherapy: Theory and Practice – CP 745, 2 Units                        Psychology Program in 2008. He served as
                               Imaginal Psychotherapy – CP 814, 2 Units                                                 Director of Mental Health for 20 years in
                               Cultural Foundations of Depth Psychology I, II – CL 723, 1 Unit, CL 724, 2 Units         two California counties, Shasta and Santa
                               Depth Psychology & Contemporary Culture II – CL 921, 1 Unit                              Barbara. He has been actively involved
      RESEARCH AND             Dissertation Development II – CP 962, 2 Units                                            in the fi elds of mental health and alcohol
  SCHOLARLY INQUIRY
           COURSES
                               Depth Psychological Methods II – CL 929, 2 Units                                         drug treatment for nearly 40 years. He is a
                               Dissertation Development III – CP 963, 2 Units
                                                                                                                        passionate advocate for quality services for
                               Research Designs & Methodology IV:
                                   Advanced Qualitative Methods – CL 940, 2 Units                                       individuals with serious mental illness. His
                                                                                                                        academic interests include phenomenology,
CONTINUING
                                                                                                                        existentialism, critical theory, and evidence-
                               Comprehensive Exam – CP 989, 0 Units (Degree Requirement)                                based psychotherapy. His major therapeutic
                               Dissertation Writing – CP 990, 15 Units (Degree Requirement)
                                                                                                                        interests include Depth-Oriented Brief
                               Personal Psychotherapy – CP 950, 0 Units (Degree Requirement)
                                                                                                                        Therapy and Sand T ray Therapy with a
Selected Courses may have online components. This curriculum is not intended to meet all the requirements of each       Jungian orientation.
State for licensure in clinical psychology. This curriculum may vary depending upon changing academic needs.

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Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology                                                                                   Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY                                                                              Descriptions


PRACTICUM SEMINARS                                                         Professional Development Seminar III
                                                                           CL 757, 1 UNIT
The Practicum Seminars prepare students for applied clinical
                                                                           The final seminar in the fi rst-year series is intended to introduce the
work in practicum and internship sites. The seminars serve as
                                                                           student to professional practice as a clinical psychologist, and to pre-
a context for students to be mentored into the profession by
                                                                           pare the student to begin applied clinical work in a fi eld practicum
the Clinical Faculty , through a seminar format wherein stu-               setting in the 2nd year and beyond. The seminar will include topics
dents learn from the clinical expertise of the faculty. Seminars           of the public mental health care system, levels of care, ethical and
are also designed to offer students a forum in which to inte-              legal issues, career planning, and self-care.
grate clinical experiences gained in practicum with academic
coursework; the Practicum Seminars act in conjunction with                 Diagnostic Readiness Assessment Module
                                                                           CL 758, 0 UNITS
the focus of the academic program.
                                                                           In this module each student will be evaluated to assure readiness to
The first year focus is on Professional Development and prepa-              perform in the Diagnostic Practicum.
                                               rst
ration for a Diagnostic Practicum. During the fi year students
will begin the development of an identity as a professional                Diagnostic Practicum Seminar I
                                                                           CL 759, 1 UNIT
psychologist, with a depth psychology emphasis. The second
year focus is on diagnostics and preparation for a Psycho-                 This seminar is designed to assist students in the integration
therapeutic Practicum. These seminars are designed to offer                of diagnostic issues at their practicum sites with the academic
                                                                           coursework at Pacifica. Topics scheduled for discussion in this
students a forum in which to integrate diagnostic experiences
                                                                           seminar include clinical and diagnostic interviewing, risk assess-
                                                        ca.
gained in practicum with academic coursework at Pacifi The
                                                                           ment, and culturally appropriate psychological test selection.
third year focus is on psychotherapy, particularly from a depth
                                                                           Prerequisite: CL 758
psychological perspective, and preparation for a pre-doctoral
Internship. These seminars are designed to offer students a                Diagnostic Practicum Seminar II
forum in which to integrate psychotherapeutic experiences of               CL 760, 1 UNIT

practicum with academic coursework at Pacifi ca and to pre-                 This seminar continues assisting students in the ongoing integra-
pare students for their pre-doctoral Internship.                           tion of diagnostic issues at their practicum sites with coursework
                                                                           at Pacifica. This seminar will cover topics such as the mental
Professional Development Seminar I                                         status exam, motivational interviewing, stages of change mod-
CL 755, 1 UNIT                                                             els, and ASAM criteria for assessment of substance abuse.
                                                                           Prerequisite: CL 758
In this initial seminar of the fi rst-year series, students will be asked
to develop educational and career goals, and strategies to eventually      Diagnostic Practicum Seminar III
become licensed. Students will begin the process of developing a           CL 761, 1 UNIT
professional identity as a clinical psychologist, the needed interper -
                                                                           This seminar completes the second-year diagnostic practicum se-
sonal and emotional capacities vital to the discipline, and the im-
                                                                           quence. It offers students a forum by which to further integrate di-
portance of organizational knowledge about mental health systems
                                                                           agnostic issues at their practicum site with academic coursework at
and licensure. T opics covered in this seminar include overview of
                                                                           Pacifica. This seminar covers diagnostics with personality disorders,
Pacifica’s clinical training program, the professional identity of a
                                                                           psychological report writing, and integrative assessment. Prerequi-
clinical psychologist, and the career path to licensure.
                                                                           site: CL 758
Professional Development Seminar II                                        Psychotherapy Readiness Assessment Module
CL 756, 1 UNIT
                                                                           CL 762, 0 UNITS
Students will continue the process of developing a professional
                                                                           In this module each student will be evaluated to assure readiness to
identity as a clinical psychologist, the needed interpersonal and
                                                                           perform in the Psychotherapy Practicum.
emotional capacities vital to the discipline, and the importance of
organizational knowledge about mental health systems and licen-
sure. Planned topics include basic psychotherapeutic processes and
interview skills, including cross-cultural competencies. A practicum
application workshop will also be included in this seminar.


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Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology                                                                                   Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY                                                                              Descriptions


Psychotherapy Practicum Seminar I                                        Psychological Assessment I
CL 763, 1 UNIT                                                           CP 930, 2 UNITS
This seminar offers students a forum in which to integrate psycho-       The psychological assessment course series begins with the study
therapy experiences of practicum with academic coursework at             of psychometric theory including test construction, standardization,
Pacifica. This seminar will include topics on empathy and attune-         validity, reliability, and the appropriate and ethical use of assess-
ment to affect, Jung’s transcendent function, managing boundaries        ment for individuals from diverse backgrounds. The administration,
in psychotherapy, and evidence-based best practices. Prerequisite:       scoring, and interpretation of the W echsler intelligence scales,
CL 762                                                                   Wechsler Memory Scales-IV, and Bender V isual Motor Gestalt Test
                                                                         are highlighted with special emphasis on integrating the results with
Psychotherapy Practicum Seminar II                                       clinical judgment, report writing, evidence-based treatment planning,
CL 764, 1 UNIT
                                                                         and communication of assessment results. The course will focus on
This seminar offers students an additional forum in which to integrate   foundational psychometric theory in the context of emphasizing prac-
psychotherapy experiences of practicum with academic coursework          tical, evidence-based best practices in cognitive assessment.
at Pacifica. Scheduled topics include imaginal techniques in therapy ,
use of dreams, the therapeutic frame, transference/countertransfer -     Psychological Assessment II
ence, and continued discussion of appropriate therapeutic boundaries.    CP 931, 2 UNITS
Prerequisite: CL 762                                                     Students will learn the principles of personality assessment and be-
                                                                         come familiar with, and learn how to administer, score, and interpret
Psychotherapy Practicum Seminar III                                      the MMPI-2, MCMI-III, CPI, PAI, MBTI, and BDI-II. Students will also
CL 765, 1 UNIT
                                                                         be provided with an overview of neuropsychological assessment in-
This seminar is the fi nal seminar in psychotherapy; it provides stu-     cluding interviewing, familiarity with common tests, and strategies
dents a last forum in which to integrate psychotherapy experiences       of interpreting and integrating neuropsychological assessment data.
of practicum with academic coursework at Pacifi ca. Scheduled top-                                                             -
                                                                         There will be a focus on integrating results into user friendly, case-fo-
ics include active listening, making psychodynamic interpretations,      cused, problem oriented reports for clinical, vocational, medical, and
additional consideration of boundaries in psychotherapy , and issues     forensic settings. The course will also focus on foundational psycho-
related to the development of a private practice. Prerequisite: CL 762   metric theory in the context of emphasizing practical, evidence-based
Internship Readiness Assessment Module                                   best practices in personality assessment. Prerequisite: CP 930
CL 766, 0 UNITS                                                          Psychological Assessment III
In this module each student will be evaluated to assure readiness for    CL 938, 2 UNITS
pre-doctoral Internship.                                                 This course will focus on psychometric theory, controversies, and prac-
                                                                         tical applications of performance-based personality instruments (pro-
CLINICAL PRACTICE COURSES                                                jectives) with an emphasis on the Rorschach but will also include the
The Clinical Practice courses provide a broad foundation for the         Thematic Apperception Test, Sentence Completion Test, and projective
development of a generalist practitioner, with diverse training          drawings. Information derived from performance-based personality
in multiple psychotherapeutic orientations, assessment, con-             assessment will be used to develop clear , user-friendly, case-focused
sulting, and empirically-validated approaches.                           reports that describe a person and his/her psychological context as
                                                                         well as answer the referral question. There will also be an emphasis on
History and Systems of Psychology                                        using assessment results to enhance the therapeutic process utiizing
CP 700, 2 UNITS                                                          evidence-based best practices. Prerequisites: CP 930, CP 931
                                  c
Students will explore the scientifi evolution of psychological systems
                                                                         Comparative Approaches to Psychotherapy
from antiquity to the present era. The course will examine how the       CP 770, 2 UNITS
historic development of the schools of psychoanalysis, behaviorism,
                                                                         This course provides a theoretical and applied introduction to current
gestalt, humanistic and postmodern psychology has led to current
                                                                         approaches in psychotherapeutic treatment. Students will examine the
practices in clinical psychology . The importance of a multicultural
                                                                         therapeutic applications of the theoretical tenets of the schools of Psy-
perspective will be emphasized. The systems developed throughout
                                                                         choanalysis, Jungian Analysis, Cognitive-Behavioral, Person-Centered, Hu-
history to treat mental illness will be evaluated. The course will
                                                                         manistic-Existential, and Postmodern psychology. Students will develop the
examine the history of the American Psychological Association in
                                                                         ability to compare, contrast, and integrate psychotherapeutic approaches in
the context of current trends in clinical psychology as a scientifi c
                                                                         the context of clinical research and evidence-based best practices.
discipline and profession.
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Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology                                                                                    Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY                                                                               Descriptions

Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice                                 Principles of Psychopharmacology
CP 832, 2 UNITS                                                           CP 873, 2 UNITS
The ethical and legal considerations involved in the practice of          This course covers the general principles of psychopharmacology ,
clinical and scientifi c psychology are reviewed, with an emphasis         as well as an overview of the pertinent neurochemistry . The indi-
on the American Psychological Association’s ethical guidelines. The       cations and side effects of common psychoactive medications will
course features discussion of key issues involved in academic work,       be evaluated. The impact of medications on psychotherapy process
research, and professional practice with a view towards the develop-      and working with a prescribing psychiatrist will be examined.
ment of ethical and professional judgment. T opics include: forensic      Prerequisite: CP 735
psychology, cultural competence, malpractice, and legal responsibili-
ties. This course meets the criteria set forth by the California Board
                                                                          Cognitive-Behavioral Psychology
                                                                          CL 835, 2 UNITS
of Psychology for training in Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice
required for licensure.                                                   This course presents the foundational theories of cognitive behavioral
                                                                          psychology. Topics include the integration of attention, perception, at-
Advanced Psychopathology I                                                tribution, schema development, memory, context, language, problem
CP 730, 2 UNITS
                                                                          solving, and decision making. Theories common to cognitive-behavioral
In the context of the historical and cross-cultural perspectives of       assessment and treatment are evaluated. The role of evidence-based,
psychopathology, students focus on the diagnosis, etiology , treat-       cognitive-behavioral interventions is examined within the conceptual
ment, and prognosis of disturbed behavior . The multi-axial system        framework of integrative models of cognitive-behavioral psychology.
of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders is the
central organizing structure of the course. Emphasis is on major          Cognitive-Affective Foundations of Human Behavior
Axis I disorders.                                                         CL 836, 3 UNITS
                                                                          This class examines the interdependence of cognition and emotion in psy-
Biological Foundations of Human Behavior
                                                                          chological experience. Discussion of the cognitive processes include: cre-
CP 735, 2 UNITS
                                                                          ative thinking, conscious and unconscious processing, and problem solving.
Students examine the theoretical concepts and constructs that explain     Related areas are also covered: sensation, perception, memory , learning,
the phylogenic origins underlying human experience, behavior and the      cognition, emotion, motivation, and psychophysiological processes. Dis-
processes of change. This course reviews anatomical and neurological      cussion of emotion involves the biological and social bases of emotion, its
functioning, examining the importance on behavior of micro biological     cognitive correlates, and the impact of emotional states.
systems (neuron, synapse, neurotransmitter systems) and macro-level
biological systems (central and autonomic nervous systems). Current       Advanced Psychopathology II
trends in psychological research regarding the neurobiological founda-    CP 731, 2 UNITS
tion of consciousness, dreaming, sensory-motor systems, cognitions,       Building on Advanced Psychopathology I, this course examines
motivation, memory mindfulness, and attention will be evaluated. The      major syndromes included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual
sense of a biological self in relation to attachment, trauma, empathy ,   of Mental Disorders, with an emphasis on Axis II disorders. Other
neuroplasticity, and the expression of archetypes throughout the life     classification systems, multiaxial diagnosis, the role of society , cul-
cycle will be examined.                                                   ture, and biology, as well as meta-issues surrounding the diagnostic
                                                                          enterprise are evaluated. Prerequisite: CP 730.
Alcohol, Chemical Dependency, and
Addictive Behaviors                                                       Evidence-Based Best Practices
CL 900, 2 UNITS                                                           CL 912, 2 UNITS
This course covers the theory and treatment of addictive behaviors.       This course is an overview of clinical treatments that are supported
Areas covered in this course include: current theories of etiology ,      by scientific study and data. The latest fi ndings in outcome research
physiological and medical aspects, dual-diagnosis, cultural and eth-      regarding therapeutic interventions are evaluated. Optimal interven-
nic considerations, iatrogenic dependency , treatment approaches,         tions or combinations of interventions for the major disorders are
family issues, prevention and education, and ethical and legal issues.    examined, as well as the integration of individual, group, and psy-
The course meets the criteria set forth by the California Board of Psy-   chopharmacological therapy.
chology for training in Alcoholism/Chemical Dependency Detection
and Treatment required for licensure.




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Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology                                                                                      Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY                                                                                 Descriptions

Principles of Group Dynamics                                                Principles of Clinical Supervision and Consultation
CL 751, 2 UNITS                                                             CL 752, 2 UNITS
This class provides a critical overview of principles, theories, and        This course provides an exposure to the professional role of psycholo-
practical applications of various techniques in group psychotherapy ,       gists as supervisors and consultants. Approaches to clinical supervi-
as well as issues in group process, including: stages in group for -        sion and consultation are examined with special attention paid to the
mation and development, cohesiveness, transference and coun-                interpersonal and psychodynamic aspects of the supervisor -supervisee
tertransference, cross-cultural dynamics, strategies and specifi c           interaction. The goal is for students to develop an “internal supervisor .”
interventions. The curative forces operating in a group setting are         Ethics, diversity, and other professional issues are examined.
illuminated through role-playing, case discussions, readings, experi-
ential exercises, and intensive group participation.
                                                                            Personal Psychotherapy
                                                                            CP 950, NO UNITS ASSIGNED (DEGREE REQUIREMENT)
Psychotherapy with Diverse Populations                                      During the program, students must take part in a total of 60 hours of
CP 845, 2 UNITS                                                             personal psychotherapy (preferably with a depth orientation) with a
Cultural competency or the knowledge, skills, and attitudes neces-          licensed psychotherapist or a certified analyst of their choice.
sary to work effectively as a diversity-sensitive clinician is an ethical
responsibility in a multicultural society . This course examines the        DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY AND
role of culture in counseling, psychotherapy , and assessment, as           HUMANITIES COURSES
well as key issues in the provision of psychological services to
                                                                            These classes stimulate dialogue among the traditions of
under-represented populations. Biases in traditional clinical theory
                                                                            clinical psychology, depth psychology , and cultural studies.
and practice are discussed, while appropriate intervention strategies
                                                                            The student is encouraged to understand that a wide variety of
with individuals of different cultural backgrounds are introduced.
Depth psychological concepts in relation to culture, such as the no-        cultural sources inform the craft of psychotherapy . Literature,
tion of an ethnic or minority unconscious, are also explored.               myth, history, and art infuse the science of clinical psychol-
                                                                            ogy with an essential sense of our connection to the recurring
Developmental Psychology Through the Lifespan                               archetypal motifs of the psyche.
CP 830, 3 UNITS
Students study developmental theories, constructs, research, and            Introduction to Depth Psychology and the
methods as they contribute to understanding normative human de-             Human Science Traditions
velopment and its variants. Emphasis is on the psychological and            CL 819, 1 UNIT
neurological development from conception through old age and at-            This course is a scholarly introduction to the theories and traditions
tachment issues that shape development through the lifespan. Clini-         of depth psychology. The cultural-historical contexts of depth psychol-
cal implications, cultural considerations, and contemporary trends          ogy’s development, along with its relation to philosophy, science, art,
are examined.                                                               religion, myth, and literature will be explored. Attention is given to the
Social Foundations of Human Behavior                                        origins of depth psychology in the works of Sigmund Freud and C.G.
CL 800, 2 UNITS
                                                                            Jung, the traditions that followed, and contemporary developments in
                                                                            the field. Students will be introduced to current research—clinical,
This course studies current advancements in social psychology . Stu-
                                                                            theoretical, and cultural—and publication in depth psychology with a
dents examine three main areas of social psychological thought which
                                                                            focus on the contributions of Pacifi ca Graduate Institute and its fac-
include social thinking, social infl uence, and social relations. Social
                                                                            ulty. The scholar-practitioner model of education in depth psychology
thinking area includes discussion of self, beliefs, judgments and atti-
                                                                            will be elaborated.
tudes. Social influence area includes the impact of culture, conformity ,
persuasion, and group behavior on social functioning. Social relations
area examines social relationships and how they are infl uenced by
prejudice, aggression, attraction, and helping. The class also empha-
sizes current research findings and the role of depth psychology in each
of these areas.




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Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology                                                                                   Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY                                                                              Descriptions

Myth, Literature, and Religious Studies                                  Archetypal Psychology: Theory and Practice
CL 820, 1 UNIT                                                           CP 840, 2 UNITS
Mythology, literature, and religious traditions provide images and       Students re-vision basic psychological concepts through the study
motifs which vividly refl ect the underlying patterns of psychological    of archetypal psychology as exemplifi ed in the works of James Hill-
life. This course focuses upon the study of symbolic experience and      man. Emphasis is placed on the development of a mythic sensibility
includes ancient and modern dramatic literature, scriptural narra-       in confronting the complexity of psychological life. Subjective and
tives from multicultural sources, philosophy , poetry, or accounts of    imaginal realities are considered as they relate to therapeutic inter -
personal religious experience. The course helps students develop the     vention. The therapy room is extended to include the wider realm of
attitude and skills necessary to discern the aesthetic, affective, and   the collective imagination, the arts, culture, multicultural reflections,
dramatic dimensions of symbolic texts and to present such fi ndings       and philosophy.
in clear scholarly writing.                                              Depth Psychology and Contemporary Culture I
Jungian-Based Psychotherapy I                                            CL 920, 1 UNIT
CP 810, 2 UNITS                                                          This course applies the principles of depth psychology to addressing
Classical Jungian concepts such as ego, Self, persona, shadow ,          various crises in contemporary society . Activist, social justice, and
anima/animus, archetype, collective unconscious, transcendent            community fieldwork manifestations of depth psychology are pre-
function, and individuation are studied. Clinical application of Jun-    sented. Postmodern critiques are discussed, and depth psychological
gian thought is demonstrated through theoretical discussions, case       theory and clinical practice are viewed through non-Western, post-
examples, and the reading of primary sources. Particular attention is    colonial, and minority perspectives. Individual psychopathology is seen
brought to understanding how various forms of psychopathology can        as having collective, historic, and contextual sources. Symbolic healing
be imagined as manifestations of ego-Self axis dynamics. Critiques       is explored at community and societal levels.
from postmodern and multicultural perspectives are covered.              Jungian-Based Psychotherapy II
                                                                         CP 811, 2 UNITS
Cultural Foundations of Depth Psychology I                               This course will expand consideration of classical Jungian concepts
CL 723, 1 UNIT
                                                                         such as the individuated ego, personal and collective shadow , the
This course focuses on the formative contexts which have given rise      contra-sexual archetypes anima/animus, manifestations of the Self,
to depth psychology. For example, healing systems from different         dreams and numinous experiences, and their application to clinical
cultures and the archetypal images they evoke are studied to pro-        practice. In addition, typology will be examined, other archetypal fi g-
vide a deeper appreciation of contemporary clinical practice. Other      ures and patterns explored, and the use of myths in depth psychother -
emphases include an examination of cultural and historical issues        apy elaborated. Students will also continue the work of self-refl ection
which have shaped the emergence of depth psychology . Philosophi-        to further their individuation process as central to their work as clinical
cal antecedents of depth psychology are a focus of study as well         depth psychologists. Prerequisite: CP 810
as the relationship between depth psychology , the arts, and poetic
imagination. The implications of depth psychology for a multicultural
                                                                         Post-Jungian Psychotherapy: Theory and Practice
                                                                         CP 745, 2 UNITS
world are discussed.
                                                                         The works of Post-Jungian psychotherapists such as Fordham,
Psychoanalytic-Based Psychotherapy I                                     Samuels, and Jacobi are studied. Issues of transference and ego de-
CP 711, 2 UNITS                                                          velopment are explored. Recent post-Jungian research and diversity
This course focuses on the evolution of psychoanalytic thought from      considerations are discussed. Prerequisites: CP 810, CP 811
Freud’s seminal writings through British traditions of Object Rela-
                                                                         Imaginal Psychotherapy
tions, up to and including contemporary Self and intersubjective ap-
                                                                         CP 814, 2 UNITS
proaches. Working within the transference-countertransference field
                                                                         Utilizing a phenomenological attitude, which is attentive to the process
is a major focus.
                                                                         of psychotherapy and to the experience of being a psychotherapist and
Psychoanalytic-Based Psychotherapy II                                    doing psychotherapy, an imaginal approach is developed. Within this
CP 712, 2 UNITS                                                          approach, issues such as transference, the unconscious, symptoms,
This course continues examining psychoanalytic theory and practice,      and dreams are examined. Special attention is paid to the development
including a focus on cultural dimensions of practice. In particular ,    of those imaginal capabilities which foster sensitivity to the symbolic
the contributions of Klein and Bion, who helped to delineate the         depths and metaphorical richness of the patient’ s and therapist’s ways
dynamics and treatment of Borderline and Psychotic conditions.           of using language. Diversity and cultural considerations are discussed
Prerequisite: CP 711                                                     in these contexts.

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Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology                                                                                    Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY                                                                               Descriptions

Cultural Foundations of Depth Psychology II                                Research Designs and Methodology II:
CL 724, 2 UNITS                                                            Qualitative Methods
This course continues the focus on formative contexts which have           CP 933, 2 UNITS
given rise to depth psychology . For example, healing systems from         The course examines the strengths and weaknesses of the major
different cultures and the archetypal images they evoke are studied        human science traditions, such as: phenomenology , hermeneutics,
to provide a deeper appreciation of contemporary clinical practice.        heuristic approaches, ethnography, grounded theory, biography, and
Other emphases include an examination of cultural and histori-             case study. Theory and praxis of these approaches are covered, and
cal issues which have shaped the emergence of depth psychology .           students gain hands-on experience with a particular qualitative ap-
Philosophical antecedents of depth psychology are a focus of study         proach (i.e., phenomenology). Emphasis is given to ethics and diver -
as well as the relationship between depth psychology , the arts, and       sity, as well as the parallels between research and clinical practice.
poetic imagination. The implications of depth psychology for a multi-      Prerequisite: CP 932
cultural world are examined.
                                                                           Quantative Design and Univariate Statistical Analysis
Depth Psychology and Contemporary Culture II                               CP 926, 2 UNITS
CL 921, 1 UNIT                                                             This course provides an overview of univariate statistical methods or
This course considers the role of depth psychology in contemporary         those pertaining to analysis of a single, continuous, dependent vari-
culture and explores the cutting edges of depth psychology . Topics        able. The goal of this overview is to prepare students to be competent
may include current works in transpersonal psychology , psychology         and critical consumers of quantitative research for clinical practice.
and quantum physics, spirituality , body/mind studies, alternative         An applied overview of both descriptive and inferential statistics is
healing forms, and the latest research in the field.                        provided. Topics covered include: (1) Descriptive statistics (Measure-
                                                                           ment scales, frequency distributions, measures of central tendency ,
RESEARCH AND SCHOLARLY                                                     measures of spread (variability), measures of linear relationships,
INQUIRY COURSES                                                            and standard scores), and (2) Inferential statistics (Hypothesis test-
                                                                           ing, correlation and regression, Z-tests, t-tests, one way analysis of
The program of study in research provides a solid ground-
                                                                           variance [ANOVA], Chi-Square tests, and estimation of population
ing in both quantitative and qualitative research traditions,
                                                                           parameters from sample data). Prerequisite: CP 932
while specializing in innovative human science methodolo-
gies addressing the multiple dimensions of psychological life.             Research Designs and Methodology III: Advanced
Research courses emphasize the complementary interdepen-                   Quantitative Analysis and Scale Development
dence of clinical intervention and empirical inquiry and provide
                                                   ,                       CL 939, 2 UNITS

the skills necessary to complete the doctoral dissertation as              The goal of this class is to provide students with an overview of
well as contribute to the academic fi eld of clinical and depth             advanced quantitative methods including multivariate statistical
psychology as a lifelong researcher.                                       analysis and scale development procedures. This course will help
                                                                           students become skilled in reading, understanding, and using these
                                                                           designs. It will also examine the broad principles and application of
Research Designs and Methodology I: Overview
                                                                           multivariate statistical models for the design of quantitative studies
CP 932, 2 UNITS
                                                                           and the treatment of data as well as statistical methods employed in
The intent of this course is to foster an introductory knowledge of
                                                                           scale development. Topics include multivariate analysis of variance
design and methodology in psychological research, including an un-
                                                                           and covariance, factor analysis, binary logistic regression, multiple
derstanding of the history and characteristics of quantitative, qualita-
                                                                           regression, discriminant analysis, power , and metanalysis. These
tive, and mixed methods approaches. The theoretical frameworks,
                                                                           methods will also be used to understand scale development along
techniques, and critiques of a variety of research perspectives are
                                                                           with knowledge and application of reliability, validity, types of scales,
surveyed, with a focus on the human science traditions. Additional
                                                                           item analysis, multi-trait multi-method validation, and item response
issues discussed include: bias, ethics, diversity , postmodernism and
                                                                           theory. Prerequisite: CP 932, CP 926
critical theory, and the relationship between research and clinical
practice. The course also emphasizes the development of critical
thinking and profi ciency with a representative method of the stu-
dent’s choosing.




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Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology                                                                                    Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY                                                                               Descriptions

Depth Psychological Methods I                                                Depth Psychological Methods II
CL 928, 2 UNITS                                                              CL 929, 2 UNITS
The foundation for a complex psychological epistemology that honors          This course expands upon the research processes introduced in
the autonomous character of soul, and an approach to research that           the first Depth Psychological Methods course. The vocational and
keeps soul in mind are developed. Students dialogue with traditions          transference dimensions of the research process are explored, and
of empirical psychology , depth psychology with particular emphasis          students practice psychological dialogues as a means to make more
on Jung‘s psychology, and phenomenology. The course articulates an           conscious their own unconscious transference to their material. In
ethical and therapeutic approach to research which takes into account
                                                                             addition this course re-visons the role of method as a metaphoric
dynamic unconscious factors in research. In addition to this focus on
                                                                             perspective and looks at the ways in which various research meth-
approach, this course briefl y introduces the processes of research that
arise from it and discusses the role of method. A key aim of the course      ods, such as imaginal and archetypal methods, both reveal and con-
is the development of a critcal attitude toward the multiple levels of the   ceal their topics. Prerequisite: CL 928
psyche as it presents itself through personal history , diverse cultures,
                                                                             Dissertation Development III
and the collective and ecological dimensions of experience.
                                                                             CP 963, 2 UNITS
Dissertation Development I                                                   The last course in the dissertation sequence focuses on the comple-
CP 961, 1 UNIT                                                               tion of the Concept Paper, which contains a literature review of the
This course emphasizes the development of critical thinking skills,          seminal sources, a well-defi ned research question, a sketch of the
related to evaluating research studies and the writing of a doctoral         method(s) to be used in addressing the question, and an explication
dissertation in clinical psychology. Other basic skills covered include:     of the relevance of the question for clinical psychological practice.
APA format, library research skills, grant-writing, as well as ethics
                                                                             Students present Concept Papers for formal approval. For advanced
and professional issues regarding writing and publishing. In addi-
                                                                             students with approved Concept Papers, work will be directed to-
tion, the course focuses on the identification of appropriate topics for
                                                                                                                                         ,
                                                                             ward Proposal completion (i.e., expanding literature review explicat-
one’s dissertation within the academic fi eld of clinical psychology ,
and the beginnings of a literature review . Faculty members review           ing method). Committee formation, professional, and diversity issues
students’ potential topics and their initial literature review efforts.      relevant to dissertation writing are discussed. Prerequisites: CP 961,
                                                                             CP 962
Research Designs and Methodology IV:
Advanced Qualitative Method                                                  Dissertation Writing
CL 940, 2 UNITS                                                              CP 990, 15 UNITS
The course focuses on one or two of the major human science tradi-           During this course, students assemble their dissertation committees,
tions, such as: phenomenology , hermeneutics, heuristic approaches,          write their dissertation proposals, and complete the dissertation
ethnography, grounded theory, biography, and case study. This quarter        process. Students are required to complete all 15 units. This course
the theory and praxis of hermeneutics, with an emphasis on social            may be taken concurrently with other courses. Additional fees are
constructionism and metabletics (investigation of historical changes)
                                                                             assessed for this course.
are covered in depth, and students gain more extensive, hands-on
experience with these particular qualitative approaches. Emphasis is         Comprehensive Examination
given to ethics and diversity, as well as the parallels between research     CP 989, 0 UNITS
and clinical practice. Prerequisites: CP 932, CP 933
                                                                             Upon completion of ten quarters of Ph.D. coursework, a student in
Dissertation Development II                                                  good academic standing is eligible to take the Comprehensive Ex-
CP 962, 2 UNITS                                                              amination. The Comprehensive Examination is designed to assess
This course continues addressing the knowledge, skills, and personal         student competencies in the area of each of the three Program Do-
process involved with the development of a dissertation. This second         mains: Clinical Practice, Research and Scholarly Inquiry , and Depth
course focuses on refining one’s dissertation topic into a specifi c re-       Psychology and Humanities. Students must pass all components of
search question. By reviewing the literature on prospective topics as        the Comprehensive Examination in order to advance in the Clinical
well as deep introspection and self-exploration, a unique query and          Program to Dissertation Writing (CP 990) or Internship. Students must
potential contribution to the field of clinical psychology is discerned.      retake any failed portion of the exam by the end of the Fall quarter of
The student begins to construct the literature review relevant to the
                                                                             the year in which the exam was administered. A student is eligible
chosen research question and considers appropriate research meth-
                                                                             to take an academic T utorial in preparation for re-examination. If a
ods. Students present research questions and literature reviews for
faculty review. Advanced students may present Concept Papers for             student does not pass any aspect of the Comprehensive Exam within
formal approval. Professional and diversity issues relevant to dis-          two attempts he or she will be academically disqualified.
sertation writing are discussed. Prerequisite: CP 961


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Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology                                                                                 Degree
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY                                                                            Requirements


REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION                                              CLINICAL TRAINING
1.   Students must complete a total of 104 quarter units to fulfill the   A minimum of 1,000 hours of practicum and 1,500 hours of internship
     unit requirement for graduation.                                    are required. Students will be placed in practicum by the Director
2.   A minimum grade of “B” is required in each completed course.        of Clinical T raining. Students must obtain Internship through a
     A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 must be maintained.         competitive application process. It is highly recommended that these
3.   Students must meet attendance requirements as articulated in        internships be completed in a multidisciplinary setting offering a
     the Student Handbook.                                               variety of training experiences. The choice of a culturally diverse site
                                                                         is encouraged.
4.   Students must submit and defend an original dissertation
     accepted by the faculty.
5.   Students are required to complete a minimum 1,000 hours of          For a full description of all requirements, consult the current
     practicum, 1,500 hours of intern ship, and 60 hours of personal     edition of the Pacifica Student Handbook, the Clinical Training
     therapy.                                                            Handbook, and the Dissertation Handbook.
6.   Students must successfully pass the Compre       hensive Exam-
     ination at the end of the third year.




FACULTY MENTORSHIP                                                       PREPARATION FOR CLINICAL
Each Student is assigned a Faculty Advisor for mentorship throughout     PSYCHOLOGY LICENSURE
the Program. Faculty Advisors meet regularly with their student          This curriculum is not intended to meet all the requirements of each
advisees to monitor their academic performance, discuss research         state for licensure in clinical psychology . Students will acquire the
interests, oversee clinical development, assist with dissertation        accredited doctoral training necessary for licensure as a clinical
decisions, and provide personal and professional support.                psychologist in the state of California. Students may need to meet
                                                                         additional licensure requirements in their home states. Each student
                                                                         is responsible for determining and remaining current on their state
                                                                         licensure requirements.




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M.A. in Counseling Psychology
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY




                                                                           In the Counseling Psychology Program, we seek
                                                                           to develop an atmosphere of openness and mutual
                                                          respect in which each voice is honored and in which each student’s
The M.A. Counseling                                       unique skills and talents are nurtured. The program offers students
                                                          the opportunity to build community while becoming well grounded in
Psychology Program with
                                                          the skills and theories foundational to the practice of Marriage and
Emphasis in Depth Psychology
                                                          Family Therapy.”
is dedicated to offering students unique                                   —WENDY DAVEE, PROGRAM CHAIR
and comprehensive training in the art
of marriage, family, and individual
psychotherapy.
Depth Psychology invites a curiosity about the psyche and respect
for the diversity of human experience. Interdisciplinary courses in
literature, mythology, religion, and culture deepen students’ ability
to link archetypal themes to socio-political issues in the lives of
individuals, families, and communities.
As preparation for professional licensure, a rigorous academic
program emphasizes theoretical understanding and experiential
training in clinical skills. Research studies prepare students to
explore and contribute to the tradition of scholarship within the
depth psychological tradition to further Pacifica’s dedication to
tending the soul of the world.
Students in the M.A. Counseling Psychology Program are required to
pursue two years of coursework in each of the three following areas:
  HUMANITIES AND DEPTH TRADITIONS
  THEORY/PRAXIS
  MARRIAGE, FAMILY, AND CHILD COUNSELING




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FIRST YEAR                                                                                                               CURRICULUM
                   FALL       Freud‘s Depth Psychology – CP 504, 2 Units                                                 OVERVIEW
                              Theoretical Foundations of Psychotherapy – CP 501, 2.5 Units
                              Process of Psychotherapy I – CP 515, 3 Units                                               Counseling Psychology
                WINTER        Jung‘s Depth Psychology – CP 505, 2 Units                                                  classes take place in three-
                              Family Systems & Domestic Violence I – CP 605, .5 Unit                                     day sessions approximately
                              Survey of Human Development – CP 520, 2 Units
                                                                                                                         once each month during fall,
                              Process of Psychotherapy II – CP 516, 3 Units
                                                                                                                         winter, and spring. There is
                 SPRING       Myth, Literature, and Religious Studies II – CP 508, 2 Units
                              Psychopathology – CP 502, 2 Units                                                          also a seven-day summer
                              Family Systems & Domestic Violence II – CP 606, 1 Unit                                     session each year.
                              Process of Psychotherapy III – CP 517, 3 Units
                              Geropsychology and Long Term Care – CP 526, 1 Unit
                SUMMER        Research in Psychology – CP 620, 1.5 Units
                              Ethics and the Law – CP 523, 3 Units
                              Child Abuse – CP 525, 1 Unit
                              Psychopharmacology – CP 670, 3 Units

SECOND YEAR
                   FALL       Imaginal Psychology – CP 512, 2 Units
                              Directed Research I – CP 650, 1 Unit
                              Mores and Values of Cross Cultural Groups – CP 530, 1 Unit
                              Alcohol and Drug Abuse – CP 660, 1.5 Units
                              Clinical Practice I – CP 610, 3 Units
                WINTER        Myth, Literature, and Religious Studies III – CP 509, 2 Units
                              Marriage, Family, and Relationship Counseling I – CP 601, 3 Units
                              Clinical Practice II – CP 611, 3 Units
                 SPRING       Cultural Psychology – CP 511, 2 Units
                              Marriage, Family, and Relationship Counseling II – CP 602, 3 Units
                              Clinical Practice III – CP 612, 3 Units
                SUMMER        Child Psychotherapy – CP 532, 2 Units
                              Group Process – CP 521, 2 Units                                                         WENDY DAVEE, M.A.
                              Psychological Assessment – CP 630, 3 Units                                              Chair, M.A. Program in Counseling
                              Human Sexuality in the Therapy Context – CP 522, 1 Unit                                 Psychology with Emphasis in
CONTINUING                                                                                                            Depth Psychology

                              Directed Research II – CP 651, 3 Units                                                  Wendy Davee is a licensed Marriage
                              Personal Therapy – CP 550, 5 Units                                                      and Family Therapist who has worked in
                              Supervised Traineeship – 300 hours, 0 Units
                                                                                                                      non-profit, human service, and governmental
Selected courses may have online components. This curriculum may vary depending upon changing academic needs.
                                                                                                                      settings. She has been a core faculty
                                                                                                                      member at Pacifica Graduate Institute since
                                                                                                                      2000, first serving as Clinical Coordinator
                                                                                                                      in the Counseling Psychology Program, and
                                                                                                                      became Chair of the program in 2003. She
                                                                                                                      has supervised MFT trainees and interns
                                                                                                                      and has a special interest in working with
                                                                                                                      children. She is particularly interested in the
                                                                                                                      power of symbolic play in the therapeutic
                                                                                                                      relationship.




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M.A. in Counseling Psychology                                                                                 Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY                                                                             Descriptions


HUMANITIES AND DEPTH                                                      Cultural Psychology
                                                                          CP 511, 2 UNITS
TRADITIONS COURSES
                                                                          Psychological experience, development, and pathology occur in a
These courses serve to promote the incorporation of literature,
                                                                          cultural context. This class examines cultural issues and problems
mythology, and depth psychology into the practice of psycho-              such as racism, sexism, ageism, violence, poverty , ecology, and
therapy. They emphasize a wide variety of topics, such as depth           education to illuminate how they affect individual development. The
psychology, literary genres, religious and mystical traditions,           intermingling of cultural psychology and depth psychology can open
                                                           .
mythic approaches to experience, and cultural psychology Stu-             the door of the consulting room to the culture itself, widening the
dents are urged to imagine and approach the human condition               scope of “psychological” practice, so that the soul of the individual
from diverse ethnic and cultural perspectives. The humanities             and soul in the world are seen to be continuous.
and depth traditions courses have the capacity to awaken a
                                                                          Imaginal Psychology
sense of the complexity of the human psyche, teaching one
                                                                          CP 512, 2 UNITS
how to see mythically, imaginally, and psychologically. Instead           Imaginal and archetypal psychology are examined for the ways in
of perceiving literature, mythology , and depth psychology as             which they revision depth psychological approaches to therapy and
isolated fields of study, the student is able to understand that           culture. Consideration is given to the development of a poetic/meta-
the psychotherapist’s vision is fed from a multiplicity of cul-           phorical sensibility in confronting the complexity of psychological
tural sources which open up the way an individual’ s suffering            life. Emphasis is placed on moving from theory to practice specifi -
is witnessed in psychotherapy. The specific contents, courses,             cally regarding the use of images to deepen one’s work.
and titles of the Humanities and Depth Traditions classes vary
each academic year. Students complete six courses in this area            THEORY/PRAXIS COURSES
of study during the two-year program.                                     These courses are designed to train students in counsel-
                                                                          ing procedures and techniques, psychotherapeutic styles,
Freud’s Depth Psychology                                                  interpersonal and group dynamics, and clinical strategies.
CP 504, 2 UNITS                                                           This training is promoted through the use of case consulta-
Students explore the emergence of the “talking cure” and the pro-         tion, review and critique of video and audio tape recordings
found repercussions this therapeutic development has had on the           of clinical sessions, dyadic practice sessions, and classroom
modern practice of psychotherapy . Themes include the psychoana-          observation. Special topic presentations, case analyses, and
                                                      s
lytic view of human nature, defense mechanisms, Freud’ typology of        in-class demonstrations strengthen the student’s understand-
the unconscious, and the relationship between psyche and culture.         ing of making a diagnosis and developing treatment plans.
Jung‘s Depth Psychology                                                   Students are encouraged to become aware of how their affec-
CP 505, 2 UNITS                                                           tive states, ideas, biases, and fantasies affect the therapeutic
This course surveys Jung’ s contributions to depth psychology , in-       relationship. Furthermore, they are asked to critically question
cluding his work on archetypes, the self, the objective psyche, the       the traditional therapeutic understandings of such concepts as
transcendent function, individuation, dreams, and active imagina-         health, growth, and healing. The Theory/Praxis courses also
tion. Jungian and post-Jungian theorists such as von Franz, Fordham,      provide a context for students to consult with faculty advisors
Samuels, and Edinger may be explored.                                     in undertaking research and generating new knowledge as part
                                                                          of the Master’s Thesis and to prepare for and sit for Pacifi ca’s
Myth, Literature, and Religious Studies I, II, III
CP 507, 508, 509, 2 UNITS EACH
                                                                          Comprehensive Examination.
Mythology, literature, and religion reveal the complex metaphoric and     Process of Psychotherapy I, II, III
symbolic nature of the human psyche and its search for meaning. T o       CP 515, 516, 517, 3 UNITS EACH
be fully present to the polyphonic nature of experience and imagina-      These courses help students develop their skills in counseling pro-
tion, psychology must pay close attention to the perennial issues that    cedures and techniques. Psych otherapeutic styles, strategies, and
guide the understanding of being human. Opening the interdisciplinary     techniques are discussed, modeled, and experienced. Students are
connections between psychology and the studies of myth, literature,       expected to take part in extensive dyadic practice sessions beyond
and religion expands and enriches the understanding of therapeutic        the classroom instruction. These three courses are sequential in na-
relationships, psychopathology, therapeutic interventions, and healing.   ture. Successful completion of each earlier Process of Psychotherapy
                                                                          course is required for entrance in the later one(s).

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M.A. in Counseling Psychology                                                                                    Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY                                                                                Descriptions

Group Process                                                               MARRIAGE, FAMILY, AND CHILD
CP 521, 2 UNITS
                                                                            COUNSELING COURSES
Discussion focuses on the individual and interpersonal dynamics
                                                                            Current approaches and treatment techniques in Marriage, Fam-
of therapy groups in general and on        process-oriented groups in
                                                                            ily and Child Counseling form the focus of these courses. The fac-
particular. In-class participation in an extensive group experience is
                                                                            ulty, composed of experienced educators who are also practicing
designed to further the student’s understanding of group interaction
and strengthen facilitator skills. Prerequisites: CP 515, 516, 517
                                                                            therapists, augment the coursework by bringing theirprofessional
                                                                            and personal experiences into the classroom setting.
Personal Therapy
CP 550, 5 UNITS                                                             Theoretical Foundations of Psychotherapy
While in this program, students must engage in 50 hours of personal         CP 501, 2.5 UNITS
therapy with a licensed mental health professional or certifi ed ana-        This course explores the foundations of contemporary psychotherapy
lyst of their choice. A minimum of 15 hours must be completed during        and examines the theories which contribute to its practice. T o pro-
the first year as a requirement to beginning a traineeship. Pass/No          vide students with a thorough cultural and historical perspective, the
Pass                                                                        course traces the development of classical psychoanalysis, object
Clinical Practice I, II, III                                                relations theory, self psychology, feminist reappraisals of psycho-
CP 610, 611, 612, 3 UNITS EACH
                                                                            analysis, and humanistic schools of thought.
The skills of initial interviewing, history taking, diagnostic assess-      Psychopathology
ment, clinical case reporting, treatment planning, and therapeutic          CP 502, 2 UNITS
intervention are taught in conjunction with small group supervision         The varieties of psychopathology as presented in the Diagnostic and
of ongoing cases in students’ traineeships. Clinical application issues     Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders are reviewed in this course.
studied may include systems theory , child/adolescent treatment,            Themes to be pursued include the history of pathologies as well as
family violence, aging, depression, HIV/AIDS, dreams, sandplay, and         their diagnoses.
depth approaches. Students are required to conduct 50 hours of face-
                                                                            Survey of Human Development
to-face psychotherapy in an approved and supervised traineeship in
                                                                            CP 520, 2 UNITS
their home setting during each quarter of this class to receive credit.
                                                                            Developmental theory and research are presented to understand
The total 150 hours required for the three quarters includes counsel-
                                                                            various approaches to developmental stages and issues across the
ing at least six individual clients for a minimum of six sessions each
                                                                            lifespan, and to look critically at key concepts and debates in devel-
(36 individual hours). These three classes are sequential in nature.
                                                                            opmental psychology. The socio-cultural context of development and
Successful completion of each earlier Clinical Practice course is
                                                                            of theories about development is emphasized.
required for entrance into the later one(s). Completion of 15 hours of
personal therapy is required prior to enrolling in Clinical Practice I.     Human Sexuality in the Therapy Context
Prerequisites: CP 515, 516, 517                                             CP 522, 1 UNIT

Directed Research I                                                         This course supports students in developing a therapeutic approach
CP 650, 1 UNIT                                                              that recognizes the diversity of human sexual expression, eroticism,
Students enroll in this course during the fall quarter of the second year   and sexual self-concepts. Physical, emotional, relational, cultural,
and participate in mandatory meetings with their thesis advisors dur -      and spiritual variables are considered. With a focus on incorporating
ing the fall, winter, and spring quarters. This course culminates in a      discussions about sexuality into therapy , various topics of current
thesis outline, which is submitted to the advisor no later than the due     clinical relevance are explored.
date for the second year summer quarter assignments. Pass/No Pass           Ethics and the Law
Directed Research II                                                        CP 523, 3 UNITS
CP 651, 3 UNITS                                                             This consideration of legal and ethical issues related to professional
Students enroll in this course when they are ready to begin writing the     psychology and counseling includes discussion of recent legislation
thesis, which is usually after the completion of on-campus coursework.      and court decisions. Case vignettes expand students’ exploration of
The research and writing of the thesis is supervised by the student’ s      the ethical and legal concerns in a variety of potential situations, in-
thesis advisor, who reads and gives feedback on the various drafts          cluding but not limited to mandated reporting laws and professional
of the thesis. A separate thesis fee is assessed in connection with         standards of conduct.
Directed Research II, and applies to all students regardless of when
they enroll in this course. This fee covers three quarters of work with
the advisor from the date of enrollment in the course. Pass/No Pass
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M.A. in Counseling Psychology                                                                                   Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY                                                                               Descriptions

Child Abuse                                                                 Marriage, Family, and Relationship Counseling II
CP 525, 1 UNIT                                                              CP 602, 3 UNITS
This course provides a comprehensive presentation of the ethics and         This course deepens and expands upon the theoretical and expe-
laws regarding child abuse assessment, reporting, and intervention          riential knowledge cultivated in Marriage, Family , and Relation-
as they pertain to clinical practice.                                       ship Counseling I. The course is designed to focus on system
                                                                            assessment and intervention by engaging the student in practical
Geropsychology and Long Term Care                                           application, skill building, and treatment planning for couples and
CP 526, 1 UNIT
                                                                            families. Simulated family sessions, role-play , myth, literature,
This course examines the psychological, mythological, social, and           and film may be used to demonstrate key concepts and patterns.
biological aspects of the aging process including theories of aging,        Prerequisites: CP 515, 516, 517
normative changes in memory versus disease processes, ageism,
sexuality, and intimacy in later life, developmental tasks of older life,   Family Systems and Domestic Violence I
life review, diversity in aging, and myths and misconceptions about         CP 605, .5 UNIT
the elderly. Assessment, diagnostic formulation, and treatment plan-        This course introduces family systems concepts and theories, with
ning guidelines are identifi ed to assist in working with the elderly        an emphasis on spousal or partner abuse assessment, detection,
and their signifi cant others regarding housing, health care options,        and prevention. It also provides an introduction to domestic violence
and long term care needs.                                                   intervention strategies.

Mores and Values of Cross Cultural Groups                                   Family Systems and Domestic Violence II
CP 530, 1 UNIT                                                              CP 606, 1 UNIT

This course is designed to develop the student’ s understanding of          Students explore the application of family systems concepts and
how one’s identification within a particular subculture infl uences           theories with emphasis on domestic violence intervention strategies.
identity and behavior. Emphasis is placed on gaining an appreciation        Coursework includes identifi cation of community resources, aware-
of the unique cultural values and psychological orientations of vari-       ness of cultural factors, and same gender abuse dynamics.
ous cultural groups.
                                                                            Research in Psychology
Child Psychotherapy                                                         CP 620, 1.5 UNITS
CP 532, 2 UNITS                                                             This course presents the basics of psychological research with
This course focuses on the assessment and treatment of childhood            particular emphasis on qualitative methodologies. During this course,
disorders. Various theoretical approaches as well as play therapy are       students begin to organize their research for the Master’s Thesis.
emphasized. Consultation with parents and schools is also addressed.        Psychological Assessment
Selected Topics in Counseling Psychology I, II                              CP 630, 3 UNITS

CP 599, 699, 1-4 UNITS EACH                                                 The field of psychological assessment and testing as it relates to
Course content varies.                                                      applied clinical settings is surveyed. Students are exposed to test
                                                                            theory and construction, diagnostic interviews, mental status ex-
Marriage, Family, and Relationship Counseling I                             aminations, neuro-psychological tests, intelligence and personality
CP 601, 3 UNITS                                                             tests, and psychological reports.
Students are introduced to basic concepts and theories in Marriage
                                                                            Alcohol and Drug Abuse
and Family practice, including historical and current theories of fam-
                                                                            CP 660, 1.5 UNITS
ily systems work. Students develop a working knowledge of multiple
levels of systemic organization, family development through the life        Students become familiar with presenting symptoms, diagnosis, and
cycle, and an ability to identify complex patterns of family relation-      treatment of the abuse of alcohol and other substances.
ships in their own families of origin and in their work with clients.       Psychopharmacology
Course content includes the development of genograms, exploration           CP 670, 3 UNITS
of implicit/explicit rules in family systems, communication patterns,
                                                                            The basic principles of psychopharmacology are presented, including
and the ability to articulate key concepts such as archetypal dynam-
                                                                            the scientific foundations and clinical applications of the psychop-
ics in families, triangulation, alliances, coalitions, gender roles, and
                                                                            harmacological management of mental disorders across the lifespan.
identified patient.Prerequisites: CP 515, 516, 517
                                                                            The use of psychopharmacology in conjunction with psychotherapy is
                                                                            discussed, emphasizing psychiatric referral criteria.

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M.A. in Counseling Psychology                                                                                    Degree
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY                                                                                Requirements


PREPARATION FOR CALIFORNIA MARRIAGE
AND FAMILY THERAPY LICENSURE
The curriculum content areas required by the Board of Behavioral           Child Abuse Assessment and Reporting
Sciences in the State of California are covered by the following           CP 525 Child Abuse
Counseling Psychology Program courses. Each student is responsible         Psychological Testing
for determining and remaining informed of licensure requirements in        CP 630 Psychological Assessment
his or her own state.
                                                                           Psychopathology
Applied Psychotherapeutic Techniques of Marriage,                          CP 502 Psychopathology
Family and Child Counseling
CP 610, 611, 612 Clinical Practice I, II, III                              Research Methodology
                                                                           CP 620 Research in Psychology
Cross Cultural Mores & Values
CP 530 Mores and Values of Cross Cultural Groups                           Theories of Marriage, Family & Child Counseling
                                                                           CP 601, 602 Marriage, Family, & Relationship Counseling I, II
Human Communication                                                        CP 521 Group Process
CP 515, 516, 517 Process of Psychotherapy I, II, III
                                                                           CP 501 Theoretical Foundations of Psychotherapy
Human Growth and Development                                               CP 532 Child Psychotherapy
CP 520 Survey of Human Development
                                                                           Alcohol and Drug Abuse
Human Sexuality                                                            CP 660 Alcohol and Drug Abuse
CP 522 Human Sexuality in the Therapy Context
                                                                           Psychopharmacology
Aging and Long Term Care                                                   CP 670 Psychopharmacology
CP 526 Geropsychology and Long Term Care
                                                                           Professional Ethics & Law
Family Violence                                                            CP 523 Ethics and the Law
CP 605, 606 Family Systems and Domestic Violence I, II



REQUIREMENTS                                                               TRAINEESHIP REQUIREMENT
FOR GRADUATION                                                             During the second year of study , students are re quired to be actively
1.   Each student must complete a total of 73 quarter units in order to    engaged in a supervised traineeship experience, approved by the ad-
     fulfill the unit requirement for graduation.                           ministration, in order to be eligible to sit for Pacifi ca’s Comprehensive
2.   A minimum grade of “C” is required in each completed course. A        Examination. Students may complete the traineeships as a trainee at
     cumulative grade point average of 3.0 must be maintained.             a charitable social service agency, hospital, or other approved facility.
3.   Students must attend at least two-thirds of each course.              The Institute’s clinical staff provides guidelines and consultation for
                                                                           students as they select traineeship sites in their home settings. The
4.   Students must complete a Master’s Thesis accepted by the faculty.
                                                                           choice of a culturally diverse site is encouraged.
5.   Students must complete a 300-hour traineeship, including a mini-
     mum of 150 direct service hours.                                      THE COMPREHENSIVE
6.   Students must participate in 50 hours of personal psychotherapy.      EXAMINATION AND
     A minimum of 15 hours must be completed during the first year.         MASTER’S THESIS
7.   Students must pass the Comprehensive Examination.                     A comprehensive examination and a master’ s thesis are to be com-
                                                                           pleted in partial fulfi llment of degree requirements. Students work
FIRST YEAR ASSESSMENT                                                      closely with the instructors of Clinical Practice and Directed Re-
During the spring quarter of a students’ first year, the faculty will as-   search courses during the second year of the program in pre paration
sess each student’s progress in process skills and readiness to begin      for the Comp rehensive Examination and master’s thesis processes.
a clinical practicum. The result of this assessment may include:
1.   Endorsement of the student’s progress as satisfactory.                For a full description of all requirements, consult the current
2.   Endorsement with reservations and recommendations.                    edition of the Pacifica Student Handbook.
3.   Recommendation that the student discontinue the program.

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Ph.D. in Depth Psychology
WITH EMPHASIS IN PSYCHOTHERAPY



                                                                         Deepening into the work of being a psychotherapist is
                                                                         a life-long process which engages not only the mind
                                                         but also the heart and ultimately our whole being. This process
                                                         requires a profound commitment to consciousness—to becoming
                                                         aware of our own inner unseen aspects, of the hidden depths waiting
                                                         to be encountered in our clients, and, in addition, a commitment to
At the core of all projects in                           exploring the unexamined assumptions and values that underlie our
Depth Psychology, we find the                             culture and our world view.”
legacy of a radical reconnection to the                                             —PATRICIA KATSKY, PROGRAM CHAIR
living psyche. Depth Psychology taps into
lived experiences of the psyche that reach
beyond the individual person and cross
the boundaries of time and culture. It requires a shift in the center of our
attention.
Pacifica Graduate Institute’s Ph.D. in Depth Psychology with Emphasis in
Psychotherapy is a training program that is centered on the psyche. Informed
by Jungian and psychoanalytic thought, integrating the best offerings of
current psychological theory and exciting new findings that enrich our
understanding of mind and body, this program challenges its students to find
and develop their own unique talents as therapists, and to participate in re-
imagining psychotherapy for the 21st century. The curriculum is designed for
students who have completed sufficient coursework for licensing at the master’s
level. This foundation allows for an emphasis on experiential learning supported
by approaches to research which are similarly experiential and psyche-centered.
The Ph.D. in Depth Psychology with Emphasis in Psychotherapy includes
three years of course work and the successful completion of an original
dissertation. Courses are offered in the following three areas:
  THEORY AND TRADITIONS OF DEPTH PSYCHOTHERAPY
     PSYCHOTHERAPY INFORMED BY THE HUMANITIES
       AND INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES
  INTEGRATED PRAXIS: RESEARCH AND CASEWORK


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FIRST YEAR                                                                                                              CURRICULUM
                    FALL      Jungian Psychotherapy I – DPP 761, 2 Units                                                OVERVIEW
                              Practicum I: Working with Dreams – DPP 780, 2 Units
                              Foundations for Research in Depth Psychotherapy I – DPP 784, 2 Units                      Depth Psychology with
                WINTER        Depth Approaches to Psychotherapy – DPP 760, 2 Units                                      Emphasis in Psychotherapy
                              Psychotherapy Informed by the Mythic Tradition – DPP 921, 2 Units
                                                                                                                        classes take place during
                              Practicum II: Face-to-Face Group Case Consultation – DPP 781, 2 Units
                                                                                                                        three-day sessions
                 SPRING       Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Depth Psychology – DPP 730, 2 Units
                              Archetypal Psychotherapy – DPP 762, 2 Units                                               (Friday, Saturday, Sunday)
                              Introduction to Research: Overview of Qualitative Methods – DPP 782, 2 Units              approximately once each
                SUMMER        Practicum III A: Processes of Therapy and Supervision – DPP 783, 2 Units                  month during the fall,
                              Practicum III B: Scholarly Writing and Publication – DPP 785, 2 Units                     winter, and spring quarters.
SECOND YEAR                                                                                                             Summer quarter coursework
                    FALL      Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy I – DPP 763, 2 Units                                         is offered in a single five-day
                              Dissertation Development I – DPP 832, 2 Units                                             session.
                              Jungian Psychotherapy II – DPP 861, 2 Units
                WINTER        Foundations for Research in Depth Psychotherapy II:
                                 Imaginal Perspectives – DPP 882, 2 Units
                              Practicum IV: Face-to-Face Group Case Consultation – DPP 880, 2 Units
                              Psychotherapy and Culture I: Diverse Healing Traditions – DPP 830, 2 Units
                 SPRING       Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy II – DPP 863, 2 Units
                              Literary Foundations for Depth Psychotherapy – DPP 835, 2 Units
                              Practicum V: Face-to-Face Group Case Consultation – DPP 890, 2 Units
                SUMMER        Practicum VI A: Processes of Therapy and Supervision – DPP 883, 2 Units
                              Practicum VI B: Scholarly Writing and Publication – DPP 885, 2 Units

THIRD YEAR
                    FALL      Jungian Psychotherapy III – DPP 961, 2 Units
                              Selected Topics in Theory and Practice I – DPP 895, 2 Units
                              Practicum VII: Face-to-Face Group Case Consultation – DPP 980, 2 Units
                              Dissertation Development II – DPP 932A, 2/3 Unit
                WINTER        Psyche in Nature – DPP 732, 2 Units
                              Practicum VIII: Face-to-Face Group Case Consultation – DPP 985, 2 Units
                              Psychotherapy, Medicine, and New Science – DPP 963, 2 Units,
                              Dissertation Development III – DPP 932B, 2/3 Unit
                                                                                                                     PATRICIA KATSKY, PH.D.
                 SPRING       Psychotherapy and Culture II: Culturally-Based Symptoms –
                                  DPP 831, 2 Units                                                                   Chair, Ph.D. Program in Depth
                              Psyche and the Sacred – DPP 920, 2 Units                                               Psychology with Emphasis
                              Practicum IX: Face-to-Face Group Case Consultation – DPP 990, 2 Units                  in Psychotherapy
                              Dissertation Development IV – DPP 932C, 2/3 Unit
                                                                                                                     Pat Katsky has served on the faculty at
                SUMMER        Oral Comprehensive Presentation – DPP 994, 2 Units
                                                                                                                     Pacifica since 2000. Dr . Katsky has been
                              Selected Topics in Theory and Practice II – DPP 995, 2 Units
                                                                                                                     a Jungian analyst for 15 years and a
CONTINUING                                                                                                           psychotherapist in private practice for 25
                              Dissertation Writing – DPP 999, 15 Units                                               years. She is the former president of the
                                                                                                                     C.G. Jung Institute of Los Angeles, and
This curriculum may vary depending upon changing academic needs. Selected courses may have online components.
                                                                                                                     has served for many years on the Review
                                                                                                                     and Certifying Boards of the Los Angeles
                                                                                                                     and San Francisco Jung Institutes. She
                                                                                                                     co-founded and continues to serve as a
                                                                                                                     Board member for a non-profi t counseling
                                                                                                                     center in the Los Angeles area.




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Ph.D. in Depth Psychology                                                                                            Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN PSYCHOTHERAPY                                                                                       Descriptions

                                                                               Jung’s studies of alchemy as applied to clinical practice by Edward
THEORY AND TRADITIONS OF
                                                                               Edinger and Marie-Louise von Franz; the archetype of the feminine
DEPTH PSYCHOTHERAPY                                                            and its amplifi cation by von Franz, Mary Esther Harding, Marion
The study of Depth Psychotherapy is anchored in a lineage                      Woodman, and others; the archetype of the shadow and its explo-
of psychological theory that examines Freudian, Jungian and                    ration by Adolf Guggenbühl-Craig; current developments in neuro-
archetypal perspectives, and includes explorations at the fron-                anatomy that relate to core Jungian ideas such as archetypes and
tiers of theoretical development in the field.                                  complexes, and other areas at the discretion of the instructor . Fairy
                                                                               tales, creation myths, the mystery traditions, or various mythologies
Historical and Philosophical Foundations                                       (Greek, Egyptian, etc.), as they represent psychological processes,
of Depth Psychology                                                            may also be addressed.
DPP 730, 2 UNITS
Students explore the organizing perspectives and therapeutic ap-               Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy I
                                                                               DPP 763, 2 UNITS
proaches which have shaped contemporary W estern psychology.
The philosophical principles of psychological models from antiquity            With the publication of Interpretation of Dreams (1901), Freud set
to the present era are examined, such as those associated with re-             the foundation for psychoanalytic scholarship for the fi rst 100 years.
ligious traditions, medicine, and the schools of psychoanalysis,               This course provides an overview of the seminal clinical insights
behaviorism, existential, humanistic, post-modern, and multicultural           harvested by Freud and his early followers, with specifi c attention
and cross-cultural psychology. The course includes a discussion of             paid to clinical technique in the psychoanalytic situation. Building
the history and development of psychology as an intellectual and               on Freud’s ideas, two major theoretical paradigms have emerged in
scientific discipline, and depth psychotherapy as a practice.                   the last century. Students engage the clinical ideas of Melanie Klein
                                                                               and Heinz Kohut and discuss how they both elaborate and depart
Jungian Psychotherapy I
                                                                               from Freud’s initial vision. The core concepts of technique studied
DPP 761, 2 UNITS
                                                                               include the transference/countertransference fi eld, the therapeutic
Classical Jungian concepts such as ego, persona, shadow , animus/
anima, Self, complex, archetype, collective unconscious, tran-                 alliance, projective identification, the psychoanalytic frame, insight
scendent function, and individuation are studied. In addition, the             and interpretation, and termination.
centrality of dreams, active imagination, typology, and transference/          Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy II
countertransference considerations are all reviewed in the context             DPP 863, 2 UNITS
of psychotherapeutic practice. Further clinical application of Jungian         This course continues explorations of the work of Freud, Klein, Bion,
thought is demonstrated through readings of primary texts and                  and others and focuses primarily on current trends in psychoanalysis
secondary source material as they elucidate Jung’ s original work.             and in psychoanalytic psychotherapy . Students look at approaches
Particular attention is paid to how various forms of psychopathology           to specific problems and pathological structures and delineate the
can be viewed on multi-dimensional levels from the personal and                dynamics and treatments of various psychological symptoms includ-
cultural-historical, to the archetypal, mythic, and imaginal.                  ing borderline and psychotic conditions.
Jungian Psychotherapy II                                                       Archetypal Psychotherapy
DPP 861, 2 UNITS                                                               DPP 762, 2 UNITS
This course explores the phenomena of synchronicity and paranormal             Focusing primarily on the work of James Hillman, this course fi rst ex-
experience, which marked a new creative phase in Jung’ s later work
                                                                               amines his critique of clinical psychology and analytical practice and his
that has far -reaching theoretical and psychotherapeutic implications.
                                                                               call to enlarge the frame of practice to include the greater community
Synchronicity involved a redefi nition of reality based on acausality , non-
                                                                               and culture. Students learn the theoretical connections and differences
locality, and the participation of consciousness and imagination, leading
                                                                               between Archetypal Psychology and the works of other depth psycholo-
towards what Jung calls creatio continua, continuing creation. Students
examine the implications of these shifts for clinical practice including the   gists including Freud, Adler , and Jung. In addition there is particular
centrality of the dream, the power of anomalous experience during wak-         focus on moving from theory to practice, specifically regarding the use
ing consciousness, and the religious function of the psyche.                   of images to deepen one’s work.

Jungian Psychotherapy III                                                      Depth Approaches to Psychotherapy
DPP 961, 2 UNITS                                                               DPP 760, 2 UNITS
In this course the later work of Jung is reviewed within the context           This course examines various psychoanalytic original formulations
of those post-Jungians who have focused on the application of these            and continues with contemporary psychoanalytic and Jungian views.
ideas to psychotherapy . Jung wrote extensively on the cultural/               Students study the psychodynamic view of character formation and
historical background to his psychology of the unconscious and its             looks at the major character disorders, neuroses, and psychotic states
archetypal foundation, in part because symbols and mythic images               both from the point of view of their phenomenology and their uncon-
from cross-cultural sources (and their modern variants) appear in              scious underpinnings. In each case we describe the ways in which theo-
a patients’ dreams, fantasies, and symptoms. Knowledge of this                 rists of different schools have approached these disorders, and various
background is useful in understanding, amplifying, and providing a             psychotherapeutic approaches, especially noting Freudian, Kleinian,
foundation for such case material. Topics for this course may include          self-psychological, intersubjectivist, and Jungian attitudes to them.

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Ph.D. in Depth Psychology                                                                                            Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN PSYCHOTHERAPY                                                                                       Descriptions

Selected Topics in Theory and Practice I and II                              of poetry. His discovery has remained true of poetry’ s power to assist
DPP 895, 995 2 UNITS EACH                                                    psyche’s healing by acknowledging its shadowed contours. Classic narra-
These courses provide fl exible opportunities to explore a variety of         tives have contemporary relevance. Through revealing the movement of
selected topics important to the practice of psychotherapy from a            soul in its struggles to know itself and its relation to a larger world order,
depth perspective. The content areas may highlight current trends in         literature holds up a mirror to the personal and collective psyche.
                                                            ,
theory and practice, work with special populations, diversity law and        Psyche and the Sacred
ethics, or interdisciplinary themes not already covered.                     DPP 920, 2 UNITS
                                                                             The psyche’s capacity and affinity for sacred experience, as expressed
PSYCHOTHERAPY INFORMED                                                       in religion, ritual, and encounters with the numinosum, continually
BY THE HUMANITIES AND                                                        remind us of the importance of a spiritual consideration in all psy-
INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES                                                    chological work. Jung once said that all psychological problems are
Depth Psychotherapy moves beyond a limited clinical paradigm                 essentially religious problems. If true, this idea becomes especially
to a broader frame that includes enriched connections to heal-               interesting to practitioners of depth psychotherapy in the ways it
ing practices informed by literature, myth, spirituality , and a             calls for a revision of our notions of self, suffering, pathology, and of
multitude of interdisciplinary studies.                                      approaches to treatment. This course explores ways that a depth psy-
                                                                             chotherapist might work with the religious function of the psyche.
Psyche in Nature
DPP 732, 2 UNITS                                                             Psychotherapy Informed by the Mythic Tradition
The ethos of psyche-centered psychotherapy is not merely a construct         DPP 921, 2 UNITS
of interiority. It has important implications for how we situate our lives   Freud, Jung, and many of their critics and followers have consistently
within the context of a field or system. If we depart from the fantasy        and directly recognized the natural connection between mythology and
of the autonomous ego and engage instead with the image of ego as            psychology. Mythology is often seen as a kind of psychology in its use of
a constellation within the psyche, our imagination about the nature          images, stories of struggle and transformation, and in the way it connects
of our individual relationship to the world also shifts. This course         us across boundaries of culture, time, and space. Students examine this
focuses on the ecological view of human interactions, including the          historical connection between mythology, psychology, and psychotherapy
particular interaction of psychotherapy . The metaphors of ecology           as well as the mythic base of psychology and the healing arts.
offer valuable directions for understanding systemic perspectives on         Psychotherapy, Medicine, and New Science
couples, family, group, and organizational psychological practice, and       DPP 963, 2 UNITS
provide lenses through which to regard our relationships.                    Brain research, holographic theory, and cosmol ogy studies, together
Psychotherapy and Culture I: Diverse Healing Traditions                      with new developments in quantum physics, give rise to radical de-
DPP 830, 2 UNITS                                                             velopments in our knowledge, thus extending our worldview toward
This course places the practice of psychotherapy in dialogue with diverse    a new psychophysical foundation of reality. These developments pro-
traditions of counseling and healing from one or more non-W estern           foundly affect issues such as the mind-body relationship. Students
cultural settings. By examining similarities and differences with other      explore these intersections of thought with specifi c focus on the
traditions students can begin to appreciate the deep common ground           implications for psychotherapy and emerging new paradigms of psy-
that unites all forms of work with the psyche. Students also develop         chological healing and transformation. W e also give consideration
greater awareness of culture-specifi c attitudes about pathology and          to exciting new developments in psychobiology and neuroscience,
health that tend to become codified in clinical practice.                     including the evidence for neurogenesis in connection with psycho-
                                                                             therapy and other healing arts.
Psychotherapy and Culture II: Culturally-Based Symptoms
DPP 831, 2 UNITS                                                             INTEGRATED PRAXIS:
Cultures and communities themselves may be symptomatic, and symp-
                                                                             RESEARCH AND CASEWORK
toms felt at the personal level are often culturally based. Alienation,
poverty, oppression, violence, and trauma sometimes provide the context      There are two interwoven threads of praxis in this program.
for psychological development that often become the focus of treatment       First, we engage in case presentation, group supervision,
as if they were intra-psychic in origin. This course examines the special    dreamwork, and consultation — all aimed at deepening our
nature of psychotherapy in the context of culturally-based stressors. It     therapeutic work with patients. Second, we step back from the
may include focus on issues related to work with patients from diverse       focus on clinical practice and adopt the attitudes and methods
backgrounds, problems of language, and the role of the therapist in          of inquiry that enable us to propose and conduct research on
cultural criticism and culture change. Various theorists who describe the    the essential themes and experiences of doing psychotherapy
relationship between culture and depth psychology will be discussed.         from a depth perspective. Thus, the courses on therapeutic
Literary Foundations for Depth Psychotherapy                                 practice are directly linked to the courses on research so that
DPP 835, 2 UNITS                                                             our research grows organically out of our therapeutic work and
When Aristotle wrote of tragedy in his Poetics in the 5th century BCE, he    the work of our colleagues.
observed that some cathartic or therapeutic cleansing occurred by means
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Ph.D. in Depth Psychology                                                                                              Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN PSYCHOTHERAPY                                                                                         Descriptions

Practicum I: Working with Dreams                                                 in the Dissertation Handbook. In addition, students begin to explore
DPP 780, 2 UNITS                                                                 issues related to forming a Dissertation Committee. Some students
Throughout time and across cultures, dreams have opened the door                 may use this course to seek approval for the Concept Paper , which is
to the psyche, offering contact with the transcendent and nourish-               the first formal step in the dissertation process.
ment for the soul. This class considers Jungian and post-Jungian                 Dissertation Development II, III, IV
approaches to the dream and explores their careful integration into              DPP 932 A,B,C, 2/3 UNIT PER QUARTER
psychotherapeutic work. The main focus of the class is on developing             These classes span the third year of coursework, slowly and or         -
personal ability and style in relating to dreams. W e invite a lived             ganically guiding students toward the completion of an approved
experience of dream consciousness to be present by sharing our own               dissertation concept paper. Over the three quarters, each student
dreams and images throughout the class.                                          sets individual learning goals that refl ect their place in the research
Introduction to Research: Overview of Qualitative Methods                        process. The instructor monitors and guides students’ progress in
DPP 782, 2 UNITS                                                                                                                                ,
                                                                                 meeting those goals so that, by the end of the Spring quartermost or
This course provides an in-depth study of major qualitative methodolo-                                                                       .
                                                                                 all students will emerge with an approved concept paper The course
gies, including their theoretical basis as well as their practical and ethical   answers any and all questions concerning dissertation writing at
implications. It shows how questions of methodology are organically re-          Pacifica, including how to refi ne a research question, select and
lated to the research topic and affect the organization and outcome of the       review relevant literature, choose an appropriate research methodol-
work. The emphasis on data gathering and data analysis is intended to            ogy, articulate a thoughtful approach to research ethics, and form a
give students practical hands-on experience working with research data.          dissertation committee. Pass/No Pass
Foundations for Research in Depth Psychotherapy I                                Oral Comprehensive Presentation
DPP 784, 2 UNITS                                                                 DPP 994, 2 UNITS
This course invites students to contemplate how the fathomless                   A key aspect of the doctoral degree is that it moves us from the realm
psyche affects the process of research. T aking seriously the core               of student into the realm of professor. Whether or not we ultimately
philosophical assumption of depth psychology , the reality of the un-            become teachers, we must still come to see ourselves as professors,
conscious, introduces profound shifts in one’s ontology, epistemology,           giving back to the world a synthesis of what we have learned. In
and methodology. In light of this, what can researchers claim to know            this course we develop effective teaching and presentation skills.
and how do they know it? This course introduces students to some                 Students present to colleagues and professors addressing all three
of the key ideas that affect research including psyche, archetype, and           of the program’ s educational domains—Theory and T raditions of
image, explains Jung’s technique of active imagination, and teaches              Depth Psychotherapy; Psychotherapy Informed by the Humanities
close reading and textual analysis as part of a general introduction to          and Interdisciplinary Studies; and Integrated Praxis: Research and
the practice of hermeneutics.                                                    Casework. The course is conducted in a seminar format combining
                                                                                 readings, lecture, and experiential elements. Listening and respond-
Foundations for Research in Depth Psychotherapy II:
                                                                                 ing to one another is an important part of the process.
Imaginal Perspectives
DPP 882, 2 UNITS                                                                 Practica II, IV, V, VII, VIII, and IX:
In complex research the wounded researcher is called into his or                 Face-to-Face Group Case Consultation
her work through his or her complexes. In this regard, research is a             DPP 781, DPP 880, DPP 890, DPP 980, DPP 985,
vocation. A topic chooses a researcher as much as, and perhaps even              AND DPP 990, 2 UNITS EACH
more than, he or she chooses it. The primary task of doing research              The pactica are conducted in groups of seven to ten students and
that keeps soul in mind is, therefore, to differentiate among the                involve case consultation supervised by faculty . The goals of these
researcher’s conscious intentions for the work, his or her complex               courses are to integrate theoretical learning with practical experience,
projections onto the work, and the voices of the soul of the work. This          and to demonstrate a variety of approaches to practice from a depth
work of differentiation takes place at different levels of the transfer -        perspective. Students present a case for depth supervision at least
ence field between the researcher and the work. These dialogues are               once per quarter in the practica. In addition to case consultation, each
an alchemical, hermeneutic process, and consideration is given to                quarterly practicum announces a particular theme that typically mirrors
how this variation differs from more traditional conceptions of herme-           specific material in other coursework including topics such as race and
neutics. It is a process that is applicable to all methods. Consideration        cultural diversity in the practice of psychotherapy, depth approaches to
is also given to how this process shapes psychological writing.                  assessment, and ethical problems in a Depth Psychotherapy Practice.
                                                                                 During the clinical practica third-year students present a control paper,
Dissertation Development I
                                                                                 examining their clinical work with one client in depth.
DPP 832, 2 UNITS
In this second year course, students begin to conceive of the disserta-          Practica IIIA and VIA: Processes of Therapy
tion by refi ning some of the ideas or topics of interest into research           and Supervision
questions that might well become dissertation topics. In a combination           DPP 783 AND DPP 883, 2 UNITS EACH
of readings, lectures, and group discussions, students begin to imagine          These two courses combine lecture and small group discussions
the shape, focus, and methodologies of their dissertations. Students             that focus on various processes of depth psychotherapy . Topics
become familiar with the dissertation process at Pacifica as described            may include working to build therapeutic relationship, resolving

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Ph.D. in Depth Psychology                                                                                          Degree
WITH EMPHASIS IN PSYCHOTHERAPY                                                                                     Requirements

transference issues, and depth approaches to both case presentation            journal articles as well as imagine and formulate their dissertation
and supervision. Techniques such as dreamwork, active imagination,             topic. As a result, topics may include a review of research methods and
psychodrama, and uses of other therapies such as body work, and                approaches, essential research skills such as finding and reviewing key
pharmacological treatments are also topic considerations. The for -            literature, and a discussion of dissertation writing at Pacifica.
mat of these courses often includes guest speakers and may combine
                                                                               Dissertation Writing
all three years of students for presentations.
                                                                               DPP 999, 15 UNITS
Practica IIIB and VIB: Scholarly Writing and Publication                       Under the supervision of a Dissertation Committee, the student submits
DPP 785 AND DPP 885, 2 UNITS EACH                                              a proposal, conducts original research, writes, and defends the doc-
These two courses combine lecture and small group discussion to in-            toral dissertation. This course traditionally follows the completion of
troduce and augment students’ research and writing skills with the aim         all other coursework and successful completion of the comprehensive
of publishing their work. The intention is to use the student’ s clinical      exams. However, students who demonstrate readiness may choose to
experience with patients as the starting point and ground for theoreti-        apply for this course while enrolled in regular coursework. This option
cal contributions to scholarship in psychology. What research questions        requires approval from the Chair of the program. Additional fees will
that have personal, professional, and cultural relevance live in the clini-    be assessed for this course. Pass/No Pass
cian’s practice itself? The courses help students develop ideas for short



                                                                               not contain any license-specifi c coursework. Furthermore, although
REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
                                                                               students will engage in some form of psychotherapeutic practice
1.   Students must complete a total of 83 quarter units to fulfi ll the         while in this program, Pacifica Graduate Institute does not authorize,
     degree requirement for graduation. A minimum grade of “C” is              monitor, or supervise that practice in this particular program, nor do
     required in each completed course. A cumulative grade point               we arrange or administratively support traineeships, pre- or post-
     average of 3.0 must be maintained.                                        doctoral internships, or other licensing practice requirements.
2.   Students must comply with attendance requirements as stated
     in the Student Handbook.                                                  COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION
3.   Students must successfully pass a comprehensive written                   The comprehensive examination consists of a written portion taken in
     examination at the end of the second year of coursework.                  the spring of second year and an oral portion taken in the summer of
4.   Students must successfully present a Control Paper describing             third year. The written exam is divided into three sections correspond-
     their clinical work with one client to two faculty members during         ing to the three study tracks of the program: Theory and T raditions
     the third year of the clinical practica.                                  of Depth Psychotherapy; Psychotherapy Informed by the Humanities
5.   Students must successfully complete a comprehensive oral                  and Interdisciplinary Studies; and Integrated Praxis: Research and
     presentation at the end of the third year of course work.                 Casework. It is designed to assess knowledge gained in the fi rst two
6.   Students must write, submit, and defend an original dissertation          years of coursework and serves as a qualifying exam that students
     accepted by the faculty.                                                  must pass in order to continue into the third year of study . The third
                                                                               year oral examination consists of the student’ s formal oral presenta-
7.   Students are advised to take part in depth-oriented psychotherapy or
                                                                               tion addressing the ways the three years of study have informed and
     analysis while enrolled in this program. While this is not monitored or
                                                                               seeded their work.
     required for graduation it is strongly recommended.
                                                                               CONTROL PAPER
PRACTICUM REQUIREMENTS                                                         During the third year clinical practica series, each student presents a
There is no minimum number of required hours of practice, but
                                                                               control paper that demonstrates his or her clinical work and the abil-
students must be engaged in the practice of psychotherapy while
                                                                               ity to synthesize a variety of appropriate clinical perspectives while
enrolled in coursework. This assures that all students will be able
                                                                               maintaining his or her own unique style of practice.
to participate fully in the sequence of practicum courses. Pacifi ca
does not provide supervision as required for licensure or any other            DOCTORAL DISSERTATION
purpose. Students must provide for their own insurance coverage for            The dissertation process involves the completion of all coursework in
professional liability.                                                        research methodologies, dissertation development, and dissertation
                                                                               writing. Students must complete Dissertation Development I and have
NOTICE REGARDING INTERNSHIP                                                    an approved Concept Paper before enrolling in Dissertation Writing.
AND LICENSURE                                                                                                                     ,
                                                                               The Dissertation Committee is composed of a Chair a Reader, and an
The Depth Psychology with Emphasis in Psychotherapy Program is                 External Reader. Each committee member must possess an earned
designed specifically for those who are already licensed or already             doctorate based in part on a dissertation unless the Chair of the
have sufficient academic and other credentials to pursue licensure at           program waives this requirement.
the level in which they intend to practice. The degree program pro-
vides in-depth education in the theory and practice of psychotherapy           For a full description of all requirements, consult the current
and related research practices. Although some students may wish to             edition of the Pacifica Student Handbook.
pursue licensure after earning the doctorate, this curriculum does
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M.A./Ph.D. in Depth Psychology

                                                                            Teaching and learning at Pacifica has always
Since its inception in 1996,                                                been, for me, a psyche centered and a psychoactive
                                                           experience. We begin with the assumption that education in
the Depth Psychology
                                                           psychology necessitates a participation with the psyche. It is a
Program has made a radical
                                                           lively and deeply satisfying approach. The material we study comes
commitment to tend the history and the
                                                           alive here, and entering a classroom one gets a sense of walking
future of depth psychology. The program
                                                           into a space in which the faculty, the students, and the ideas are all
has held in the center of its mission
                                                           equally engaged in a fantastic collaboration.”
two related commitments: to educate
students in the history and lineage of                                          —JOE COPPIN, PROGRAM CHAIR
depth psychology and to explore the
non-clinical frontiers of the field. While                              All students in the program share a core course of study in
deepening the understanding of the roots and development               depth psychological theory, interdisciplinary studies, and depth
of depth psychology, faculty, students, and alumni are also            psychological approaches to research. This core curriculum
extending the theories and practices of the field beyond                includes the following courses:
the limits of clinical work and across the traditional lines of
                                                                          • Introduction to Depth Psychology
professional and academic disciplines. Through scholarship,
                                                                          • Dreamwork
teaching, and work in a wide array of professional and
community roles utilizing the insights of depth psychology,               • Ecopsychology
students and alumni contribute to understanding and                       • Foundations for Research in Depth Psychology
addressing many contemporary personal, community,                         • Dissertation Development
ecological, and cultural issues.                                          • Depth Psychology and the Sacred
Over the years these commitments have led to a branching of               • Jungian Psychology
interests that call for a further diversification of coursework
                                                                          • Post-Jungian Psychology
and training. The Depth Psychology Program offers incoming
                                                                          • The Psychoanalytic Tradition
students three options for specialization:
                                                                          • Archetypal Psychology
• EMPHASIS IN JUNGIAN AND
     ARCHETYPAL STUDIES
                                                                          • Somatic Studies

• COMBINED EMPHASIS IN COMMUNITY
                                                                          • Depth Psychology and the Mythic Tradition

     PSYCHOLOGY, LIBERATION PSYCHOLOGY,                                   • Mythopoetic Imagination
     AND ECOPSYCHOLOGY                                                    • Imaginal Ways of Knowing
• EMPHASIS IN SOMATIC STUDIES                                          Each specialization blends this core curriculum with additional
                                                                       courses in the area of emphasis, leading to a highly focused
                                                                       and innovative graduate education true to the original radical
                                                                       dual intentions of our program.
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                                               AN EMPHASIS IN
                                               JUNGIAN AND
                                               ARCHETYPAL STUDIES
                                               is a blended online/low-residency
                                               program that affirms Pacifica’s
                                               mission to tend soul in and of
                                               the world through an in-depth
                                               engagement with the work of C.G.
                                               Jung and post-Jungians. It surveys
                                               Jungian and archetypal theories and
                                               practices most applicable to healing,
                                               transformation, self-expression, and
the development of consciousness. Students critically evaluate both the limitations
and the potentials of Jungian psychology in contemporary contexts, and work
together in a dynamic learning community to advance, apply, and imagine new
extensions for these theories and practices in the world.



AN EMPHASIS IN COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY, LIBERATION
PSYCHOLOGY, AND ECOPSYCHOLOGY                                                                   JOSEPH COPPIN, PH.D.

is creating a 21st century depth psychologically informed critical community                    Chair, M.A./Ph.D Program in
                                                                                                Depth Psychology
psychology. To address the personal, community, cultural, and ecological
challenges of our time, Euro-American depth psychological theories and practices                Joseph Coppin has been on the faculty at
                                                                                                Pacifica since 1996 and has taught across
are placed in dynamic dialogue with ecopsychology, cultural studies, indigenous,
                                                                                                several programs focusing on studies in
and liberation psychologies. Nourished by depth psychology, students become
                                                                                                Archetypal Psychology, Research, and
sensitive to the interdependence of individual, cultural, and collective dynamics,              Depth Psychotherapy. He chaired the Depth
and to the arts and the imaginal as catalysts to vision and transformation. Praxis              Psychology Program for four years and the
classes mentor students in creative approaches to working in organizations, non-                Depth Psychotherapy Program for its fi rst
                                                                                                three years. He has most recently served
profits, community groups, and educational settings. Community and ecological
                                                                                                for three years on the Institute’ s Executive
fieldwork and research are designed to help students pursue their distinctive areas              Management Council. Dr . Coppin has
of interest, gathering the theoretical understanding and fieldwork and research                  been a practicing psychotherapist since
skills to deepen their engagement.                                                              1980 and has written and published in the
                                                                                                field of Depth Psychology , including co-
                                                                                                authoring the text, The Art of Inquiry: A
                                                                                                Depth Psychological Approach. In addition
AN EMPHASIS IN SOMATIC STUDIES
                                                                                                to his teaching at Pacifi ca, Dr. Coppin is a
extends into practice one of the foundational ideas of Pacifica Graduate                         contributing faculty member at the Instituto
Institute—healing can occur through working with profound experiences                           de Psicología Profunda in Mexico City.
stemming from myth, imagination, and unconscious motivation. This
specialization builds upon the deep conviction that there are forces of the psyche
that stimulate the body’s capacity to heal itself. The many traditions and practices
that address the body—be they old, new, Western, non- Western, scientifically
based, or indigenous—call for our attention in this specialization.

                                                                                            2011–2012 COURSE CATALOG 5 1
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M.A/Ph.D. in Depth Psychology

WITH EMPHASIS IN                                                                                      Curriculum
Jungian and Archetypal Studies                                                                        Overview



The M.A./Ph.D. Program in Depth
Psychology with Emphasis in Jungian and
Archetypal Studies centers around the philosophy
that the theories and practices within the Jungian tradition
continue to offer valuable insights and tools into working
                                                                  STUDENTS IN THE JUNGIAN AND
with the psyche beyond the analytic encounter. For students
                                                                  ARCHETYPAL STUDIES SPECIALIZATION
who are called to work with the personal and/or collective
psyche, but not within the clinical milieu, this specialization    • Read deeply and broadly from the Collected Works of

responds to Marie-Louise von Franz’s visionary idea: “The            C.G. Jung’s recently published Red Book, as well as

real psychology is a psychology that is for everybody. It            other core texts in the depth psychological tradition

naturally includes the problems of clinicians, but is not          • Engage with the creative, dynamic unconscious in both
concentrated solely on that area.”                                   its personal and collective dimensions

This specialization offers a container where students can          • Deepen the capacity for imagistic, symbolic, mythic,
explore, apply, and advance depth psychology both personally         and archetypal thinking and being in the world
and vocationally, where the through-line in every course           • Hone the expression of a unique voice and vision
is the direct engagement with two basic questions: how               through courses in research, writing, publication, and
is this material meaningful to me and my life, and how is            presentation
it meaningful to the world within which I live and work?
                                                                   • Study side-by-side with Jungian scholars and analysts
Because of its overstated emphasis on the application
                                                                     interested in envisioning new possibilities for
and advancement of Jungian and archetypal studies into
                                                                     extending Jungian theories and practices into the world
the vocational and occupational arena, it seeks to provide
skills, tools, and practices to those who work directly with
other people, truly becoming a psychology for everybody. In
addition, those who work in any creative field will find that
this specialization provides an understanding and experience
of the personal and collective psyche that can inform their
creative process and enhance their creative products.




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                                                         A Blended Online/Low-Residency Program


PACIFICA GRADUATE INSTITUTE ONLINE

This degree program takes advantage of online technology which allows students to work and learn in their home
environments in conjunction with residential sessions on the tranquil Ladera Lane Pacifica campus. Classes begin
online and meet during four-day residential sessions (Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday) once a quarter. During these
on-campus sessions, students have access to the Institute’s extensive resources and are able to engage with their
classmates and instructors in face-to-face learning, combining lecture, discussion, and experiential and embodied
learning. Residential sessions also allow time for community-building through shared meals, social events, film
screenings, guest lectures, and circle councils.



FIRST YEAR
                    FALL     Introduction to Depth Psychology – DJA 700, 3 Units
                             C. G. Jung in Context – DJA 710, 3 units
                 WINTER      Foundations for Research in Depth Psychology – DJA 900, 3 Units
                             Jungian Psychology: The Individuation Journey – DJA 720, 3 Units
                 SPRING      Archetypes: Universal Patterns of the Psyche – DJA 800, 3 Units
                             Our Soul’s Code: A Depth Psychological View of Vocation – DJA 910, 3 Units
                SUMMER       Mythopoetic Imagination: Viewing Film, Art, and Literature
                                 from a Jungian Perspective – DJA 805, 2 Units
                             Complexes: Jung’s “Royal Road” to the Unconscious – DJA 810, 2 Units
                             Reflective Studies I – DJA 920, 2 Units

SECOND YEAR
                    FALL     Depth Psychology and the Mythic Tradition – DJA 815, 3 units
                             Imaginal Ways of Knowing: Active Imagination,
                                The Red Book, and Psychic Creativity – DJA 820, 3 units
                 WINTER      Archetypal Psychology – DJA 730, 3 units
                             Dreamwork: Tending the Living Images – DJA 825, 3 units
                 SPRING      The Political and Organizational Psyche – DJA 830, 3 units
                             The Psychoanalytic Tradition: The Ongoing Conversation – DJA 740, 3 units
                SUMMER       Psychological Types – DJA 835, 2 units
                             Depth Psychology: Commentaries, Controversies, and Critiques – DJA 750, 2 units
                             Reflective Studies II – DJA 930, 2 units

THIRD YEAR
                    FALL     Psyche and Eros: The Psychology and Mythology of Relationships – DJA 840, 3 units
                             Somatic Studies: The Psyche-Soma Connection – DJA 845, 3 units
                 WINTER      Depth Psychology and the Sacred: Approaching the Numinous – DJA 850, 3 units
                             Post-Jungian Psychology: Leading Edge Thoughts and Thinkers in Depth Psychology – DJA 760, 3 units
                 SPRING      Synchronicity and the New Sciences – DJA 855, 3 units
                             Dissertation Development – DJA 950, 3 units
                SUMMER       Ecopsychology: The Psyche in Nature – DJA 860, 2 units
                             The Alchemy of Transformation – DJA 865, 2 units
                             Reflective Studies III – DJA 940, 2 units

CONTINUING
                             Self-Directed Studies – DJA 970, 3 units
                             Dissertation Writing – DJA 960, 15 units

This curriculum may vary depending upon changing academic needs.



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M.A/Ph.D. in Depth Psychology                                                                                  Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN JUNGIAN AND ARCHETYPAL STUDIES                                                                Descriptions

DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY:                                                         The Psychoanalytic Tradition: The Ongoing Conversation
PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE                                                 DJA 740, 3 units
This portion of the curriculum grounds students in the trajectory         The first conversation between Sigmund Freud and C.G. Jung lasted
                                                                          over 13 hours, and explored many places of convergence and diver -
of depth psychology from its ancient roots to its modern mani-
                                                                          gence. In many ways, this conversation continues today , with places
festations. Students learn about the psychoanalytic, Jungian,
                                                                          of convergence and divergence in post-Freudian and post-Jungian
post-Jungian, archetypal, and developmental lineages of depth
                                                                          theory and practice. Students will study the psychodynamics of early
psychology, paying special attention to the cultural and histori-         development and psychopathology and examine the infl uence of the
cal contexts in which they arose. Commentaries and critiques              object-relations, self-psychology, and other modern psychoanalytic
of these fields are discussed, and controversies are explored in           theories on contemporary Jungian theory and practice.
order for students to develop a critical and refl exive eye about
depth psychology, both its strengths and its limitations.                 Depth Psychology: Commentaries, Controversies,
                                                                          and Critiques
Introduction to Depth Psychology                                          DJA 750, 2 units
DJA 700, 3 units                                                                                   eld
                                                                          From its inception as a fi of study and set of clinical practices, depth
Though its antecedents stretch backward toward the ancients, the          psychology has engendered its fair share of commentary, controversy,
modern field of depth psychology is usually traced forward beginning       and critique. The infamous break in the relationship between Freud
with Sigmund Freud and C.G. Jung. This course provides an overview        and Jung is just one example of strife and division inside the ranks
of the trajectory of depth psychology from its ancient roots up to        of depth psychology; judgments have been leveled from outside the
Sigmund Freud and the advent of psychoanalysis.                           field as well. This course examines some of the shadow of depth
                                                                          psychology, which includes accusations of Eurocentricism, racism,
C. G. Jung in Context
DJA 710, 3 units                                                          sexism, cultural insensitivity, elitism, anti-Semitism, political apathy,
                                                                          and an obsession with the inner life at the expense of the outer
In order to fully appreciate, understand, and critique Jungian psy-
                                                                          world. A depth psychology for this century needs to seriously examine
chology, it is necessary to understand the personal, social, cultural,
                                                                          these critiques, and transform theories and practices in their light to
religious, and historical context in which it arose. This necessarily
                                                                          increase their cultural sensitivity and inclusiveness.
entails studying the life and times of C.G. Jung himself, for as Jung
knew, the psychology one professes can never be separated from the        Post-Jungian Psychology: Leading Edge Thoughts
context and milieu of the psychologist.                                   and Thinkers in Depth Psychology
Jungian Psychology: The Individuation Journey                             DJA 760, 3 units
DJA 720, 3 units                                                          This course invites students and scholars to explore together the lead-
The central process in Jungian psychology is the individuation pro-       ing edges of depth psychology, and thus, topics may vary from year to
cess, which can be defi as the psyche’ journey toward wholeness,
                        ned               s                               year. The course may focus on a contemporary cultural issue or event,
an embodiment of the archetype of the Self. In Jungian psychology ,       examining it from a depth psychological perspective; it may consider a
this is done in large part by balancing or uniting the opposites within   new direction for theory or practice; or it may examine the work of a
the psyche, including the feminine and masculine principles, known        single scholar or group of scholars doing innovative work in the field.
as the anima and animus. This course explores the centrality of the       WORKING WITH THE PSYCHE:
individuation process to Jungian psychology , reviewing terms such        PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES
as the ego-Self axis, the persona and the shadow , the transcendent
                                                                          These courses focus on the theories, concepts, and principles
function, and the personal and collective unconscious.
                                                                          primarily arising from the Jungian and archetypal traditions which
Archetypal Psychology                                                     are most applicable to working with the individual and collective
DJA 730, 3 units
                                                                          psyche today. Here the psyche is envisioned as having mythological,
Archetypal psychology is one of the central strands of post-Jungian       spiritual, political, archetypal, creative, mystical, erotic, and embod-
theory. As envisioned by its main proponent, James Hillman, it
                                                                          ied dimensions. Students are exposed to practices of working with
emphasizes the development of a mythic sensibility in confronting
                                                                          these multiple dimensions of psyche, such as dream-tending, active
the complexity and multiplicity of psychological life. Students learn
                                                                          imagination, typology, authentic movement, art-making, and image
the history and central ideas of this psychology , and become con-
versant with its four basic moves: personifying, or imagining things;
                                                                          work. Mentored by faculty and with the support of their peers, stu-
pathologizing, or falling apart; psychologizing, or seeing through; and   dents are encouraged to adapt or refine these practices, or develop
dehumanizing, or soul-making.                                             new practices most suited to their work in and with the world.

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M.A/Ph.D. in Depth Psychology                                                                                  Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN JUNGIAN AND ARCHETYPAL STUDIES                                                                Descriptions

Archetypes: Universal Patterns of the Psyche                              Imaginal Ways of Knowing: Active Imagination,
DJA 800, 3 units                                                          The Red Book, and Psychic Creativity
Robert Hopcke states that “perhaps the most fundamental and dis-          DJA 820, 3 units
tinctive concept in analytical psychology” is “that of the archetypes     Active imagination is the name given to the technique Jung pioneered
of the collective unconscious.” This course focuses on Jung’ s major      for working with unconscious material in the psyche, often through
writings on the collective unconscious and archetypes, tracing the        working with an image or through dialogue with an inner fi gure. The
development of Jung’s conceptualization and exploring the evidence                                             s
                                                                          Red Book contains 16 years of Jung’ active imagination within its cov-
he gave in support of it (ranging from myth, religion, literature, art,   ers, and thus is the textpar excellence for exploring this powerful tech-
and culture). Students will research a contemporary scholar who is        nique and its relationship to psychic creativity and consciousness.
working with the archetypes today, such as Carol Pearson, Caroline
                                                                          Dreamwork: Tending the Living Images
Myss, Robert Moore and Douglas Gillette, and Michael Conforti.
                                                                          DJA 825, 3 units
Mythopoetic Imagination: Viewing Film, Art, and                           Ever since Freud released The Interpretation of Dreams in 1900, these
Literature From a Jungian Perspective                                     mysterious nocturnal visitors have been of seminal importance to the
DJA 805, 2 units                                                          field of depth psychology. In this course, students learn historical and
Symbols are one of the ways the unconscious speaks to us and              cultural approaches to dreams, and practice a variety of dreamwork
through us, its visual language for conveying the deep mysteries of       methods including working with dreams in groups, drawing upon
life. After exploring the psychological importance of symbols, we         Freudian, Jungian, post-Jungian, and archetypal theories.
turn our focus to the manifestation of symbol-making in literature,
film, and art. In addition, students will explore and amplify a symbol
                                                                          The Political and Organizational Psyche
                                                                          DJA 830, 3 units
that speaks to their psyches through artistic creations of their own.
                                                                          Jung recognized that our culture is undergoing a transition from the
Complexes: Jung’s “Royal Road” to the Unconscious                         patriarchal values that ruled our political and organizational life and
DJA 810, 2 units                                                          influenced our dominating attitudes towards nature to new values
 In his seminal essay “A Review of the Complex Theory ,” Jung calls       of relationship and stewardship of community and the environment.
complexes the via regia, or royal road, to the personal and collective    This course will explore the unconscious dynamics that infl uence
unconscious. The complexes were so important to Jung that for a           contemporary events, which may include: the emerging archetype of
while he called his psychology “complex psychology .” The course          wholeness; the danger of a savior or hero fi gure; the rise of funda-
explores complexes on multiple levels—personal, familial, group,          mentalism and fanaticism; and the archetypal roles and motifs that
and cultural—looking at their phenomenology , their autonomy, and         appear in political, social, and institutional organizations.
their biology. How to recognize and work with and through one’ s
complexes is discussed.
                                                                          Psychological Types
                                                                          DJA 835, 2 units
Depth Psychology and the Mythic Tradition                                 Jung is probably best known in mainstream culture for his theory of
DJA 815, 3 units                                                          psychological types, the basis for the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator(tm)
James Hillman wrote,” Psychology shows myths in modern dress and          which is now known and used throughout the world. Students learn
myths show our depth psychology in ancient dress.” Understanding          about Jung’s theory, including the rational and irrational functions,
                                                    ,
the connection between mythology and psychology Jung argued that          the eight basic types of people, and the importance of developing
it is important to our psychological health to know the myth we are       the inferior function. Various typological assessment tools are
living. The course will focus on archetypal motifs in fairy tales and     introduced, and discussions center around their reliability and
myths as they appear in our personal and collective psychological         validity, ethical use, and their contemporary and cross-cultural ap-
lives. Students will study Jungian and post-Jungian mythological          plicability. Attention will be paid to primary applications of typology,
theory and interpretation; in addition, they will choose one author       such as increasing self-awareness, decreasing stress by living “in
who has successfully brought the mythological psyche before the           type,” increased understanding of and appreciation of others, type
public eye, such as Joseph Campbell, Clarissa Pinkola Estes, Jean         development over the lifespan, and fostering tolerance in groups and
Shinoda Bolen, Marion Woodman, Robert Bly, etc., critically review-       organizations.
ing his or her contribution.




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M.A/Ph.D. in Depth Psychology                                                                                    Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN JUNGIAN AND ARCHETYPAL STUDIES                                                                  Descriptions

Psyche and Eros: The Psychology and                                        Ecopsychology: The Psyche in Nature
Mythology of Relationships                                                 DJA 860, 2 units
DJA 840, 3 units                                                           As Jung saw it, “Natural life is the nourishing soil of the soul.”
Romantic relationships are often laden with psychological expecta-         Many of us feel split off from that nourishment today, living within a
tions of mythic proportions. This course examines key relationship         worldview which divides the inner from the outer, spirit from matter,
fairy tales and myths, including the myth of Psyche and Eros, as           and humans from nature. An ecopsychological perspective remedies
it mines the treasures of depth psychological thinking about love,         this malaise by considering individuation as rooted not only in our
desire, sexuality, and marriage. Concepts such as libido, anima and        relationship to self and human others, but to the natural world as
animus, projection, transference, and the infl uence of typology on         well. The importance of place to the psyche will provide rich discus-
relationships will be discussed.                                           sion material, including an observation of the natural world as it
                                                                           appears in our dreamscapes. Students will explore archetypal and
Somatic Studies: The Psyche-Soma Connection
                                                                           mythological motifs which emerge from the ensouled world, includ-
DJA 845, 3 units
                                                                           ing differing natural landscapes and the animal world, which in turn
Jung wrote, “The spirit is the life of the body seen from within, and      resonate within the human soul. Means of (re)connecting psyche
the body the outward manifestation of the life of the spirit—the           and nature will be discussed, including traditional and contemporary
two really being one.” This course explores this interrelationship         wilderness rites of passage and nature-based healing practices from
between psyche and soma. Topics may include the body as shadow             indigenous cultures. The course will contain a strong experiential
in depth psychology; the body as a site of trauma, healing, and            engagement with the natural world as well.
contact with the divine; bodywork practices like dance, authentic
movement, yoga, and breathwork; non-W estern and indigenous                The Alchemy of Transformation
healing traditions; the relationship of the body with the collective       DJA 865, 2 units
unconscious, including concepts like cellular memory, morphic fields,       When Jung realized that the ancient practice of alchemy contained
and archetypes as bodily-based inherited images; an exploration of         a rich symbolic language which mirrored the process of transforma-
various depth psychologists who have championed the importance of          tion inherent to individuation, he called it “a momentous discovery.”
the psyche-soma connection; or the current interest in the intersec-       This course explores alchemical symbolism and processes, including
tion of neuroscience and psychology.                                       nigredo, separatio, mortifi catio, and dissolutio, looking for their
                                                                           manifestations in our personal and cultural lives. As Rumi once said,
Depth Psychology and the Sacred:
                                                                           “The alchemy of a changing life is the only truth.”
Approaching the Numinous
DJA 850, 3 units                                                           THE PSYCHE AT WORK:
This course begins by contrasting Freud’ s and Jung’s views of the         RESEARCH AND REFLECTION
psychology of religion. Though Freud was dismissive of religion, Jung
                                                                           In The Art of Inquiry, authors Joseph Coppin Ph.D. and Elizabeth
explored it extensively from the beginning to the end of his life, argu-
                                                                           Nelson Ph.D. note, “although psychological inquiry can be a joy , it
ing unequivocally for its psychological importance, going so far as to
                                                                           is unusually demanding. It asks one to be fully involved with the
declare that all psychological problems are essentially spiritual prob-
                                                                           opus on every level. This kind of inquiry is not merely an intellectual
lems which can be cured through an encounter with the numinosum, or
                                                                           exercise. It obligates the person to participate intellectually, spiritu-
god-image. This course focuses on the spiritual function of the psyche
                                                                           ally, and physically, because the work extends well beyond the ego
though key Jungian and post-Jungian works, exploring the variety of
                                                                           to reverberate in the depths of the soul… Many who have done this
ways people approach and experience the divine.
                                                                           kind of work have realized at some point that they were engaging in
Synchronicity and the New Sciences                                         soul retrieval. That is, their work integrates aspects of the personal
DJA 855, 3 units                                                           psyche to restore their individual health, and it integrates aspects of
Jung’s concept of synchronicity is a central concept in understanding      the objective psyche to enhance humanity’ s collective wisdom. The
the psyche-world relationship, which was a recurring theme in his          personal and archetypal nature of psychological inquiry makes the
later work. This course will examine the generation of this concept        work especially meaningful and especially arduous.” The courses in
and associated studies, including Jung’s thoughts on the I Ching and       this sequence serve as a container for this soul work.
astrology. Advancing the understanding of the archetypal level of the
psyche through considerations of the psychoid realm, and in dialogue
with the fi ndings of quantum physics, the course explores the inter-
twined and interpenetrating relationship of psyche and matter.


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M.A/Ph.D. in Depth Psychology                                                                                    Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN JUNGIAN AND ARCHETYPAL STUDIES                                                                  Descriptions

Foundations for Research in Depth Psychology                                 Reflective Studies III
DJA 900, 3 units                                                             DJA 940, 2 units
This course introduces students to the distinctive theory and practice                                            ,
                                                                             Taken at the end of the third summer this course serves as a container
of research in depth psychology , with its unique demands—and                for the oral comprehensive examination where, in part, students artic-
rewards—that come from working in partnership the autonomous                 ulate the conceptualization of their dissertations. This course offers a
psyche. This course raises the all-important question: if we take            final opportunity for students who did not have their concept papers ap-
seriously the existence of the personal and collective unconscious,          proved during Dissertation Development in the spring to seek approval.
what are the implications for our research? Special attention is paid        Pass/No Pass
to the vocational and transferential aspects of research, as research
is conceived as a path to both personal and collective healing and
                                                                             Dissertation Development
                                                                             DJA 950, 3 units
transformation. Students begin exploring potential ideas for research
topics, and learn about a variety of qualitative research method-            Writing a dissertation is arguably the most rigorous and ultimately
ologies. Students are encouraged to publish and present their work           rewarding work of any doctoral student’s academic life. This course
while in the program, and are introduced to some of the venues in            prepares students for the task, guiding them through the crafting
the Jungian world for such ventures.                                         of a research project which culminates in the fi rst research product
                                                                             required by Pacifica: an approved concept paper. Students learn how
Our Soul’s Code: A Depth Psychological View of Vocation                      to navigate through the dissertation landscape, including forming a
DJA 910, 3 units                                                             committee, organizing a project of such magnitude, and confronting
Freud claimed that love and work are the cornerstones of our humanness.      psychological roadblocks along the way.
And yet, compared to love, relatively little has been written in the depth
psychological literature about our work in the world, with the exception
                                                                             Dissertation Writing
                                                                             DJA 960, 15 units
of James Hillman’s most popular book, The Soul’s Code, where he views
work as vocation, our calling in the world. This course explores Hillman’s   During this course, the student assembles a committee, submits a
seminal text, then asks, what other depth psychologists have contributed     proposal, writes the dissertation, and defends the dissertation in a
to our thinking about vocation? Turning to the vocation of depth psychol-    public forum. This course traditionally follows the completion of all
ogy itself, this course also asks, outside of psychotherapywhat vocations
                                                          ,                  other coursework and successful completion of the comprehensive
call to/call for a depth psychologist, and how does one work with the        exams. However, a student who demonstrates readiness may choose
psyche of others both efficaciously and ethically?                            to apply for this course while enrolled in regular coursework. This
                                                                                                                                 .
                                                                             option requires approval from the Program Director Addition fees are
Reflective Studies I                                                          assessed for this course. Pass/No Pass. Prerequisites: DJA 900, 950,
DJA 920, 2 units                                                             and an approved concept paper
The courses in this sequence offer students an opportunity to engage
in reflection upon their studies thus far . The intention is threefold:
                                                                             Self-Directed Studies
                                                                             DJA 970, 3 units
students will integrate the coursework they have completed in the
past, reflect on their learning process in the present, and articulate        The purpose of Self-Directed Studies is to allow students to explore
how they are being called to work with the material in the future.           areas of interest in depth psychology outside the boundaries of the
In addition, in this fi rst course, students are introduced to the dis-       curriculum. This may take the form of attending conferences, work-
sertation process at Pacifi ca, and assess their personal desire and          shops, lectures, and/or seminars; engaging with an analyst or other
academic readiness to undertake such a venture by creating a mini-           practitioner/s for personal therapy or healing work; or seeking train-
dissertation proposal. Pass/No Pass                                          ing in a modality that augments their practice of depth psychology .
                                                                             Students must complete a total of 30 hours and submit a refl ective
Reflective Studies II                                                         paper; this may occur anytime during the course of the program, and is
DJA 930, 2 units                                                             required for the awarding of the Ph.D. All hours must be pre-approved
Taken at the end of the second summer , this course serves as the            through discussion with the Program Director. Pass/No Pass
container for the written comprehensive examination which assesses
how well students have met the program’ s learning objectives. In
addition, students wishing to pursue the Ph.D. will make an oral
presentation of their scholarly journal article required for advance-
ment into the third year , and turn in the written article for formal
evaluation. Pass/No Pass

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M.A/Ph.D. in Depth Psychology
WITH EMPHASIS IN
Community Psychology, Liberation                                                                            Curriculum
                                                                                                            Overview
Psychology, and Ecopsychology

This specialization is a bold initiative to forge                    STUDENTS IN THE COMMUNITY
interdisciplinary, transformative approaches                         PSYCHOLOGY, LIBERATION PSYCHOLOGY,
                                                                     AND ECOPSYCHOLOGY SPECIALIZATION
to personal, community, cultural, and eco-
logical challenges of our time. While grounding                         • Deepen insight about individual, group, and cultural
                                                                          life through study of depth psychological concepts and
students in psychoanalytic, Jungian, archetypal, and phenom-              practices
enological lineages of depth psychology, Euro-American depth
                                                                        • Develop scholarly and creative writing skills
psychological theories and practices are placed in dynamic dia-
                                                                        • Learn innovative approaches to trauma healing, restor-
logue with ecopsychology, cultural studies, critical community            ative justice, ecological sustainability, community build-
psychology, and indigenous and liberation psychologies from               ing, economic justice, forced migration, alternatives to
diverse cultural settings.                                                violence, peacebuilding, and reconciliation

To study community and ecopsychology in the light of libera-            • Practice participatory action research and program
                                                                          and organizational evaluation, while deepening ethical
tion psychology is to commit to the exploration of the profound           discernment regarding issues of power and privilege
effects of injustice, violence, and the exploitation of others and
                                                                        • Train in a wide variety of group approaches to cultural
nature in psychological, communal, and ecological well-being.             and ecological work
It is a commitment to create paths to peace and reconciliation,         • Heighten sensitivity to the imaginal, the metaphorical,
justice, and sustainability.                                              and the mythical

Through community and ecological fi eldwork and research,                • Develop the capacity to teach in academic and
                                                                          community learning environments
students work in the areas of their calling, while deepening
                                                                        • Apply insights to a wide variety of professions and
their ethical discernment, practicing their repertoire of dia-
                                                                          leadership positions
logue and arts-based approaches, and gathering the theoreti-
cal insight and practical skills to conduct participatory action
research, community and organizational program evaluation,           Students and alumni work in fi elds such as education (high
and transformative work.                                             schools, colleges, universities, prisons, alternative learning
                                                                     centers, adult education, youth programs); prison reform and
Praxis classes mentor students in innovative group approaches:
                                                                     restorative justice initiatives; arts-based community building;
council/circle, appreciative inquiry, theater of the oppressed,
                                                                     trauma healing; advocacy and grassroots coalitions; social jus-
                                         ,
public conversation, open space technology community dream-          tice; organizational development and transformation; peace-
work, liberation arts, restorative justice, somatic approaches       building and community dialogue; health services (including
to trauma healing, confl ict transformation, and imaginal and         hospice); non-profits; NGO’s (nongovernmental organizations);
ritual approaches to community health and healing.                   planning and evaluation; land preservation; peak oil planning
                                                                     and sustainability issues; local food initiatives; philanthropy;
                                                                     microlending and economic alternatives.




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Classes take place in nine, three-day sessions (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday), approximately once each month during
fall, winter, and spring. In the first and second summers, students complete community or ecopsychological fieldwork
and research in their home communities or other off-campus sites. In the third summer and subsequent year(s),
students are involved in writing their dissertations in their home communities.


FIRST YEAR
                    FALL     Introduction to Depth Psychology – DPC 730, 2 Units
                             Introduction to Critical Community Psychology – DPC 700, 2 Units
                             Psychoanalytic Tradition: Social Psychoanalysis – DPC 760, 2 Units
                             Council Practice – DPC 871, 2/3 Unit
                 WINTER      Jungian Psychology – DPC 761, 2 Units
                             Psychologies of Liberation – DPC 781, 2 Units
                             Indigenous Psychologies – DPC 710, 2 Units
                             Appreciative Inquiries – DPC 872, 2/3 Unit
                 SPRING      Ecopsychology I: The Ethics of Place – DPC 732, 2 Units
                             Foundations for Research in Depth Psychology: Participatory Qualitative Research – DPC 881, 2 Units
                             Mythopoetic Imagination: Community Theater – DPC 873, 1-1/3 Units
                             Community Dreamwork – DPC 874, 1-1/3 Units
                SUMMER       Community/Ecological Fieldwork Practicum – DPC 783, 5 Units
SECOND YEAR
                    FALL     Archetypal Psychology – DPC 762, 2 Units
                             Phenomenology of Depth Psychological Cultural and Ecological Work – DPC 880, 1-1/2 Units
                             Depth Psychology of Violence and its Prevention – DPC 731, 2 Units
                             Orientation to Scholarly and Community Publication – DPC 812, 1/2 Unit
                             Restorative Justice – DPC 875, 2/3 Unit
                 WINTER      Post-Jungian Psychology: Jungian Approaches to Culture and Ecology – DPC 862, 2 Units
                             Post-Freudian Psychology: Ethnopsychoanalysis – DPC 860, 2 Units
                             Community Program and Organization Evaluation – DPC 879, 2 Units
                             Public Conversation – DPC 876, 2/3 Units
                 SPRING      Hermeneutic and Phenomenological Traditions – DPC 991, 2 Units
                             Ecopsychology II: Engaged Deep Ecology – DPC 847, 2 Units
                             Individual and Collective Trauma – DPC 923, 2 Units
                             Somatic Approaches to Trauma Healing – DPC 877, 2/3 Unit
                SUMMER       Community/Ecological Fieldwork and Research Practicum – DPC 883, 5 Units
                             Depth Transformative Practices – DPC 997, 0 Units
THIRD YEAR
                    FALL     Participatory Research Practicum: Creating an Interpretive Community – DPC 990, 2 Units
                             Community Building and Empowerment – DPC 720, 2 Units
                             Depth Psychology and the Sacred: The Experience of the Sacred – DPC 920, 1 Unit
                             Depth Psychology and the Mythic Tradition: Mythic Dimensions of Communal Life – DPC 921, 1 Unit
                             Social Network Analysis – DPC 878, 2/3 Unit
                 WINTER      Imaginal Ways of Knowing – DPC 882, 2 Unit
                             Community Counseling and Advocacy – DPC 885, 1 Unit
                             Community and Organizational Careers Skill Building – DPC 884, 1 Unit
                             Reconciliation and Peacebuilding – DPC 740, 2 Units
                             Dissertation Development 1 – DPC 932A, 2/3 Unit
                 SPRING      Frontiers of Depth Psychology – DPC 963, 2 Units
                             Frontiers of Liberation Psychologies – DPC 964, 2 Units
                             Liberatory Pedagogy – DPC 992, 2 Units
                             Dissertation Development II – DPC 932B, 2/3 Unit
                SUMMER       Research Writing: Conceiving the Dissertation – DPC 933, 5 Units
CONTINUING
                             Dissertation Writing – DPC 980, 15 Units

This curriculum may vary depending upon changing academic needs.



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M.A/Ph.D. in Depth Psychology                                                                                    Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY,                                                                           Descriptions
LIBERATION PSYCHOLOGY, AND ECOPSYCHOLOGY




TRADITIONS, LEGACIES, AND                                                    Archetypal Psychology
FRONTIERS OF DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY                                                DPC 762, 2 units
                                                                             Archetypal psychology, as envisioned by James Hillman, moves
This portion of the curriculum grounds students in the psycho-
                                                                             beyond clinical inquiry and locates its identity within the W estern
analytic, Jungian, archetypal, and phenomenological lineages
                                                                             imagination, finding affiliation with the arts, culture, and history of
of depth psychology, as well as in the contemporary fl owering
                                                                             ideas. Its central aim is the appreciation and development of soul
of these traditions that aid cultural, community, and ecological             through the cultivation of the life of the imaginal. W e investigate
understanding and transformation.                                            the history and central ideas of this rich psychological perspective,
                                                                             focusing on concepts such as archetype, image, seeing-through, and
Introduction to Depth Psychology                                             the soul of the world, anima mundi.
DPC 730, 2 units
The term “depth psychology” evokes many associations and images              Hermeneutic and Phenomenological Traditions
yet is often difficult to define. In this course we formulate a definition      DPC 991, 2 units
of our field by investigating historical, cultural, and conceptual tradi-     This course introduces students to hermeneutics and phenomenol-
tions that shape its identity . Topics include ancient approaches to         ogy, two broad philosophical traditions that underlie the theory and
healing, encounters with the unconscious, and soul making through            practice of research in depth psychology. Historical, conceptual, and
literature and mythology.                                                    methodological foundations of both traditions are examined. Critical
                                                                             problems and conundrums in the theory and practice of hermeneutics
Psychoanalytic Tradition: Social Psychoanalysis                              and phenomenology are addressed, as well as cultural and ethical
DPC 760, 2 units                                                             perspectives and implications.
Freud’s students, colleagues, and dissenters generated a body of work
that extended the focus of psychoanalysis to the relation between            Post-Freudian Psychology: Ethnopsychoanalysis
psyche and culture. The works of key psychoanalysts who have made            DPC 860, 2 units
important contributions to this body of work are explored.                   Students will learn how psychoanalysis has been applied in diverse
                                                                             cultural settings, integrating disciplines such as anthropology , soci-
Jungian Psychology                                                           ology, religion, mythology, and philosophy. Students will apply depth
DPC 761, 2 units                                                             psychological methods and approaches to conduct cultural analysis
The basic concepts of Jungian psychology such as persona, anima,             of rituals, symbols, myths, magic, and healing strategies from di-
animus, shadow, the ego-Self axis and others are studied. Attention is       verse cultures. Critical refl ection will be used to nurture awareness
brought to the historical, philosophical, psychological, and religious in-   of cultural countertransference in understanding depth psychological
fluences acting upon Jung’s psychology. We explore the usefulness of          cultural phenomena.
Jungian concepts for understanding inter- and intrapsychic processes,
as well as for seeing more deeply into the issues of our time.               Depth Psychology and the Sacred:
                                                                             The Experience of the Sacred
Post-Jungian Psychology: Jungian Approaches to                               DPC 920, 1 unit
Culture and Ecology                                                          To sense and honor the sacred in “each and every” is at the heart
DPC 862, 2 units                                                             of apprehending interdependence and living in its light. W e will
In recent decades a number of theorists within Jungian circles as            explore how individuals and communities prepare for and welcome
well as fi gures outside who use Jungian and archetypal ideas have            the numinous dimension of life, allowing the springs of the sacred to
offered needed perspectives on psyche in relation to culture, politics,      support, deepen, and enliven us and our relations.
and ecology. These voices will be studied as we discern future direc-
tions for Jungian studies.                                                   Depth Psychology and the Mythic Tradition:
                                                                             Mythic Dimensions of Communal Life
                                                                             DPC 921, 1 unit
                                                                             Mythic images may be used to explore psychic and communal pro-
                                                                             cesses, allowing us to see more deeply into contemporary issues and
                                                                             archetypal realities. Students work with sacred tales from diverse
                                                                             cultures, opening portals into mythic ways of seeing.




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M.A/Ph.D. in Depth Psychology                                                                                    Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY,                                                                           Descriptions
LIBERATION PSYCHOLOGY, AND ECOPSYCHOLOGY



Frontiers of Depth Psychology                                               Psychologies of Liberation
DPC 963, 2 units                                                            DPC 781, 2 units
Depth psychological theories and practices are placed in dynamic            This course places Euro-American approaches to depth psychol-
dialogue with ecopsychology, psychologies of liberation, and cultural       ogy into conversation with psychologies of liberation arising from
studies from diverse cultural settings as we create a critical depth        Asia, Africa, Central, and South America. By focusing on dialogue
oriented community psychology for the 21st century . Contemporary           as their common methodology, we reflect on how one can integrate
work in Freudian, Jungian, archetypal, and phenomenological schools         psychologies that have focused primarily on the individual and the
is explored, enabling students to begin to place their own evolving         intrapsychic with psychologies that look at the psychological through
scholarship in dialogue with the frontiers of depth psychology.             the lens of culture. How does this integration lead us to work with
                                                                            dream, symptom, image, and calling? How does it help us imagine
CRITICAL COMMUNITY                                                          depth psychological work with psychological suffering and well-being
PSYCHOLOGY, LIBERATION                                                      through small group and community participatory fi eldwork and re-
PSYCHOLOGY, ECOPSYCHOLOGY                                                   search? We examine the development of dialogical capacities across
These courses enlist us to create a depth psychologically                   the intrapsychic, interpersonal, and group domains. This course lays
informed critical community and ecopsychology for the 21st                  the theoretical and practical foundation for depth psychologically
century. Community psychology, liberation psychologies, and                 oriented community fieldwork and research.
ecopsychology are placed in conversation with depth psychol-
                                                                            Indigenous Psychologies
ogy to explore the interface between psyche, culture, and na-               DPC 710, 2 units
ture, as we seek to create paths for psychological, community,
                                                                            Psychological knowledge with scientifi c ambitions has primarily
cultural, and environmental well-being.                                     emerged in the W estern World. New movements around the world
                                                                            are seeking to create ownership of psychological and cultural knowl-
Introduction to Critical Community Psychology                               edge in an expanded sense as a means of liberation from centuries
DPC 700, 2 units                                                            of intellectual imposition. As a result, indigenous psychologies are
Students will be introduced to the history of community psychology          proposing emic versus etic research, ethno-cultural methodologies,
and the application of critical theory to examine its concepts, meth-       ethno-semantics, and ethno-epistemologies. These movements are
odologies, and frameworks within diverse socio-cultural, economic,          furnishing the making of a promising “indigenous depth psychology,”
and political contexts (i.e., social and human services, schools, youth     that ignites the encounter with the collective unconcious and proposes
development, the health care system, non-governmental, governmen-           “cultural individuation” as a unifying human motif to heal globally ,
tal, and community-based organizations). The process and outcome                                                                                    -
                                                                            through unity in diversity. This course will address the plurality of per
of the community mental health movement will be examined, show-             spectives and voices representing cultural analyses of depth psychol-
ing how a depth psychological understanding of community assets             ogy and psychological phenomena in diverse geographical settings.
and stressors, coping strategies, social networks, and social support       Students will critically apply indigenous psychologies’ methodologies,
contributes to the application of community-based approaches to             tools, and approaches and discern the interplay of intersubjectivity in
holistic community health and well-being. Discourse on key concepts         the description of depth psychological cultural phenomena, as well as
such as oppression, social class, ethnicity and racism, social justice,     in the interaction of self-subject-culture-ecology.
and social change will lead to the acquisition of practical skills in as-
sessing community health and in utilizing lessons learned for social        Community Building and Empowerment
change and policy development.                                              DPC 720, 2 units
                                                                            Students will analyze studies on community participation and em-
                                                                            powerment, learning to assess (diagnose) pathways of community
                                                                            change, and designing interventions to foster community health.
                                                                            Students will learn to apply community capacity building strategies,
                                                                            interventions, and assessments to promote community empower -
                                                                            ment, organizing, mobilization, and social activism. Lastly , students
                                                                            will be exposed to the analysis and development of participatory
                                                                            community visioning, planning and action models, and community
                                                                            learning, fostering a sense of community effi cacy to strengthen
                                                                            holistic community health.


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M.A/Ph.D. in Depth Psychology                                                                                  Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY,                                                                         Descriptions
LIBERATION PSYCHOLOGY, AND ECOPSYCHOLOGY



Individual and Collective Trauma                                           Phenomenology of Depth Psychological Cultural
DPC 923, 2 units                                                           and Ecological Work
The ever-enlarging literature on personal and community trauma is          DPC 880, 1.5 units
reviewed. The trauma literature is linked to the social and cultural       In this course students present their community and ecological field-
environments that historically produced depth psychologies as well         work and research, examining how depth psychology oriented their
as contemporary perspectives. We explore the roles of victim, oppres-      work, their transferential relation to the work, and what they learned
sor, collaborator, bystander, witness, and ally in relation to traumatic   through their application of depth psychological and community
events. Approaches to the healing of collective trauma are discussed.      psychology approaches. Through reflection on the array of fieldwork,
                                                                           students work toward discerning a phenomenology of how depth
Depth Psychology of Violence and Its Prevention                            psychology and cultural and ecological work are and can be related.
DPC 731, 2 units                                                           Attention to the interfaces between culture and intrapsychic experi-
With the hope of deepening our capacities for both the prevention          ence, between cultural/ecological symptom and individual suffering
and treatment of violent behaviors, we will explore the archetypal         or psychopathology, ecological/cultural/institutional transformation
foundations of violence in various myths, cultural beliefs about vio-      and psychological and communal healing are stressed. Students
lence, and psychological theories that account for it. Innovative com-     study how such community based depth psychological work is of
munity treatment and prevention programs will be presented.                value to cultural work and to the evolution of depth psychological
Ecopsychology I: The Ethics of Place                                       theory and practice. Pass/No Pass.
DPC 732, 2 units                                                           Reconciliation and Peacebuilding
Our human selves are part of a vast nexus that includes other selves,      DPC 740, 2 units
animals, plants, earth, and sky. The psychological is always already       This course explores how cycles of revenge can be interrupted, as well
ecopsychological. The collective unconscious as well as conscious          as how efforts of reconciliation and reparation in postconfl ict situa-
being in the world are continuous with the natural world. We shall         tions can pave the path to ongoing and sustainable peace. The limits of
move from Jung’s writings on nature and spirit to new approaches to        peacebuilding in the aftermath of violent conflict will be confronted.
be found in contemporary ecopsychologists, anthropologists, poets
of place, environmentalists, and ecologists. The aim is to rethink         Frontiers of Liberation Psychologies
nature and psyche at once and together, and to illuminate our place        DPC 964, 2 units
as humans within the surrounding environment.                              This course offers theoretical and experiential study of various par-
                                                                           ticipatory, dialogical, and restorative approaches being developed
Ecopsychology II: Engaged Deep Ecology                                     throughout the world to foster critical consciousness, build commu-
DPC 847, 2 units                                                           nity, reconcile divisive differences, heal community trauma, transform
Many of us have become increasingly alienated from the natural             oppressive social conditions, and imagine utopic possibilities.
world and its life-sustaining principles of interdependence, diversity,
and reciprocity. Through practices such as wilderness rites of pas-        Liberatory Pedagogy
sage, nature/council circles, ecotherapies, and nature-based healing       DPC 992, 2 units
practices, we are given the opportunity to practice an ecopsychology       In this culminating course students create their philosophies of teach-
that both honors the ways of our ancestors and also increases our          ing, and then embody them as they teach the work that draws them
responsiveness to the environmental crises that we face.                   into their dissertations and professional work beyond the dissertation.
                                                                           This course fulfills the oral exam requirement. Pass/No Pass.




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M.A/Ph.D. in Depth Psychology                                                                                 Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY,                                                                        Descriptions
LIBERATION PSYCHOLOGY, AND ECOPSYCHOLOGY




APPROACHES TO GROUP AND                                                   Public Conversation
COMMUNITY PRACTICE                                                        DPC 876, 2/3 unit
                                                                          Students will learn approaches to working with groups when there
These didactic-experiential classes introduce students to a
                                                                          is a history of divisive confl ict. Structured conversation to promote
wide variety of dialogical, arts, and image based approaches
                                                                          mutual understanding and conflict transformation will be practiced.
to community and organizational issues and dynamics.
                                                                          Somatic Approaches to Trauma Healing
Council Practice                                                          DPC 877, 2/3 unit
DPC 871, 2/3 unit
                                                                          Community based somatic approaches to healing trauma, re-estab-
Circle and council practices build on ancient practices of many cul-
                                                                          lishing a sense of trust, and engendering resilience will be explored.
tures. They draw upon practices of deep listening to self and other ,
the honoring of contributions of all participants, and the sharing of     Social Network Analysis
leadership. Attention will be given to the use of council in educa-       DPC 878, 2/3 unit
tional and organizational environments.                                   Students will learn the theory and methodological approaches to con-
                                                                          duct Social Network Analysis. They will learn how to assess group
Appreciative Inquiries
                                                                          and community relations and to determine pathways to improve
DPC 872, 2/3 unit
                                                                          community health, identifying key organizational and community
This is an innovative approach used to guide communities in visualizing
                                                                          assets to design and evaluate community and group interventions.
their community assets and how these can contribute to community
health and well-being. Using participatory methodologies, students        Depth Transformative Practices
will learn to identify and map community assets and their impacts as      DPC 997, 0 units
well as design individual, group, and community applications.             Various schools of depth psychology have created therapeutic
                                                                          contexts for personal transformation and/or healing. These practices
Mythopoetic Imagination: Community Theater
                                                                          are related to transformative rituals and rites across cultures and his-
DPC 873, 1-1/3 units
                                                                          tory. Ecological, cultural, and organizational work have also created
Theater of the Oppressed, Legislative Theater, and Playback Theater
                                                                          transformative practices. During the fi rst two years of the program,
will be explored for their potential to raise awareness, to build com-
                                                                          students are expected to engage in a minimum of 60 hours of depth
munity, and to support community visioning and future planning.
                                                                          transformative practice within a relational context. Latitude is given
Community Dreamwork                                                       to students to choose the form of this practice in accordance with
DPC 874, 1-1/3 units                                                      their needs and interests. Examples of such practice may include, but
This class will reclaim dreams as a community resource and practice       are not limited to, individual depth psychotherapy , group dialogue
methods (i.e., social dreaming, cultural dreaming, dream theater ,        work, community theater, facilitated vision questing, rites of pas-
communal vision questing) that allow us to hear the metaphorical          sage, arts based community work, appreciative inquiry. Students are
resonance between dreaming and waking life, and to widen our              invited to use this requirement to gain experience and further train-
perception to include the imaginal.                                       ing in a group or community modality they hope to use in their work.
                                                                          Students are required to submit a proposal in advance of beginning
Restorative Justice                                                       and a log recording the hours they complete.
DPC 875, 2/3 unit
From gacaca rituals in Rwanda to juvenile justice courts in the U.S.,
people are exploring both old and new alternatives to retributive
justice. In the hope of re-including perpetrators into the human com-
munity, practices are developed to share the effects of the action
in question and to search for ways to make human recompense,
opening the path for forgiveness and mutual understanding.




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M.A/Ph.D. in Depth Psychology                                                                                Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY,                                                                       Descriptions
LIBERATION PSYCHOLOGY, AND ECOPSYCHOLOGY




PARTICIPATORY FIELDWORK                                                 Community/Ecological Fieldwork
AND RESEARCH                                                            and Research Practicum
                                                                        DPC 883, 5 units
Through participatory and dialogical fi eldwork and research,
                                                                        In this externship students either return to the site of their original
students learn how to apprentice to community groups and
                                                                        fieldwork or choose a new one. Some fi eldwork may involve the
issues, to be a witness to the ongoing work of such groups,             student in the ongoing work at that site; some may involve depth
to work collaboratively toward mutually desired transforma-             psychologically oriented work that is initiated by the student in con-
tions and actions, and to evaluate to what extent these                 sultation with members of the community. This summer students also
goals have been reached. Research approaches—such as                    have the option to engage in a pilot piece of research in order to hone
hermeneutic, phenomenological, critical, participatory action,          the research skills that will assist them in the work of their disserta-
and feminist—enable students to deeply engage a group’ s                tion. Through deep listening to or dialogue with the community where
questions and concerns, while deepening ethical discernment             they are working, students generate research questions that may be
around issues of power and privilege.                                   explored using various phenomenological/heuristic/hermeneutic
                                                                        methodologies and/or participatory action research approaches.
Foundations for Research in Depth Psychology:
                                                                        Orientation to Scholarly and Community Publication
Participatory Qualitative Research
                                                                        DPC 812, 1/2 unit
DPC 881, 2 units
                                                                        Drawing from their coursework and/or community/ecological fi eld-
Students are provided with the theoretical perspective and meth-
                                                                        work, students are introduced to techniques of scholarly research
odological tools to engage in community and ecological fi eldwork
                                                                        and are guided in choosing the fi eld, topic, and approach to produce
and research. This form of research draws on the critical theories of
                                                                        a publishable paper . This includes an exploration of options for
feminist, third world, and indigenous research practices. It requires
                                                                        publishing both online and in print media.
that researchers participate collaboratively with those in their re-
search community to foster individual and community self-reflection,     Community and Organizational Careers Skill Building
knowledge, and empowerment.                                             DPC 884, 1 unit
                                                                        Students will learn skills in proposing and conducting research and
Community/Ecological Fieldwork Practicum:
Tending the Soul of the World                                           advocacy in non-governmental and community-based organizations.
DPC 783, 5 units                                                        Further, students will acquire grant-writing skills to help organiza-
                                                                        tions and grassroots groups fi nd economic means to conduct their
This summer externship helps students to create a bridge from their
                                                                        own projects.
growing theoretical knowledge of depth and liberation psychologies
to cultural and ecological fi eldwork that supports psychological and    Community Counseling and Advocacy
community well-being. Through participatory work in community set-      DPC 885, 1 unit
tings connected to a contemporary cultural, community, or ecological    This course will teach students skills in community counseling and
issue that interests them, students explore and practice applications   advocacy. Students will learn to apply negotiation, mediation, and
of depth psychology that extend beyond the consulting room.             conflict resolution to address community and/or organizational
                                                                        conflicts. Further, they will gain skills in identifying and preventing
                                                                        conflicts, including those that are unconscious and expressed in
                                                                        symbols, metaphors, and community or organizational symptoms.
                                                                        Students will learn to spark social capital, capacity , and empower-
                                                                        ment in organizations to promote desired development.




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M.A/Ph.D. in Depth Psychology                                                                               Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY,                                                                      Descriptions
LIBERATION PSYCHOLOGY, AND ECOPSYCHOLOGY



Community Program & Organization Evaluation                              Dissertation Development II
DPC 879 2 units                                                          DPC 932B, 2/3 unit
Students will learn to conduct community program and organizational      Students complete a concept paper , and learn to craft a literature
evaluations using depth psychological frameworks, for example, col-      review. Prerequisite: DPC 932A
lecting and analyzing symbols, rituals, myths, and collective dreams,
interpreting results and applying lessons learned for community and
                                                                         Research Writing: Conceiving the Dissertation
                                                                         DPC 933, 5 units
organizational healing and development. Particular emphasis will be
given to the role of worldview and political ideology in addressing      For students who do not yet have an approved concept paper , this
evaluative inquiry and the framing of an evaluation approach. Students   course provides another opportunity to have their concept paper
will learn to design evaluations, develop evaluation plans, and align    submitted and approved. Students begin to craft their dissertation
evaluation questions to program and organizational learning needs.       literature review. Prerequisites: DPC 932A, DPC 932B.
In addition, students will conduct needs assessments, defi ne and         Dissertation Writing
prioritize program goals and objectives, and develop procedures and      DPC 980, 15 units
techniques to identify evaluation data sources and target population.
                                                                         During this course, students assemble their dissertation committees,
Emphasis will be placed on participatory and empowering evaluation
                                                                         write their proposals, complete the dissertation process, and defend
approaches that increase program sustainability.
                                                                         their dissertations in a public forum. This course may be taken con-
Imaginal Ways of Knowing                                                 currently with other courses. Additional fees are assessed for this
DPC 882, 2 units                                                         course. Prerequisites: DPC 932A, DPC 932B, DPC 933
One way of gaining access to understandings, knowledge, desires,
and visions is to invite ourselves and those we work with to welcome
images, symbols, metaphors, reverie, aesthetic sensibility , active
imagination, and somatic experiences. This class will explore research
approaches that encourage both researcher and co-participants to be
aware of the imaginal level of their work together.

Participatory Research Practicum:
Creating an Interpretive Community
DPC 990, 2 units
Students will work with a variety of qualitative interpretive frame-
works, including phenomenological, heuristic, voice-centered, and
intuitive inquiry, in order to learn how to deepen their analysis of
interview data. By engaging together in research, students will
deepen their sensitivity to ethical issues and the impact of social
location on interpretation, as well as practice strategies to include
interviewees in the analysis of their own experiences.

Dissertation Development I
DPC 932A, 2/3 unit
The Dissertation Development two-course sequence provides the
framework for writing the concept paper, which serves as the basis
for the dissertation proposal. The focus of the fi rst course is on
crafting a research question/area, and choosing a methodological
approach that is appropriate to it.




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M.A/Ph.D. in Depth Psychology

WITH EMPHASIS IN                                                                                      Curriculum
Somatic Studies                                                                                       Overview



In the classical world when the healing                          STUDENTS IN THE SOMATIC
god Asklepios was still afoot, the powers                        STUDIES SPECIALIZATION

of imagination and the spirit of place were                       • Read, interpret, and critically reflect upon the theories
integral to the practice of medicine. In modern                     and traditions of Depth Psychology, remembering the
times, C. G. Jung thought that these should be combined             body and recalling its voice
with and tested by the continuing developments of science.        • Develop the capacity and skill to maintain awareness
Non-Western healing traditions and practices, many that             of and connection to the unconscious
have never needed to split psyche from soma as we have            • Learn techniques and practices of dream work, body
in the West, are increasingly found working side-by-side            movement, and active imagination as healing practices
with Western medicine. Neuroscience has now convincingly          • Develop literacy in the emerging domain of
demonstrated the functional unity between mind and body.            neuroscience as it applies to Depth Psychology and
By doing so, science is validating one of the foundational          somatic studies
principles of depth psychology which is an understanding          • Develop skills in research and writing that will support
that there are forces in the psyche that stimulate the body’s       their efforts to articulate and promote effective healing
capacity to heal itself. This new paradigm of healing has led       practices
us to offer this opportunity to pursue an M.A. and/or Ph.D. in    • Participate with like-minded scholars and healers in an
Depth Psychology while specializing in Somatic Studies.             emerging field of study
Students choosing this specialization have a variety of
interests, experiences, and callings that have led them to
believe that in order to study the psyche one must give
primary attention to the body—its sensibilities, movements,
symptoms, and many ways of healing. They come from many
different backgrounds—some with established healing
practices, some with a passion for researching this new field,
and some with a desire to move forward in their study of
depth psychology with the lived experience of the body as the
primary focus.




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Students in this specialization come to campus ten times each year for three years of course work following the pattern of
three day sessions per quarter during fall, winter, and spring and one extended five day session for summer. During each
residential session students attend lectures and seminars, engage experiential and embodied learning, and have time for
reflection and research in the Pacifica Library and archives.


FIRST YEAR
                   FALL      Introduction to Depth Psychology - DPS 730, 2 Units
                             History of Healing Traditions I: Ancient Greece a Model of Integrative Medicine - DPS 710, 2 Units
                             Imagery in Somatic Studies I: The Technique of Active Imagination and the Practice of Dream Tending - DPS 770, 2 Units

                 WINTER      Neuroscience and Somatic Depth Psychology I - DPS 720, 2 Units
                             Jungian Psychology - DPS 761, 2 Units
                             Complementary and Alternative Medicine I - DPS 740, 2/3 Unit
                             The Psychoanalytic Tradition - DPS 760, 2 Units

                 SPRING      Alchemy - DPS 750, 2 Units
                             Neuroscience and Somatic Depth Psychology II - DPS 721, 2 Units
                             History of Healing Traditions II: Non-Western and Indigenous Healing Traditions - DPS 711, 2 Units
                SUMMER       Foundations for Research in Somatic Psychology - DPS 782, 2 Units
                             Body-Oriented Therapies - DPS 751, 2 Units

SECOND YEAR
                    FALL     Imaginal Ways of Knowing - DPS 882, 2 Units
                             Depth Psychology and the Sacred - DPS 920, 2 Units
                             Research Methods I: Quantitative and Clinical Studies- DPS 883, 2 Units
                             Complementary and Alternative Medicine II - DPS 840, 2/3 Unit
                 WINTER      Research Methods II: Qualitative Methods - DPS 884, 2 Units
                             Ecopsychology: The Body on the Earth - DPS 732, 2 Units
                             Archetypal Psychology - DPS 762, 2 Units
                             Complementary and Alternative Medicine III - DPS 841, 2/3 Unit
                 SPRING      Trauma, Pain, and Dissociation - DPS 850, 2 Units
                             Post-Jungian Psychology - DPS 862, 2 Units
                             Dissertation Development I - DPS 832, 2 Units
                             Written Comprehensive Examination - DPS 892, 0 Units
                SUMMER       Transference and Counter-transference in Somatic Healing Practice - DPS 851, 2 Units
                             Scholarly Writing and Publication - DPS 812, 2 Units
THIRD YEAR
                    FALL     Imagery in Somatic Studies II: Embodied Dreamwork - DPS 970, 2 Units
                             Fieldwork, Practice, and Case Presentation I - DPS 901, 2 Units
                             The Body in Literature: Themes of Sickness and Health - DPS 950, 2 Units
                             Dissertation Development IIA - DPS 932A, 2/3 Unit
                 WINTER      Chronic Illness, Terminal Illness, and Conscious Dying - DPS 951, 2 Units
                             Mythopoetic Imagination: Arts and Expressive Therapies - DPS 921, 2 Units
                             Fieldwork, Practice, and Case Presentation II - DPS 902, 2 Units
                             Dissertation Development IIB - DPS 932B, 2/3 Unit
                 SPRING      Non-Western and Indigenous Healing Practices - DPS 952, 2 Units
                             Fieldwork, Practice, and Case Presentation III - DPS 903, 2 Units
                             Eros, Isolation, and Relationship - DPS 953, 2 Units
                             Dissertation Development IIC - DPS 932C, 2/3 Unit
                SUMMER       Depth Psychology and Behavioral Medicine/Health Psychology - DPS 954, 2 Units
                             Integration of Theory, Practice, and Teaching (Oral Comprehensive Examination) - DPS 992, 2 Units

CONTINUING
                             Depth Transformative Practices - DPS 997, 5 units
                             Dissertation Writing - DPS 980, 15 units

This curriculum may vary depending upon changing academic needs.


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M.A/Ph.D. in Depth Psychology                                                                                     Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN SOMATIC STUDIES                                                                                  Descriptions

                                                                           prevailed. For example, the mythological figures of Asklepios and his
THEORY AND TRADITIONS
                                                                           daughters were revered as the symbols of another form of healing
OF SOMATIC DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY
                                                                           that Hippocrates himself found essential to restore health. Students
Courses in this domain ground students in the psychoanalytic,              will examine how this model still offers inspiration for rethinking
Jungian, and archetypal lineages of depth psychology. In addi-             integrative medicine.
tion, connections are made across time and cultures to tradi-
tions that reconnect psyche and soma as we explore the ways                Alchemy
that new developments in neuroscience challenge and affi rm                 DPS 750, 2 units
the understandings of somatic depth psychology.                            Marie-Louise von Franz tells us that alchemy was born at the meeting
                                                                           place of the speculative mind of the west and the experimental techno-
Introduction to Depth Psychology                                           magical practices of the east. This course revisits the work of alchemy in
DPS 730, 2 units                                                           relation to somatic studies. Students will work the alchemical metaphor
                                                                                                                              .
                                                                           and its explicit and implicit connection to the body Students will review
The term depth psychology evokes many associations and images
                                                                           the ways that neuroscience uses terms and concepts that have a long
yet is often difficult to define. In this course we formulate a definition
                                                                           history, appearing not only in the repertoire of symbols from alchemy ,
of our field by investigating historical, cultural, and conceptual tradi-
                                                                           but also in the concepts and vocabulary of depth psychology, including
tions that shape its identity. Topics include a history of soul, ancient
                                                                           “imagination,””transformation,” “dream,” “symptom,” and “healing.”
approaches to healing and encounters with the unconscious through
dreams, literature, mythology, as well as a refl ection on the ways         History of Healing Traditions II: Non-Western and
that depth psychology has both emphasized and, at times, ignored           Indigenous Healing Traditions
the body in the course of its own theoretical development.                 DPS 711, 2 units
Neuroscience and Somatic Depth Psychology I                                This course addresses various non-western correlates to the con-
DPS 720, 2 units                                                           cepts of mind, body , and disease with an emphasis on alternative
                                                                           modalities of healing. It includes an exploration of healing traditions
Students in this course develop a thorough understanding of the
                                                                           of Africa, Asia, Central, and South America and brings focus to the
functional organization of the brain and how it is relevant for healing
                                                                           diverse ways that health and disease are interpreted and treated
practices. Students will familiarize themselves with the language
                                                                           within these varied cultural contexts.
of neuroscience in order to be able to read and interpret ongoing
research in neurobiology, the neuroscience of affect and emotion,          The Psychoanalytic Tradition
behavioral genetics, functional neuroanatomy , and developmental           DPS 760, 2 units
science. They will be introduced to the methodologies of neurosci-                                                            s
                                                                           Students develop a working understanding of Freud’ model for body/mind
ence focusing on studies using fMRI and EEG equipment.                     dynamics and how it challenged the materialism and the body/mind split
Neuroscience and Somatic Depth Psychology II                               of his time. They will also see how the psychoanalytic tradition is currently
DPS 721, 2 units                                                           blended with studies in body movement and movement therapies.
An extensive exploration of the placebo/nocebo response will lead          Jungian Psychology
to a discussion of the relationship between expectation and healing        DPS 761, 2 units
and the difference between healing and cure, especially where end          The basic concepts of Jungian psychology such as persona, anima,
of life is concerned. Students will take a critical look at the medical    animus, shadow, the ego-Self axis, and others are studied. Attention
and pharmaceutical approaches to illnesses that are most responsive        is brought to the historical, philosophical, psychological, and reli-
to the placebo response, such as depression and anxiety disorders.         gious influences acting upon Jung’s psychology and in particular the
History of Healing Traditions I: Ancient Greece:                           scientific and philosophical milieu in which Jung developed his ideas
A Model of Integrative Medicine                                            about psyche and soma. Students will develop a critical perspective
DPS 710, 2 units                                                           on this material and explore the usefulness of Jung’s psychology for
                                                                           seeing more deeply into the issues of our time.
The birth of modern western medicine is attributed to Hippocrates
because he was the fi rst to defi ne the clinical approach that today
in turn defi nes modern medicine. Hippocrates was the fi rst to offer
causal and somatic explanations instead of attributing all sickness
to divine intervention. Nevertheless, on the islands of Cos and Delos,
where Hippocratic medicine was put into practice, other infl uences


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M.A/Ph.D. in Depth Psychology                                                                                        Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN SOMATIC STUDIES                                                                                     Descriptions

Archetypal Psychology                                                          Body-Oriented Therapies
DPS 762, 2 units                                                               DPS 751, 2 units
Archetypal psychology, as envisioned by James Hillman, moves beyond            The term “somatic” refers to the awareness of our bodies as they
clinical inquiry and locates its identity within the western imagination,      receive inner and outer stimulation. Students will be introduced
finding affiliation with the arts, culture, and history of ideas. Its central    to somatic therapies that focus on bodily states of consciousness
aim is the appreciation and development of soul through the cultivation        (breath, muscle tension, posture) in order to help clients reach an
of the life of the imaginal. We investigate the history and central ideas of   optimal integration of psyche with soma.
this rich psychological perspective, focusing on concepts such as arche-
type, image, seeing-through, and the soul of the world, anima mundi.
                                                                               Trauma, Pain, and Dissociation
                                                                               DPS 850, 2 units
Post-Jungian Psychology                                                        This course reviews new approaches to trauma therapy, the treatment
DPS 862, 2 units                                                               of PTSD, ADHD, and other symptoms that are now being looked at from
Students gain literacy in a variety of post-Jungian theoretical                the perspective of a holistic integrative approach. The course also fo-
contexts and practices that focus on somatic concerns. They will               cuses on the nature of the healing process, including a review of health
study the major essays by significant post-Jungian thinkers (Hillman,           care practices within diverse cultural systems and historical contexts.
Woodman, Stein, Whitmont, Perera). The work of Marion Woodman is
featured with particular emphasis on Body Soul work which includes
                                                                               Chronic Illness, Terminal Illness, and Conscious Dying
                                                                               DPS 951, 2 units
dreamwork, movement, voice, and creative expression. This practice
grows out of a deep respect for dreams, Jung’s understanding of the            The culturally dominant allopathic medical approaches for treating
psyche, and a trust in the wisdom of the body.                                 chronic and terminal illnesses are increasingly criticized as being
                                                                               inefficient, cost prohibitive, and failing to contribute to the overall
PRACTICES AND FRONTIERS                                                        well-being of the patient. Students will review the alternatives to
OF SOMATIC DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY                                                    traditional practices, reviewing new approaches for the training
Courses in this domain focus on training in particular therapeutic             of nurses, doctors, and support personnel working in hospices and
and healing practices and on extensions of theory and knowledge                hospitals for the chronically ill.
that derive from connecting depth psychology with somatic psy-                 Eros, Isolation, and Relationship
chology. Students will prepare and present material and casework               DPS 953, 2 units
drawn from their fieldwork or from their own healing practices.                 In this course students examine the ways that the dynamics of love and
                                                                               relationship may produce or prevent symptoms and contribute to healing.
Imagery in Somatic Studies I:                                                  Students will learn to use a depth psychological approach which goes
The Technique of Active Imagination                                            beyond the symptom, treating the pain of betrayal and abandonment,
and the Practice of Dream Tending                                              for example, as a push from nature to evolve into a new form of loving
DPS 770, 2 units                                                               and relating. Instead of “treating” the heartbreak, the client is offered an
This course will offer an introduction to Jung’ s technique of active          initiation into the darker aspects of the Lover’s archetype.
imagination and how it has evolved into contemporary applications,
such as the Dream Tending approach of Dr. Stephen Aizenstat.                   Non-Western and Indigenous Healing Practices
Students will start by reviewing the experimental evidence of the              DPS 952, 2 units
impact of imagery on the healing process. Students will learn to ap-           This course will focus on the theories and techniques of several dif-
ply active imagination and Dream Tending as therapeutic measures               ferent healing practices including shamanic practices from a variety
for coping with medical illness and emotional disorders.                       of cultural contexts: curanderos, plant medicine healers, diviners,
                                                                               spirit healers, and others. As with similar reviews of western healing
Imagery in Somatic Studies II: Embodied Dreamwork                              traditions, students will also examine these practices for clear con-
DPS 970, 2 units                                                               nections to, and enrichments for, depth somatic psychology.
Students will study and learn to practice a contemporary approach
to the ancient practice of dream incubation, now called “Embodied
Dreaming” by Robert Bosnak. Based upon the phenomenological
perspectives of C.G. Jung, James Hillman, and Henry Corbin, the
supposition in this practice is that all psychological events can be
best understood as embodied phenomena.


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M.A/Ph.D. in Depth Psychology                                                                                  Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN SOMATIC STUDIES                                                                               Descriptions

The Body in Literature: Themes of Sickness and Health                      Transference and Counter-Transference
DPS 950, 2 units                                                           in Somatic Healing Practice
Stories from literature and from worldwide oral traditions abound          DPS 851, 2 units
with metaphorical and literal references to the symptomatic and            This course has an experiential component in which students
wounded body as a rich context for suffering and remedy. The body          develop a subjective awareness of the body and a capacity to
becomes a narrative in its own right and, as such, leads us along          constantly monitor and interpret their own somatic responses to
through its experiences. Students will read various works of myth and      clinical situations. Students learn to listen with an awareness of
literature and learn how to critically interpret them from the perspec-    fluctuations in somatic cues during the narrative meaning-making
tive of somatic depth psychology. In addition they will critically refl
                                                                     ect   process. Therapeutic skills and dynamics such as transference and
on the cultural role of these works in forming ideas about the body.       counter-transference, diagnosis, interpretation, intervention, timing,
                                                                           and others are reimagined from an embodied perspective.
Mythopoetic Imagination:
Arts and Expressive Therapies                                              Depth Psychology and Behavioral
DPS 921, 2 units                                                           Medicine/Health Psychology
The humanities have traditionally been the source of our most innova-      DPS 954, 2 units
tive ideas about the meaning of life, the beauty of the sensate world,     This course will review the fi eld of Behavioral Medicine/Health
the depth of the soul, and the birth of new values. The intention of       Psychology and frame it within the context of depth psychology.
this course is to develop an aesthetic approach that reconnects the        Topics covered will include the biopsychosocial model, strategies of
arts with the art of healing.                                              intervention, cross-cultural aspects of understanding health/illness,
                                                                           somatization, the worried well, models of change, and environment
Depth Psychology and the Sacred                                            and health. Particular focus will be given to understanding and treat-
DPS 920, 2 units                                                           ing disorders that typically present themselves in medical contexts
When Jung said that all psychological problems are essentially             including smoking, eating disorders, insomnia, hypertension, chronic
religious problems, he was calling attention to the spiritual func-        pain, headache, irritable bowel syndrome, and stress syndromes.
tion of the psyche. In this course we examine the psyche’s capacity        Standard western treatments will be explained combined with how
for sacred experience as it fi nds expression in religion, ritual, and      depth psychology can both expand the understanding of these disor-
encounters with the numinosum. Students will examine non-medical           ders as well as assist with their prevention and treatment.
approaches for managing pain and symptoms due to mourning,
heartbreak, and the loss of meaning in life that comes from an             Complementary and Alternative Medicine I, II, III
impoverished sense of the sacred.                                          DPS 740, 840, 841, 2/3 unit each
                                                                           Western medicine has developed alongside many other systems
Ecopsychology: The Body on the Earth                                       of thought and many types of therapies that have been shown to
DPS 732, 2 units                                                           be effective as either complementary or alternative approaches to
The evolution of homo sapiens, both body and mind, is inextricably         healing and wellness. Some of these approaches, such as hypno-
connected to everything on earth. Carl Jung even suggests that the         sis, art therapy, aromatherapy, bioenergetics, biofeedback, music
collective unconscious is patterned from the body’s contact with the       therapy, dance therapy, breath work, ayurveda, meditation, yoga,
seasonal rhythms, textures, sounds, and shapes of the natural world.       naturopathic medicine and many others, have begun to be shown
Thus, to be a psychological being is to be an embodied being: to be        as efficacious even when standard medical practice has exhausted
firmly placed on terra fi rma, the ground from which all of us have          its options. This sequence of short courses is available for engaging
emerged. Through lecture and experiential exercises, this course con-      with practitioners in such diverse healing traditions.
centrates on the embodied psyche in nature as an important means
for dissolving the artificial boundaries between body and earth.




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M.A/Ph.D. in Depth Psychology                                                                                   Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN SOMATIC STUDIES                                                                                Descriptions

Fieldwork, Practice, and Case Presentation I, II, and III                   RESEARCH, WRITING,
DPS 901, 902, 903, 2 units each                                             AND PUBLICATION
Throughout the third year of coursework students will participate in
                                                                            There are three primary goals of the research domain. First,
at least 60 hours of fieldwork or therapeutic practice that will further
                                                                            students learn to read and critically evaluate current research
their own learning goals and provide an opportunity to integrate the
                                                                            literature in the areas of depth psychology , somatic psychol-
theories, ideas, and experiences they have gained in the fi rst two
years. Fieldwork will involve entering into a particular community          ogy, and neuroscience. Second, students learn to use a variety
setting with the intention of studying some aspect of community             of quantitative, qualitative, and hybrid methodologies typically
experience that relates to the learning goals of this program. Practice     employed in such research. Third, students will acquire the
will involve actually practicing therapeutically with clients or patients   necessary skills in order to engage in their own research and
in a mode in which the student is qualifi ed. Students must formally         write for a scholarly and scientifi c audience. Ultimately, this
propose their work in fi eldwork or practice and have it approved by         domain guides students to design, propose, and complete an
the faculty prior to beginning the fi rst class in this sequence (unless     original doctoral dissertation.
the work being proposed is part of work the student already has
underway). Students submit a log of completed fieldwork or practice          Foundations for Research in Somatic Psychology
hours and make formal case presentations during the on-campus               DPS 782, 2 units
portion of this course.                                                     Students read and interpret current research in somatic psychology,
Integration of Theory, Practice, and Teaching                               neuroscience, and related research in depth psychology. This serves
(Oral Comprehensive Examination)                                            the need for literacy in the fi eld as well as the development of a
DPS 992, 2 units                                                            resource guide for the student’s ongoing research. Examples of theo-
                                                                            retical, qualitative, and quantitative research will be addressed.
Students develop and articulate individualized approaches to a
practice of Depth Psychology with Emphasis in Somatic Studies, and          Imaginal Ways of Knowing
prepare and deliver a presentation to faculty and students which will       DPS 882, 2 units
serve as the oral comprehensive examination.                                Depth psychology is an approach to the psyche that begins with the
Depth Transformative Practices                                              understanding that the imagination is the primary source of knowl-
DPS 997, 5 units                                                            edge and a compelling force shaping thought and action. Therefore,
                                                                            students must learn to criticize their own approaches to knowing
Various schools of depth psychology have created therapeutic con-
                                                                            and research by examining their own complex relationships to the
texts for personal transformation and/or healing. These practices are
                                                                            field. In this class, exercises in reading and writing help develop
dynamically linked to transformative rituals and rites across cultures
                                                                            this complex awareness.
and through time. The provision of a witness, a guide, or teacher has
been seen as essential to the containing vessel for such transforma-        Research Methods I:
tive experiences. During the first two years of the program, students        Quantitative Methods and Clinical Studies
are expected to engage in a minimum of 50 hours of depth transforma-        DPS 883, 2 units
tive practice within a relational context. Latitude is given to students    This course will provide an introduction to the design and meth-
to choose the form of this practice in accordance with their needs          odology of quantitative research projects and clinical studies. The
and interests. Examples of such practice may include, but are not           emphasis will be on the role of this type of research in the emerg-
limited to, body work, breath work, individual depth psychotherapy,         ing field of somatic psychology and its relationship to research in
group dialogue work, facilitated vision questing, rites of passage,         neuroscience that is increasingly important in studying the effi cacy
meditation, artistic engagement, or other psycho-spiritual practices.       of various approaches to treatment.
Students are required to submit a proposal in advance of beginning,
a log recording the hours they complete, and a refl         ective essay     Research Methods II: Qualitative Methods
addressing their experience of Depth Transformative Practices.              DPS 884, 2 units
                                                                            Students learn how to integrate significant shifts in ontology, episte-
                                                                            mology, and methodology required by depth psychological research.
                                                                            They develop literacy and capability in the use of various qualitative
                                                                            methods and approaches including hermeneutics, case study , eth-
                                                                            nography, and phenomenology.



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M.A/Ph.D. in Depth Psychology                                                                               Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN SOMATIC STUDIES                                                                            Descriptions


Dissertation Development I                                              Dissertation Writing
DPS 832, 2 units                                                        DPS 980, 15 units
Students begin to plan for their dissertation research, becoming        During this course, students assemble their dissertation committee,
familiar with the Dissertation Handbook and with the processes of       write the proposal, complete the dissertation process, and defend
conducting dissertation research at Pacifi ca. The course requires       the dissertation in a public forum. This course may be taken con-
attendance at a dissertation defense and writing critical reviews of    currently with other courses. Additional fees are assessed for this
dissertations previously completed.                                     course. Pass/No Pass

Scholarly Writing and Publication                                       Written Comprehensive Examination
DPS 812, 2 units                                                        DPS 892, 0 units
Students will develop skills in scholarly research aimed at publica-
                                     eld,
tion. They are guided in choosing a fi topic, and approach required
to produce a publishable paper. This will include writing or revising
a paper and exploring options for publishing both online and in print
media.

Dissertation Development IIA, B, C
DPS 932A, 932B, 932C, 2/3 unit each
Students master the elements of a research concept paper and its
relationship to the proposal and fi nal draft of a dissertation. This
sequence of courses will result in the writing of a complete and ap-
proved concept paper.




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                                                                                                                Degree
M.A./Ph.D. in Depth Psychology                                                                                  Requirements


REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION                                                OTHER REQUIREMENTS:
                                                                           JUNGIAN AND ARCHETYPAL STUDIES
1.   Students must complete a total of 90 quarter units for the Ph.D.
     to fulfill the degree requirements for graduation. A minimum           SELF-DIRECTED STUDIES
     grade of C is required in each completed course. A cumulative         The purpose of Self-Directed Studies is to allow students to explore
     grade point average of 3.0 must be maintained.                        areas of interest in Depth Psychology outside the boundaries of the
2.   Students must attend at least 2/3 of each course.                     curriculum. This may take the form of attending conferences, work-
                                                                           shops, lectures, and/or seminars; engaging with an analyst or other
3.   During the second year of coursework, students must pass
                                                                           practitioner for personal therapy or healing work; or seeking training
     a written comprehensive examination. The M.A. degree is
                                                                           in a modality that augments their practice of Depth Psychology        .
     awarded when the exam is passed and:
                                                                           Students must complete a total of 30 hours and submit a refl ective
  a. 50 units of fi rst and second year coursework and fi eldwork,
                                                                           paper; this may occur anytime during the course of the program, and
     and 60 hours of depth transformative practices are com-
                                                                           is required for the awarding of the Ph.D. degree. All hours must be
     pleted (Community Psychology , Liberation Psychology , and
                                                                           pre-approved through discussion with the Program Director.
     Ecopsychology)
  b. 48 units of fi rst and second year coursework are completed            OTHER REQUIREMENTS:
     (Jungian and Archetypal Studies)                                      COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY,
  c. 46 units of fi rst and second year coursework, and 50 hours            LIBERATION PSYCHOLOGY,
     of depth transformative practices are completed (Somatic              AND ECOPSYCHOLGY
     Studies)                                                              COMMUNITY FIELDWORK
4.   Students must petition to proceed with the third year . Faculty
                                                                           Students are required to arrange for community/ecological fieldwork
     approval is based on a comprehensive review of coursework,
                                                                                                                                   fi
                                                                           in their home communities or other settings during therst and second
     exam results, writing skills, and readiness to conduct research.
                                                                           summers. A minimum of 70 hours of direct participation in a setting,
     In addition, in Jungian and Archetypal Studies, students must
                                                                           and 140 hours of related reading, writing, imaginal engagement, and
     prepare and submit a scholarly article suitable for publication.
                                                                           reflection are required in the fi rst summer. This is also true in the
5.   Students must pass an oral examination at the end of the third        second summer, unless a student chooses to engage in community/
     year of coursework.                                                   ecological research, in which case hours of direct participation may
6.   Students must submit and defend an original dissertation ac-          be less to allow for in-depth data analysis.
     cepted by the faculty.
                                                                           OTHER REQUIREMENTS:
COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION                                                  SOMATIC STUDIES
The comprehensive examinations consist of a written portion at the         FIELDWORK AND PRACTICE
end of the second year, and an oral portion at the end of the third. The   Students are required to participate in at least 60 hours of fieldwork or
written examination is designed to assess knowledge gained in the          somatic therapeutic practice in their home communities or other set-
first two years, and is a requirement for the awarding of the M.A. de-      tings during their third year of coursework. This will provide students
                                                              s
gree. The third year oral examination consists of the student’ formal      with the opportunity to integrate the theories, ideas, and experiences
oral presentation addressing the ways the three years of study have        they have gained in the fi rst two years, and to further their own learn-
informed and seeded their work leading to the dissertation.                ing goals.

DOCTORAL DISSERTATION
                                                                           NOTE: The Depth Psychology Program and it’ s specializations is
The dissertation process involves the completion of Dissertation           designed to provide students with theoretical traditions of depth
Development and Dissertation Writing courses. Students must                psychology and its contemporary applications to personal, cultural,
have completed all requirements for the M.A. degree and have an            community, and ecological health and well-being. The program does
approved concept paper before enrolling in Dissertation Writing. The       not prepare students to become licensed or to practice psychotherapy .
Dissertation Committee is comprised of a Chair , a Reader, and an          Although some students may wish to pursue licensure after gaining
External Reader. Each member of the committee must possess an              their doctorate in this program, the curriculum does not contain
earned doctorate based in part on a dissertation unless this require-      specific coursework aimed at any type of licensure, nor does it ar -
ment is waived by the Program Chair.                                       range or administratively support traineeships, pre- or post-doctoral
                                                                           internships, or other practice requirements related to licensure.

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M.A. in Engaged Humanities
and The Creative Life
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY


“The creative act is not hang-                                               “One privilege of directing this program is that I’m
ing on, but yielding to a new                                                surrounded by students and faculty who honor
creative movement.”
                                                         creativity in all of its many manifestations, and who understand that
                                                         the creative impulse is the primal force in the universe—indeed there
         —Joseph Campbell
                                                         would be no field called ‘the humanities’ without it. Depth psychology
In today’s rapidly changing world, we                    gives us valuable insight into the generative process, and deepens our
are constantly called to yield, as Joseph                relationship with the dynamic psyche, the source of all acts of creativity.”
Campbell writes, to a new creative move-
                                                                                      - DR. JENNIFER LEIGH SELIG, PROGRAM CHAIR
ment, to create and recreate all fields and
invent new forms, structures, designs, and
products that address the needs of our era.
                                                                      themselves and others. It combines intellectual rigor with
Campbell suggests that “we are at this moment participating
                                                                      creative expression, encouraging dialogue amongst students
in one of the very greatest leaps of the human spirit,” a leap
                                                                      and faculty working in all mediums in an effort to deepen and
fueled by the creative impulses manifested in part by the new
                                                                      broaden our individual and collective potential to make our
sciences, and in part by technology, the arts, and humanities.
                                                                      contribution to the humanities. The program culminates in the
The Internet has democratized the creative movement: never
                                                                      completion of a substantial creative project or portfolio.
before has it been so easy to share in the creative process and
products of humanity. Indeed, we live in awe-inspiring times.         What does it mean to live a creative life? How can we contrib-
                                                                      ute to the leap in human spirit of our times, and move forward
At Pacifica Graduate Institute, we believe the wisdom
                                                                      in awe? Join us in this one-of-a-kind degree program dedicat-
traditions of the humanities and depth psychology influence
                                                                      ed to exploring these questions, and expanding the answers.
the arts and new media, and this influence and confluence
can help inform and enrich the creative life. In keeping with         STUDENTS IN THE M.A. IN ENGAGED
                                                                      HUMANITIES AND THE CREATIVE LIFE PROGRAM:
Pacifica’s mission to tend soul in and of the world, this pro-
gram suggests there is no fundamental difference between                 • Discover strategies for tapping into the deep well of
engaging in art-making and soul-making, that we can tend to                the collective unconscious as a source of creativity,
soul in the world by tending to our creative life in the world.            including studying imagery, symbolism, and the
The world itself has a creative life, manifested in the arche-             archetypal patterns and stories that underpin our
types of the collective unconscious, whose symbols, images,                everyday lives
metaphors, and movements are all the prima materia for the               • Study how people working in any creative capacity
creative movement of humanity.                                             in any creative medium inspire and influence each
The program invites students in the visual, performing, nar-               other, and experience that same inspiration and
rative, studio, and media arts; the creative side of advertis-             influence inside of their cohort
ing, marketing, and product development; teachers of art,                • Increase their generativity and cultivate their aesthetic
literature, and the humanities; professionals in creative fields            sensibility and sensitivity by being in constant conversa-
such as architecture, interior design, and fashion, and the                tion about the creative life with faculty and peers, with
film, television, and music industries; and any others who                  great literature, classic films, and works of art spanning
want to live and work more creatively, or foster creativity in             diverse genres, cultures, and periods of time
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                                                   A Blended Online/Low-Residency Program


   • Find rich sources of inspiration in the humanities, including the study of                             CURRICULUM
     mythology, philosophy, psychology, history, literature, and ecology as they                            OVERVIEW
     affect the art and craft of living and working artfully                                                The M.A. program in
                                                                                                            Engaged Humanities and the
   • Collaborate with a community of creative individuals from across a wide variety
                                                                                                            Creative Life with emphasis
     of artistic disciplines, educational backgrounds, and life experiences
                                                                                                            in Depth Psychology
   • Complete two substantial creative projects or portfolios and reflect upon their                         provides an education in
     creative process                                                                                       the humanities informed
   • Receive a degree which expands their job options or opens up new career tracks                         by mythology and depth
                                                                                                            psychology. The program’s
The approach is broad, strongly interdisciplinary, and satisfying for those who seek
                                                                                                            unique learning format
to combine intellectual exploration with creativity. Candidates from a variety of                           combines the best aspects of
backgrounds are encouraged to apply.                                                                        a connected, heartfelt, inter-
                                                                                                            personal experience with the
                                                                                                            convenience of distance-
PACIFICA GRADUATE INSTITUTE ONLINE                                                                          learning technology.
This degree program takes advantage of online distance-learning technology that
allows students to work and learn in their home environments. Additionally , once each
quarter, students gather on Pacifi ca’s Ladera Lane Campus for a four -day weekend
(Thursday–Sunday) in residence. During these on-campus sessions, students have access
to the Institute’s extensive resources and are able to further community involvement
and professional collaboration. They join classmates from around the world in forming
professional relationships and networks of like-minded individuals. This convenient format
brings Pacifica’s graduate degree programs to global citizens and the life-long learners
who would otherwise might not be able to fufill their educational calling.

FIRST YEAR
              SPRING     Creativity and Aesthetic Sensibility – HMC 100, 3 units                            JENNIFER LEIGH SELIG, PH.D.
                         Joseph Campbell and the Mythmaker’s Path – HMC 110, 3 units
                                                                                                            Chair, M.A. Program in Engaged
             SUMMER      The Complex Nature of Inspiration – HMC 120, 3 units
                                                                                                            Humanities and the Creative Life
                         Creative Influence Across the Humanities – HMC 130, 3 units
                                                                                                            with Emphasis in Depth Psychology
                 FALL    The Expressive Power of Archetypes – HMC 140, 3 units
                         C. G. Jung, Individuation, and the Symbolic Life – HMC 150, 3 units                Jennifer Leigh Selig, Ph.D. joined Pacifica’s
                                                                                                            faculty in 2005, and has served as Chair
              WINTER     The Purpose and Power of Image – HMC 160, 3 units
                                                                                                            and Research Coordinator for the Depth
                         Project Workshop I: Creative Dialogue and Design – HMC 170, 3 units
                                                                                                            Psychology program before moving into her
SECOND YEAR                                                                                                 role as Academic Director of Hybrid Programs
              SPRING     Active Imagination, Dreams, and Psychic Creativity – HMC 200, 3 units              where she oversees the two current hybrid
                         Mythic Narratives: Eternal Sources and                                             specializations, the M.A./Ph.D. in Depth
                          Contemporary Inflections – HMC 210, 3 units                                       Psychology with emphasis in Jungian and
                                                                                                            Archetypal Studies, and the M.A. in Engaged
             SUMMER      Time, Place, Space, and the Ecology
                                                                                                            Humanities and the Creative Life with
                           of Creative Expression – HMC 220, 3 units
                                                                                                            emphasis in Depth Psychology. Her books
                         The Healing Power of Creativity – HMC 230, 3 units
                                                                                                            include Thinking Outside the Church: 110 Ways
                 FALL    The Artist as Activist and Agent of Social Change – HMC 240, 3 units               to Connect With Your Spiritual Nature and
                         Technology and the Psyche – HMC 250, 3 units                                       Reimagining Education: Essays on Retrieving
              WINTER     From Starving Artist to Working Artist:                                            the Soul of Learning which she co-edited with
                           Sustaining the Creative Life – HMC 260, 3 units                                  Dr. Dennis Patrick Slattery, a Mythological
                         Project Workshop II: Creative Expression and Reflection – HMC 270, 3 units         Studies professor at Pacifica. Additionally,
                                                                                                            she has written several award-winning
This curriculum may vary depending upon changing academic needs.                                            screenplays, and enjoys photography.


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M.A. in Engaged Humanities                                                                                            Course
and The Creative Life                                                                                                 Descriptions
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY


Creativity and Aesthetic Sensibility                                        Creative Influence Across The Humanities
HMC 100, 3 units                                                            HMC 130, 3 units
While on the surface, creativity seems a simple phenomenon, it is           This course explores the rich terrain of creative influence by examin-
actually quite complex. Though often studied, it is still not completely    ing several notable case studies of artists who have infl uenced one
understood. Nor do we know the source of creativity: is it the right-       another, other forms of art, and history and culture at large. W     e
brain, is it our unconscious psyche, is it the muse, or is it God? In the   define “artist” broadly as anyone working creatively in their fi eld; in
first half of the course, students read a wide variety of interdisciplin-    this sense, environmentalist John Muir was an artist who was infl u-
ary texts on the nature of creativity, ranging from science to psychol-     enced by poets such as William Wordsworth, John Milton, and Ralph
ogy to spirituality to philosophy, identifying some of the key debates      Waldo Emerson; civil rights activist and preacher Martin Luther King,
in the field. In the second half of the course, students will read about     Jr. was an artist who was influenced by Mahatma Gandhi and Henry
aesthetics and ponder questions such as is the sense of beauty in           David Thoreau; psychoanalyst and dancer Marion W oodman is an
our biology, or is it socially constructed? Throughout the course,          artist who was influenced by Emily Dickinson, William Shakespeare,
students critically reflect upon their own beliefs about creativity and      and many other poets. Students will present their own personal case
the cultivation of their aesthetic sensibility.                             study of the artists, pieces of art, art forms, and movements which
                                                                            have most influenced them.
Joseph Campbell and the Mythmaker’s Path
HMC 110, 3 units                                                            The Expressive Power of Archetypes
Joseph Campbell understood mythology to be humankind’ s most                HMC 140, 3 units
creative act. Throughout his career Campbell focused on the creative        Archetypes can be defi ned as universal patterns which reside in the
mythopoetic act as manifested in the art and literature of the world’s      collective psyche. We all know the characters when we see them:
culture in order to explore mythology itself. Through an exploration        the Lover, the Innocent, the Sage, the V illain, etc. We all recognize
of Campbell’s work, students will learn the methods of comparative          the themes when we see them: the Fall from Innocence, the Battle
mythology which gives them eyes to see the universal themes of                                                 s
                                                                            Between Good and Evil, the Hero’ Journey, etc. These archetypes are
humanity expressed through image and story. The story of Campbell           found in classic pieces of art as well as the artifacts of pop culture;
shows how he saw the mythmaker’ s path as extending into the                the stronger the archetypal presence, the more powerful, evocative,
present moment—the mythmakers of the ancient times become the               and resonant the product is likely to be. This course begins with an
modern day teachers, writers, painters, and poets, and it is through        overview of archetypal theory , and then turns toward an examina-
their works that the cosmos continues to come forth.                        tion of art and cultural artifacts which express archetypal themes.
                                                                            Particular emphasis is placed on the archetypes of the Artist and the
The Complex Nature of Inspiration                                           Creator as they are manifested in film, literature, and other mediums.
HMC 120, 3 units
                                                                            Throughout the course, students will become more aware of the ar -
Creative people have all experienced those moments when our work            chetypes which manifest in their creative projects, and discuss ways
seems like it’s coming from somewhere wholly “Other .” Characters           to amplify their presence to make them more emotionally satisfying
become autonomous, surprising their writers. The hands chip away at         to the audience.
the stone until a figure emerges. The fingers hover over the keyboard,
then move seemingly with their own will. Later , we wonder to our -         C. G. Jung, Individuation, and the Symbolic Life
selves, “Who created that?” What is it that inspires, even possesses        HMC 150, 3 units
the creative artist? Do we draw from mythology and consider it the          Classical Jungian concepts such as ego, Self, persona, shadow ,
arrival of a Muse? Do we envision it as our daimon, an ancient idea         anima/animus, collective unconscious, transcendent function, and
revived by James Hillman? Or dare we wonder whether it’s the pres-          individuation are studied in light of the creative process. Jung’     s
ence of a psychological complex, which Jung called the via regia, or        own relationship with his creativity will be explored, especially
royal road, to the personal and collective unconscious. This course         his struggle between what he called Personality Number One and
explores multiple theories of the source of inspiration. Students           Personality Number Two, between the Scientist and the Artist within.
will read case studies of well-known creatives, their sources of            This course also takes a tour through some of Jung’s seminal essays
inspiration and the complexes which are refl ected in their work, and        in Volume 18 of the Collected Works, The Symbolic Life, including the
consider their own personal complexes and their connection to their         title essay which states that people “are far more civilized and cre-
creative life.                                                                                                           s
                                                                            ative on account of the symbolic life.” Jung’ example and theoretical
                                                                            works provide a process whereby students can utilize creativity in the
                                                                            individuation process, including fi nding their voice, following their
                                                                            calling, and discovering the myth they are living in order to create a
                                                                            more authentic life.
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M.A. in Engaged Humanities                                                                                           Course
and The Creative Life                                                                                                Descriptions
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY


The Purpose And Power of Image                                             Mythic Narratives: Eternal Sources
HMC 160, 3 units                                                           and Contemporary Inflections
Depth psychology has always maintained a close relationship with           HMC 210, 3 units
Image—the literal images which visit in our sleep, the fantasy im-         In the book series The Myths, contemporary world renowned authors
ages we flirt with while awake, the autonomous images that appear           retell ancient myths, writing them in their unique style with their own
“out of nowhere,” the metaphorical images we have of ourselves             particular spin. Though a relatively new series, there is nothing new
and others—the psyche is always creating images. In turn, those            about the concept: artists across mediums have always drawn on
images give shape to our psyche, an idea which archetypal psycholo-        myths for inspiration and source material. Sometimes, they recre-
gist James Hillman explores in his work. Hillman proposes that “at         ate them using modern technology, such as the animated version of
the soul’s core we are images,” and that life can be defi      ned as       Hercules, or the 3-D version of Clash of the Titans. Other times, they
“the actualization over time” of the images in our hearts and souls.       borrow ancient mythic themes to create an entirely new story; for
Hillman goes even further by suggesting that our unique images are         example, C. S. Lewis’ novel Till We Have Faces retells the Cupid and
the essence of our life, and “calls [us] to a destiny .” Students will     Psyche myth; the South African novel Cry the Beloved Country by
study the writings of James Hillman and others on the purpose and          Alan Paton retells the myth of the prodigal son. In truth, the most
power of Image in psychological and creative life, and meditate upon       impactful films, novels, plays, and other artistic expressions not only
the core images meaningful to their lives and work.                        reflect eternal mythic narratives, but do so in a way that feels fresh
                                                                           and timely. Students will compare several original myths with both
Active Imagination, Dreams, and Psychic Creativity                         historical and contemporary retellings of them, and will produce their
HMC 200, 3 units                                                           own creative retelling of a myth.
Active imagination is the name given to the technique C. G. Jung
pioneered for accessing unconscious material in the psyche, often          Time, Place, Space, and the Ecology
by working with an image or by dialoging with an inner fi gure; The         of Creative Expression
Red Book contains 16 years of Jung’ s active imagination within its        HMC 220, 3 units
covers. Students will study The Red Book in addition to Katherine          Artists and creators have long been influenced and inspired by place.
Sanford’s The Serpent and the Cross: Healing the Split through Active      Ansel Adams had Yosemite, Woody Allen had Manhattan, and
Imagination which contains 62 archetypal paintings along with              Georgia O’Keefe had the American Southwest. The Lost Generation
dreams and active imaginations representing 30 years of Sanford’ s         had Paris in the 20’s, while in America at that time, what was known
personal inner journey. In addition to active imagination, the role of     then as the New Negro Movement had Harlem, bringing about the
dreams in the creative life will be explored. Across the humanities,       Harlem Renaissance. In fact, it is diffi cult to imagine what these
people have received inspiration and guidance from their dreams            artists or groups of artists would have been without being in that
while asleep and their visions while awake, and from the rituals they      place during that time in their lives, so intricately is the sense of
have undertaken to explore the creative unconscious. As one of the         time and place woven into the fabric of their creative being: would
final products in this course, students will create and share an artistic   anyone know the name “Julia Child” had she not found herself with
product inspired by one of their own dreams or active imaginations.        time on her hands in post-war France? Could reggae have emerged
                                                                           anywhere else but Jamaica in the late 60’s? Students will explore
                                                                           the importance of time and place to the creative artist, including the
                                                                           literal space in which one creates, and consider ways to enhance
                                                                           their own creative ecology.




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M.A. in Engaged Humanities                                                                                            Course
and The Creative Life                                                                                                 Descriptions
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY



The Healing Power Of Creativity                                          Technology and the Psyche
HMC 230, 3 units                                                         HMC 250, 3 units
Sand-tray therapy, dance therapy, psychotherapy, art therapy, music      From the alphabet to motion capture, technologies have been
therapy, and narrative therapy are recently established therapeutic      integral to human expression. Technologies shape the landscape of
modalities in psychology today. An Internet search adds other thera-     the physical worlds we inhabit as well as the stories and images
peutic forms such as bibliotherapy, landscape therapy, film therapy,      of the human experience. The interchange between technology and
                                                ,             .
horticultural therapy, and architectural therapy to name a fewThough     the psyche stimulates the fl ow of creative thinking, infl uences our
these forms of therapy are relatively new to W estern psychology,        dreams, and is the gift from the gods that fi res human enterprise.
they have ancient roots and cross-cultural shoots. This course will      This gift brings with it light (literally, as in the case of Edison’s inven-
study those roots and shoots, along with their contemporary mani-        tion of the light bulb) and shadow (literally , as in the case of the
festations. It will discuss the ethical implications of working with     atomic bombs which covered Hiroshima and Nagasaki in a shroud
the creative psyches of others with the intent to heal or transform,     of darkness). Students will consider how technology affects not only
meditating on relationship of the artist and therapist. Throughout the   the way we live, but more specifically, the ways we create and what
course, students will refl ect upon the pieces of art, art forms, and     we create, and what’s more, the ways we share what we create: a
creative practices that have been a source of personal healing and       particular focus will be placed on the Internet and digital technolo-
transformation.                                                          gies as a democratizing force in human expression.

The Artist As Activist and Agent of Social Change                        From Starving Artist to Working Artist:
HMC 240, 3 units                                                         Sustaining the Creative Life
Artistic expression has always had the power to raise conscious-         HMC 260, 3 units
ness and contribute to social change. The photographs of Dorothea        We’re all familiar with the reality of the starving artist, and we are
Lange which chronicled the tragic poverty of the Great Depression,       equally familiar with the reality of star artists, those who make mil-
Upton Sinclair’s novel The Jungle which highlighted the corruption of    lions for their art and are bloated with fame and fortune. In contrast,
the meatpacking industry at the turn of the 20th century , the docu-     most of us just hope to be somewhere in between, the working
mentary films of Michael Moore. In fact, art and artists have played      artist. The fi rst half of this course examines through literature and
a powerful role in many revolutionary movements: for example,            film the psychological effects of being on either end of the spectrum,
Mexican muralism which arose in the 1930’ s in post-revolutionary        either a starving artist or a star artist. In the second half, students
Mexico, and the Black Arts Movement in the United States during          will explore together strategies for being a working artist, including
the 1960’s. Great works of art often open up taboo conversations:        applying for grants or fellowships, writing query letters and book
one recalls movies like Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner which used          proposals, getting an agent or representative, fi nding performance
humor to explore interracial relationships, and Brokeback Mountain       venues or galleries likely to be interested in one’ s work, creating a
which used tragedy to challenge heteronormality. Through examples        portfolio of sample works, writing an artist’ s statement, network-
like these and more, this course explores the artist as activist and     ing at events, using new media for self-promotion, developing a
agent of social change. W orking in groups, students will select a       freelance business, marketing oneself and/or selling one’s work on
social issue of importance to them, and use various forms of creative    the Internet, and more, focusing on the specifi c career goals of the
expression to raise critical consciousness.                              students in the class.




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M.A. in Engaged Humanities                                                     Course Descriptions and
and The Creative Life                                                          Degree Requirements
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY



Project Workshop I: Creative Dialogue and Design                               REQUIREMENTS
HMC 170, 3 units                                                               FOR GRADUATION
This course takes place at the end of their fi rst year, and asks students      1.   Students must complete a total of 48 units to fulfi ll
to work together in dyads or small groups to envision, design, and                  the unit requirement for graduation.
then create a shared artistic product that arises from a creative, col-
                                                                               2.   A minimum grade of “C” is required in each com-
laborative dialogue between them. For example, an animator may pair
                                                                                    pleted course. A cumulative grade point average of
with a dancer, a chef may pair with a painter , a poet may pair with a
                                                                                    3.0 must be maintained.
photographer, a writer may pair with a fi lmmaker and a musician, etc.
Students share their process through online journals, and share their          3.   Students must attend at least two-thirds of each
final outcomes during the residential session. Readings for the course               course.
focus on the collaborative process and on examples of artists who have
worked together. Pass/No Pass                                                  For a full description of all requirements, consult
                                                                               the current edition of the Pacifica Student Hand-
Project Workshop II:                                                           book.
Creative Expression and Reflection
HMC 270, 3 units
This course takes place at the end of the second year . Students will reflect
upon what they have learned in the program, and will create a project
or portfolio that expresses and refl ects their learning. This may take the
form of a performance piece, a series of photographs, a collection of
essays or poetry, a digital media expression, collage work, sculpture, a
film, etc. Students will share their work at the fi nal residential session,
and will submit to their instructor a written essay which summarizes
their learning and growth while in the program. Pass/No Pass




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M.A./Ph.D. in Mythological Studies
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY




                                                                         The deepest values and existential concerns of
                                                                         a people are encoded within its myths. It is a
                                                        delight for me to teach in a truly unique graduate program devoted
                                                        to the study of the myths, beliefs, symbols, literature, and rituals
Pacifica Graduate Institute’s                            of a wide range of religious and cultural traditions. The creative
program in Mythological                                 vision that animates the faculty and students in this program is
Studies explores the understanding of                   inspiring. Our studies together nourish the soul, kindle creativity,
human experience revealed in mythology                  and expand our appreciation for the diverse ways in which human
and in the manifold links between myth                  beings live their lives.”
and ritual, literature, art, and religious                         —PATRICK MAHAFFEY, PROGRAM CHAIR
experience. Special attention is given
to depth psychological and archetypal
approaches to the study of myth.The Mythological Studies
Program is a doctoral program designed as an integrated M.A./
Ph.D. sequence with coursework in three areas of study:

  MYTHOLOGY AND RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS
  MYTH, LITERATURE AND CULTURE
  DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY AND RESEARCH

The Master of Arts degree is awarded after the first two years of
study and a comprehensive examination. The program continues
with a third year of classes including a sequence of research
courses and the development of an acceptable concept paper
for the dissertation. The fourth and fifth years of study focus
on dissertation writing and research. Continuing supervision is
provided for the completion of the dissertation.




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                                                                                                                            CURRICULUM
FIRST YEAR                                                                                                                  OVERVIEW
                    FALL       Greek & Roman Mythology I – MS 505, 2 Units
                               Hindu Traditions – MS 503, 2 Units                                                           Mythological Studies
                               Dreams, Visions, Myths – MS 521, 2 Units                                                     Classes take place in three-
                 WINTER        Approaches to the Study of Myth – MS 620, 2 Units                                            day sessions (Monday,
                               Joseph Campbell: Metaphor, Myth and Culture – MS 516, 2 Units
                                                                                                                            Tuesday, Wednesday)
                               Ritual – MS 603, 2 Units
                                                                                                                            approximately once each
                  SPRING       European Sacred Traditions – MS 502, 2 Units
                               Myth and Philosophy – MS 515, 2 Units
                                                                                                                            month during fall, winter,
                               Jungian Depth Psychology – MS 511, 2 Units                                                   and spring. There is also a
                SUMMER         Colloquium – MS 540, 1 Unit                                                                  five-day summer session
                               Post-Jungian & Archetypal Theories – MS 611, 3 Units                                         each year.
SECOND YEAR
                    FALL       Cultural Mythologies II – MS 614, 2 Units
                               Greek & Roman Mythology II – MS 705, 2 Units
                               African & African Diaspora Traditions – MS 506, 2 Units
                               Integrative Studies Process I – MS 627, 0 Units
                 WINTER        Native Mythologies of the Americas – MS 522, 2 Units
                               Buddhist Traditions – MS 605, 2 Units
                               Mythic Motifs in Cinema – MS 626, 2 Units
                               Integrative Studies Process II – MS 628, 0 Units
                  SPRING       Folklore & Fairy Tales – MS 602, 2 Units
                               Psyche and Nature – MS 615, 2 Units
                               Epic Imagination – MS 604, 2 Units
                               Integrative Studies Process III – MS 629, 0 Units
                SUMMER         Colloquium – MS 640, 1 Unit
                               Myth and the Underworld – MS 619, 3 Units
                               Integrative Studies – MS 630, 1 Unit

THIRD YEAR
                    FALL       Religious Studies Approaches to Mythology – MS 720, 2 Units                               PATRICK MAHAFFEY, PH.D.
                               Mythopoetic Images – MS 727, 2 Units
                               Hebrew and Jewish Mythology – MS 702, 2 Units                                             Chair, M.A./Ph.D. Program in
                                                                                                                         Mythological Studies with Emphasis
                 WINTER        The God Complex – MS 711, 2 Units                                                         in Depth Psychology
                               Christian Traditions – MS 703, 2 Units
                               Egyptian Mythology – MS 717, 2 Units                                                      Patrick Mahaffey is a religious studies scholar
                  SPRING       Islamic Traditions – MS 608, 2 Units                                                      who has published essays on Hindu yoga
                               Research Strategies for Dissertation Writing – MS 730, 2 Units                            traditions, Jung’s depth psychology and
                               Dissertation Formulation – MS 733, 2 Units                                                yoga, religious pluralism, postmodernity, and
                                                                                                                         religion in America. He teaches courses on
                SUMMER         Colloquium – MS 740, 1 Unit
                                                                                                                         Hindu and Buddhist traditions and has chaired
                               Myths of the Self: Memoir and Autobiography – MS 726, 3 Units
                                                                                                                         Pacifica’s Mythological Studies Program
CONTINUING                                                                                                               since 1995.
                               Dissertation Writing* – MS 900, 15 Units

*Writing projects for this course take place away from campus. This curriculum may vary depending upon changing
 academic needs.




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M.A./Ph.D in Mythological Studies                                                                                 Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY                                                                                 Descriptions

MYTHOLOGY AND                                                              Native Mythologies of the Americas
                                                                           MS 522, 2 UNITS
RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS                                                       This course explores the meanings of selected mythic texts from North
The foundation of Mythological Studies at Pacifi ca is the close            American, Mesoamerican, and South American traditions. It consid-
reading of primary texts from a variety of cultural and religious          ers these texts not only in regard to their manifest narratives and
traditions. These courses encourage interdisciplinary scholarship,         images, but also seeks an understanding of their potential interpret-
giving particular attention to myths, iconography , symbols, reli-         ers. This factor, involving history and hermeneutics within a context
gious beliefs, and ritual practices. Historical and contemporary           of Euro-American colonialism, presents important methodological as
approaches to the study of myth are also carefully reviewed.               well as political issues for working in mythological studies, and the
                                                                           course engages such issues as it surveys these texts.
European Sacred Traditions                                                 Colloquium
MS 502, 2 UNITS                                                            MS 540, 640, 740, 1 UNIT EACH
Medieval religious and spiritual life is the focus of this course. Grail   This series is an exploration of critical issues pertaining to the study
lore, Celtic mythology, esoteric teachings, and nature-based tradi-        of myth in relation to religious traditions, literature, depth psychol-
tions may be used for illustration.                                        ogy, and culture. The course is based on a guest lecture by a major
                                                                           scholar in the field of mythology. Pass/No Pass
Hindu Traditions
MS 503, 2 UNITS                                                            Buddhist Traditions
This course explores selected aspects and primary texts of Hindu           MS 605, 2 UNITS

traditions. Special attention is given to prominent myths and symbols      This course focuses on selected aspects and primary texts of
in Indian culture, epic literature, and other primary texts, as well as    Theravada, Mahayana, and Vajrayana traditions. Particular attention
influential philosophical systems such as Y oga, Sankhya, Vedanta,          is given to the life story of Shakyamuni Buddha, as well as the myths
Tantra, and Kashmir Shaivism. Depth psychological interpretations of       associated with major bodhisattvas. Key thematic issues, doctrines,
key thematic issues, doctrines, and practices will also be examined.       and practices are examined from a depth psychological perpective.
                                                                           Approaches to the Study of Myth
Greek and Roman Mythology I                                                MS 620, 2 UNITS
MS 505, 2 UNITS
                                                                           This course investigates different approaches to the study of sacred
This course explores the most important contemporary approaches            narratives, stories derived from oral traditions, and cultural events
to the study of classical mythology. It also looks at how the poets of     that invite symbolic analysis. These approaches are examined
ancient Greece reworked inherited mythic themes and plots. It en-          with reference to their historical and disciplinary contexts. Sir
gages in close readings of the cultic and bardic poems known as The        James George Frazer’ s The Golden Bough exemplifies anthropo-
Homeric Hymns and of the lyric poetry of Sappho. Dramatic poetry ,         logical approaches to study of traditional myths and archetypes in
both tragic and comic, of the 5th century Athens is also examined.         early cultures. Psychological, structural and folkloric approaches are
Attention is given both to the role these myths played in their original   studied in relation to how polarity functions in myth. Contemporary
historical context and to their ongoing archetypal significance.            approaches are considered to elucidate some of the ways in which
African and African Diaspora Traditions                                    literary, philosophical, and ethnographic scholars interpret myth.
MS 506, 2 UNITS                                                            Integrative Studies Process I, II, III
The myths and rituals of Africa are a rich legacy , still vital today .    MS 627, 628, 629, 0 UNITS
Moreover, they endure in adaptive form, in V odou, Santeria, and           Preparation for the Comprehensive Exam is       facilitated by class
other religions of the African Diaspora. The course explores common        discussion pertaining to theoretical perspectives and thematic is-
mythic characters, themes, rituals, symbol systems, and worldviews         sues raised by fi rst and second year coursework. This process also
in Africa and traces their connection to New World Traditions.             includes guest lectures on special topics. Pass/No Pass
Myth and Philosophy                                                        Integrative Studies
MS 515, 2 UNITS                                                            MS 630, 1 UNIT
This course examines the historical relationship between myth and          This course is designed to assess students’ understanding of theo-
philosophy in the West. Rationality and science emerged as the revo-       retical perspectives on myth and their ability to apply these perspec-
lutionary critique of myth, but that revolution is not beyond criticism.                                                                       ect
                                                                           tives to a particular tradition. It also evaluates the ability to refl on
Myth represents a meaningful expression of the world, different            myth in relation to depth psychology, literature, and cultural issues.
from, and not always commensurate with, the kind of understanding          This course serves as the Comprehensive Exam for the Mythological
sought by philosophers. The notion that philosophy has corrected the       Studies Program. Pass/No Pass
ignorance of the past is challenged while philosophy itself is shown
to exhibit elements of the mythic world from which it emerged.

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M.A./Ph.D in Mythological Studies                                                                                Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY                                                                                Descriptions

Greek and Roman Mythology II                                              MYTH, LITERATURE, AND CULTURE
MS 705, 2 UNITS
This course explores the critiques of myth and poetry put forward         These courses focus on the interpretation of classical literature,
by Plato and Aristotle in 4th century Greece, as well as the new un-      poetry, and the mythic aspects of culture. Contemporary fi lm
derstandings and revisionings of myth put forward in the Hellenistic      and literature are also considered from a mythic perspective.
period and in early imperial Rome. Particular attention is given to the   Mythology’s role in the social realm and the natural environ-
works of Virgil, Ovid, and Apuleius.                                      ment is considered, as well as how modern cosmologies and
                                                                          evolutionary theories function as contemporary myths.
Egyptian Mythology
MS 717, 2 UNITS
                                                                          Cultural Mythologies I, II, III
The mythology that informs the ancient Egyptian way of life and
                                                                          MS 514, 614, 714, 2 UNITS EACH
death is the subject of this course. It explores the principal Egyptian
                                                                          Psychological life is situated in the complexities of politics, media,
creation myths, gods, goddesses, motifs, symbols, temple ritual,
                                                                          architecture, technology, economics, and history. These courses draw
pyramid building, and mummifi cation. The night sea journey of the
                                                                          on key theories from a range of disciplines to examine the underlying
sun god Re and that of the deceased Pharaoh, and eventually of all
                                                                          archetypal patterns influencing personal experience and the cultural
                                                        n,
deceased Egyptians, is studied through Pyramid, Coffi and mortuary
                                                                          institutions which, in turn, shape and display our quandaries, aspira-
texts, particularly the Amduat. The Isis and Osiris myth receives par-
                                                                          tions, and needs. Students take at least one of these courses during
ticular attention, and its reverberations across literature, alchemy,
                                                                          the three-year program. Repeatable for credit depending on topic.
and depth psychology are followed.
                                                                          Joseph Campbell: Metaphor, Myth and Culture
Hebrew and Jewish Mythology
                                                                          MS 516, 2 UNITS
MS 702, 2 UNITS
                                                                          Following on Joseph Campbell’s insight that “metaphor is the native
This course studies Hebrew and Jewish monotheism from a mytho-
                                                                          tongue of myth,” this course explores the centrality of myth in sub-
logical perspective. The focus is on the emergence of monotheism in
                                                                          jects as diverse as history, cosmology, religion, poetry as well as the
early Israel and on trying to understand the ways in which this mythic
                                                                          wide range of world narratives as inflections of one great monomyth.
system differs from polytheistic traditions. Attention is given to how
                                                                          These explorations examine the nature of mythic consciousness and
this mythology develops and changes in relation to changing histori-
                                                                          provide insight into the power of myth in psyche and culture.
cal circumstances, not only within the Biblical period but throughout
the course of Jewish history.                                             Folklore and Fairy Tales
                                                                          MS 602, 2 UNITS
Christian Traditions
                                                                          The archetypal interpretation of folktales and fairy tales is the focus
MS 703, 2 UNITS
                                                                          of this course. Principal themes include: theories concerning the
This course examines Christian narratives, images, archetypes and
                                                                          origin and dissemination of folktales; review of mythological, socio-
symbols within a historical context. It provides an epistemological
                                                                          logical, and psychological approaches to the study of fairy tales; the
basis for a mythological and depth psychological hermeneutics. Key
                                                                          purpose and meaning of violence in fairy tales; parallels between the
themes include cultural infl uences and theological paradigms of the
                                                                          archetypal motifs of fairy tales and their manifestation on psychol-
Greek East and the Latin W est, mysticism, iconoclasm, and post-
                                                                          ogy and culture.
Reformation worldviews.
                                                                          Ritual
Islamic Traditions
                                                                          MS 603, 2 UNITS
MS 608 , 2 UNITS
                                                                          Myth and ritual are inextricably related. This course proposes that
This course explores the major historicaltraditions of Islam, including
                                                                          ritual offers an equally eloquent, though non-discursive, commentary
Sufism, as well as modern religious movements. Special attention is
                                                                          on the human condition. The aims are: to make students familiar
given to central themes in the Qur’an and the life of Mohammad. The
                                                                          with classic theories of ritual process; to explore comparatively
cultural clash between Islam and the West is also examined.
                                                                          fundamental ritual phenomena across cultures, such as initiation,
Religious Studies Approaches to Mythology                                 divination, purification and healing, pilgrimage, sacrifi ce, masking,
MS 720, 2 UNITS                                                           and funerary rituals; and to assess the association of myth and ritual
In many ways Religious Studies can be seen as a forerunner of             in religious traditions and depth psychology.
Mythological Studies. A wareness of the debates that shaped this
field and the methodological approaches that emerged from them
can help students determine how best to hold the phenomenon of
myth up to view. The aim of this course is to understand these various
possible approaches and the wider implications of those choices.


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M.A./Ph.D in Mythological Studies                                                                                  Course
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY                                                                                  Descriptions

Epic Imagination                                                             DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY AND RESEARCH
MS 604, 2 UNITS
                                                                             Depth psychology is an important resource for the study of
Epics are stories created by poets to give an entire people a sense of
                                                                             myth, dreams, and initiatory experiences. These courses
their history and their destiny. As stories that give shape and coher-
                                                                             draw substantially on the work of Freud, Jung, and Hillman.
ence to the collective myth, epics engage the figure of the epic hero,
                                                                             Research skills are also cultivated through a sequence of
who either breaks through the conventional wisdom of the people or
                                                                             courses leading to dissertation writing.
re-establishes their most profound wishes.

Psyche and Nature                                                            Jungian Depth Psychology
MS 615, 2 UNITS                                                              MS 511, 2 UNITS
Geographies of paradise, wilderness, frontier , desert, and ocean            Key Jungian concepts such as the collective unconscious, arche-
are mythic interior landscapes as well as external habitations of            types, and the individuation process are surveyed with attention to
divinities and demons, where individuals experience tests, revela-           the evolution of these theoretical constructs. The influence of Jung’s
tions, and illuminations. This course explores external landscapes           ideas on the arts, literature, and religious thought is explored.
and their (archetypal) analogues as mythopoetic spaces to discern
                                                                             Dreams, Visions, Myths
how mythic consciousness is rooted in the poetry of landscapes.
                                                                             MS 521, 2 UNITS
Myth and the Underworld                                                      Examination of dreams arises out of certain assump        tions: that
MS 619, 3 UNITS                                                              psyche is nature revealing herself in images, that psyche is multidi-
The underworld is place, condition, and situation. This course ex-           mensional, and that the images of dreams give form to the various
plores the journey to, the dwelling within, and the departure from,          expressions of psychological life. The focus is on dream theory and
this nether region of the soul. Poetic renderings of the Underworld of-      amplification methods. Pass/No Pass
fer the richest repositories for the insights gleaned in this arena. The
                                                                             Post-Jungian & Archetypal Theories
inescapable journey down and into the realm of the invisibles, where
                                                                             MS 611, 3 UNITS
figures who journey there begin to discern its patterns, its darkness,
                                                                             The depth psychology of C.G. Jung and his successors enables us to
and its treasures, is the focus of this course. In the Underworld, the
                                                                             see how mythology expresses psychology and how psychology may
archetypal ground of being is confronted most directly . Works from
                                                                             be understood as mythology . Special attention is given to insights
the early Sumerian period to contemporary psychological and literary
                                                                             from James Hillman’s archetypal psychology, including the notions of
illustrations amplify the complexity of this depth.
                                                                             personifying, pathologizing, psychologizing, and de-humanizing. The
Mythic Motifs in Cinema                                                      works of other post-Jungian writers are also examined to exemplify
MS 626, 2 UNITS                                                              selected aspects of the archetypal approach.
An application of the concepts of depth psychology to the analysis
                                                                             The God Complex
of film. Using the archetypal method, the instructor presents selected
                                                                             MS 711, 2 UNITS
portions of fi lms to dis close underlying themes and archetypal pat-
                                                                             Nietzsche’s announcement of the “death of God” still ripples through
terns, in an effort to illustrate as wide a range of archetypal characters
                                                                             the Western psyche. In its wake lies both a decline of religiosity and
as possible. Television fiction series may occasionally be included.
                                                                             the emergence of new God images. Alongside these trends we may
Selected Topics in Mythological Studies I, II, III, IV                       place Jung’s notion that lost divinities return as symptom. Against
MS 599, 699, 799, 899, 1-4 UNITS EACH                                        the backdrop of individual and cultural dependence on a fundamen-
Course content varies.                                                       tal mythos, this course examines our “God-complex” from a depth
                                                                             psychological and mythological perspective.
Mythopoetic Images
MS 727, 2 UNITS
This course explores the confluence of mythology and poetics through
an exploration of the language, imagery , geography, and themes of
merging in classical and contemporary works of literature and myth.
Its method will include a hermeneutics of aesthetic intuition in order
to prepare students for dissertation topics and research in literary
studies.




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M.A./Ph.D in Mythological Studies                                                                              Degree
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY                                                                              Requirements

Myths of the Self: Memoir and Autobiography                                Dissertation Formulation
MS 726, 3 UNITS                                                            MS 733, 2 UNITS
This course examines the mythic aspects of two literary genres             The issues, tasks, and processes of conducting research and drafting
(memoir and autobiography) and engages questions concerning                initial concepts are addressed. This course provides the framework for
the relation of memory and the imagination, the individual and the         implementing a research idea and writing the concept paper which
archetypal, self and others, and narcissism and guilt. Attention is        serves as the basis for the dissertation proposal. The classes also
given to classic examples of the genres, as well as refl ections on         teach strategies and techniques for research and completion of the
the defiing characteristics of these genres by literary critics, depth      concept paper. Pass/No Pass. No incompletes are allowed in MS 733.
psychologists, and feminists. Pass/No Pass
                                                                           Dissertation Writing
Research Strategies for Dissertation Writing                               MS 900, 15 UNITS
MS 730, 2 UNITS                                                            Under the supervision of a Dissertation Committee, students submit
This course examines dissertation research options supported by the        a proposal, conduct original research, write and defend a doctoral
program including theoretical studies in the humanities, humanistic        dissertation. Additional fees will be assessed for this course. Pass/
social sciences approaches, and production style projects. It explores     No Pass. Prerequisite: MS 733
the technical aspects of conducting research such as style, rhetoric,
and utilization of library resources. The psychological aspects of
research and writing processes are also addressed. Pass/No Pass




REQUIREMENTS                                                               COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION
FOR GRADUATION                                                             The Comprehensive Examination is a written exam taken during the
1.   Students must complete 82 quarter units to fulfill the unit require-   second year of the program that examines students’ understanding of
     ment for graduation.                                                  theoretical perspectives pertaining to myth, as well as their ability to
2.   A minimum grade of “C” is required in each completed course. A        apply them to particular cultural traditions. It also assesses students’
     cumulative grade point average of 3.0 must be maintained.             ability to refl ect on myth in relation to depth psychology , literature,
3.   Students must attend at least two-thirds of each course.              and cultural issues. In addition, an oral consultation takes place in the
                                                                           Dissertation Formulation course during the third year of the program.
4.   Students must successfully pass a Comprehensive Examination
                                                                           The purpose of this assessment is to raise critical questions pertaining
     during the second year of course work. Each exam essay must
                                                                           to the proposed dissertation project. Students must successfully incor-
     receive at least 70 points. The M.A. degree is awarded when this
                                                                           porate the critique of this consultation into their dissertation concept
     is achieved along with the completion of 45 quarter units. T o be
                                                                           papers in order to be advanced to candidacy.
     eligible to continue taking course work for the Ph.D. degree, stu-
     dents must receive at least 80 points for each exam question.         DOCTORAL DISSERTATION
5.                                                     le
     Students who wish to earn the Ph.D. degree must fi an Intention        The dissertation requirements include successful completion of the
     to Continue form during the second year of enrollment.                advanced research courses: Mythopoetic Images, Religious Studies
6.   Students must pass an Oral Consultation pertaining to a concept       Approaches to Myth ology, Research Strategies for Dissertation
     paper for the dissertation.                                           Writing, and Dissertation Formulation. Students must produce an ac-
7.   Students must submit and defend an original dissertation ac-          ceptable Dissertation Concept Paper before enrolling in Dissertation
     cepted by the faculty.                                                                                                          ,a
                                                                           Writing. The Dissertation Committee is composed of a Chair Reader,
                                                                           and an External Reader. Each member must possess an earned doctor   -
                                                                           ate degree based on a dissertation, unless this requirement is waived
                                                                           by the Research Coordinator of the Mythological Studies Program.

                                                                           For a full description of all requirements, consult the current
                                                                           edition of the Pacifica Student Handbook.




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ANNOUNCING A HYBRID MASTERS DEGREE PROGRAM


M.A. in Leadership and
Organizational Psychology
WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY
SCHEDULED TO BE LAUNCHED SPRING 2012*


                                                                            So many people today would like to make a greater
                                                                            difference than they are—however little or much they
                                                               are doing. Some have done deep inner work and have a vision
                                                               for what they would like to accomplish, but do not have enough
                                                               knowledge of how leadership, groups, and organizations work to
New times require new leaders,                                 manifest that vision. Others have plenty of real world skills, but
capable of bringing increased                                  have not done the work on themselves that could enable them to
creativity and depth to their                                  persevere or to inspire the trust and cooperation needed to succeed.
work. In periods of significant social                          This program is designed to combine and link transformational
transformation, old paradigms begin to                         personal reflection and awareness with the knowledge and skills
erode, and new ways of being, thinking, and                    required to be an agent of positive change.”
acting spring up everywhere, like new grass                                  —CAROL PEARSON, ACTING PROGRAM CHAIR
growing in the cracks in a sidewalk. These
sprouts may seem small and separate, yet
each can be viewed as part of a larger, new creation – perhaps
even as a new species of grass, not yet “discovered” because
not yet noticed.
As new ways of leading and interacting emerge in diverse
places, a collective shift can follow if links are made between
these separate events and insights. This leadership master’s
program is designed to spotlight these connections and open
windows into ways of thinking and being appropriate for the
current interconnected global environment. Its curriculum
integrates ancient wisdom, ongoing best-practices, and cutting
edge new approaches, revolutionizing how leaders approach
their work, whether with individuals, groups, organizations or
complex networked systems.
                                                    (continued on page 88)



*Timing and details of the program are subject to review and approval of
 the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC).


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                                                            A Blended Online/Low-Residency Program




YEAR ONE :                                                                                                   A BLENDED ONLINE/
LEADING SELF AND OTHERS
                                                                                                             RESIDENTIAL
FIRST QUARTER: THINKING ABOUT LEADERSHIP FOR THE 21ST CENTURY
       Leadership Theory, Philosophy, and Vocation                                                           PROGRAM
       Leadership as Psycho-Spiritual Practice
                                                                                                             The Leadership and Organizational
       The Leadership Journey: Images, Mythological Narratives, and Emerging Worldviews
                                                                                                             Psychology specialization blends
SECOND QUARTER: TOOLS FOR MAKING DECISIONS IN A FAST-PACED WORLD
       Analytical and Archetypal Leadership Psychology
                                                                                                             online and residential education
                                                                                                             preparing students to lead and to
       Accessing Insight I: Dream-Analysis, Dream-Tending.
                                                                                                             develop individuals, organizations,
       Accessing Insight II: Active Imagination and the Art of Mythic Awareness
                                                                                                             and other social systems. A two year
THIRD QUARTER: DEVELOPING THE LEADER IN SELF AND OTHERS
       Leadership Development Across the Life Span                                                           program, it is composed of 24, 2-unit
       Depth Coaching for Leadership Individuation                                                           courses, taught in a hybrid format,
       Embodied Leadership: A Somatic Approach to Transforming Leaders                                       55% residential and 45% on-line.
FOURTH QUARTER: LEADERSHIP COMMUNICATION
                                                                                                             Students come to campus quarterly
       Depth Communication: Supervision, Negotiation, & Conflict Management                                  for a four-day weekend residential
       Cross-Cultural Communication for a Diverse, Global Age                                                session. In between, they have the
       E-Leadership and the Psychology of Virtual Communication                                              opportunity to study in their home
                                                                                                             environment.
YEAR TWO :
LEADING GROUPS AND ORGANIZATIONS
FIRST QUARTER: LEADING GROUPS
       Emotional Life of Groups: Group Dynamics, Group Relations, and Cultural Competence
       Theories and Strategies for Harvesting Group Intelligence
       Depth Team-Building Approaches and Models
SECOND QUARTER: LEADING ORGANIZATIONS
       Jungian Approaches to Integrated Branding, Recruitment, and Employee Engagement
       New Models of Organizational Development
       System and Leadership Complexes
THIRD QUARTER: STEERING CHANGE EFFORTS IN A WORLD IN TRANSITION

       Boundary-Crossing: Leading Networks, Coalitions, and Movements
       Financial Stewardship in a Networked World
       Strategic and Scenario Planning Models
FOURTH QUARTER: ASSESSMENT TOOLS FOR CONTINUOUS LEARNING
                                                                                                             CAROL PEARSON, PH.D.
       Tests and Measurements: Depth Leadership and Organization Assessment Methods*
                                                                                                             Acting Program Chair
       Action Research Project
       Virtual Vision Quest: Vision, Container, Shadow, Commitment                                           Carol S. Pearson, Ph. D, Pacifica Executive Vice
                                                                                                             President and Provost and author or co-author
This curriculum is in the developmental stage and may be revised.                                            of The Hero Within: Six Archetypes We Live
                                                                                                             By; Awakening the Heroes Within: Twelve
*Qualifies graduates to use the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator™ instrument, the Pearson-Marr Archetype          Archetypes That Help Us Find Ourselves
 Indicator™ instrument, and the Kenexa Climate Survey™ instrument.                                           and Transform our World; Magic At Work:
                                                                                                             Camelot, Creative Leadership and Everyday
                                                                                                             Miracles; The Hero and the Outlaw: Building
                                                                                                             Extraordinary Brands Through The Power of
                                                                                                             Archetypes, and Mapping the Organization
                                                                                                             Psyche: A Jungian Theory of Organizational
 STAY INFORMED                                                                                               Dynamics and Change.
 visit www.pacifica.edu/leadership for further details on
 this degree program as they become available.
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M.A. in Leadership and                                                                     scheduled to be
                                                                                                           Course
                                                                                           launched Descriptions
Organizational Psychology                                                                           in Spring 2012

WITH EMPHASIS IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY



In today’s world, leaders cannot just tell
people what to do and expect them to do it.
Rather they need to inspire people, which
means leadership in its very nature requires
psychological awareness. Understanding
groups and social systems well enough
to transform them, while successfully
engaging collaborative efforts and limiting
unanticipated side effects, necessitates
sophisticated psychological knowledge
and abilities.
It is also imperative that leaders understand
unconscious as well as conscious
                                                        Students in the Leadership and Organizational
motivations and patterns in order to balance
                                                        Psychology Program:
these complex factors. The material in
this curriculum emphasizes applications                 • Engage with cutting-edge leadership, group, and organizational theory

drawing on the theory and practice of depth               and research emerging from a variety of schools of thought and

psychology, and invites those involved,                   communities of practice

both faculty and students, to bring their               • Critique, synthesize, integrate and apply learning to real situations
whole beings – mind, body, spirit, and soul             • Gain a sophisticated knowledge of how depth and other psychological
– to participate together in forging a new                theories and practices can be applied to developing leaders and other
paradigm of effective leadership. In this way,            employees, marketing and public relations, employee recruitment and
this program supports Pacifica’s commitment                retention, employee engagement, team-building, and organizational
to tending the soul of the world through                  development and change efforts
engaging and strengthening the soul within
                                                        • Learn experientially from the practical application of diverse depth
leadership, groups, organizations, networks,
                                                          psychology approaches in their own development as individuals and as
and coalitions.
                                                          leaders and in the development of others
The Leadership and Organizational
                                                        • Utilize the experience of learning in a cohort to build group process
Psychology program is designed for people
                                                          and virtual collaboration expertise, using an action research model for
who want to make a positive difference in
                                                          gaining insight from group experience
the world and in doing so understand that,
as Gandhi advised, they must be the change              • Clarify their own senses of purpose and calling, formulating a leadership or
they want to see. It prepares students to                 leadership/organization development philosophies and plans for how they
become, or enhance their effectiveness,                   will use their new learning and abilities in their professional and civic lives.
as leaders and/or as leadership and
                                                        STAY INFORMED
organizational development professionals.
                                                        Visit www.pacifica.edu/leadership for further details on
                                                        this degree program as they become available.

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                                                                                                                               TABLE OF CONTENTS | KEYWORD SEARCH


Executive Administration
President............................................................................................................................................................................. Stephen Aizenstat, Ph.D.

Executive Vice President & Provost .................................................................................................................................Carol Pearson, Ph.D.

Chief Administrative Officer ................................................................................................................................................ Alex Miranda, Ph.D.

Chief Financial Officer.......................................................................................................................................................... David Henkel, M.B.A.

Director of Business Affairs and General Counsel ........................................................................................ Franklyn S. Michaelson, J.D.




Board of Trustees
Pacifica has the good fortune to be supported by a uniquely                                                  PATRICK McNALLY, Trustee
gifted and hard-working Board of T   rustees. They have fiduciary                                            A strategy consultant and executive facilitator, Patrick McNally is a
responsibility for the Institute, approving and monitoring the                                              lecturer at the University of Chicago’s Graduate School of Business.
budget. The Board oversees all policyand long-range planning.                                               He worked with Pacifi ca’s management and trustees as an advisor
                                                                                                            on business practices in 1998, and facilitated off-site Pacifi ca Board
In addition, they provide ongoing advice in their various areas
                                                                                                            retreats in 1999 and 2003 before joining the Board in 2004.
of expertise. Pacifica wishes to acknowledge the outstanding
contributions of these individuals. Their ongoing involvement                                               HARVEY BOTTELSEN, Trustee
is significant in the growth and well-being of our school.                                                   Long active in Santa Barbara area banking, real estate, educational,
                                                                                                            and charitable endeavors, Harvey Bottelsen joined Pacifi ca’s Board
ERNEST E. ZOMALT, Ph.D., Chair
                                                                                                                                              rustee and the Executive Director of
                                                                                                            of Trustees in 2007. He is also a T
Dr. Zomalt has worked in educational administration for over 30 years.                                      the James S. Bower Foundation, which supports Santa Barbara area
His career included 20 years at the University of California, Santa                                         projects helping the early years, the later years, the environment,
Barbara, culminating with the position of Assistant V ice Chancellor,                                       and consciousness in the world view.
Student Affairs. He then moved to California State University at San
Marcos. In 1993, he was appointed Executive Vice President, the posi-                                       THYONNE GORDON, Ph.D., Trustee
tion he held until his retirement in 2000. He has been a member of                                          Holding a Ph.D. in Human and Organizational Development from
Pacifica’s Board since 1991 and has served as Chair since 1997.                                              Fielding Graduate University , Thyonne Gordon also brings an
                                                                                                            extensive experiential background in organizational structure and
RUSS REVLIN, Ph.D., Vice Chair
                                                                                                            management to Pacifica’s Board of Trustees. Dr. Gordon is Executive
                                              ca’s
Dr. Revlin was an early faculty member in Pacifi Clinical Psychology                                         Director of Coach Art, an organization that assists children and ado-
Program and is a Professor of Psychology at the University of California                                    lescents who have chronic or life-threatening illnesses. She joined
at Santa Barbara. He has served on Pacifica’s Board since 1995.                                              the Pacifica Board of Trustees in 2007.
FRANKLYN S. MICHAELSON, J.D., Secretary-Treasurer
Santa Barbara attorney Frank Michaelson is one of the initial mem-                                          NORMAN TERRY PEARCE, M.A., Trustee
bers of Pacifi ca’s Board, serving since early 1991. He was the fi rst                                        Terry Pearce, an alumnus of Pacifi ca’s Mythological Studies program,
Board Chair, and he is also Pacifica’s Director of Business Affairs and                                      brings a background in business and religious philosophy as well as
General Counsel.                                                                                            extensive business leadership experience to Pacifica’s Board. He is an
                                                                                                            Adjunct Professor (retired) at the University of California at Berkeley ,
BETS WIENECKE, M.Div., Trustee
                                                                                                            and a visiting faculty member at The London Business School and
Reverend Wienecke is a Unitarian Universalist Minister who serves
                                                                                                            the Sloan Fellowship Programme. He is the founder and President of
as a consultant to congregations after retiring from full time parish
                                                                                                            Leadership Communication, a company that coaches corporate, politi-
ministry in 2004. She has been with Pacifi ca’s Board since its incep-
                                                                                                            cal, and community leaders. He joined Pacifica’s Board in 2009.
tion in early 1991.




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Academic Staff

PH.D. PROGRAM IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY
  Chair ................................................................................................................................................................................... James Broderick, Ph.D.
  Associate Chair ........................................................................................................................................................................ Allen Bishop, Ph.D.
  Program Administrator ........................................................................................................................................................................Diane Carroll
  Director of Training ......................................................................................................................................................... Matthew Bennett, Psy.D.
  Clinical Internship Assistant & Student Affairs Coordinator ........................................................................................................ Breeanna Dixon
  Training Coordinator ...............................................................................................................................................................Chris Peterson, Ph.D.
  Director of Research ......................................................................................................................................................Gary Groth-Marnat, Ph.D.
  Research Coordinators ................................................................................................................Oksana Yakushko, Ph.D., Michael Sipiora, Ph.D.
  APA Analyst....................................................................................................................................................................................... Suzanne Frost

M.A. PROGRAM COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY
  Chair ........................................................................................................................................................................................ Wendy Davee, M.A.
  Associate Chairs ................................................................................................ Cynthia Hale, Ph.D., Willow Young, M.A., Avrom Altman, M.A.
  Program Administrators ........................................................................................................................Joanne Hayden, Sybille Wesner-Salperto
  Director of Clinical Training ....................................................................................................................................................Willow Young, M.A.
  Clinical Coordinators ........................................................................................................................Lou Ann Wallner, M.A., Willow Young, M.A.
  Student Affairs Coordinator ....................................................................................................................................................Katy Castillo-Dunlap
  Traineeship Coordinator ........................................................................................................................................................................... Karla Kim
  Director of Research ...............................................................................................................................................................Avrom Altman, M.A.
  Research Coordinators ....................................................................................Avrom Altman, M.A., Tom Elsner, M.A., J.D., Cynthia Hale, Ph.D.
  Program Assistant ..............................................................................................................................................................................Rachel Reeve

M.A./PH.D. PROGRAM IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY
  Chair ............................................................................................................................................................................................ Joe Coppin, Ph.D.
  Associate Chair, Jungian and Archetypal Studies .......................................................................................................Jennifer Leigh Selig, Ph.D.
  Associate Chair, Somatic Studies ..........................................................................................................................................Alan Kilpatrick, Ph.D.
  Co-Associate Chairs, Community Psychology, Liberation Psychology, and Ecopsychology ................ Nuria Ciofalo Ph.D., Mary Watkins, Ph.D.
  Program Administrator (Lead) ..................................................................................................................................................................Nina Falls
  Program Administrator, Jungian and Archetypal Studies .............................................................................................................Alison Reynolds
  Community/Ecological Fieldwork Coordinator....................................................................................................................... Mary Watkins, Ph.D.
  Research Coordinator ..............................................................................................................................................................Jennifer Selig, Ph.D.
PH.D. PROGRAM IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY WITH EMPHASIS IN PSYCHOTHERAPY
  Chair ..............................................................................................................................................................................................Pat Katsky, Ph.D.
  Program Administrator .......................................................................................................................................................................... Susan Gary
  Research Coordinator ......................................................................................................................................................... Elizabeth Nelson, Ph.D.

M.A. PROGRAM IN ENGAGED HUMANITIES AND THE CREATIVE LIFE
  Chair ..............................................................................................................................................................................Jennifer Leigh Selig, Ph.D.
  Program Administrator ...................................................................................................................................................................Alison Reynolds

M.A./PH.D. PROGRAM IN MYTHOLOGICAL STUDIES
  Chair ...................................................................................................................................................................................Patrick Mahaffey, Ph.D.
  Associate Chair ...........................................................................................................................................................Evans Lansing Smith , Ph.D.
  Program Administrator ................................................................................................................................................................... Meghan Saxton
  Research Coordinator .......................................................................................................................................................V. Walter Odajnyk, Ph.D.

DISSERTATION OFFICE
  Director ............................................................................................................................................................................... Elizabeth Nelson, Ph.D.
  Senior Dissertation Administrator ........................................................................................................................................................ Robyn Cass

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Core & Adjunct Faculty
Stephen Aizenstat                                 Kathryn Brown                                         Wendy Davee
Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, Fielding Graduate     M.A. Counseling Psychology, Pacifica Graduate          M.A., Counseling Psychology, Pacifica Graduate
University                                        Institute; Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist       Institute; Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist
PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: DreamTending;               AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Clinical Practice; Ethics and      AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Process and Practice of
Imagination and Medicine (co-editor)              the Law; The Therapeutic Relationship; The Art        Psychotherapy; Clinical Practice; Child,
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Depth Psychotherapy;           and Practice of Depth Psychotherapy; Process of       Adolescent, and Family Therapy
Dream Research; Archetypal Psychology             Psychotherapy
                                                                                                        Claudia David
Avrom Altman                                      Linda Buzzell                                         Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, Pacifica Graduate
M.A. University of Missouri, Kansas City;         M.A, Social Science, Azusa Pacific University;         Institute; Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist
Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist;             M.J., Journalism, UCLA; Marriage & Family             AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Human Sexuality, Domestic
Licensed Professional Counselor                   Therapist
                                                                                                        Violence, Jungian Psychology
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Process of Psychotherapy;      PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: Ecotherapy: Healing with
Clinical Practice; Group Dynamics; Group          Nature in Mind; How to Make it in Hollywood           Jorge De La O
Process; Human Sexuality; Body-Centered Depth     AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Ecopsychology; Ecotherapy          M.A., Counseling Psychology, Pacifica Graduate
Psychotherapy; Sacred Dance and the Gurdjieff                                                           Institute; Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist
                                                  George Callan
Movements                                                                                               AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Chicano Studies; Process
                                                  Ph.D., Depth Psychology, Pacifica Graduate
Allen Bishop                                                                                            of Psychotherapy; Group Process; Domestic
                                                  Institute; Marriage and Family Therapist
Ph.D., Educational Psychology, University                                                               Violence; Jungian Psychology; Sand Play
                                                  AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Embodied Depth
of Southern California; Psychoanalysis,           Psychotherapy; Couple and Family Therapy/             Mike Denney
Psychoanalytic Center of California; Licensed     Depth Perspectives; Depth Psychology in Image,        M.D., University of Michigan, Ph.D., Depth
Psychologist; Certified Psychoanalyst              Film and Literature; Mytho-poetic Approaches          Psychology, Pacifica Graduate Institute
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Psychoanalysis; Music &                                                              PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: Second Opinion; a Matter
                                                  to Global Concerns; Dream Work
Psychoanalysis; Psychoanalytic Practice                                                                 of Choice
                                                  Edward S. Casey                                       AREAS OF EMPHASIS: The Union of Science and
Matthew Bennett                                                                                         Spirituality – Body and Soul, Soma and Psyche –
Psy.D., Clinical Psychology, Georgia School of    Ph.D., Philosophy, Northwestern University
                                                  PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: Imagining: A Phenomenological   in Healing; Complexity Theory and Quantum
Professional Psychology                                                                                 Mechanics at the Frontiers of Depth Psychology;
PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: Return to Freedom and
                                                  Study; Getting Back Into Place; Spirit and Soul:
                                                                                                        Emergence, Discontinuity, and Self-referential
                                                  Essays in Philosophical Psychology
Dignity: Towards an Integrated Analytical                                                               Paradox in the New Sciences of the 21st Century
                                                  AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Phenomenology; Philosophical
Psychology. Manuscript submitted for                                                                    as Related to Depth Psychology and Cultural
Publication.                                      Psychology; Environmental Philosophy; Post-           Issues
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Diagnosis and treatment of
                                                  Structuralism; Contemporary European Thought
                                                                                                        Christine Downing
personality disorders; Comparative Personality    Nuria Ciofalo                                         Ph.D., Religion & Culture, Drew University
theory; Psychology in Literature and Art;         Ph.D., University of Hawaii                           PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: The Luxury of Afterwards;
Psychological assessment and testing; Internet-   AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Depth psychology applied to        Prelude: Essays in Ludic Imagination;
enabled and telehealth applications               community studies; Jungian approaches to              Disturbances in the Field: Essays in Honor
in Psychology                                     youth development; Ethno-cultural aspects in          of David L. Miller (editor); Gleanings: Essays
David Bona                                        depth psychology; Indigenous psychologies,            1982-2006
                                                  Participatory action research; Indigenous             AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Greek Mythology; Women’s
Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, Pacifica Graduate
                                                  approaches to knowledge generation; Depth             Studies; Psychoanalysis
Institute; Ordained Catholic Priest of the
Franciscan Order (inactive)                       psychology and psychodrama; Archetypal                Richard Dunn
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Psychology & Spirituality;     psychology and cultural issues; Liberation            Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, International College;
Depth Psychology; Dreams; Religion and            psychology                                            Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist
Psychology                                                                                              AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Clinical Supervision, Jungian
                                                  Joseph Coppin
                                                                                                        Analysis, Object Relations, and the Application
Linda Branch                                      Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, Pacifica Graduate          of Attachment Theory to the Practice of Analytic
Ph.D., Human Development, Fielding                Institute; Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist       Psychotherapy.
Graduate University                               PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: The Art of Inquiry: A Depth
                                                                                                        Thomas Elsner
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Cultural Diversity; Social     Psychological Approach
                                                                                                        J.D., University of San Diego Law School,
Justice; Art; Writing; Healing                    AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Depth Psychology; Clinical
                                                                                                        M.A., Clinical Psychology, Antioch University;
James Broderick                                   Practice; Therapeutic Dialogue; Organizational        Certified Jungian Analyst, Certified Research
Ph.D., Clinical Psychology & Community            Psychology; Depth Psychological Approaches to         Psychoanalyst
Change, California School of Professional         Research                                              PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: The Western Gate; The
Psychology, San Diego; Licensed Clinical          Lionel Corbett                                        Night-Sea Voyage of Coleridge’s Ancient
Psychologist                                                                                            Mariner
                                                  M.D., University of Manchester; Certified
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Evidence-Based Practices and                                                         AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Jungian Psychology; Alchemy;
                                                  Jungian Analyst, C.G. Jung Institute, Chicago         Dreams; Relation between Literature and Depth
Diagnostics; Phenomenology; Critical Theory (of   PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: The Religious Function of the
Frankfurt School of Social Research); Sand Tray                                                         Psychology
                                                  Psyche
Therapy; Humanistic-Existential Psychology;       AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Religious Function of the
                                                                                                        Diana M. Ferrari
Innovative Approaches to Serious Mental                                                                 M.A., Clinical Psychology, Antioch University;
                                                  Psyche; Interface of Analytical Psychology and        Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist
Illness; Depth Psychology in Management
                                                  Psychoanalytical Theories                             AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Psychoeducation of Learning
                                                                                                        Disabilities and Attention Deficit Disorder;
                                                                                                        Process of Psychotherapy; Clinical Practice;
                                                                                                        Group Dynamics; Group Process



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Alexandra Fidyk                                      Cynthia Anne Hale                                  Cynthia King
Ph.D., Philosophy of Education & Interpretive        Ph.D., Depth Psychology, Pacifica Graduate          Ph.D., Mythological Studies, Pacifica Graduate
Inquiry, University of Calgary, AB; Certified         Institute; Licensed Clinical Social Worker         Institute; M.A. Intercultural Communication,
Jungian Psychotherapist, C. G. Jung Institute,       AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Imaginal and Archetypal         California State University at Chico
Chicago; Family Constellation Therapy & Body         Studies of Color and of Music; The Creative        PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: Unleashing Collaborative
Psychodynamics, Bert Hellinger Institute of          Process; The Internet as Psychic Space; Depth      Power in the Workplace
Western PA                                           Psychotherapy, Embodied Imagination, Dream         AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Organizational Mythology;
PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: Democratizing educational      Work, Life Transitions, Trauma.                    Conflict Transformation; Co-creating Collaborative
experience: envisioning, embodying, enacting                                                            Partnerships and Communities; and Power Dynamics
                                                     Maren Tonder Hansen
(Ed.); Jung and the classroom: Education for         Ph.D., Psychology, Saybrook Graduate School;       Aaron Kipnis
diversity and meaning (Ed., forthcoming);            M. Div., Starr King School for the Ministry;       Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, Pacifica Graduate
Silence and eros: Beckoning the background           Licensed Marriage, Family and Child Therapist;     Institute; Licensed Clinical Psychologist
                                                     Ordained Unitarian Universalist Minister           PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: Knights Without Armor;
forward (forthcoming).
                                                     PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: Mother Mysteries; Teachers
                                                                                                        What Women and Men Really Want; Angry
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Education & Depth Psychology;
                                                                                                        Young Men
Process Philosophy; Taoist & Buddhist Thought;       of Myth
                                                                                                        AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Gender Studies; Depth
Curriculum Studies; Poetic Inquiry; Interpretive     AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Psychological and Educational
                                                     Uses of Myth; Women’s Spirituality; Human          Psychology; Psyche and Culture; Clinical
Research; Arts-informed Methods; Family                                                                 Psychology; Ecopsychology Research
Systems Constellation Work                           Development
                                                     C. Doyle Hollister                                 Allen D. Koehn
Sukey Fontelieu                                                                                         D.Min., Fuller Theological Seminary; Certified
M.A., Counseling Psychology, Pacifica Graduate        M.A. English, University of California, Santa
                                                     Barbara, M.A. Counseling, University of            Jungian Analyst, C.G. Jung Institute, Los
Institute; Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist                                                         Angeles; Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Jungian and Archetypal            Santa Clara; Marriage and Family Therapist;
                                                                                                        AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Theoretical Foundations
Theory; Mythological Studies; Clinical Issues        Neurolinguistic Programming Certificate
                                                                                                        of Depth Psychology; Myth, Literature, and
                                                     PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: Jung Journal, “Letter to
Jennifer Freed                                                                                          Religion; The Trickster; The Creative Process
                                                     Jane Wheelwright”
Ph.D., Depth Psychology, Pacifica Graduate            AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Relationship Counseling,        Thomas Lane
Institute; Licensed Marriage and Family              Couples and Families, Mens’ Issues                 Ph.D., Comparative Literature, Yale University
Therapist                                                                                               AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Classical Literature and
PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: The Ultimate Personality       Robert Kalter
                                                                                                        Mythology, 19th and 20th Century Literature,
Guide; Lessons from Stanley the Cat; Nine Lives      M.D., Psychiatry, University of Texas Health
                                                                                                        Cultural History, Buddhist Meditation Practice,
of Everyday Wisdom                                   Science Center at San Antonio; Board
                                                     Certification in Psychiatry and Neurology;          Hatha Yoga Practice
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Healing Arts for Teens
                                                     Board Certification in Psychosomatic Medicine;      Christine Lewis
Paul Gabrinetti                                      Licensed M.D.                                      Ph.D., Psychology, University of California;
Ph.D., University of Southern California; Certified   AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Clinical Psychopharmacology;    Licensed Clinical Psychologist
Jungian Analyst                                      Clinical Work in Areas of Interaction Between      AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Theoretical Foundations
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Psychology & Alchemy, the         Psyche and Soma                                    of Depth Psychology; Myth, Literature, and
Odyssey from an analytic perspective; role of                                                           Religion; The Trickster; The Creative Process
Faust in Jung’s Psychology                           Ian Kaminsky
                                                     Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, Pacifica Graduate       Michael Madden
Veronica Goodchild                                   Institute; Licensed Marriage and Family            M.A., Experimental Psychology, Northeastern
Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, Pacifica Graduate         Therapist                                          University; M.A. Clinical Psychology, Antioch
Institute                                            AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Phenomenology of Addictive      University
PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: Eros and Chaos: The Sacred     Behavior; Adolescent Depression; Group             AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Trauma and Recovery; Couples
Mysteries and Dark Shadows of Love                   Process; Greek Mythology                           and Family Systems Therapy; Domestic Violence
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Jungian Thought and Practice;
                                                     Patricia Katsky                                    Assessments and Treatment; Spiritual and
Imaginal Perspectives in Research; Dreams;                                                              Buddhist Approaches to Psychotherapy &
Religious Experience; Synchronicity; Anomalous       Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles;
                                                     Certified Jungian Analyst, C.G. Jung Institute      Transformation
Encounters
                                                     of Los Angeles; Licensed Marriage & Family         Patrick Mahaffey
Laura S. Grillo                                      Therapist                                          Ph.D., Religious Studies, University of
Ph.D., History of Religions, University of           AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Dreamwork; Training and
                                                                                                        California, Santa Barbara
Chicago; M.Div., Union Theological Seminary          Growth of Therapist; Culture and Psyche            AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Comparative Religions;
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Theory and Method in History
                                                     Richard J. Kelliher                                Psychology and Religion; Hindu Traditions;
of Religions; Comparative Religions; Cultural        Psy.D., Clinical Psychology, Illinois School of    Buddhist Traditions
Anthropology; African and African Diaspora           Professional Psychology; Licensed Clinical
Religious Traditions; Psychology and Religion;       Psychologist                                       Christina Mentes
Theology and Biblical Scholarship                    AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Cognitive-Behavioral
                                                                                                        Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, Tennessee State
                                                     Psychotherapy; Psychological Assessment;           University; Licensed Clinical Psychologist
Gary Groth-Marnat                                                                                       AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Psychodynamic Psychotherapy;
Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, California School of     Developmental Psychology; Addictions;
                                                     Transformation Psychology                          Clinical Practice; Survivalistic Cultures and
Professional Psychology, San Diego; Diplomate                                                           Diversity
American Board of Professional Psychology            Alan Kilpatrick
(Clinical); Diplomate American Board of              Ph.D., Anthropology, University of California at   Kathee Miller
Assessment Psychology; Licensed Psychologist         Los Angeles                                        M.A., Antioch University, Santa Barbara;
PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: Neuropsychological             PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: The Night has a Naked Soul   Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist
Assessment in Clinical Practice: A Practical         AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Shamanism and Folk Healing      AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Process of Psychotherapy;
Guide to Test Interpretation and Integration;                                                           Clinical Practice; Imaginal Psychology;
Handbook of Psychological Assessment;                                                                   Active Imagination and Sandplay; Authentic
Integrative Assessment of Adult Personality                                                             Movement—A Pathway to Psyche; The Body as
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Psychological Assessment;                                                            Sacred Text; Symbol & Image in Visual Art
Eating Disorders; Dreams of Terminally Ill
Patients; Clinical Hypnosis; Near Death
Experience
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Core & Adjunct Faculty
Angela Mohan                                        Meditations; Mythology: A CD-ROM                    Life; Technology as Symptom and Dream; The Soul
M.A., Marriage and Family Therapy, Phillips         Encyclopedia of Greek and Roman Mythology;          in Grief: Love, Death, and Transformation; and
Graduate Institute; Licensed Marriage and Family    The Wisdom of Psyche                                Psychological Life: From Science to Metaphor
Therapist                                           AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Depth & Archetypal               AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Imaginal Psychology
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Couples, Adolescents, Family     Psychology                                          as the Outcome of a Dialogue Between
Systems; Interpersonal Dynamics; Philosophy                                                             Phenomenology and Jungian Psychology and
and Rituals; Multi-cultural Issues; Legal and       Craig Park                                          Its Application to Research, Cultural Issues,
Ethical Issues in the Helping Professions; Use of   M.A., Clinical Psychology, Antioch University,      and Psychotherapy; Exile, Homecoming and
Literature and Film in Therapy                      San Francisco; Licensed Marriage and Family         the Mythic Roots of Technology; Writing Down
                                                    Therapist                                           the Soul and the Creative Process; Dialogues
Mark Montijo                                        AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Chemical Dependency;
Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, Pacifica Graduate                                                            Among Jungian Psychology, the Poets, and
                                                    Family Systems Therapy; Dual Diagnosis and          Quantum Physics.
Institute; Marriage and Family Therapist            Adolescent Treatment
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Native American                                                                      Jennifer Selig
Healers; Anima Mundi; Sacred Work of a              Carol S. Pearson                                    Ph.D., Depth Psychology, Pacifica Graduate
Psychotherapist                                     Ph. D. English, Rice University                     Institute
                                                    PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: The Hero Within: Six          PUBLICATIONS: Thinking Outside the Church:110
Ana Mozol                                           Archetypes We Live By; Awakening the Heroes         Ways to Connect With Your Spiritual Nature;
Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, Pacifica Graduate        Within: Twelve Archetypes That Help Us Find         Reach for the Stars; What Now? Words of
Institute; Registered Clinical Counselor            Ourselves and Transform our World ; Magic           Wisdom for Life After Graduation; Reimagining
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Dreams; Depth Psychology;        At Work: Camelot, Creative Leadership and           Education: Essays on Retrieving the Soul
Archetypal Theory; Human Sexuality; Sacred          Everyday Miracles; The Hero and the Outlaw:         Learning
                                                                                                        AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Multicultural Studies and
Feminine; Shamanism                                 Building Extraordinary Brands Through The
                                                                                                        Diversity Issues; The Application of Therapeutic
Elizabeth Nelson                                    Power of Archetypes, (co-authored by Margaret       Principles to Cultural Settings; Psyche and the
Ph.D., Depth Psychology, Pacifica Graduate           Mark); Mapping the Organization Psyche: A           Humanities; Depth Psychological Approaches to
Institute                                           Jungian Theory of Organizational Dynamics and       Writing and Research
PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: The Art of Inquiry (co-
                                                    Change (co-authored by John Corlett) ; What
                                                    Story Are You Living? (co-authored with Hugh        Jennifer Seyler
authored)                                                                                               M.A. Counseling Psychology, Pacifica Graduate
                                                    Marr); Maturing the American Dream as well as       Institute.
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Research Methodology and
                                                    two psychological instruments.                      AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Symbol in the Visual
Dissertation Development
                                                    AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Applied Jungian and              Arts; Interdisciplinary Research; Portfolio
V. Walter Odajnyk                                   Archetypal Psychology as related to narrative       Development
Ph.D., Public Law and Government, Columbia          patterns in literature and life; Human
                                                                                                        Mady Schutzman
University; Certified Jungian Analyst, C.G. Jung     Development, Leadership, Organizational             Ph.D., Performance Studies, New York University
Institute, Zurich; NAAP Certified Psychoanalyst;     Development and Branding.                           PUBLICATIONS: The Real Thing: Performance,
Research Psychoanalyst (Med. Bd. of CA)             Elizabeth Perluss                                   Hysteria, and Advertising; Playing Boal:
PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: Gathering the Light: A        Ph.D., Depth Psychology, Pacifica Graduate           Theatre, Therapy, Activism; A Boal Companion:
Psychology of Meditation; Jung and Politics:        Institute; Licensed Marriage and Family             Dialogues on Theatre and Cultural Politics
The Political and Social Ideas of C.G. Jung;                                                            AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Ritual; Theatre and Social
                                                    Therapist and Credentialed School Counselor
Marxism and Existentialism                          AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Psyche and Nature;
                                                                                                        Justice; Trickster Figure in Culture; Humor/
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Jungian Psychology; Egyptian
                                                                                                        Comedy/Parody
                                                    Wilderness Rites of Passage; Jungian
Mythology; Folklore and Fairytales; Post-           Psychotherapy; Use of “Council” as a Means for      Michael P. Sipiora
Jungian Depth Psychology                            Facilitating Transformative Dialogue; Expressive    Ph.D., Psychology, University of Dallas
                                                                                                        AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Phenomenological Psychology;
Jean Palmer-Daley                                   Arts Therapy; Child Psychotherapy
                                                                                                        Archetypal Psychology
Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, Pacifica Graduate        Chris Peterson
Institute; MFT                                                                                          Glen Slater
                                                    Ph.D., Counseling Psychology, University of         Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, Pacifica Graduate
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Jung Analysis and                California, Santa Barbara; Licensed Psychologist,   Institute
Psychotherapy; Alchemy; Shamanism; Marital          Diplomate of the American College of Forensic       PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: Senex and Puer (editor)
Therapy; Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy;        Examiners; Certificate from National Board of        AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Jungian Psychology; Archetypal
Psyche and Soma; Human Development                  Addiction Examiners; Certificate in Psychoanalytic   Psychology; Psychology of Religion; Cinema and
                                                    Psychotherapy                                       Psyche
Avedis Panajian
                                                    AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy;
Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, U.S. International                                                          Dennis Patrick Slattery
                                                    Clinical Supervision; Treatment of Addictive        Ph.D., Literature & Phenomenology, University
University; Certified Psychoanalyst; Training        Disorders
and Supervising Analyst; Licensed Psychologist;                                                         of Dallas
                                                    Wendy Phillips                                      PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: Harvesting Darkness: Essays
Diplomate in Clinical Psychology, American                                                              on Literature, Myth, Film and Culture; Casting
Board of Professional Psychology                    Ph.D., Psychology, Georgia State University
                                                    AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Culturally Informed Beliefs
                                                                                                        the Shadows; Grace in the Desert: Awakening
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Clinical Psychoanalysis;                                                             to the Gifts of Monastic Life; Just Below the
Psychopathology; Primitive Mental States            about Physical and Psychological Illness and        Water Line; Depth Psychology: Meditations in
                                                    Healing; Traditional Healing Rituals, Archetypes    the Field (editor)
Tina Panteleakos                                    of Traditional Indigenous African Religious         AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Psyche and Nature; Literary
Ph.D., Counseling, Clinical, and School             Systems such as the Yoruba; Culturally Relevant     Classics; Genre Theory; Theories of Mytho-
Psychology, University of California, Santa         Psychotherapy; Symbols in Visual Art.               poeisis; Pedagogy; Body and Psyche; Epic
Barbara; Registered Psychological Assistant                                                             Narrative; Phenomenology; Joseph Campbell’s
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Psychopathology; Trauma;
                                                    Robert Romanyshyn
                                                                                                        Theory of Myth
                                                    Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, Duquesne University;
Assessment; Psychotherapy
                                                    Affiliate Member of The Inter-Regional Society
Ginette Paris                                       of Jungian Analysts
Ph.D., Social Psychology, University of             PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: Ways of the Heart: Essays
Montreal; Licensed Clinical Psychologist            Toward an Imaginal Psychology; Mirror and
PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: Pagan Grace; Pagan            Metaphor: Images and Stories of Psychological

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Lisa Sloan                                               Priscilla Taylor                                       Mary Watkins
Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, Pacifica Graduate             Ph.D., Mythological Studies, Pacifica Graduate          Ph.D., Clinical and Developmental Psychology,
Institute; Licensed Clinical Psychologist                Institute; Licensed Marriage and Family                Clark University; Licensed Clinical Psychologist
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Jungian Psychotherapy;                                                                       PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: Waking Dreams; Invisible
                                                         Therapist
Imaginal Psychology; Shamanism and Jungian                                                                      Guests; Talking with Young Children about
                                                         AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Psychopathology from DSM IV
Theory                                                                                                          Adoption; Toward Psychologies of Liberation
                                                         and Archetypal Psychology Perspectives; Psyche
Evans Lansing Smith                                      and Landscape; Mythodrama: Storytelling                co-author with Helene Shulman).
Ph.D. Comparative Literature, Claremont                                                                         AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Imaginal/Archetypal
Graduate School                                          Blending Theater, Psychology and Mythology
                                                                                                                Psychology; Object Relations Theory; Liberation
PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: Sacred Mysteries: Myths            Judatha Temple Kline                                   Psychology; Participatory and Phenomenological
About Couples in Quest; The Descent to the               Ph.D., Mythological Studies, Pacifica Graduate          Research; Dialogue Theory/Praxis
Underworld in Literature, Painting, and Film:            Institute; Licensed Marriage and Family
The Modernist Nekyia; Figuring Poesis: A                                                                        Gary White
Mythical Geometry of Postmodernism                       Therapist                                              M.A., Antioch University; Licensed Marriage &
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Myth in Literature from               AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Tibetan Buddhism                    Family Therapist
Antiquity to Postmodernism; Arthurian                    Andrew Teton                                           AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Sexual Violence; Sexuality;
Romances; The Hermetic Tradition                         M.A., Clinical Psychology, Antioch University,         Multi-Cultural Issues; Men’s & Women’s Issues;
                                                         Santa Barbara; Licensed Marriage and Family            Multiple Personality Disorder
Zaman Stanizai
Ph.D., Political Science, University of Southern         Therapist                                              Dana C. White
                                                         AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Theories of Psychotherapy;          Ph.D., Mythological Studies, Pacifica Graduate
California; M.A. Linguistics, University of
Washington                                               Marriage, Couples, and Family Systems; Law             Institute
                                                         and Ethics; Clinical Skills; Group Psychotherapy;      AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Psyche & Nature
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Islamic Studies; Theosophy,
                                                         Trauma Recovery; Body Inclusive Therapeutic
Political Philosophy; Islamic Mysticism; Sufism;          Approaches; California Licensing Preparation           Oksana Yakushko
Poetic Expression in Mystic Thought                                                                             Ph.D., Counseling Psychology, University of
                                                         Paula Thomson
Maurice Stevens                                                                                                 Missouri
                                                         Psy.D., Psychology, American Behavioral
Ph.D., History of Consciousness, University of                                                                  AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Holistic Professional and
                                                         Studies Institute; Licensed Clinical Psychologist
California at Santa Cruz                                 AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Developmental Psychology
                                                                                                                Scholarly Development; Work with Recent
PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: Trans(per)forming African-         through Adolescence, Strong Focus on                   Immigrants and Refugees; Sacred Approaches
American history and identity                            Neurobiology and Attachment Theory                     to Motherhood and Parenting.
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Critical Trauma Studies; Critical     Lou Ann Wallner                                        Willow Young
Race Studies; Critical Psychoanalysis; Cultural          M.A., Counseling Psychology, Pacifica Graduate          M.A., Counseling Psychology, Pacifica Graduate
Studies                                                  Institute; Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist        Institute; Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist;
C.D. Taylor                                              AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Family Systems from a Depth         CAMFT Certified Supervisor
                                                         Perspective; Adolescent Psychology; Myth               AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Jungian and Self-Psychology,
Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, Pacifica Graduate
                                                         and Narcissism in Western Culture; Eco and             Archetypal Research; World Arts, Culture,
Institute; Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist
                                                         Wilderness Psychology                                  and Mythology; Psyche and Dreams; Clinical
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Clinical Process; Group Therapy;
                                                                                                                Practice Issues
Depth Psychology; The Creative Process;
Chemical Dependency; Dual Diagnosis




Contributing Faculty
Robert Bosnak, Psy.A.                                    Michael Meade, D.H.L.                                  Ross Woodman, Ph.D.
Jungian Psychoanalyst, C.G. Jung Institute, Zürich       Founder of MOSAIC Multicultural Foundation             University of Toronto; Professor-Emeritus,
PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: Embodiment: Creative Imagination   areas of emphasis: Storytelling; Drumming;             University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario;
in Medicine, Art and Travel                              Mythology; Study of Ritual in Traditional Cultures     Distinguished Scholar, Keats-Shelley Association
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Embodied Imagination and                                                                     of America
                                                         Richard Tarnas, Ph.D.
Psychoanalysis; Therapeutic Training; Dreamwork;         PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: The Passion of the Western
                                                                                                                PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: Apocalyptic Vision in the Poetry
Cyberdreamwork—Interactive Real-Time Voice               Mind; Cosmos and Psyche: Intimations of a New          of Shelley; Sanity, Madness, and Transformation:
and Video Work with Imagery                              World View                                             Psyche and Romanticism; and Revelation and
Nor Hall, Ph.D.                                          AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Archetypal Studies;
                                                                                                                Knowledge (forthcoming)
PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: The Moon and the Virgin; Those     Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness;
Women                                                    Cultural History
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: History of Consciousness;
                                                         Marion Woodman, D.H.L.
Archetypal Psychology; Initiation Psychology             Scholar-in-Residence, Pacifica Graduate Institute,
James Hillman, Ph.D.                                     1992; Certified Jungian Analyst, C.G. Jung Institute,
University of Zürich                                     Zürich
PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: The Soul’s Code; Revisioning       PUBLICATIONS INCLUDE: Addiction to Perfection; The
Psychology; The Dream and the Underworld; A Blue         Pregnant Virgin; The Ravaged Bridegroom
Fire                                                     AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Jungian and Archetypal Thought;
AREAS OF EMPHASIS: Jungian and Archetypal                Addictive Behaviors; The Role of the Feminine in
Psychology; Dreams; Cultural Studies                     Our Changing World




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Admission Requirements
Pacifica Graduate Institute welcomes a culturally diverse academic           psychology through formal coursework or personal study and experience;
community. Students are selected for matriculation in the programs          a background in interdisciplinary studies, such as the humanities, sci-
at the Institute according to the potential Pacifi ca perceives they         ences, and social sciences; a demonstrated interest and ability in schol-
have to succeed in master’s or doctoral level work. While maintain-         arly writing; and a familiarity with the perspectives of depth psychology,
ing rigorous standards for admission relative to professional and           such as psychoanalytic, Jungian, and archetypal psychology.
personal attributes, the Institute seeks to emphasize those correlates
that measure a student’s aptitude for success in Pacifica’s courses of       PH.D. IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY WITH
study. Thus, the application review process focuses on past educa-          EMPHASIS IN PSYCHOTHERAPY
tional performance, letters of recommendation, emotional maturity,          Applicants must have a bachelor’ s and master’ s degree from an
and the presentation of self in the application essays and on-campus        accredited or state-approved institution of higher education.
interviews. All applicants are asked to demonstrate research skills         Successful candidates will have completed all of the academic
and writing ability by submitting samples of their written aca-             requirements of a Master’ s Degree in Counseling, a Master’ s in
demic work. The Institute’s doctoral and master’s programs require          Psychology, a Master’s in Social W ork, or a related fi eld such that
separate applications and admission evaluations. Completion of one          their degrees qualify them for licensure at the master’s level in their
of Pacifica’s M.A. programs does not guarantee the student’s admis-          own places of residence. Applicants must either be practicing, or
sion to the Institute’s Ph.D. programs in Depth Psychology , Clinical       have a plan in place to start practicing as psychotherapists, once
Psychology, or Mythological Studies.                                        they become enrolled in the program.
PH.D. IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                Because the program carries a strong emphasis on learning through
                                                                            case presentation and supervision, we seek candidates who are psy-
Applicants must have a bachelor’ s and/or master’s degree from a
                                                                            chologically-minded and show evidence of the emotional resilience
regionally accredited institution of higher education. Applicants
                                                                                                                           -
                                                                            necessary to work in the transference/countertransference field. Prior
to the Clinical Psychology Program are expected to bring a strong
                                                                            experiences as a psychotherapist patient or patient in psychotherapy
foundation in the fi eld of psychology and a demonstrated inter -
                                                                            are important factors in our consideration of your application.
est and aptitude for the study of depth psychology . The program
seeks individuals who are psychologically-minded and evidence               In addition to having advanced writing and scholarship skills, suc-
the emotional resilience necessary to work in the transference/             cessful candidates will hold some familiarity with, and aptitude for ,
counter-transference field. In addition to advanced writing and              the perspectives of depth psychology , and demonstrate a commit-
scholarship skills, successful candidates will have supervised              ment to practice and research in the field of depth psychotherapy.
clinical experience and manifest an interest in the relationships
among psychology, the humanities, and the arts. The experience
                                                                            M.A. IN ENGAGED HUMANITIES AND
of personal depth psychotherapy is highly valued. These capacities
                                                                            THE CREATIVE LIFE WITH EMPHASIS
are normally found in applicants who have already earned master’s
                                                                            IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY
degrees in psychology or a related fi eld from an accredited or state-       Applicants must have a bachelor’ s and/or master’s degree from an
approved institution of higher learning. The Admis sions Committee          accredited or state-approved institution of higher education. While
may consider applicants who have earned bachelors’ degrees from             the program seeks students with a background in social science,
an accredited or state-approved institution of higher education in          humanities, psychology, or the arts, other degrees will be consid-
psychology or a related fi eld who, in addition to meeting the admis-        ered. Successful applicants will also display scholarly writing skills
sions requirements as noted above, also present a strong foundation,        and show an interest in the application of depth psychological or
including a minimum of two years of advanced study and experience           mythological principles.
in depth psychology.
                                                                            M.A./PH.D. IN
M.A. IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY                                               MYTHOLOGICAL STUDIES
Applicants must have a bachelor’ s and/or master’s degree from an           Pacifica’s Mythological Studies Program seeks students who have
accredited or state-approved institution of higher education. The           the potential to succeed in the creative application of mythologi-
Counseling Psychology Program values students whose backgrounds             cal themes and psychological insights. In the process of reviewing
include work in social, religious, or human services;
                                                    academic training       applicants, attention is focused on past educational, creative, and
in psychology or the humanities; and experience in personal therapy.        professional endeavors.
Successful applicants will also display scholarly writing skills and an     Applicants must have a bachelor’ s and/or master’s degree from an
interest in research.                                                       accredited or state-approved institution of higher education. While
                                                                            a degree in the humanities, arts, or social sciences is preferred, other
M.A./PH.D. IN DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY                                              degrees will be considered. Successful completion of a Comprehensive
Applicants must have a bachelor’ s and/or master’s degree from an           Examination during the second year of the program and demonstrated
accredited or state-approved institution of higher education. Ap plicants   proficiency in academic research are required for continuation into the
must also demonstrate aptitude in the following areas: a background in      third year of the program.

96    PA C I F I C A G R A D U AT E I N S T I T U T E
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Admission Procedures
                                                                        Additional information about transfer of credits and prior training can
APPLYING TO PACIFICA
                                                                        be obtained in the Offi ce of Admissions. The transfer of credits is
Prospective students are asked to submit the online application         administered by the Director of Admissions prior to the start of the
form (available at www .pacifica.edu), personal statement, re-           first quarter of study at Pacifica.
sumé, and a non-refundable $60 application fee to the Offi ce of
                                                                        For students eligible for education benefi ts through the V eterans
Admissions. To complete the application fi le, official transcripts
                                                                        Administration, all previous education and training will be
and recommendation forms and letters should be forwarded to
                                                                        evaluated. Credit will be awarded where appropriate and the pro-
Pacifica Graduate Institute by the appropriate parties. The school is
                                                                        gram will be shortened accordingly. The student and the Veterans
authorized under Federal Law to enroll non-immigrant students (F-1
                                                                        Administration will be notified promptly.
Visa only). International students are required to submit transcript
evaluations prepared by a professional agency (such as www    .wes.     INTERVIEW PROCEDURE
org) that verifi es the necessary degree equivalency . International
                                                                        Those applicants who are advanced to the interview stage will
                                          e
students also must submit results of the Tst of English as a Foreign
                                                                        be invited to the campus for a group interview and an individual
Language (TOEFL). Applicants also must provide an academic writ-
                                                                        interview with Pacifi ca faculty. These interviews will take place
ing sample. Clinical Psychology doctoral applicants are requested
                                                                        beginning in March. The interviews address a number of important
to submit documentation of all supervised clinical experience.
                                                                        issues concerning the applicant’ s potential to engage in gradu-
                                                              ca’s
Early applications are encouraged due to limited space in Pacifi         ate studies. These issues include past educational experience,
programs. The Admissions Com mittees review completed ap-               emotional maturity, personal readiness, and those specifi c to the
plication files and schedule on-campus interviews for qualifi ed          applicant’s chosen program of study.
applicants.
                                                                        ACCEPTANCE AND ENROLLMENT
TRANSFER OF CREDITS
& PRIOR TRAINING                                                        Applications for Fall 2011 enrollment can be submitted after
                                                                        December 1, 2010. Notification letters will be mailed upon comple-
Due to the unique instructional nature of the Doctoral and Master’ s
                                                                        tion of the in-person interview. Please consider a deadline of June
degree programs, prior coursework or training usually is not equiv-
                                                                        30th as you prepare your application for the Admissions Committee.
alent to the approach and methodology used at Pacifi ca Graduate
                                                                        Application files received thereafter will be processed on a space-
Institute. Additionally, because of the sequential nature of the pro-
                                                                        available basis. Check Pacifi ca’s website at www.pacifica.edu for
grams, students are strongly advised against transferring in prior
                                                                        additional information.
coursework. A maximum of eight (8) units for any program may be
                                                                        Applicants who have been accepted must submit an enrollment
transferred. Courses taken at another institution more than four
                                                                        deposit of $500 within three weeks of acceptance in order to be
(4) years prior to the student’ s matriculation at Pacifi ca Graduate
                                                                        enrolled. The deposit is refundable in the amount of $250 should an
Institute will not be considered for transfer.
                                                                        applicant be unable to participate in the program. Those who are
Only Master’s level courses may be used to transfer credits in the
                                                                        unable to attend the 2011-2012 academic year must submit a new
M.A. programs. Only Doctoral level courses may be used to trans-
                                                                        application should they wish to be considered for acceptance at a
fer credits in the Ph.D. programs. Articulation agreements between
                                                                        later date. Currently enrolled Pacifica students who wish to switch
Pacifica programs and/or external partners will be considered on
                                                                        from one program to another prior to completion must apply in full.
a catalog year basis.
                                                                        There is a $500 administrative fee to make a program change.




                                                                                                   2 0 1 1 – 2 0 1 2 C O U R S E C ATA L O G      97
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2011–2012 Tuition and Fees
All students are responsible for the tuition and residential fees listed below for the 2011-2012 academic year. Tuition and fees are reviewed
annually and periodically adjusted as a matter of policy

APPLICATION FEE: A $60 fee must accompany the Application for Enrollment. This fee is non-refundable..
TUITION DEPOSIT: Once an applicant is accepted to Pacifica, in order to be enrolled as a student, a $500 deposit must be
received with the signed Tuition and Fee Agreement. This deposit is partially refundable.

TUITION
M.A. in Counseling Psychology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,550                     M.A./Ph.D. in Depth Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,965
                                                                                                                   M.A./Ph.D. in Depth Psychology with Emphasis
M.A. in Engaged Humanities & the Creative Life. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,164                                in Jungian and Archetypal Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,965
Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,965                 M.A./Ph.D. in Depth Psychology with Emphasis in Community
M.A./Ph.D. in Mythological Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,965                       Psychology, Liberation Psychology and Ecopsychology . . . . . . . . . . $25,965
                                                                                                                   M.A./Ph.D. in Depth Psychology with Emphasis
Ph.D. in Depth Psychology with Emphasis in Psychotherapy . . . . . . $25,965
                                                                                                                   in Somatic Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,965

THESIS FEE: M.A. COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM
Initial Thesis Fee (for 3 quarters). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,800
The thesis fee includes the required three-unit Directed Research II course and work with the thesis advisor for three (3) cons cutive quarters. Students                              e
requiring additional quarters to complete the Thesis will be assessed a separate $500 for each additional quarter of work with their thesis advisor.

DISSERTATION FEE: PH.D. PROGRAMS The dissertation fee for all doctoral programs is the Ph.D level tuition for the
year the student entered into the Ph.D. program. The Dissertation Fee covers two years of work with the committee. Dissertation work usually
begins during or after the third year of course work. In the event any student withdraws and is re-admitted to Pacifica, the two-year Dissertation
Fee is equal to the annual tuition for the year the student was re-admitted to a Ph.D. program.

POST TWO-YEAR DISSERTATION FEE For those students who need to enroll in subsequent one-year dissertation
enrollment periods, the annual fee is based on one-half of the Ph.D. level tuition from three years prior to the current academic year as follows:
for academic year 2011-2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,700 for academic year 2012-2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$12,050
One-fourth of the annual dissertation fee will be billed quarterly . Students will only be responsible for those quarters that a re started and/or
needed to complete their dissertation.

MISCELLANEOUS FEES                                                                                                Late Payment Fee* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $100 per quarter
                                                                                                                  *Tuition and Residential/Non-residential fees are due 14 days prior to the first day of
Leave of Absence (LOA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $100              the quarter. The Late Payment Fee will be assessed if not paid in full (either by student
Academic Tutorial (1 month) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $150               and/or secured Financial Aid) on or before the first day of each quarter .

Extended Academic Tutorial (3 months) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $300                      Late Registration Fee** . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $75 per quarter
                                                                                                                  **Late Registration Fee is assessed for continuing students who do not register on or
Traineeship Tutorial (1 month) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $150                 before 14 days prior to the beginning of the first session of a quarter.
Internship/Traineeship Only (1 quarter) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $300                    Transcripts, per copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4

RESIDENTIAL AND NON-RESIDENTIAL FEES
The 2011-2012 Non-Residential Fee covers all meals, shuttle transportation between off-site accommodations and the campuses, and a day use
fee for designated days classes are in session according to the annual academic calendar. The Residential Fee includes the above-listed services
plus shared accommodations for the in-session nights and 10% Santa Barbara County occupancy use tax.
Residential Fee:                                                                                                   Non-Residential Fee:
M.A. in Counseling Psychology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,431                  M.A. in Counseling Psychology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,026
M.A. in Engaged Humanities & The Creative Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,624                              M.A. in Engaged Humanities & The Creative Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,424
Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,131              Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,827
M.A./Ph.D. in Mythological Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5,052                    M.A./Ph.D. in Mythological Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,848
Ph.D. in Depth Psychology with Emphasis in Psychotherapy . . . . . . . . $5,052                                    Ph.D. in Depth Psychology with Emphasis in Psychotherapy . . . . . . . . $2,848
M.A./Ph.D. in Depth Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,206                  M.A./Ph.D. in Depth Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,403
M.A./Ph.D. in Depth Psychology with Emphasis in                                                                    M.A./Ph.D. in Depth Psychology with Emphasis in
Jungian and Archetypal Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,624                  Jungian and Archetypal Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,424
M.A./Ph.D. in Depth Psychology with Emphasis in Community                                                          M.A./Ph.D. in Depth Psychology with Emphasis in Community
Psychology, Liberation Psychology, and Ecopsychology . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,206                                Psychology, Liberation Psychology, and Ecopsychology . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,403
M.A./Ph.D. in Depth Psychology with Emphasis in Somatic Studies $5,052                                             M.A./Ph.D. in Depth Psychology with Emphasis in Somatic Studies . . . $2,848

98       PA C I F I C A G R A D U AT E I N S T I T U T E
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Financial Aid
The purpose of fi nancial aid is to provide fi nancial assistance to        1) Be enrolled full-time (minimum 6 units) each quarter.
                                                                   ca.
students enrolled at least half time in an eligible program at Pacifi      2) Complete and submit the scholarship application and essay.
Pacifica’s Board of Trustees, administrators, faculty, and staff do all    3) Results of the FAFSA must be on file in the Financial Aid Office for
they can to ensure a quality education is accessible for all students.    U.S Citizens or eligible non-citizens in order to qualify.
Important Note: The financial aid information published in this catalog    4) International students must complete and submit the Financial Aid
is current and accurate at the time of printing. Institutional policies   Addendum form (page 2 of the application).
along with Federal and State regulations may change periodically.
Contact the Financial Aid Office for the most up to date information       Pacifica Yellow Ribbon Scholarship Program
regarding applications, deadlines, policies, and procedures or visit      Pacifica Graduate Institute is pleased provide up to six Y ellow Ribbon
the website at http://www.pacifica.edu/financial_aid.aspx.                  Scholarships each year for qualifying veterans under the Post 9/11
                                                                          GI Bill on a fi rst-come first-serve basis. Students in the Master’ s in
GENERAL ELIGIBILITY                                                       Counseling will qualify for up to $6,500 per year , Engaged Humanities
REQUIREMENTS:                                                             will qualify for up to $5,400, and those enrolled in the doctoral programs
A student must adhere to the following in order to qualify for federal    will qualify for up to $7,800 per year.
financial aid at Pacifica:
                                                                          Pacifica Matching AmeriCorp Scholarship Program
1) Be admitted and enrolled at least half time (minimum 3 units/
                                                                          Pacifica Graduate Institute is a proud participant in the Segal
quarter) in an eligible degree program at Pacifica.
                                                                          AmeriCorps Matching Education A ward program and is pleased
2) Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (F AFSA)         to offer the Segal AmeriCorps Matching Scholarship to qualifi ed
                                                    fi
form each year to determine eligibility for federal nancial assistance.   AmeriCorps Alumni enrolled in one of our MA or PhD programs.
Pacifica’s School Code is G31268.
                                                                          The matching scholarship amount will be a dollar-for-dollar match up
3) Be in good standing in order to qualify for federal fi     nancial      to $4,725 per year with a maximum of $9,450 throughout enrollment in
assistance (student may not have federal liens, or be in default, or      the program of study. To qualify, students must submit to the Financial
owe a refund on any federal financial aid program).                        Aid Office the AmeriCorps voucher confi rming benefit eligibility. A
4) Be a U.S. Citizen, legal permanent resident of United States or        total of fi ve new scholarships will be available on a fi rst-come first-
eligible non-citizen; provide proof of compliance with drug conviction    served basis. These scholarships are not transferable, have no cash
regulations and if male, provide proof of compliance with selective       value, and will be applied directly toward tuition charges.
service registration.
5) Be making Satisfactory Academic Progress toward the completion         STUDENT LOANS
of degree requirements. (See SAP policy for details.)                     Federal Student Loans
TYPES OF ASSISTANCE:                                                      Pacifica participates in the US Department of Education William Ford
Pacifica provides students with a number of fi nancial assistance           Direct Loan program. The Direct Loan program provides students with
options including scholarships, loans, and financing alternatives.         access to federally Subsidized and Unsubsidized Stafford Loans as
                                                                          well as Graduate PLUS Loans by allowing students to borrow directly
PACIFICA GRADUATE INSTITUTE                                               from the US Department of Education rather than a private lender.
SCHOLARSHIPS                                                              The Direct Stafford Loans are low interest loans made to students
Pacifica Scholarship Program                                               admitted to an eligible academic program and attending at least
To make education accessible to students who show high fi nancial          half time (minimum 3 units). All new Direct Stafford loans have a
need and academic merit Pacifi ca is pleased to offer a scholarship        fixed interest rate of 6.8% for the life of the loan and offer a six-
program to our graduate students.                                         month post-enrollment grace period. All Direct Stafford loans are
Applications are available through the Financial Aid Offi and on our
                                                       ce                 subject to an origination fee, which is deducted from each quarterly
website after March 1.                                                    disbursement. The Direct Stafford loans also offer a repayment
                                                                          incentive benefit with an up-front interest rate rebate. The rebate is
New applicants must meet the following requirements by August
                                                                          in effect as long as, during repayment, the borrower makes the fi rst
1 to be considered:
                                                                          12 monthly payments on time. If timely payments are not made, the
1) Be accepted into a program of study.                                   rebate amount will be added back to the principle loan amount.
2) Complete and submit the scholarship application and essay.             Graduate students may borrow an annual maximum of $20,500 in the
3) Results of the FAFSA must be on file in the Financial Aid Office for     Direct Stafford Loan program. The aggregate loan limit of all federal
U.S Citizens or eligible non-citizens in order to qualify.                Stafford Loans (FFELP + Direct combined) for a graduate student is
4) International students must complete and submit the Financial Aid      $138,500 (including undergraduate loans and a maximum of $65,500
Addendum form (page 2 of the application).                                in Subsidized Stafford Loans).
Returning students must meet the following requirements by June
15 to be considered:


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Financial Aid
Direct Subsidized Stafford Loans                                            Private Alternative Loans
                                                            ling
Students who demonstrate financial need (as determined by fi the              Alternative source of fi nancial assistance. These loans are non-federal
FAFSA) may qualify for the Direct Subsidized Stafford Loan program.         loan programs that require at least half-time enrollment (minimum
The federal government, during eligible periods of enrollment and           of 3 units at Pacifi ca), a good credit history , the ability to repay the
deferments, pays the interest on this loan. The annual maximum for          loan, and US citizenship or permanent resident status. Some loans
graduate students is $8,500.                                                may require a credit worthy US citizen or permanent resident co-
Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans                                          signer. For complete details of the alternative loans available, please
Available to students regardless of fi nancial need. Students who            contact the Financial Aid Offi ce or visit our website. US Department
do not qualify for the Subsidized Loan may qualify for the Direct           of Education regulations on private education loans require that:
Unsubsidized Stafford Loan. Interest on this loan begins to accrue          1. the lender present full disclosure of the terms and conditions of
upon disbursement. The student is responsible for the interest on this      the loan (including fees, interest rates, repayment amounts) and
loan during eligible periods of enrollment and deferments (interest         2. the school certify a student’ s cost of attendance and eligibility
deferment options available).                                               prior to the lender disbursing funds and
Direct Graduate PLUS Loans                                                  3. the lender obtains written confi rmation through a signed self-
Available to qualifying graduate/professional students to assist with       certification from the borrower that s/he understands the terms and
education expenses (tuition, housing, books, travel, and reasonable         conditions prior to releasing loan funds to the school.
personal expenses). Direct PLUS Loans are not based on income or            This new process may extend the processing time for private loans
assets. However, to qualify borrowers must:                                 and may delay the release of loans funds to the school. Please
1) Be a U.S. Citizen or eligible non-citizen and have a valid Social        allow a minimum of two to three weeks for processing of private
Security Number.                                                            alternative loans.
2) Complete the F AFSA and apply for the maximum amount of                  Financial Aid Disbursements
Stafford loans for which you are eligible.                                  In general, all fi nancial aid will be released to Pacifi ca in multiple
3) Meet credit eligibility requirements as determined by the US             disbursements that coincide with the start of each enrollment period
Department of Education.                                                                                                                   fi
                                                                            (quarter). Payment for all outstanding charges not covered by nancial
4) Complete/submit a Master Promissory Note (MPN) to the US                 aid are due 14-days prior to the start of each quarter.
Department of Education.                                                    Financial Aid Refunds
Direct Grad PLUS Loans are subject to 4% origination fees. These fees                                                                              .
                                                                            Excess financial aid refunds are available after the start of each quarter
are deducted from disbursements made each quarter . Repayment               Pacifica has partnered with Sallie Mae’ s Business Offi ce Solutions
incentive benefits are also available with a 1.5% up-front interest          to provide timely refunds to students. Students have the option of
rate rebate. The rebate is in effect as long as the borrower makes the      receiving refunds through Direct Deposit, Debit MasterCard, or Paper
first 12 monthly payments on time. If timely payments are not made,          Check processing. All refunds will be processed within 5-7 business
the rebate amount will be added back to the loan amount.                    days after the financial aid funds are received from the Department of
The interest rate on the Grad PLUS loan is fixed at 7.9% and interest        Education. If you do not sign up for the direct deposit process, a paper
begins to accrue as the funds are disbursed each quarter Repayment
                                                        .                   check will be mailed to you directly from Sallie Mae Business Offi ce
begins 60 days after the last disbursement for that loan period.            Solutions approximately 14-days after the funds are received.

Direct Loan Repayment                                                       EXTERNAL SOURCES:
There are several repayment plans for Direct Loans that range between       Outside Scholarship Searches
10-25 years of repayment. Early repayment in whole or in part may be        There are many free sources providing scholarship listings and
made without penalty at any time. These extended repayment plans and        databases available to students on the Internet. Please be aware that
loan forgiveness programs are available to assist in successful repayment   you should not pay for a search service. Pacifi ca’s website provides
of student loans. Consult with the Direct Loan Servicing Center for com-    a listing of several scholarship search resources. Log on to www .
plete details on the repayment options available or visit the website at    pacifica.edu, under Financial Aid, click on Outside Scholarships.
http://www2.ed.gov/offices/OSFAP/DirectLoan/student.html .                   Tax Breaks for College
Student Loan Counseling                                                     There are a number of federal tax benefi ts for college, including
All students who borrow from the Federal Loan Programs are                  credits, deductions, and savings incentives. All benefits have income
required to complete an online “Entrance Counseling” session                limitations and other qualifications.
prior to receiving the fi rst loan disbursement and an online “Exit          Consult your tax advisor or IRS for complete details. Web resources:
Counseling” session prior to leaving Pacifi ca. The purpose of these
                                                                              www.irs.gov/individuals
loan counseling sessions is to bring student awareness to his/her
rights and responsibilities as a student loan borrower.

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Financial Aid
State Sources                                                              refer to Refundable Tuition and Fee Policy in this catalog. If there is
Many states offer grants and/or other types of fi nancial aid to their      a balance due by the student as a result of the unearned fi nancial
residents. Contact the Department of Education in your state for           aid being returned, the student will be responsible for payment of
information, or check the Department of Education’s website:               the difference. Details and examples of the Return of Federal Funds
   www.ed.gov/about/contacts/state for a listing.                          Policy are available in the Financial Aid Office.

Veterans Administration Educational Benefits                                Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)
Pacifica’s programs are approved for the training of veterans and           Students enrolled in coursework
other eligible persons under T itle 38, U.S. Code. T o find out if you      All students who apply for and receive fi nancial aid must be making
are eligible under any of these programs, call (888) GIBILL1 or visit      SAP toward completion of degree requirements. SAP is evaluated
the VA website at http://www.gibill.va.gov. Pacifica is proud to offer      annually after grades are posted for the spring quarter to determine
Yellow Ribbon Scholarships to those qualifying Post 9/11 veterans.         continued eligibility for those students enrolled in coursework.
                                                                           Students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 and
For students eligible for education benefi ts through the V eterans
                                                                           complete a minimum number of units per academic year (students
Administration, all previous education, and training will be evaluated.
                                                                           may not have more than two incomplete, withdraws, failing, no
Credit will be awarded where appropriate and the program will be
                                                                           passing grades). Refer to the SAP brochure available in the Financial
shortened accordingly. The student and the Veterans Administration
                                                                           Aid Office for complete details.
will be notified by the Registrar promptly.
                                                                           Students who do not make SAP will receive written notification from
Student Employment                                                         the Financial Aid Office and will be placed on financial aid probation
Pacifica does not currently participate in the federally-sponsored          for up to three quarters. During this financial aid probationary period,
College Work-Study program.                                                students may receive fi nancial aid and are expected to resolve ALL
                                                                           academic deficiencies. If after being placed on fi nancial aid probation,
POLICIES APPLYING TO ALL                                                   the deficiencies are not removed by the end of the probationary
FINANCIAL AID RECIPIENTS                                                   period or if deficiencies exceed those listed above; further aid will be
Return of Federal Funds/Refunds                                            suspended until the deficiencies have been resolved. Students whose
Pacifica Graduate Institute has implemented the Return of Federal           financial aid is suspended for failure to achieve SAP will be notifi ed
Funds policy as required by federal regulations (Sect. 668.22 of           in writing. Students may appeal if extenuating circumstances (such
Higher Education Amendments of 1998). For those students who               as prolonged illness or a death in the family) hindered academic
receive federal fi nancial aid and fi nd it necessary to withdraw            performance. Students are strongly encouraged to fi le their appeal
from all courses at Pacifi ca prior to the completion of the current        immediately after receiving notification of suspension. Appeals must
quarter, the following federal policy applies. The focus of the policy     include a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) to explain in detail how and
is to return the unearned portion of the federal fi nancial aid for the     when deficiencies will be resolved. The Department Chairperson for
enrollment period. Only the amount of fi nancial aid that has been          the respective program of study must approve the Corrective Action
earned (based on the number of calendar days completed in the              Plan. The appeal and the approved CAP must be in writing and sent
period of enrollment) will be retained on the student’ s behalf. Any       to the Director of Financial Aid.
aid unearned will be returned to the Department of Education. If           Students enrolled in dissertation
a student withdraws after the 60% point-in-time, the student has           PhD program students are eligible for fi nancial aid during the two-
earned 100% of the federal funds.                                          year dissertation phase of the program. During the fi rst year the
The Return of Federal Funds will be calculated based on the date           student must be actively engaged in the dissertation process by
official written notification of withdrawal is received by the Registrar’s   submitting written material and have ongoing communication with
Office, the last date of documented attendance or for an unoffi cial         the committee. If the student does not meet this requirement, any
withdrawal, the mid-point of the term or the last documented date of       further aid will be suspended until progress is made and confi rmed
attendance. The following distribution of returned funds is as follows:    by the committee. Students whose fi nancial aid is suspended will
                                                                           be notified in writing. Following the completion of the second year ,
1) Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan
                                                                           students must have an approved proposal on fi le to remain eligible
2) Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan                                        for financial aid during an extended one-year period.
3) Federal Graduate Plus Loan                                              Please note that once the fi nal dissertation draft is approved by the
4) State, Private, or Institutional Aid                                    committee all pending fi nancial aid will be canceled. Contact the
5) The student                                                             Financial Aid Office for complete details.
“Refund” – refers to the calculation of institutional charges and is a     Students enrolled in thesis
separate calculation from the Return of Federal Funds calculation. The     Students enrolled in the thesis phase of the Master’ s in Counseling
amount of refundable institutional charges (tuition and residential/       Psychology Program are eligible for financial aid only during the first
non residential fees) will be prorated based on school policy. Please      quarter of the initial three quarter thesis enrollment period.


                                                                                                 2 0 1 1 – 2 0 1 2 C O U R S E C ATA L O G   101
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Financial Aid
Student Rights and Responsibilities                                          Student Responsibilities:
Student Rights:                                                              You have a responsibility to:
You have the right to ask the college:                                       • Review and consider all information about the college’s programs
• What it costs to attend and what its refund policies are if you dropout.     before enrolling.
• How the college determines whether you are making SAP and                  • Compare your anticipated monthly student loan payments and other
  what happens if you are not.                                                 expenses to your expected take-home pay after college.
• What financial help is available, including information on all fed-         • Complete the financial aid application accurately and submit it on
  eral, state, and college financial aid programs, not just loans.              time to the right place. Intentional misrepresentation on an ap-
                                                                               plication for federal financial aid is a violation of law and a criminal
• About the deadlines for submitting applications for each financial
                                                                               offense subject to penalties.
  aid program and how recipients are selected.
                                                                             • Ask current and former students and local employers about the
• How your financial need is determined, including the costs for tuition,
                                                                               school.
  fees, housing, food, transportation, books, supplies, personal and
  miscellaneous expenses are considered in your cost of attendance.          • Read and keep copies of all forms and agreements you sign.
• What resources (such as employer reimbursement, private                    • Respond promptly and provide all requested documentation, verifica-
  scholarships, personal assets) are considered in the financial need           tion, corrections, or new information to the appropriate office.
  calculation, and how much of your financial need, as determined             • Notify the college and the holder (servicer) of your loans promptly
  by the college, is met.                                                      of changes in your name, permanent mailing address, telephone
• To explain the various elements in your financial aid package, and            number or enrollment status.
  how and when you will receive your aid.                                    • Know and comply with the deadlines for applications or reapplica-
• To reconsider your financial aid application, if you believe you have         tions for aid, and understand the school’s refund procedures.
  been treated unfairly.                                                     • Repay your student loans, even if you do not complete your educa-
• How much of your financial aid must be paid back, and what por-               tion, cannot get a job, or are not happy with your education.
  tion is grant or gift aid.                                                 • File for a deferment or forbearance, or change repayment plans if you
• If you are offered a loan, you have the right to know the interest            are at risk of default.
   rate, the total amount that must be repaid, payback procedures,           • Complete entrance counseling before you receive your first loan
   when repayment begins and how long you have to repay.                       disbursement and exit counseling before you leave school.
• How to apply for additional aid, if your financial circumstances change.    • Report in writing to your college financial aid office all additional
• About the effect outside scholarships may have on your financial              financial aid resources you receive.
  aid award.
• For its statistics on crimes committed on and off campus, and for
  its campus safety policies and procedures.



Administrative Information
STUDENT RECORDS                                                               the limits imposed by law or Institute policy), marital status, medical
Pacifica Graduate Institute is in compliance with the Family Educational       condition, or age in any of its policies, procedures, or practices.
Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 as amended in 1979, 1990, 1992, 1994,          This non-discrimination policy covers treatment in institutionally
and 1998, guaranteeing students the right to inspect and review their         approved academic programs and activities. In conformance with
education records, have some control over the disclosure of information       Institute policy, Pacifica Graduate Institute is an Affi rmative Action/
from their education records, and seek to amend education records. For        Equal Opportunity Employer . If a student believes s/he has been
details on students’ rights and issues relating to disclosure of directory    subjected to any form of unlawful discrimination, please submit a
information, consult the current Student Handbook.                            written complaint to the Provost.
NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY AND                                                 WITHDRAWAL POLICY
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY STATEMENT                                                   Students wishing to withdraw from Pacifi ca Graduate Institute are
Pacifica Graduate Institute does not discriminate on the basis of              required to notify the Registrar’s Office in writing. Upon receipt, the
race, color, national origin, religion, creed, gender, sexual orientation     Registrar will notify the appropriate departments. The Refund Policy
or identity, physical or mental disability , citizenship status (within       will be administered by the Business Office.


102     PA C I F I C A G R A D U AT E I N S T I T U T E
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Administrative Information
LEAVE OF ABSENCE POLICY                                                           REFUNDABLE RESIDENTIAL AND
Students requesting a leave of absence are required to submit a                   NON-RESIDENTIAL FEE POLICY
completed Leave of Absence Form with the Program Chair’ s signature               If you plan to miss an on-site session, in order to be eligible for a refund,
to the Registrar. Upon receipt, the Registrar’ s Office will notify the            written notification must be submitted to the Housing Department at
appropriate departments. The Refund Policy will be administered by                least five (5) days prior to the start date of on-site instruction.
the Business Office.
                                                                                  If you attend a portion of your on-site instruction and then withdraw
REFUNDABLE TUITION POLICY                                                                                                                    ,
                                                                                  from Pacifica or take a leave of absence during the quarterthe refund
For Students Withdrawing or Taking a Leave of Absence                             will be prorated based upon the number of days of on-site instruction
To be eligible for a refund of Tuition, timely written notification must           in the quarter, up to and including the date written notification of the
be submitted to the Office of the Registrar as specified below. The                 withdrawal is received by the Offi ce of the Registrar . If the school
date of withdrawal will be determined by the date written notifica-                cancels or discontinues an on-site course, you will receive a pro rata
tion is received by the Office of the Registrar. If you withdraw or file a          refund of the fee.
Leave of Absence from Pacifica after instruction has begun, you will
                                                                                  ACCREDITATION
receive a partial refund of the Tuition charges as stated below::
                                                                                  Santa Barbara Graduate School, Inc., d.b.a Pacifi       ca Graduate
For Students Dropping Withdrawing from a Course                                   Institute, is accredited by the Accrediting Com mission for Senior
To be eligible for a refund, a completed Request to Drop a Class Form             Colleges and Universities of the W estern Association of Schools
must be received by the Office of the Registrar. The date of dropping              and Colleges, an institutional accrediting body recognized by the
or withdrawing from a course will be determined by the date written               Council on Postsecondary Accreditation and the U.S. Department
notification is received by the Offi ce of the Registrar . If you drop a            of Education. (W estern Association of Schools and Colleges, 985
class or withdraw from a course after instruction has begun, you will
                                                                                  Atlantic Avenue, Suite 100, Alameda, CA 94501; tel: 510-748-9001;
receive a partial refund based on a “per unit T uition calculation”**
                                                                                  fax: 510-748-9797; www.wascweb.org). In addition, this school is
as specified below:
                                                                                  authorized under Federal Law to enroll non-immigrant students.
**”Per unit Tuition calculation”: the Tuition for the specific quarter, program,
and academic year, divided by the number of units offered in that specific         STANDARDS FOR
quarter and program.                                                              STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT
    Time Frame – Academic Quarter                                Refund**         Good Standing: A graduate student is considered to be in good
     Fall, Winter, and Spring for all Programs, plus Summer for                   academic standing when a minimum 3.0 (B) grade point average is
     Engaged Humanities, Jungian and Archetypal Studies, and
                                                                                  maintained. A full description of grading standards and academic
     Depth Psychology Tracks J and K
                                                                                                                                             ca
                                                                                  regulations is contained in the current edition of the Pacifi Graduate
     On or before the first day of class of the quarter              100%*
                                                                                  Institute Student Handbook.
     First week of the quarter (day 2 to 7)                            80%
     Second week of the quarter (day 8 to 14)                          70%        CAMPUS SECURITY
                                                                                  In accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security
     Third week of the quarter (day 15 to 21)                          60%
                                                                                  Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, the Department of Education
     Fourth week of the quarter (day 22 to 28)                         50%
                                                                                  requires all higher education institutions to track, report, and
     Fifth week of the quarter (day 29 to 35)                          40%        distribute this information each year (in the fall) to all students and
     Sixth week of the quarter (day 36 to 42)                          30%        employees. Statistics are availalbe online at www.pacifica.edu
     After sixth week (day 43 and beyond)                               0%
                                                                                  CHANGES IN POLICIES
   *For newly admitted students, $250 of the enrollment deposit will              AND PROCEDURES
    be deducted from the refund.                                                  Pacifica may from time to time alter the policies or procedures stated
    Summer Quarter Policy                                                         in this Catalog in order to address emerging needs, or if otherwise
    Summer for all Programs, except Engaged Humanities,                           in the best interest of the Institute. In that event the Institute would
    Jungian and Archetypal Studies, and Depth Psychology                          make all reasonable efforts to notify students. Thus students should be
    Tracks J, K, and P.
                                                                                  aware that the policies and procedures described in this catalog may
     On or before the first day of class                               100%        not necessarily remain in effect during their entire program of studies
     After the fi rst day — Tuition refund is prorated based on the                at Pacifica. Also, to the extent there may be discrepancies in any time
     number of days in the quarter , up to and including the date                 period between the Tuition and Fee Agreement and this Catalog, the
     written notification is received by the Office of the Registrar.               Agreement signed by Pacifica and the student shall be binding.




                                                                                                         2 0 1 1 – 2 0 1 2 C O U R S E C ATA L O G    103
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Applying to Pacifica Graduate Institute
Pacifica welcomes a diverse academic
community. Students are selected for admission in
the Institute’s programs on the basis of their perceived
potential to succeed in masters or doctoral level
work. The application review process focuses on past
educational performance, letters of recommendation,
emotional maturity, application essays, and on-campus
interviews. Applicants are asked to demonstrate research
skills and writing ability by submitting a sample(s) of
their written academic work. Applications for fall 2011
enrollment may be submitted anytime after December 1,
2011. Notification letters will be mailed upon completion
of the in-person interview. Please consider a deadline
of June 30th as you prepare your application for the
Admissions Office. Applications received thereafter will
be on a space-available basis. For additional information
on the admissions process see pages 96–97. For more
information, contact Pacifica’s Admissions Office                            Pacifica’s Admissions Team, from left: Nancy Galindo, Senior
                                                                           Admissions Counselor; Gwyn Wood, Senior Admissions Counselor;
at 805.969.3626, ext. 305. You may apply online at
                                                                           Tamar Frysh, Senior Admissions Counselor; Wendy Overend,
www.pacifica.edu.                                                           Director of Admissions; and Daniella Graves, Admissions Coordinator.



Visiting Pacifica Graduate Institute
You are welcome to visit either or both of Pacifica’s campuses. To arrange a campus visit,
please call the reception office at 805.969.3626, ext. 101 for information on parking and shuttle bus schedules.
The best way to see the campuses is to attend a One-Day Introduction to Pacifica, as described at right. This
special day-long program is held several times each year. It includes a comprehensive tour of the campuses
and detailed presentations on the Institute’s degree programs. For more information on the
One-Day Introductions, call 805.969.3626, ext. 103 or visit www.pacifica.edu.

www.pacifica.edu
We keep our website updated with current information on the Institute and its programs.
Visit www.pacifica.edu and explore the resources we’ve made available online.
  • Schedules, descriptions, and online registration for One-Day Introductions
    to Pacifica and other public programs
  • Additional information on admissions and financial aid
  • Online admissions application
  • Informational videos featuring Pacifica’s faculty and campuses
  • Detailed information on Pacifica’s Graduate Research Library and
    other educational resources

104    PA C I F I C A G R A D U AT E I N S T I T U T E
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                I had an inspirational, wonderfully intimate day, and I will never forget it. I loved listening to faculty
                and staff, and felt a deep resonance with the school and the Pacifica community.”
                                                                        — ATTENDEE AT A ONE-DAY INTRODUCTION


One-Day Introductions to Pacifica
Join us for a special program designed to give prospective students an in-depth introduction
to Pacifica’s degree programs and unique educational features.

These programs include representative classroom presentations     • Explore both Pacifica campuses and their resources,
by core and guest faculty members; an alumni panel with gradu-      including the OPUS Archives and Research Center, the
ates from each degree program; program-specifi c information         Graduate Research Library, the Pacifica Bookstores, and
meetings; and admissions and financial aid presentations.            the organic gardens.
 • Experience Pacifica’s unique interdisciplinary curriculum        • Learn more about admissions procedures and financial aid.
   through characteristic classroom presentations by core
                                                                   • Meet Pacifica alumni, faculty, and other prospective students.
   faculty and special guest faculty in-residence.
 • Learn about Pacifica’s monthly, three or four-day learning     For a schedule of upcoming On-Campus
   session formats, and its unique blended online/               Introductions to Pacifica Graduate Institute
   low-residency degree programs.                                and information about registering, call
 • Get detailed information about each of Pacifica’s              805.969.3626, ext. 103 or visit www.pacifica.edu.
   graduate degree programs.

  Space at the One-Day Introductions is limited. Early registration is recommended.
        PACIFICA
         G R A D U A T E                          I N S T I T U T E

Graduate Degree Programs in the Tradition of Depth Psychology

      249 LAMBERT ROAD, CARPINTERIA, CALIFORNIA 93013
         8 0 5 . 9 6 9 . 3 6 2 6 , E X T. 1 0 3   |   W W W. P A C I F I C A . E D U




               TABLE OF CONTENTS | KEYWORD SEARCH

				
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