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Parasites by keara

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Parasites 981-74. Vector - Disease transmission A. Mosquito - Malaria B. Black fly - Onchocerciasis C. Deer fly - Tularemia D. Sand fly - Leishmaniasis E. All the above 971/ 92. Opportunistic parasitic infections that occur in AIDS patients include A. Toxoplasmosis B. Microsporidiosis C. Cyclosporiasis D. Isosporidiasis E. All the above 961/ 118.Opportunistic trophozoites penetrate the cribriform plate, multiply in the gray matter and cause an acute fulminating meningoencephalitis in: A. Negleriasis B. Cerebral malaria C. Acanthamebiasis D. Reactivation toxoplasmosis E. Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis 961/ 114. Autoinfections can occur in the following Except: A. Visceral larval migrans B. Pinworm C. Hymenolepiasis nana D. Cysticercosis from taeniasis E. Strongyloidiasis 971/103 Pinworm, hymenolepiasis nana, cysticercosis from taeniasis, and strongyloidiasis have which of the following in common A. Autoinfections B. Nematodes C. Eating raw meat D. Larval migrans E. Appendicitis 971/ 106. Hepatomegaly is a frequently observed clinical sign in A. Malaria B. Visceral larval migrans C. Hydatid disease D. Visceral leishmaniasis E. All the above 961/ 102 Trichuriasis A. Chronic lymphadenitis B. Liver abscess C. Hepatomegaly D. Chronic myocarditis E. Prolapsed rectum

971/ 109. Allergic dermamatitis may result from Texas Tech University Health Science Center School of Medicine Peer Tutors

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A. B. C. D. E.

Filariform larvae Schistosome cercariae Fly and mosquito bites Microfilariae Any of the above

981-87. Agent - Condition A. Mosquito bite - Allergic dermatitis B. Microfilariae - Filarial (onchocerca) dermatitis C. Schistosome cercariae - Swimmer's itch D. Filariform larvae - Cutaneous larval migrans E. Any of the above 951/ 109. An allergic dermatitis can develop after repeated exposure to which of the following: A. Mosquito bite B. Microfilariae C. Schistosome cercariae D. Filariform larvae E. All of the above 961/ 120. Mosquito bites, microfilariae, schistosome cercariae, and filariform larvae have which of the following in common: A. Allergic dermatitis B. Hyperalbuminemia C. Hypereosinophilia D. Nematodiases E. Transient edema 961/ 115. Release of a toxalbumin venom that acts as a potent neurotoxin on myoneural junctions causing depletion of acetylcholine at motor nerve endings and provoking release of catecholamines at adrenergic nerve endings leading to severe pain and abdominal muscle rigidity occurs in: A. Loxocelism B. Scorpion envenomation C. Lactrodectism D. Lepidopterism E. Hymenopterism 981-103. Specific antivenin is usually used in cases of A. Lactrodectism B. Loxocelism C. Pedunculosis D. Centipede envenomation E. African honey bee envenomation 961/ 116. Release of a toxin containing polyamines among other factors and resulting in painful lesions with edema, cellular infiltration and muscle necrosis followed by consolidation and healing without scarring characterizes the stings of: A. Scorpions B. Fire ants C. Black widow spiders D. Puss caterpillars E. Paper wasps

981-88. A.

Organism - Toxin Brown recluse spider - Sphingomyelinase Texas Tech University Health Science Center School of Medicine Peer Tutors

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B. C. D. E.

Black widow spider - Alkaloids Fire ant - Cantharidin Blister beetle - Formic acid Puss catapillar - Polyamines

951/ 104. Release of venom with a sphingomyelinase that acts as a 0 hemolytic toxin causing pain, erythema and ulceration (only about 10% of patients) at the site of the bite and systemic effects including hemolytic anemia occurs in: A. Loxocelism B. Scorpion envenomation C. Lactrodectism D. Lepidopterism E. Hymenopterism 951/ 105. Release of a toxin containing alkaloids which cause development of a small sterile pruretic pustule surrounded by erythema and edema is typical of stings of: A. Scorpions B. Fire ants C. Black widow spiders D. Puss catapillars E. Blister beetles 971/105 The complex toxin injected in stings of bees, hornets, paper wasps and yellow jackets resulting in painful lesions with edema, cellular infiltration and muscle necrosis followed by consolidation and healing without scarring contains which of the following as a major compoment A. Formic acid B. Alkaloids C. Spinglomyelinase D. Polyamines E. Cantharidin 971/ 108. The life history stage actually responsible for pathogenesis (produce the lesions) is correctly associated in the following except A. Amebiasis - trophozoites B. Trichuriasis - adult worms C. Paragonimiasis - cercariae D. Onchocerciasis - microfilariae E. Schistosomiasis - eggs 981-99. Metacercariae obtained from ingesting raw crayfish and adult paired encapsulated trematodes in the lungs is characteristic of A. Clonorchiasis B. Paragonimiasis C. Fasciolopiasis D. Fascioliasis E. Schistosomiasis 971/ 87 A. B C. D. E African trypanosomiasis Galactose-binding adherence lectin Immunologic camouflage Erythrocyte agglutination Antigenic variability of surface coat proteins Blocked lysosome-phagosome membrane fusion

961/ 111. Skin penetration of larvae from fecally contaminated soil resulting initially in a transient pneumonitis due to larvae migrating through the lungs and later anemia from hemorrhagic lesions in the small intestine describes the pathogenesis of: Texas Tech University Health Science Center School of Medicine Peer Tutors

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A. Ascariasis B. Enterobiasis C. Trichuriasis D. Hookworm E. Strongyloidiasis 951/ 108. A condition where zoonotic plerocercoid larvae migrate under the skin or develop in the eye and cause an unencapsulated inflammatory lesion is: A. Cysticercosis B. Visceral larval migrans C. Myiasis D. Cutaneous larval migrans E. Sparganosis 951/ 94. Larvae ingested from snail slime trails on uncooked leafy vegetables result in adult worms in the abdomin al arteries and mesenteric arterioles causing chronic severe granulomatous lesions leading to intestinal blockage characterizes: A. Schistosomiasis B. Ascariasis C. Abdominal angiostrongyliasis D. Visceral larval migrans E. Strongyloidiasis 981-79. A. B. D. E. Disease - Primary lesion Schistosomiasis - Brain abscess Ascariasis - Portal hypertension C. Abdominal angiostrongyliasis - Intestinal granuloma Visceral larval migrans - Eosinophilic lymphadenitis Strongyloidiasis - Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis

951/ 82. Ascariasis A. Metronidazole B. Praziquantel C. Mebendazole D. Thiabendazole E. Primaquine 981-92. A larval infection with the pork tapeworm, Taenia solium, often resulting from autoinfection is A. Hydatid disease B. Hymenolepiasis C. Cysticercosis D. Sparganosis E. Erythema chronicum migrans 951/ 99. Ingestion of eggs from fecal contaminated sources leading to the development of larvae that produce skeletal muscle pseudohypertrophy and/or space-occupying lesions in the brain depicts: A. Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis B. Trichinosis C. Chronic granulomatous acanthamebiasis D. Cysticercosis E. Multilocular hydatid disease

971/ 99. Macroscopic larvae that produce space-occupying lesions in the brain and eye and pseudohypertrophy in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells depicts A. Visceral larval migrans B. Trichinosis Texas Tech University Health Science Center School of Medicine Peer Tutors

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C. Sparganosis D. Cysticercosis E. Onchocerciasis 981-84. Disease - Clinical symptom A. Loiasis - Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis B. Trichinosis - Space-occupying brain lesions C. Naegleriasis - Chronic amebic granulomatous encephalitis D. Cysticercosis - Skeletal muscle pseudohypertrophy E. Multilocular hydatid disease - Megaloblastic pernicious anemia 951/ 100. Ingestion of eggs from fecal contaminated sources resulting initially in a transient pneumonitis due to larvae migrating through the lungs and later possible mechanical irritation or blockage by the large adults in the small intestine describes the pathogenesis of: A. Ascariasis B. Enterobiasis C. Trichuriasis D. Taeniasis E. Strongyloidiasis 981-100. Sequestered larvae which, following their lung migration, enter a resting phase in tissue and do not complete their development in the intestine until it is cleared by old age attrition of the previous generation of adult worms explains the constant reinfection in hyperendemic areas of A. Ascariasis B. Strongyloidiasis C. Hymenolepiasis D. Taeniasis E. Enterobiasis 981-85. A. B. C. D. E. Infection - Pathogenesis Ascariasis - Pneumonitis(larvae)/intestinal obstruction (adults) Enterobiasis - Pneumonitis(larvae)/ulcerative colitis (adults) Trichuriasis - Pneumonitis(larvae)/duodenitis (larvae) Taeniasis - Expanding tumorlike hepatic cyst (hydatid) Strongyloidiasis - Chronic obstructive lymphadenitis/lymphangitis (microfilariae)

971/ 107. Infection with opportunistic trophozoites producing a chronic granulomatous encephalitis or keratitis in contact lens wearers is A. Reactivation toxoplasmosis B. Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis C. Acanthamebiasis D. Negleriasis E. Cerebral malaria 981-91. Chigger dermatitis, scabies, demodicosis, and much of "house dust allergy" are problems created by A. Ticks B. Flies C. Mites D. Spiders E. Lice

961/ 107. Submacroscopic adults and microscopic eggs and larvae in burrows in the epidermis usually in areas of wrinkled skin and causing an intensely pruritic, secondarily infected, protracted (years duration if untreated) dermatitis describes: A. Scabies B. Tungiasis Texas Tech University Health Science Center School of Medicine Peer Tutors

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C. Cutaneous larval migrans D. Dracunculiasis E. Sparganosis 981-81. Disease - Transmission A. Scabies - Contact B. Tungiasis - Ingestion C. Cutaneous larval migrans - Ingestion D. Dracunculiasis - Skin penetration E. Sparganosis - Aerosol 981-89. A. B. C. D. Complications of scabies may include Norwegian itch (superscabies) in anergic or genetically susceptible persons Pyoderma and/or eczemitization from chronic scratching Nodular scabies from dermal infections Urticariae from IgE mediated antibody response E. Any of the above

971/ 96. Scabies is an intensely pruritic, secondarily infected, protracted dermatitis caused by a submacroscopic infection of a A. Mite B. Flea C. Nematode larva D. Spargana E. Cercaria 961/ 110. Ingestion of larvae from infected meat which subsequently results in the development of microscopic larvae that producehypereosinophilia and mild to severe myositis depicts: A. Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis B. Trichinosis C. Sparganosis D. Cysticercosis E. Visceral larval migrans 961/ 92. Lymphatic filariasis A. Mosquito B. Black fly C. Deer fly D. Sand fly E. Tick 961/ 117. The pathogenesis of severe lymphadenopathy leading to elephantiasis in some cases of lymphatic filariasis involves: A. Certain severely hypersensitized individuals B. Antigenic variation in the parasite C. Immunologic camouflage of adult worms D. Immunosuppressed anergic debilitated individuals E. Parasite-altered host cell phagosomal membranes

951/ 106. Which of the following is an infection in which mosquito transmitted larvae mature to adults in the lymphatics where they may remain asymptomatic or produce a transient edema, eosinophilia, fever and microfilaremia in most patients, but in some sensitized individuals repeated infections may cause severe lymphadenopathy leading to elephantiasis? A. Loiasis B. Onchoceriasis Texas Tech University Health Science Center School of Medicine Peer Tutors

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C. Lymphatic filariasis D. African trypanosomiasis E. Drancunculiasis 961/ 100. Visceral larval migrans A. Chronic lymphadenitis B. Liver abscess C. Hepatomegaly D. Chronic myocarditis E. Prolapsed rectum 951/ 107. Ingestion of eggs of zoonotic ascarids, the wandering larvae of which cause a transient pneumonitis, hepatomegaly and eosinophilia, results in which of the following? A. Visceral larval migrans B. Trichinosis C. Mansonelliasis D. Tropical eosinophilia E. Hepatic ascariasis 961/ 108. Sandfly transmission resulting in proliferation of intracellular amastigotes in the skin leading to self-curing cutaneous ulcerative lesions describes: A. Visceral leishmaniasis B. African trypanosomiasis C. Mansonelliasis D. Cutaneous leishmaniasis E. American trypanosomiasis 951/ 97. Sandfly transmission leading to proliferation of intracellular amastigotes in the skin which produce either (1) self-curing cutaneous ulcerative lesions, (2) invasive destructive mucocutaneous lesions that persist for years, or (3) lymphoreticular hyperplasia causing massive hepatomegaly and severe anemia defines the types of: A. American trypanosomiases B. African trypanosomiases C. Leishmaniases D. Malaria E. Mansonelliases 981-82. Disease - Lesion A. American trypanosomiases - Self-curing cutaneous ulcers B. African trypanosomiases - Destructive mucocutaneous lesions C. Visceral leishmaniasis - Lymphoreticular hyperplasia D. Malaria - Meningoencephalitis/meningomyelitis E. Mansonelliases - Chronic elephantiasis 971/97 Sandfly transmission resulting in massive proliferation of intracellular amastigotes leading to hyperplasia of the lymphoreticular system describes the pathogenesis of A. Visceral leishmaniasis B. African trypanosomiasis C. Lymphatic filariasis D. Mucocutaneous leishmaniasis E. American trypanosomiasis 971/ 93. Following ingestion1 fecal-transmitted cysts produce motile asexually reproductive flagellated trophozoites that can attach to the surface of, but do not become embedded upon nor invade, the small intestinal mucosa. This causes asymptomatic infections to mild self-limiting diarrhea in some individuals and severe protracted diarrheal disease of long duration in others. This best describes the pathogenesis of A. Amebiasis B. Cryptosporidiosis C. Balantidiasis Texas Tech University Health Science Center School of Medicine Peer Tutors

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D. Giardiasis E. Isosporidiasis 981-95. A. B. C. Clinical features of chronic giardiasis may include the following except Malabsorption Weight loss in adults/retarded growth in children Alternating periods of diarrhea/constipation D. Cachexia/sleeping sickness E. Hypoproteinemia with hypogammaglobulinemia/vitamine deficiencies

951/ 85. Giardiasis A. Metronidazole B. Praziquantel C. Mebendazole D. Thiabendazole E. Primaquine 971/85 Giardiasis A. Metronidazole B. Praziquantel C. Mebendazole D. Thiabendazole E Primaquine 951/ 103. Skin penetration by filariform larvae resulting in episodes of transient pneumonitis and severe duodenitis that may persist for many years due to autoinfection describes: A. Visceral larval migrans B. Pinworm C. Hymenolepiasis nana D. Hookworm E. Strongyloidiasis 971/ 100.Skin penetration of larvae from fecally contaminated soil resulting initially in a transient pneumonitis due to larvae migrating through the lungs and later a duodenitis from eggs, larvae and adult nematodes within the mucosa of the small intestine describes the pathogenesis of A. Ascariasis B. Strongyloidiasis C. Trichuriasis D. Hookworm ', E. All the above 961/ 93. Strongyloidiasis A. Metronidazole B. Praziquantel C. Mebendazole D. Thiabendazole E. Primaquine

981-75. A. B. C. D. E.

Infection - Appropriate treatment Cryptosporidiosis - Metronidazole Ascariasis - Praziquantel Giardiasis - Mebendazole Strongyloidiasis - Thiabendazole Trichomoniasis - Primaquine

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951/ 98. Skin penetration by cercariae resulting in adults in the abdominal venous circulation that release eggs which can cause foreign body granulomas with all the attendant pathologic lesions in the intestine, urinary bladder, liver, brain and/or lungs describes: A. Angiostronyliasis B. Paragonimiasis C. Clornorchiasis D. Fasciolopiasis E. Schistosomiasis 981-90. A. B. C. D. E. 971/ 90 A. B C. D. E The severe pathology seen in schistosomiasis mostly results from Adults in abdominal mesenteric and urinary tract veins Schistosomules (larvae) in the liver Eggs localized in tissue of liver, intestines, urinary bladder, etc. Cercariae in skin Metacercariae encapsulated in liver, lung, etc. Schistosomiasis Galactose-binding adherence lectin Immunologic camouflage Erythrocyte agglutination Antigenic variability of surface coat proteins Blocked lysosome-phagosome membrane fusion

971/ 98. The lesion in the schistosomiases is best described as a A. Foreign body granuloma B. Necrotic abscess C. Fibrocystic invasion D. Chronic obstructive vasculitis E. Catarrhal ulceration 961/ 119. The pathogenesis of the severe visceral lesions in schistosomiasis result from the: A. Cysticerus larvae B. Adult worms C. Cercariae D. Filariform larvae E. Eggs 961/ 109. Lesions in the schistosomiases may occur in: A. Intestines B. Liver C. Lung D. Urinary bladder E. Any of the above

961/ 101. Schistosomiasis A. Chronic lymphadenitis B. Liver abscess C. Hepatomegaly D. Chronic myocarditis E. Prolapsed rectum 971/86 Schistosomiasis A. Metronidazole Texas Tech University Health Science Center School of Medicine Peer Tutors

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B. C. D. E

Praziquantel Mebendazole Thiabendazole Primaquine

951/ 84. Schistosomiasis A. Metronidazole B. Praziquantel C. Mebendazole D. Thiabendazole E. Primaquine 981-101. Mebendazole is the drug of choice for the treatment of the following except A. Ascariasis B. Strongyloidiasis C. Hookworm D. Trichuriasis E. Enterobiasis 961/ 96. Amebiasis A. Metronidazole B. Praziquantel C. Mebendazole D. Thiabendazole E. Primaquine 981-78. B. C. D. E. Disease - Pathology A. Amebiasis - Ulcerative colitis/liver abscess Giardiasis - Duodenitis/transient pneumonitis Balantidiasis - Hemorrhagic gastritis/lung abscess Cryptosporidiasis - Granulomatous obstructive colitis/portal cirrhosis Isosporidiasis - Interstitial plasma cell pneumonia/hypoxia

951/ 93. Fecal transmitted cysts that produce tissue invasive trophozoites which can cause ulcerative colitis and liver abscess describes: A. Amebiasis B. Giardiasis C. Balantidiasis D. Cryptosporidiosis E. Isosporidiasis 951/ 93. Fecal transmitted cysts that produce tissue invasive trophozoites which can cause ulcerative colitis and liver abscess describes: A. Amebiasis B. Giardiasis C. Balantidiasis D. Cryptosporidiosis E. Isosporidiasis 951/ 87. Extraintestinal amebiasis A. Disseminated intravascular coagulation B. Liver abscess C. Allergic dermatitis D. Chronic myocarditis E. Prolapsed rectum 981-93. A. B. The pathogenic ameba responsible for clinical intestinal amebiasis is Entamoeba dispar Entamoeba coli Texas Tech University Health Science Center School of Medicine Peer Tutors

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C.

Entamoeba hartmanni D. Entamoeba histolytica E. Endolimax nana Entamebiasis Galactose-binding adherence lectin Immunologic camouflage Erythrocyte agglutination Antigenic variability of surface coat proteins Blocked lysosome-phagosome membrane fusion Transmission of the etiological agent for dientamoebiasis involves Cysts Pinworm eggs Filariform larvae Microfilariae Cercariae

971/ 91 A. B C. D. E 971/ 94. A. B. C. D. E.

971/107 Infection with opportunistic trophozoites producing a chronic granulomatous encephalitis or keratitis in contact lens wearers is A. Reactivation toxoplasmosis B. Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis C. Acanthamebiasis D. Naegleriasis E. Cerebral malaria 102. Reactivation or recrudescence of infection following release and proliferation of bradyzoites after compromise of an adult's immune system or the uncontrolled asexual reproduction and cell lysis by trophozoites following transplacental infection in a neonate with an undeveloped immune system leads to pneumonia, encephalitis, myocarditis, hepatitis, lymphadenopathy, ocular lesions, etc. in: A. Malaria B. Pneumocystosis C. Toxoplasmosis D. Primary amebic meningoencephalitis E. American trypanosomiasis 981-98. The percent of the total population infected with the Toxoplasma gondii (toxoplasmosis) in the United States is currently estimated at: A. <1% B. 5-10% C. 15-25% D. 30-50% E. >50%

971/104 Encephalitis, hepatitis, myocarditis, pneumonia, myositis, retinochoroiditis, and lymphangitis are all lesions that may be seen in cases of A. Pneumocystosis B. Visceral leishmaniasis C. Acute toxoplasmosis D. Trichinosis E. Disseminated lymphatic filariasis 951/971/ 88 Toxoplasmosis A. Galactose-binding adherence lectin B Immunologic camouflage Texas Tech University Health Science Center School of Medicine Peer Tutors

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C. D. E

Erythrocyte agglutination Antigenic variability of surface coat proteins Blocked lysosome-phagosome membrane fusion

961/ 113. Microglial nodules, vascular thrombosis, ependymal ulcerations, inflammation around the aqueduct and venticles, and ultimately intracerebral calcification from scarring are lesions peculiar to: A. Cerebral malaria B. Chronic acanthamoebic encephalitis C. Neonatal toxoplasmic encephalitis D. Primary amebic meningoencephalitis E. West African trypanosomiasis 951/ 101. Mosquito transmission of sporozoites leading to syncronous lysis of infected erythrocytes from schizogony which causes a periodic fever crisis occurs in: A. Visceral leishmaniasis B. African trypanosomiasis C. Lymphatic filariasis D. Toxoplasmosis E. Malaria 981-97. The pathology in most cases involving all forms of malaria includes the following except: A. Parasitemia B. Anemia C. Nephritis D. Leukopenia E. Hepatosplenomegaly 961/ 112. Synchronous lysis of infected erythrocytes from schizogony of the parasites which causes a periodic fever crisis describes the pathogenesis of: A. African trypanosomiasis B. Visceral leishmaniasis C. Malaria D. Toxoplasmosis E. Loiasis 981-86. A. B. C. D. Disease - Pathogenesis Leishmaniases - Amastigote antigenic variability causing successive parasitemias African trypanosomiasis - Massive hyperplasia of lymphoreticular cells Lymphatic filariasis - Blocked zooite-infected phagosome-lysosome fusion Toxoplasmosis - Mucosal adherence by galactose-binding lectin E. Malaria - Synchronous lysis of infected erythrocytes from schizogony

971/ 101.Synchronous lysis of infected erythrocytes from schizogony of the parasites which causes a periodic fever crisis describes the pathogenesis of a common parasitic disease; the host in which its sexual reproduction occurs and the subsequent transmission of this parasite to humans involves which of the following vectors A. Tsetse flies B. Sand flies C. Mosquitoes D. Black flies E. Mango (deer) flies 961/ 89. Malaria A. Mosquito B. Black fly Texas Tech University Health Science Center School of Medicine Peer Tutors

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C. Deer fly D. Sand fly E. Tick 961/ 98. Malaria A. Chronic lymphadenitis B. Liver abscess C. Hepatomegaly D. Chronic myocarditis E. Prolapsed rectum 971/ 102. Hemorrhage in subcortical white matter due to thrombosis of vessels with emboli of infected erythrocytes describes the primary lesion seen in A. Cerebral malaria B. Chronic acanthamoebic encephalitis C. Neonatal toxoplasmic encephalitis D. Primary amebic meningoencephalitis E. West African trypanosomiasis 951/ 88. Falciparum malaria A. Disseminated intravascular coagulation B. Liver abscess C. Allergic dermatitis D. Chronic myocarditis E. Prolapsed rectum 971/ 89 Falciparum malaria A. Galactose-binding adherence lectin B Immunologic camouflage C. Erythrocyte agglutination D. Antigenic variability of surface coat proteins E Blocked lysosome-phagosome membrane fusion 981-76. A. B. C. D. E. Infection - Pathologic lesion Falciparum malaria - Disseminated intravascular coagulation Extraintestinal giardiasis - Liver abscess Lactrodectism - Allergic dermatitis Lymphatic filariasis - Chronic myocarditis Enterobiasis - Prolapsed rectum

951/ 92. Following the bite of an infected blood-sucking arthropod, larvae drop off the insect and penetrate the skin where they develop and feed for the next several months each producing a single, boil-like lesion characterized by throbbing pain, a seropurulent exudate and lymphangitis. This describes the transmission and lesions of: A. Cutaneous larval migrans B. Human botfly myiasis C. Tungiasis D. Sparganosis E. Onchocerciasis 981-77. Pathogen - Transmission A. Cutaneous larval migrans - Trophozoites in dog feces B. Human botfly myiasis - Mosquito bite C. Tungiasis - Skin penetration by filariform larvae Texas Tech University Health Science Center School of Medicine Peer Tutors

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D. E.

Sparganosis - Trophozoites in fecal contaminated food/drink Lymphatic filariasis - Tick bite

961/ 104. Following ingestion, fecal-transmitted cysts produce sexual and asexual reproductive stages partially embedded into the surface of the intestinal mucosa. This causes asymptomatic or mild self-limiting diarrhea in immunocompetent individuals or severe protracted diarrheal disease in immunocompromised individuals. This describes the pathogenesis of: A. Amebiasis B. Giardiasis C. Balantidiasis D. Cryptosporidiasis E. Isosporiasis 981-96. In addition to its common occurrence in AIDS patients, cryptosporidiosis has recently been responsible for epidemics in otherwise healthy individuals and these are most often associated with A. Contaminated municipal water supplies B. Eating at certain fast-food hamburger chains C. Local rural slaughterhouses and associated urban butcher shops D. Nosocomial infections in certain neonatal units E. Iatrogenic infections associated with certain medical centers

961/ 103. Following the bite of an infected blood-sucking arthropod, larvae drop out of the mouth parts of the vector and penetrate the skin where they develop to macroscopic adults and localize in non painful subcutaneous granulomas reaching a few centimeters in diameter. They reproduce and the females shed large numbers of microscopic larvae into the skin. A type I hypersensitivity reaction to these larvae results in allergic dermatitis, lymphangitis, and/or ocular lesions. This describes the transmission and pathogenesis of: A. Cutaneous larval migrans B. Human botfly myiasis C. Tungiasis D. Sparganosis E. Onchocerciasis 981-102. Hypersensitivity to tissue dwelling microfilariae leading to dermatitis, lymphadenitis, and blindness is characteristic of A. Non-obstructive lymphatic filariasis B. Obstructive filariasis C. Loiasis D. Onchocerciasis E. Mansonelliasis

951/ 91. Onchocerciasis A. Disseminated intravascular coagulation B. Liver abscess C. Allergic dermatitis D. Chronic myocarditis E. Prolapsed rectum 961/105. When larvae encysted in infected copepods are ingested in drinking water they subsequently mature to large adult worms that localize in the subcutaneous tissues of an extremity. The female sheds larvae through a painful boil-like lesion when it comes in contact with water. This describes the epidemiology and pathogenesis of: A. Sparganosis B. Cutaneous ascariasis C. Dracunculiasis D. Cutaneous larval migrans Texas Tech University Health Science Center School of Medicine Peer Tutors

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E. Human botfly infection 951/ 89. Chagas' disease A. Disseminated intravascular coagulation B. Liver abscess C. Allergic dermatitis D. Chronic myocarditis E. Prolapsed rectum 951/ 90. Trichuriasis A. Disseminated intravascular coagulation B. Liver abscess C. Allergic dermatitis D. Chronic myocarditis E. Prolapsed rectum 951/ 83. Enterobiasis A. Metronidazole B. Praziquantel C. Mebendazole D. Thiabendazole E. Primaquine 971/82 Enterobiasis A. Metronidazole B. Praziquantel C. Mebendazole D. Thiabendazole E Primaquine 961/ 94. Trichuriasis A. Metronidazole B. Praziquantel C. Mebendazole D. Thiabendazole E. Primaquine

971/83 Trichomoniasis A. Metronidazole B. Praziquantel C. Mebendazole D. Thiabendazole E Primaquine 951/ 86. Trichomoniasis A. Metronidazole B. Praziquantel C. Mebendazole D. Thiabendazole E. Primaquine 981-83. A. Disease - Infective stage Angiostrongyliasis - Rhabditiform larvae Texas Tech University Health Science Center School of Medicine Peer Tutors

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B. D. E.

Paragonimiasis - Cysticercus larvae C. Clornorchiasis - Metacercariae Fasciolopiasis - Cercariae Schistosomiasis - Eggs

961/ 97. Clonorchiasis A. Metronidazole B. Praziquantel C. Mebendazole D. Thiabendazole E. Primaquine 961/ 95. Taeniasis A. Metronidazole B. Praziquantel C. Mebendazole D. Thiabendazole E. Primaquine 971/84 Hymenolepiasis A. Metronidazole B. Praziquantel C. Mebendazole D. Thiabendazole E Primaquine 951/ 95. The bite of which of the following blood-feeding arthropods may release a toxin that causes a conduction defect in nerve endings or acetylcholinesterase inhibition that leads to an ascending motor paralysis: A. Tick B. Flea C. Chigger D. Black fly E. Head louse

961/ 106. The bite of which of the following blood-feeding arthropods may release a toxin that causes a conduction defect in nerve endings or acetylcholinesterase inhibition that leads to an ascending motor paralysis: A. Screw worm fly larvae B. Jigger flea C. Hard tick D. Soft tick E. Bedbug 971/ 95. In all cases of ascending motor paralysis resembling poliomyelitis in children occurring during warm weather months, you should also consider A. Lactrodectism B. Lepidopterism C. Tick bite paralysis D. Loxocelism E. Pedunculosis nervosa 981-80. Bite/sting - Clinical symptom A. Tick - Ascending motor paralysis Texas Tech University Health Science Center School of Medicine Peer Tutors

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B. C. D. E. 981-94. A. B. C. D.

Black-widow spider - Necrotic skin ulcer Chigger - Acute necrotizing vasculitis Scorpion - Hemorrhagic enteritis Brown recluse spider - Boardlike abdominal rigidity Hard ticks are the vectors for all the following except Lyme disease Granulocytic and lymphocytic ehrlichiosis Rocky Mountain spotted fever Colorado tick fever E. Endemic relapsing fever

971/77 Ehrlichiosis A. Mosquito B. Blackfly C. Deer fly D. Flea E. Tick 951/ 81. Babesiosis A. Mosquito B. Black fly C. Deer fly D. Sand fly E. Tick 961/ 90. Babesiosis A. Mosquito B. Black fly C. Deer fly D. Sand fly E. Tick

971/79 Lyme disease A. Mosquito B. Blackfly C. Deer fly D. Flea E. Tick 951/ 79. Lyme disease A. Mosquito B. Black fly C. Deer fly D. Sand fly E. Tick 971/81 Rocky Mountain spotted fever A. Mosquito B. Blackfly C. Deer fly D. Flea E. Tick Texas Tech University Health Science Center School of Medicine Peer Tutors

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951/ 77. Rocky Mountain spotted fever A. Mosquito B. Black fly C. Deer fly D. Sand fly E. Tick 971/80 Plague A. Mosquito B. Blackfly C. Deer fly D. Flea E. Tick 961/ 88. Dengue fever A. Mosquito B. Black fly C. Deer fly D. Sand fly E. Tick 961/ 91. Eastern equine encephalitis A. Mosquito B. Black fly C. Deer fly D. Sand fly E. Tick 951/ 80. St. Louis encephalitis A. Mosquito B. Black fly C. Deer fly D. Sand fly E. Tick

971/78 Yellow fever A. Mosquito B. Blackfly C. Deer fly D. Flea E. Tick 951/ 78. Yellow fever A. Mosquito B. Black fly C. Deer fly D. Sand fly E. Tick 981-104. Myiasis is infection with A. Crab lice B. Follicular mites C. Fly larvae D. Chigoe flea E. Moth catepillars

Texas Tech University Health Science Center School of Medicine Peer Tutors

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Texas Tech University Health Science Center School of Medicine Peer Tutors


								
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