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Professional Composition Professiona Image Cosmetology

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					8 HR. PROFESSIONAL COMPOSITION PROFESSIONAL IMAGE

You have probably heard the expression that Image is everything. It is this belief that
has traditionally driven the beauty and fashions industries, although this is not changing.
Today, we are beginning to view image as the combination of our external appearance
on how we look to the world with which we are deep inside or how we look to ourselves.
Every one of us has an image, but the problem is that our images are not necessarily
the ones we hope to project. You might wish to be thought of as glamorous and
sophisticated, while others actually thing of you as wholesome and rather innocent.
Your personal image may not necessarily be the same as your professional image.
Your professional image is the impression you project as a person engaged in the
profession of cosmetology, and consist of your outward appearance and the conduct
you exhibit in the workplace. This image is extremely important. Your appearance
attitude, abilities and energy create a mental picture in the minds of your clients and
associates. You want that image to conjure up respect, trust and eagerness for your
knowledge, creativity, technical skills, and sense of style. Your professional image is
also tied into your role as a model for your clients. Do not forget that your work in the
area of beauty not only helps your clients to look their best but also touches on wellness
as you advise clients how to care for their hair, skin and nails and as you alert them to
lifestyle decisions that can have an impact on their beauty concerns. That means as a
professional you will need to look your best and express lifestyle choices that signify a
real sense of responsibility for your own health. Deep in mind that people are coming to
you so that you can make them look good. If you do not look good, your clients may
assume that you cannot make them look good. Your professional image is not one
single thing; it emerges from the interaction between the external and the internal. As a
practitioner you should strive for a holistic image, one that reflects the whole person.
Your professional and personal lives need to not be entirely separate from each other. If
you truly know who you are and are comfortable with yourself, you will always present
your authentic self at both work and play. Most people start to develop an image by
focusing on the surface. The way you dress and groom yourself is very important;
however your external appearance should reflect your authentic self. If you are
essentially an informal sort of person, it might take you a while to feel comfortable in a
situation that requires you to dress up and makeup all the time. Your surface image also
has to do with the graciousness of your speech, how pleasing your voice is how you
stand and
carry yourself and the facial expression you show to the world. Your surface is just a
reflection of what you carry inside of yourself. How you feel about people and the world
is reflected on your surface. When you feel whole in body, mind and spirit then you can
present your best self to the world.

With the growth of spa culture in our profession, you will be called on more than ever
before to integrate beauty and wellness. You will be providing services that make others
look good and feel good. Think of yourself as a professional "toucher" That means you
should have a caring and healing quality that you can transmit to others. As a
cosmetologist and a beauty and wellness consultant, you are also a caregiver. As such,
your first concern is to take care of yourself so that you can go on to take care of others.
To do this, you must start by paying attention to your health.

We are at our best when all the dimensions of our selves- body- mind and spirit come
together as a whole. When you are in good health, when body, mind and spirit are all
working together and cooperatively you will be able to enjoy the pleasures of life and
work creatively and productively. Optimal health will increase your feelings of self- worth
and will add to your value in the eyes of your clients, associates, employer and the
beauty and wellness community in general.


Balance

Real beauty begins with health and real beauty stays grounded in health. Good health
greatly impacts your energy level, your attitude and ultimately your appearance. One of
the most important factors in promoting and maintaining health is balance. Balance can
be hard to achieve in this day and age. For many of us, it can be a challenge to manage
stress. But when in balance, we are able to make the right choices for ourselves. If you
consistently undermine your well being with poor choices, you may be leading a highly
unbalanced lifestyle and putting yourself at risk for disease. Eating poorly, smoking,
drinking excessively, taking drugs, skipping exercise, holding on to toxic emotions and
lacking a sense of purpose are just some of the ways in which we create a disconnect
between the mind and the body. Every thought you have sets off an emotional change
in your body. It is up to you to make those choices that is most life affirming. Achieving
balance in your life between what you want for yourself and what others want for you,
between work and play, between self-interest and sensitivity to others is the key to
leading a happy and productive life.

Always looking Professional


Personal hygiene is the daily maintenance of cleanliness and healthfulness through
certain sanitary practices. It is customary to learn many of these principles as a child.
Today as an adult, sticking to these principles will help you maintain and project your
best image. The basics of personal hygiene include; daily bathing or showering, shaving
for men and freshening up throughout the day as necessary, washing your hands
throughout the day as required, such as when beginning a service with a new client or
after visiting the bathroom, using underarm deodorant or antiperspirant and brushing
and flossing your teeth as well as using a mouthwash or breath mints throughout the
day as needed. Remember that offensive odors can be quite a turnoff for the clients, it
can event keep them from returning. We all have different body chemistries, one person
may sweat profusely in stressful circumstances while another remains as cool as a
cucumber. Be mindful of your personal hygiene. This means doing self checks
periodically during the day to make sure that everything is as it should be. The skin is
the body largest organ and is responsible for eliminating toxins from the system through
perspiration. In order5 to perform it many jobs properly, the skin deserves special daily
care to keep bacteria in check. Cleanse moisturize, exfoliate and protect your bodily and
facial skin with a regular skin care regimen
Wearing clothing that express your personal style and is also appropriate for your
surroundings I key to looking your best. Your clothing is your packaging. Anybody who
has ever tried to sell something knows packaging counts for a lot.

Dress for Success
At the salon, strive to have your hair, makeup, and clothing style blend harmoniously
with the surroundings. Although your self-expression may be a big part of who you are,
it is not always wise to have your attire become the topic of conversation with your
clients or your fellow beauty professionals. If you want to go out on the weekend and
wear something wild, outrageous, and/or sexy, that is your choice. But while you are
employed at a place of business, you will want to consider whether your wardrobe
selection expresses a professional image that is consistent with the image of the salon.

A few ideas out of the many possibilities of classic wardrobe selections could include
these. For women, it might be an A-line skirt in simple muted colors with no patterns,
coupled with a white or black silk T-shirt. Men can adopt a comfortable, dignified, all-
purpose look by wearing a shirt and tie every day with clean, tailored kakis. These
"uniforms" project the kind of professional appearance and attitude that may allow you
to charge more for your services. Extremely short dresses or skirts, bare legs, exposed
underarms, torn blue jeans, or faded T-shirts for men or women may be acceptable in
some types of salons, but are generally not considered proper attire when you are trying
to present a professional image.

To some degree, your clothing can reflect the fashions of the season with current
colors, textures, skirts lengths, and so forth. Depending on your place of work, it may be
allowed or even appropriate to wear "new-looking" blue jeans or T-shirts that are clean
and simple. You may find yourself in a salon that caters to the art world or to young
professionals. Such an environment projects a hip, modern energy, and so
individualized and fashionable clothing may be worn by each individual in the salon.
Just remember to "tune in" to your salon's energy and clientele so that you can make
the most appropriate clothing selections.

You should always be guided by your salon's or spa's dress code with regard to these
matters, but the following guidelines are generally appropriate.
• Make sure your clothing is clean, fresh and in proportion to your height, weight, and
body shape.
• Choose clothing that is functional as well as aesthetically pleasing. It must be
comfortable enough to get you through a long day, and it should be able to move with
the physical demands of your job.
• Wear clean undergarments every day and keep them out of view. Underwear elastic
peeking out of your pants, exposed bra straps, or the glimpses of a slip are inconsistent
with the professional image you are doing your best to cultivate.
• Accessories are best kept simple and attractive, whether hair ornamentation, scarves,
jewelry, belts, or ties.
• Socks or hosiery need to be free of runs, and you will want them to harmonize with
your attire.
• Keep shoes clean and comfortable, and with good support. Complicated, faddish
shoes and any with high heels may not be appropriate in a work setting where you may
be required to stand all day.
• Because feet perspire quite heavily over the course of a day, it is a good idea to use a
natural foot powder in your shoes and to alternate pairs of shoes from one day to the
next, so that one pair can air out in between.

Hair Care
Just as your clothing can reflect who you really are, so can your hair and makeup
choices. As with your clothing, one of your first considerations should be comfort and
utility. You will want your haircut to work with your own texture and wave pattern
(natural or artificial), and be easy to maintain.

With this in mind, trim your hair every six to eight weeks (as often as every four weeks
for men), so that the line and shape of the cut looks fresh and defined. Stay abreast of
hairstyles that are in fashion, both for yourself and your client. Use liquid styling tools to
achieve the effect you are looking for in textural definition, volume enhancement, or
contoured closeness. Light hold gels and foams will give the hair a polished and defined
edge, while keeping the hair fluid and touchable. Medium-to firmer-hold products will
help you maintain your style throughout the day. Of course, your product selection will
depend in large part on your hair type and condition.

Hair color and texture services can be important part of your personal hairstyle
statement and image as well. Dimensional coloring, blonding, highlights, and gray hair
coverage are enhancements you might wish to consider. Using these services on
yourself will also work as an excellent advertisement to help sell these services to your
clients.
A note on personal grooming for male cosmetologists: if you wear any form of facial
hair, you will want to keep you beard, goatee, and/or mustache regularly trimmed.

Looking Professional

Makeup is an exciting realm for beauty professionals. It helps you promote your
professional image and is an area where some of your most lucrative sales can be
made. You will be learning the basic of makeup application while in school, but the most
important point to keep in mind is that your makeup should accentuate your best
features and mask your less flattering ones.

A clean, natural approach in makeup is key or presenting yourself professionally.
Unless you are working in a rock and roll, punk, or Goth oriented salon, heavily
blackened eyes, blue lips, or green nail polish are generally best left to the nightlife
scene. Let the salon's image guide you in how you present yourself.
Healthy Mind and Body
Having focused on your external appearance, let us now look at the very important
issues of how to protect and sustain the inner person. The goal is to achieve and
maintain optimal health so that you can be the best you can be.

Reduce Stress
Stress is so present in our lives today that the World Health Organization (WHO) has
classified it as a worldwide epidemic. Stress is defined as the inability to cope with a
threat, real or imagined, to your well-being that results in a series of responses and
adaptations by our minds and bodies.
Stress can also be thought of as any situation that causes tension. Some experts
believe that up to 80 percent of visits to doctors are related to mind and /or body stress.

As you work in a salon environment (or even a spa environment whose very purpose is
to reduce stress), you may often feel that you have selected a particularly stressful
arena in which to work. In some ways it is true; you have. As a beauty professional, you
have to deal with the high expectations of your clientele and your employer. You have to
handle a wide range of personalities among clients and colleagues. You may be asked
to work faster than you wish and standing on your feet all day does not help matters
either.

Some individuals actually thrive on this kind of pressure whereas others may suffer. It
all depends on your personality type, temperament, physical health, and on your coping
skills.
For example, some of us may tend toward anxiety in a stressful situation, others may
become angry, and still others may become withdrawn. Think about your own coping
style when you are under pressure. Remember, in addition to the stress that comes with
the workplace, there are other stressful factors that may affect your personal life,
including exposure to chronically negative emotions, unhealthy relationships, and
environment toxins.

The long-term effects of chronic stress can be very damaging to the body.
One way to alleviate stress is to carve out a small amount of time every day to go
inward and connect with your spiritual side. Meditation, prayer, yoga walks in nature,
and positive affirmations are methods by which you can quiet the mind. Deep breathing
is another technique that will help you calm down and reduce the flow of stress
hormones that may be circulating through your body.

Try to establish a daily routine. This helps promote balance and stability that can give
great comfort in stressful times. Try to go to bed and wake up at the same time every
day if possible. Eat your meals at regular times. Try not to take on more than you can
handle. Connect with nature daily. Live a life of moderation, which means eating in
moderation, working in moderation, sleeping in moderation, playing in moderation,
watching TV in moderation, and so on. Such practices can bring balance and harmony
into your life hat will be reflected in your outer appearance.
Rest and Relaxation (R & R)

One critical way to manage stress and gain wellness is to get a nurturing amount of rest
every day and to build relaxation and leisure-time activities into your daily routine.
Adequate sleep is essential. Without it, you cannot expect to function efficiently. The
body should be allowed to recover from the fatigue of the day's activities and replenish
with a good night's sleep. During sleep, tissues and organs are rebuilt and renewed.
The amount of sleep needed to feel refreshed varies from person to person. However,
medical professionals recommend at least seven to eight hours of sleep every night. For
those who are particularly stressed, going to bed before 10 p.m will normalize levels of
stress hormones.

In addition to sleep, renew yourself with relaxation. Relaxation represents a very
important change of pace from your day-to-day routine. Taking a movie, going to a
museum, reading a book, seeing friends and family, biking or walking, dancing, and
even watching a bit of TV (not too much though) are all ways for you to "get away from it
all." When you return to work, you will feel refreshed and eager to face the work at
hand. Taking a few long weekends and yearly vacations is essential as well. This is part
of living a balanced, joyful life.

Nutrition
Like stress reduction, good nutrition is a vital factor in your overall health picture. Food
serves as fuel for our body by providing energy. It also provides the raw material that
renews and repairs our body's tissues and organs. The Surgeon General has said that
70 percent of all disease is related to deficiencies in our diet, and the National Academy
of Sciences tells us that 30 percent of all cancer is diet-related. Every day, researchers
discover chemical constituents in whole, nutritious foods that can help stave off a wide
variety of illnesses.

There is a great truth in the old adage "We are what we eat." There are 40 specific
nutrients in our food that fall into the categories of carbohydrates, proteins, fats,
vitamins, minerals, and water. All of these are part of a healthy diet. People vary,
however, in the way they use these nutrients according to their height and weight, level
of activity, and metabolism.

Some basic guidelines for good nutrition include:

• Eating a diet of nutrient-packed, whole (preferably organic) foods when ever possible.
That means plenty of fruits and vegetables, beans, and whole grains.
• Eating a wide variety of foods to optimize your nutritional intake. Broaden your food
horizons. Experiment. And, whatever you do, try not to make fast foods a habit. They
tend to be packed with salt, sugars, and fat. Use sugar, salt or sodium, and alcohol only
in moderation.
• Maintaining a healthy weight. Eat sensible portions; take your meals in a calm
environment if possible, and chew each bite of food thoroughly do not eat when you are
not hungry. Too many of us try to relieve stress by turning to food. Excessive eating at
such times and the guilt that can result from such eating often aggravate our stress.
• Staying hydrated. This is very important. Drink plenty of water every day, eight 8-
ounce glasses at minimum. Take a large container of water with you to work if
necessary. Our bodies are made up of 60 to 70 percent water that is responsible for a
wide variety of metabolic functions. It also oxygenates your blood and gives you energy.

The Food Guide Pyramid, developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), is
an efficient guide to selecting nutritious foods. The pyramid is divided into tiers, or
levels. The bottom tier consists of bread, cereal, rice, and pasta (6 to 11 servings are
recommended per day). Tier two is fruits and vegetables (3 to 5 servings of vegetables
and 2 to 4 servings of fruits per day). Tier three includes meat, poultry, fish, dry beans,
eggs, and nuts (2 to 3 servings per day). As well as milk, yogurt, and cheese (2to 3
servings daily). The fats, oils, and sweets at the top of the pyramid should make up only
a small part of a healthy diet.

The best way to take charge of your diet and ensure proper nutrition is by preparing
your own meals. Including those you have during the workday. Try bringing healthful
lunches and snacks to work. You will save money and you will be getting wholesome
and energizing food as well. The following discussion of the various food groups will
help us understand what our bodies need.

• Fats. It is important to understand that there are good fats and bad fats. Saturated and
hydrogenated fats, found in junk foods as well as red meats, whole-milk dairy, butter,
and processed foods should be restricted in any diet. Fats from nuts, seeds, grains, fish,
and liquid oils (olive, canola, peanut, and other vegetable oils) are a healthy choice. A
no-fat or extremely low-fat diet can be detrimental to your health. Instead, try to make
sure your fat calories come from healthy sources and comprise no more than 30
percent of your diet.
• Carbohydrates. The USDA Food Pyramid advises 6 to 11 servings of grain based
carbohydrates a day. Whole-grain foods are considered more desirable in a healthy diet
than refined foods. Whole-grain foods are digested more slowly, promote long-term
health, and may provide some protection from diabetes, heart disease, certain cancers,
and gastrointestinal problems. Excellent sources include brown rice, whole grain
breads, oatmeal, kasha and buckwheat, barley and more.
• Protein. Although the USDA Food Pyramid advocates a daily protein intake, some of
the recommended protein sources are now considered undesirable when consumed in
large quantities, specifically red meats .Healthy alternative protein sources include
beans and nuts, fish, poultry, and eggs.
• A diet rich in fruits and vegetables can help lower blood pressure, decrease chances
of having heart disease or stroke, provide protection against certain types of cancer and
gastrointestinal problems, and reduce the severity of age-related problems such as
cataracts.


Get Up and Go
While good nutrition is vital to our overall well-being, the importance of regular physical
activity cannot be overemphasized. If nothing else, the physical aspect of salon work
can be intense, and you will need to be in shape to meet these demands. Therefore, it
is essential that you begin a fitness program of some sort.
An adequate amount of physical activity ensures the proper functioning of organs such
as the heart and lungs, strengthens muscles and bones, enhances immune function,
and improves circulation. Improved cardiovascular and respiratory functioning will result
in the enhanced transport of oxygen and nutrients to every cell in the body and
facilitates the movement of carbon dioxide and waste products from body tissues into
the bloodstream and on into the excretory organs.

A sound Fitness Program
The optimal fitness program includes three main areas of activity.
1. Aerobic activity that includes brisk walking, jogging, swimming, biking, cross-country
skiing, and dancing. This activity pays off in cardiovascular health, increased immune
system function, greater endurance, stress reduction, and overall improved quality of
life. Start your program with a reduction, and overall improved quality of life. Start your
program with a brisk 20-minute walk before work or in the middle of the day and see the
difference it makes in your energy level.
2. Stretching activities enhance flexibility. Stretching movements (no bouncing!) ease
physical tension, improve range of bodily motion and agility, and act as a warm-up or
cool-down from aerobic activity. Stretching activities may include yoga or tai chi, forms
of movement that connect the mind-body with its energy source. Try to build stretching
movements into the workday, even after every client. All it takes is a few movements
into the workday, even after every client. All it takes is a few stretches done in less than
a minute, and the payoff can be immense.
3. Weight-bearing activities to build strength and endurance. In building muscle, you
develop a leaner, fat burning body, and help to prevent osteoporosis. Consider a
program that includes the use of free weights or weight machines. Brisk walking and
yoga can also provide weight-bearing benefits.

A good, attainable goal is to have now fewer than three 30-minute sessions of aerobic
activity a week. Ideally, though, it is best to make exercise a part of your daily routine.
Long walks, stretching, and light weightlifting will do wonders. If you have been
sedentary, consult your doctor before beginning a regular physical activity program.

Your Physical Presentation

Another important aspect of professional image is what is called physical presentation.
To a large degree, your physical presentation is making up of your posture, walk, and
movements. Do you stand straight or do you slouch? Do you walk confidently with your
head held high or do you scuffle along, stooped over, dragging your feet? Your physical
presentation enhances or detracts from your attractiveness and is also an important part
of your well being. Unhealthy or defective body postures can cause a number of
physical problems, particularly when these postures become habit.
Posture
Good posture is a very important part of your physical presentation. It shows off your
figure to its best advantage and conveys an image of confidence. It can also prevent
fatigue and many other physical problems. When you work as a professional
cosmetologist, you spend a large amount of your time on your feet, and good posture
will prove to be one of your best aids to get you through the day.

Good posture should be developed as early in your lifetime as possible, and then
reinforced through self-awareness and regular physical activity. Yoga is particularly
helpful in creating and maintaining correct bodily alignment. Any type of accident, even
a small one, should be addressed with appropriate physical or movement therapies. If
accidents and trauma are not addressed, the resulting "incorrect" bodily adaptation can
lead to chronic physical alignment problems.
• Keeping your head up and chin level with the floor.
• Keeping the neck elongated and balanced directly above the shoulders.
• Lifting your upper body so that your chest is out and up (do not slouch).
• Holding your shoulders level and relaxed, not scrunched up.
• Standing with your spine straight, not curved laterally or swayed from front to back.
• Pulling your abdomen in so that it is flat.
• Keeping your hips level (horizontally), making sure they do not protrude forward or
back.
• Flexing your knees slightly and positioning them over your feet.

Correct Sitting Posture
To sit down comfortable and attractively, use your thigh muscles and support from your
hands and arms to lower your body smoothly into a chair. Do not fall or flop into the
chair. This can worsen an already posture. When lowering your body, keep your back
straight. Do not bend at the waist or reach with the buttocks. When seated, slide to the
back of the chair by placing both hands on the front edge of the chair at the sides of
your hips. Raise your body slightly and slide back. Do not wiggle or inch back.
When giving a manicure or facial, sit with the lower back against the chair, leaning
slightly forward. If a stool is used, sit on the entire stool. Keep your chest up and rest
your body weight on the full length of your thighs.

Some tips for a proper sitting position include:
• Keeping your back straight.
• Keeping the soles of the feet entirely on the floor.
• Not crossing your legs or your feet at the ankles.
• Not bending forward from the waist or stooping forward from the shoulder. Bend from
the hips, or sit on a chair or wedge-shaped cushion that tilts forward.

Care of the Feet
On average, your feet will carry you more than 115,000 miles in your lifetime. Such
faithful servants deserve to be treated with care and attention. But the fact is that most
people do not spend a lot of time thinking about their feet until they begin to hurt. The
human foot is a complex creation. It contains 26 bones, 20 muscles, and 114 ligaments.
Therein lies the potential for many foot problems.
As a cosmetologist, you will no doubt be spending a great deal of time on your feet.
Proper foot care will help you maintain good posture and a cheerful attitude. Sore feet
and/or ill-fitting shoes can cause great discomfort that will, in turn, affect your posture
and well-being.


Shoes
Foot and leg problems generally stem from wearing improper shoes and standing for
long periods, particularly on hard floors. High heels are particularly bad for you, whether
they are chunky or narrow. Scientists have found that both types of heels apply
pressure to the knees. High heels throw off your center of gravity, creating or
aggravating a variety of musculoskeletal problems, including back and knee pain and
arthritis.

For your work, wear low-heeled, wider shoes that spread shock absorption on the foot
and give the toes more room. These shoes will give you the support and balance that
will help maintain good posture and offset fatigue. Carpeted or cushioned mats made
specifically for the purpose of reducing fatigue are available for use in salons.

Daily Foot Care
Exercise, massage, and comfortable, well-fitting shoes encourage healthy blood
circulation to the feet. Give your feet some tender loving care by massaging them for a
few minutes with oil or lotion before showering. Afterwards, thoroughly dry the feet,
especially between the toes, and apply an antiseptic foot lotion or a natural foot powder.
Try massaging your feet with a moisturizing lotion or oil before going to bed at night.
Slip on cotton socks to preserve the moisturizing effect.

Regular pedicures are well worth the investment. A pedicure that includes cleansing,
removal of callused skin, massage, and toenail trims will keep your feet at their best.
Also, make an effort to put your feet up at intervals throughout the day. This will give the
vascular system in the legs a much-needed rest, however brief, and may help prevent
varicose veins.

Ergonomics
Each year, hundreds of workers, including cosmetologists, report musculoskeletal
disorders (MSDs) including carpal tunnel syndrome, tendonitis and back injuries. Beauty
professionals expose their bodies to potential injury on a daily basis. They have to stand
all day and hold their bodies in unnatural positions for long periods of time. They are
particularly susceptible to problems of the hands, wrists, shoulders, neck, back (the
entire spinal column), feet and legs. If not attended to, these problems may become
serious, sometimes so much so that a person can no longer work.

Prevention is the key to alleviating these problems. It is very important that you fit your
work to your body and not your body to your work. An awareness of your body posture
and movements, coupled with better work habits and proper tools and equipment, will
enhance your health and comfort. An understanding of ergonomics is useful as well.
Ergonomics is the study of human characteristics for the specific work environment. It
attempts to "fit the job to the person". The principles of ergonomics are being applied in
more and more workplaces.
Monitor yourself as you work to see if you are:
• Gripping or squeezing implements too tightly.
• Bending the wrist up or down constantly when cutting the hair, using a blow-dryer, or
using a round brush.
• Holding your arms away from your body as you work, or holding your elbows above a
60-degree angle outward from your body for extended periods of time.
• Bending forward and/or twisting your body to get closer to your client or to reach for
something, a position that results in neck or back strain.
• Standing for long periods of time in ill-fitting shoes that can lead to leg and back
fatigue.

Try these measures to avoid some of the problems discussed above.
• Adjust the height of the client's chair so that the client's head is at a comfortable
working level. Swivel the chair as often as necessary to maintain a comfortable arm and
back position.
• Gently tilt the client's head as necessary during any hair services.
• During haircutting and other hair services, keep your wrists in a straight or neutral
position as much as possible.
• Keep your shears sharpened and lubricated.
• Try holding the blow-dryer sideways to avoid raising your arms above shoulder level.
• Use your fingers rather than your wrist when handling the round brush. Use curling
irons with a revolving base.
• Keep your back straight. Bend at the hips or knees, especially when picking up an
object. Bending over at the waist leads to back strain and possible back injury.
• Try placing one foot on a small stool if you must stand for long periods of time.
Alternate feet as necessary. Standing on a cushioned mat also helps prevent muscle
fatigue.
• If possible, use a cutting stool and adjust as needed.
• Wear comfortable, well-fitting, low-heeled shoes with good arch supports. If you have
flat feet or overly high arches, try wearing orthopedic inserts (available at most
drugstores).
• When giving a manicure, avoid reaching across the manicure table and gripping the
client's hand. Instead, have the client extend his or her hand across the table to you.
• When giving a pedicure, keep your back straight, whether you are sitting on a low stool
or kneeling on the floor. Keep your wrists in a neutral position as much as possible.

Your work environment would likely benefit from an ergonomic assessment. Evaluate
your workstation according to these criteria.
• Workstations should have adequate space between them so that you and your
coworkers do not have to worry about bumping into each other.
• Cabinets should be easy to reach. A "rollabout" is a good place to keep implements
close at hand.
• There are cutting shears and other implements available that make it easier to
maintain a relatively neutral hand and wrist position for a variety of cutting elevations.
• Free-standing shampoo bowls are an excellent investment for a salon or spa. The
shampoo is done from behind the client instead of from he side, which is a safer
position and which can help stylists avoid back problems.
• Hydraulic chairs that can be raised or lowered at least five inches are highly
recommended.
• Manicure tables with armrests for the wrists allow you to keep your knuckles below
your wrists as you work.
• Facial chairs should be adjustable for height.

If you work in an environment that has any physical discomfort built into it, as most of us
do, try to counter the problem by including regular stretching intervals in your schedule
to break up the receptiveness of the motions you use.

BUSINESS AND MARKETING

Too many small-business owners think marketing is like a trip to the doctor- something
you just got to do. But when marketing is continuous and targeted rather than
occasional and shotgun, business gets easier. If prospective customers have a positive
view of you and your reputation before they come to your business, you're that much
closer to nailing a sale.
The next news flash is that ongoing marketing isn't tied to a price tag. It's defined only
by putting the right message in front of the right person at the right time.
Here are 10 ideas for doing that - on the cheap.
1. Take steps to make customers feel special. Customers respond to being recognized,
especially in these rush-rush, get-the-lowest-price times. Send a handwritten thank-you
note.
2. Create business cards that prospects keep. Most business cards are tossed within
hours of a meeting. Instead of having your card tossed, create one that recipients
actually will use - say, a good-looking calendar with your contact info and discount
coupons or monthly special on each page. "The calendar is referred to almost daily,
kept for a year and carries a high remembrance factor.
3. Stop servicing break-even customers. If this idea makes you gasp, think harder.
You're falling for the notion of increasing sales instead of boosting profits. If you stop
marketing to unprofitable customers, you have more time and resources for customers
who actually grow your business. "More than likely, 20% of your customer base is
contributing 150% to 200% of total annualized profit (TAP); 70% is breaking even; and
10% is costing you 50% to 100% of TAP." Take a detailed look at your customer
profitability data and then direct premium services and marketing to customers who
count.

4. Develop an electronic mailing list and send old-fashioned letters. Most businesses
have harnessed the power of e-newsletters - and you definitely should be sending out
one, too. It's very cost-effective because e-mail marketing is now nearly ubiquitous, you
can quickly stand out by occasionally sending personal, surface mail letters to
customers and prospects. Just make sure the letter delivers something customers want
to read, whether an analysis of recent events in your field, premium offers or a
sweetener personalized for the recipient (a discount on their next visit to your
establishment). This mailing has to have value to those that read it, so it reflects the
value of what you offer. Remember, the best way to sell is to tell. The process is
simplified by creating a letter template and envelope, which you can print out.
5. Boost your profile at trade shows and conferences. You can quickly create signage,
glossy postcards with your contact information and the services you specialize in.
6. Combine business with pleasure - and charity. Spearhead an event, party or
conference for a cause you care about. That puts you in the position of getting to know
lots of people. It lets me reconnect with current clients and impress potential clients.
7. Create a destination. Bookstore chain Barnes & Noble has its coffee bars.
Furnishings giant Ikea offers child-care centers and cafeterias. Why? So customers
gravitate to the stores to enjoy an experience, to hang out for a while. Sunday morning
at Barnes & Noble becomes a pleasant weekend routine, rather than a shopping errand.
Steal this idea. This tip isn't limited to offline destinations. Traditionally in the marketing
world, it takes weeks or even months to generate acceptable awareness and traffic. Be
patient and don't quit
8. Become an online expert. This is the "free sample" approach to bringing in business.
Research active e-mail discussion lists and online bulletin boards that is relevant to your
business and audience. Join several and start posting expert advice to solve problems
or answer questions. You may need to keep this up for a bit. But the rewards come
back in paying clients and referrals.


9. Court local media. Editorial features convey more credibility with prospective clients
than paid advertising does. To get coverage from the local media, whether from the
town newspaper, from TV or radio stations, or from trade journals, you need a fresh,
timely story. It's usually worthwhile to hire an experienced publicist to position the
stories, target appropriate media representative and write and send press releases.
Usually, you can work on a short-term or contingency basis.
10. Finally, don't let customers simply slip away. Make an effort to reel them back in. It
costs a lot less to retain a disgruntled or inactive customer than to acquire a new one. If
you haven't heard from a customer in awhile, send a personalized e-mail (you can
automate this process), inquiring whether all is well. For a customer who suffered a bad
experience, pick up the phone, acknowledging. The wheels of business revolve with
such spin and speed these days that we roll right over the courtesies. Who has time for
quaint customs? More to the point, who can afford to let competitors rush onto the new
and the next while we slow down for pleasantries? You're in for a surprise. The advice
that follows, rest assured, is not some lecture about society's loss of grace. This is
about leveraging an underutilized edge in the marketplace. Today, extending old-time
courtesies helps you stand out. Yes, boys and girls, saying "thank you" has become a
competitive advantage. So few people express appreciation. Five out of every 10
people don't always say thanks - that remembering to do so is a sales point of
difference. It also goes a long way toward relationships that can turn into opportunities.
Here are fast and affordable ways to show business gratitude, as well as tips about
timing and tactics.
Your takeaway: Don't underestimate the power of saying thanks.
1. Throw a bash that boosts their business.
In New York, TelX, an interconnection facility, invites all its vendors to an annual party
to say thanks. The event, called the "Customer Business Exchange," is held in a large
hall with tables where participants can set up demos or materials. TelX arranges for
snacks and an open bar. The party attracts about 400 telecom customers who get the
opportunity to network in a comfortable way. You can do the same like an appreciation
party. Invite everyone in the neighborhood and showcase your talent.

2. Be warm and personal.
When was the last time you wrote or received a handwritten note of thanks or even a
thank-you e-mail? Strictly in gratitude, mind you, not as prelude to asking for something
else. Customers and suppliers notice such gestures. Depending on your business, the
note can vary from no-frills to fancy.
Joseph Dingle runs a boutique in New York that specializes in fashion and luxury
goods. He says thank-you notes in his industry are key to maintaining the personal
relationships that support business. But the look of the note must advance a company's
professional image. Recently, Dingle ordered custom-designed notepaper on heavy
stock with a personal monogram.
The envelopes are expensively hand-lined to color-coordinate with his business cards.
"People in the fashion and lifestyle industry apply the same standards to stationery they
would to flowers. Hand-written is imperative," he says.

3. But know that timing counts.
On the other hand, for most businesses, effective appreciation is less about cost or
creativity and more about courtesy. Getting a note or an e-mail out right away - within
48 hours of whatever you're thanking for - is more important than drop-dead stationery.
4. Pass along compliments.
When you want to express gratitude for something that's had successful ripple effects,
get the third party to send thanks. It creates a strong incentive for your recipient to stay
connected. In Orlando, Fla., a nonprofit group called A Gift for Teaching provides free
school supplies to central Florida teachers. Over the past five years, it has given $9
million worth of supplies to 278 schools. "The only thing the organization asks of
teachers is to write, or have their students write, thank-you notes. This idea isn't limited
to nonprofits. Think about testimonials that could go out to customers from employees,
vendors and more. Remember the bulk of your business is from word of mouth.
5. Send value-added appreciation.
Whenever you come across an article or information that you think a customer or
supplier might find enlightening, clip it and send it along at the right moment. Of course,
make sure these are timely. But even if the client's already seen it, he or she will
appreciate that you're supporting his or her interests.
6. Appreciate employees.
Saying thanks to employees has several benefits. You build staff loyalty (and we all
know how much turnover can cost in time, money and stress). And you increase
productivity, which leads to customer greater satisfaction. Yet few managers or
business owners bother. 10% of employees report they have supervisors who say a
daily "thank you" for a job well done. More than half of employees (55%) said they were
thanked never, seldom or only occasionally.


7. Thank your complaining customers.
Research indicates that the majority of dissatisfied customers don't bother to complain.
They simply vote with their wallets and go elsewhere. That means complaints are a
valuable gift in providing a heads-up about where to focus. "A customer who complains
still wants to do business with you, if you can make things right. So thank him or her for
giving you that chance and assure him that you want to do everything you can to make
him happy again."
8. Don't go over the top.
If someone refers significant business to you or is responsible for a healthy percentage
of your revenues, it's certainly appropriate to offer thanks by way of a free service
occasionally or maybe a gift card to a nice restaurant.
9. Feel the power.
Simple or complex, e-mailed or mailed on expensive materials, saying "thank you"
always works. The only time its effectiveness fizzles is when you pretend gratitude that
you don't feel.


BUY OR RENT SPACE
Sooner or later, every business has to consider whether it is better off owning or leasing
office space. From law firms to retailers to beauty salons, the decision varies. But here
are some elements that most small businesses take into account.
The cash outlay factor:
Generally, you don't need to put out as much money upfront when you lease as you do
when you buy. A quick example: A real-estate agent is looking to sell a $500,000
commercial property. Someone leasing the space might pay around $4,000 monthly in
rent. Someone looking to buy the building would have to put about $150,000 down, and
also would have had to pay for an appraisal, building inspections, loan fees and other
costs.
The fixed/variable cost factor: Buy a building and you have a good idea of what your
costs are going to be year after year, especially if you get a fixed-rate loan on the
property. Lease and you're subject to the vagaries of the market when your lease term
expires. Many leases also have a clause allowing for an annual cost increase tied to
changes in the Consumer Price Index or some other measure.
The growth factor: Buying a building that's just the right size for you now can look
attractive. But what will you do if your business and your space requirement grow over
the next few years? Outgrowing a space doesn't have to be a financial crisis. Still,
growing out of a place you own can involve more upheaval than growing out of a leased
space. Sometimes a growing business can avoid the cost and hassle of moving by
simply leasing more space in the building it occupies. That's not an option when you
own a building unless you're only occupying part of it and can terminate the lease of
another tenant.


The appreciation factor: Buying a building puts you in a second business: real estate
investing. If you're in an area of appreciating land values, eventually you could sell it at
a profit. But if you own a building with more space than your business needs, you'll
probably end up renting to others, thus becoming a landlord. It can all be profitable (or a
financial drain in a down market), but what it is sure to be either way is more work than
simply leasing space.
The tax factor: As usual, there are tax issues to consider. Businesses routinely can
deduct the full amount they pay in rent. Owners of rental property can write off repairs
immediately, but improvements to commercial real estate have to be deducted over 39
years. Depreciation on commercial buildings also is taken over 39 years. That means
that if you buy a commercial property for $250,000 and the land is valued at $60,000,
you can write off only slightly less than $5,000 of the purchase price annually,
regardless of the size of your down payment. You also can deduct interest on the
purchase loan, property taxes and other qualifying expenses. Attorneys may
recommend placing a commercial property inside an entity such as a limited liability
company (LLC), with the LLC then leasing space to other businesses including your
own. The reasons for, and logistics of, doing this are too complex to explore fully in this
column. The best advice is to consult with your attorney and tax professional about the
legal and financial considerations of owning investment property.
Getting more help
In general, leasing tends to appeal to business people who don't want to make the kind
of large upfront investment required with a purchase, who aren't really sure how much
space they'll ultimately need and who simply don't want to have to deal with the
responsibilities of owning a piece of commercial property. Buying is going to make more
sense for businesspeople who are more established, who want to be in one location for
several years and who have the financial resources to take on a significant real estate
investment.


Some of the basics of comparing leasing to buying (trying to predict future price
appreciation, considering cash-flow issues and factoring in the cost of a down payment
on something you own versus rental payments that don't build any equity, for example)
are similar to issues involved in deciding whether to lease or buy a house

If you build it, stay with it. Put another way: If you've put in the work and created a
business budget, follow it! If you don't, you'll lose the benefits that you planned for when
you built the little monster. Get started by reminding yourself that your business budget
is not a monster. It's nothing more than a set of guidelines for your spending and saving
habits. Below is a list of some common problems that pop up with many established
budgets, along with some solutions that can help you stay within budgetary guidelines.
1. Accept the learning curve. Living with a budget is an education. Trimming your
expenses, knowing how long a paycheck is going to last or how much of a cash reserve
to keep around . . . working these skillfully will take some time. But you can learn to
adjust a budget as you go, and what was once a shot in the dark gradually will become
a more predictable and useful practice.
2. Be prepared to miss your budget estimates and act accordingly. This was rule No. 1
in setting up a budget: knowing that your budget projections are a best guess and
nothing more. You're going to miss your estimates. That doesn't make you unintelligent
or a bad businessperson. Instead, try to miss them intelligently and in ways you can
correct. "For example, if you budgeted $200 a month for long-distance phone service
and your bill consistently top $250, say, for at least three months running adjust your
phone allocation up $50. By the same token if the bill is only running an average of
$150, you can trim your phone share. To keep things in line as much as possible, try to
reallocate some other area of your overall budget to account for the adjustment.

3. Work flexibly. As with setting up a small-business budget, sticking by one often boils
down to a willingness to be flexible. For instance, if your revenue doesn't match what
you expected and there's a good chance that might be the case trim back your
expenses to compensate. By the same token, if you're taking in more than you
anticipated, it might be time to invest in better equipment.
4. Watch your cash flow. If you want to stick to a budget, make sure that your inflow
more than compensates for your outflow. Monitor your income closely to make certain
that you'll have adequate funds to pay your bills, particularly if your business is prone to
long lapses between paychecks. Even if it's just from the left pocket to the right pocket,
cash-flow problems are what kill most small businesses. Keep checking to make certain
that your revenues match your expenses."
5. Err on the side of conservative. When setting up your budget, it's a good idea to
overstate your expenses and lowball your expected revenue. That approach is also a
solid strategy when making sure your cash flow is going to hold up. Look into budget
savers such as telephone calling plans, less expensive office furniture and other ways
to lessen the burden on your income. People always feel they have to have the best
computer, but money you don't spend is money you don't have to earn."
6. Nurture a cash cushion. The uncertainty of budgeting both in terms of income as well
as expenses stands as one of the biggest threats to the survival and success of any
small business. While trimming expenses to the absolute bone is always a good idea,
it's also prudent to set aside income whenever possible. If you can afford it, earmark a
portion of every paycheck you get and sock those funds away in a money market
account. Not only can that money come in handy for predictable expenses such as
year-end taxes, it also can prove an absolute lifesaver should an unexpectedly high bill
suddenly crop up. By contrast, if you're thinking about starting a business sometime in
the future, start saving - the money you set aside now ultimately may bail you out in
ways you can hardly imagine.

7. Check your budget every month. This is a point that can't stress enough. Go over
your budget every month and examine your cash flow to make certain your available
funds are sufficient to meet your liabilities. If you're following point No. 2, above, and
adjusting your budget as you go, you'll have some sort of emergency fund to take care
of monthly overruns. Use it when things cost more than you thought and put money into
the contingency fund if you come in under your expected numbers.
8. Use your budget as a form of restraint, not constraint! Setting up and sticking to a
solid budget is the most effective teacher of fiscal discipline there is. But don't be shy
about busting your budget on occasion should something truly warrant it. It's often
impossible to budget for a valuable last-minute seminar or a trip to a trade show to
make valuable contacts. If you are too rigid with your budget, you'll refuse to spend
when you really should. Don't be afraid to go beyond your budget to spend money that's
a valuable investment in your business. A good budget is great, but don't let it dictate
your business.


WAYS TO IMPROVE CASH FLOW
One of the challenges of running a small business is dealing with the feast-or-famine
nature. Not just about the flow of business, but also the flow of cash into and out of the
business. Here are seven ideas for improving your small business's cash flow:
1. Bill promptly. Ever find yourself so busy building your business and making deadlines
that you don't get around to billing on a regular basis? If you don't already have a
system in place, start (or assign an employee to start) billing for projects on a regular
basis. When taking on longer-term projects or clients, negotiate in advance for regular
payments instead of allowing the amount due to build up until completion of a contract.
Especially for the beauty industry, it is best to ask for payment once service is rendered.
2. Avoid slow pay/no pay customers from the start. The best way to avoid cash-flow
problems because of customers or businesses not paying you is to weed out the no
pays before they become clients. Let it be known upfront how much a service cost. This
is to make the customer aware of the cost so that the two of you are on the same page.
3. Trim your inventory. Purchase your products whenever it's on sale and try to
purchase your products in large bulks. Whenever a new sales rep. comes into the
business, be proceed with caution. Ask for samples of the product that is being sold.
Make sure this is something you absolutely needs before spending large sums of
money on a product you are not familiar with.
4. Consider consolidating your loans. I know it's often tough for small businesses to
borrow money. But I'm surprised at the number of ways entrepreneurs do manage to
borrow. If you also have several loans related to your business, review the rates and
terms on each one. You may be able to consolidate two or more loans into a lower-
interest account and improve your cash flow. If you're thinking of talking to a lender
about consolidating existing loans into a new loan, you might look at taking on a longer-
term loan in exchange for lower monthly payments.


UPGRADE ON THE CHEAP
Many business people shudder when their information officer, technology consultant or
office manager suggests they need to "upgrade" their software, hardware, working
space or even just the furniture. But upgrades or improvements are a necessary
element to ensure the growth and profitability of any business. Yes, some upgrades are
expensive (not to mention time-consuming). That can be a hassle in any economy, but
it's particularly difficult in dicey economic conditions where any money spent carries a
higher risk factor.
But there are strategies to upgrade your business without spending a fortune. Here are
six ways to upgrade on the cheap
1. Don't buy new. There are scads of car shoppers who happily forgo that new-car smell
to save thousands of dollars on a year-old model. Consider the same tack with your
business. If you need items such as furniture or computer systems, look into used or
refurbished models. The actual amount of "upgrade" may be indistinguishable from new
and at a fraction of the cost.
2. Compensatory upgrades. When it's upgrade time, start looking for ways to trim other
costs. For instance, Keishas' firm recently introduced new telemarketing technology to
further the speed and efficiency of marks marketing efforts. Pricey unto itself, but the
company trimmed their telemarketing staff considerably. Not only were the employees
unnecessary due to the new technology, but salary reductions added up to more than
the cost of the new system.
3. Upgrade by the percentages. A critical strategy to upgrading your operation with an
eye to the bottom line is to break your needs down as much as possible. Never assume
that upgrading requires a massive commitment of cash to equipment that you may not
fully utilize. Instead, determine precisely what you need to upgrade and identify ways to
fill that need.


4. Upgrade your people. Not every form of upgrade takes the form of slick new
workstations or wholesale software changes. Another form of cost-effective
improvement lies with your employees specifically, the skills they bring to their varied
responsibilities. Create a professional dress code or color etc. Have meetings on
customer service, how to approach the customers and how to be friendlier.
5. Hit 'em while you're hot. Another salient strategy to upgrading on the cheap is using
your relationships and connections. Make your ongoing commitment to client
satisfaction pay off when it comes time to improve your business.
6. Cut a big check. This last bit of advice may seem to be at complete odds with the
notion of cost-conscious upgrades, but sometimes spending more means spending less
in the long run. Here, detailed long-term planning is essential to ensure that the funds
you earmark now will carry their weight down the line. For instance, computer upgrades
that run 50% more than other options may seem expensive, but the sting of that cost
cools if the upgrade keeps you current longer. When hiring, the most cost-effective
upgrade might actually be the most expensive solution. Instead of looking at the salary
of a person, look at their contribution. Look at specific examples of how a prospective
employee can add to the bottom line by bringing in revenue and cutting or saving costs.
Don't just look at the compensation on the front end look at the back-end contributions."
Here's something to look for the next time you visit one of your local merchants such as
a clothing store or sporting goods retailer: Check out the cash register. It may not be the
old stereotypical, paper-based cash register we see in the movies. It may instead be a
personal computer with special software known as "point-of-sale" technology. More and
more retailers are switching from electronic cash registers or outmoded paper-based
systems to PC-based solutions. Why? Because it gives them the ability to generate
better revenues, increase productivity and, in the end, have more time in their personal
lives for something besides work.


'More efficient, less sweaty'
"Technology can empower small retailers, freeing them up from mundane chores such
as managing inventory and accounting systems manually. It can enable them to be a
little more creative, a lot more efficient and a lot less sweaty. In any retailing format
imaginable, you have competition coming at you - from Wal-Mart, Costco, Hair Cutterys
etc. So get a handle on what your business can do, from an efficiency and customer
management standpoint. Technology can help . . . even if you are the smallest of the
small, and you do volume ordering, why not automate it?"

Keeping Good Records
You can avoid headaches at tax time by keeping track of your receipts and other
records throughout the year. Good recordkeeping will help you remember the various
transactions you made during the year, which in turn may make filing your return a less
taxing experience.

Records help you document the deductions you've claimed on your return. You'll need
this documentation should the IRS select your return for examination. Normally, tax
records should be kept for three years, but some documents such as records relating to
a home purchase or sale, stock transactions, IRA and business or rental property
should be kept longer.


In most cases, the IRS does not require you to keep records in any special manner.
Generally speaking, however, you should keep any and all documents that may have an
impact on your federal tax return:

• Bills
• Credit card and other receipts
• Invoices
• Mileage logs
• Canceled, imaged or substitute checks or any other proof of payment
• Any other records to support deductions or credits you claim on your return.

Good recordkeeping throughout the year saves you time and effort at tax time when
organizing and completing your return. If you hire a paid professional to complete your
return, the records you have kept will assist the preparer in quickly and accurately
completing your return.
Business recordkeeping isn't an art form. There are certain records you should keep
and certain records you should toss.
Everyone knows that recordkeeping is just part of doing business. But which records
should you keep and which ones should you toss? Throw away too much and you'll find
yourself in hot water with your accountant. On the other hand, if you keep everything
you'll bury yourself beneath a paper avalanche.


There's got to be a happy balance between the two, right?
Fortunately there is a happy balance, and knowing where that balance lies is critically
important to your company's success. Although there is no legal mandate to maintain a
particular recordkeeping system, an efficient and organized system is necessary for a
variety of reasons, not the least of which is to provide supporting documentation for
income, expenses, and other items your business is required to report to the I.R.S.
Gross Receipts
Gross receipts represent the income you bring in through your business. Records of
gross receipts are used to determine your gross income not only for tax purposes, but
for your company's financial statements as well. Records related to receipts should
include information detailing the sale amount, sale date, and buyer.
Purchases
Unless you are in an exclusively-service related industry, you'll need to keep track of the
amount you spend on items for resale including raw materials, parts, and finished
products. The amount of these purchases is deductible from your gross income, but
only to the extent you are able to prove who you bought the products from and the
amount you paid.


Expenses
In most cases, expenses represent the biggest category of receipts in a small business.
Records detailing expenses dates, amounts, and payees need to be maintained for
everything from utilities to travel-related expenses.
Other
Depending on the nature of your business, there may be other areas in which you need
to retain supporting documentation. For most businesses, two big ones stand out:
Employee records and asset documentation (for calculating depreciation).
The kinds of documents you should retain vary, but typically include:
• Cash register tapes
• Deposit slips
• Invoices
• Receipt books
• Credit card charge slips
• Account statements
• Cancelled checks
• Checkbook registers
If you have any doubts about the adequacy of your company's recordkeeping system,
schedule an appointment with your tax preparer before you discard anything. Your tax
preparer should be able to tell you what you need to keep and how long you need to
keep it. He also might be willing to help you develop a coherent system so that the
records can be easily accessed at tax time.
Every year, the cosmetology industry serves hundreds of thousands of clients. That
means billions and billions of germs, viruses, and bacteria are coming along for the ride.
To combat this army of invaders, regulatory agencies and governmental departments of
health require that any business that serves the public, such as a salon, must follow
certain prescribed sanitary precautions. As a practitioner, it is your duty to ensure that
your clients receive their service in the safest possible environments. This chapter will
help you understand the need for preventing infection and will introduce you to practices
that will allow to perform your work in a safe manner that protects individual and public
health.
In this chapter, we will learn the nature of various organisms, how they relate to
disease, and how their spread can be prevented in the salon and at school. Let us begin
with bacteria.




                                        Bacteria

Bacteria are one-celled microorganisms with both plant and animal characteristics. Also
known as germs or microbes, bacteria can exist almost anywhere; on the skin, in water,
 air, decayed matter, secretions of body openings, on clothing, and beneath the nails.
  Bacteria can only be seen with the aid of a microscope. Fifteen hundred rod-shaped
                    bacteria will fit comfortably on the head of a pin.

                                    Types of Bacteria

 There are hundreds of different kinds of bacteria. However, bacteria are classified into
         two main types, depending on whether they are beneficial or harmful.

      Most bacteria are nonpathogenic organisms (helpful or harmless; not disease-
       producing), which perform many useful functions, such as decomposing garbage
       and improving soil fertility. In the human body, nonpathogenic bacteria help
       metabolize food, protect against infectious microorganisms, and stimulate
       immune response. Some bacteria cultures are used to produce penicillin,
       acidophilus yogurt, and a special type of mile used for gastrointestinal disorders.
       Saprophytes, a type of nonpathogenic bacteria, lives on dead matter.
      Pathogenic bacteria (microbes or germs) are harmful and, although in the
       minority, cause disease when they invade plant or animal tissue. To this group
       belong the parasites, which require living matter for their growth. It is because of
       pathogenic bacteria that salons and cosmetology schools must maintain certain
       sanitary standards.
Classifications of Pathogenic Bacteria

Bacteria have distinct shapes that help to identify them. Pathogenic bacteria are
classified as follows:

      Cocci are round-shaped bacteria that appear singly (alone) or in the following
       groups.
          o   Staphylococci- Pus-forming bacteria that grow in clusters like a bunch of
              grapes. They cause abscesses, pustules, and boils.
          o   Streptococci- Pus-forming bacteria arranged in curved lines resembling a
              string of beads. They cause infections such as strep throat and blood
              poisoning.
          o   Diplococcic- Spherical bacteria that grow in pairs and cause disease such
              as pneumonia




      Bacilli are short, rod-shaped bacteria. They are the most common bacteria and
       produce diseases such as tetanus (lockjaw), typhoid fever, tuberculosis, and
       diphtheria.
   Spirilla are spiral or corkscrew-shaped bacteria. They are subdivided into
    subgroups, such as Treponema pallida, which causes syphilis, a sexually
    transmitted disease (STD) or Borrelia burgdorferi, which causes Lyme disease.
Movement of Bacteria

Different bacteria move in different ways. Cocci rarely show active motility (self-
movement). They are transmitted in the air, in dust, or within the substance in which
they settle. Bacilli and Spirilla are both motile and use slender, hair like extensions,
known as flagella or cilia, for locomotion (moving about). A whip like motion of these
hairs moves the bacteria in liquid.


Bacterial Growth and Reproduction

Bacteria generally consist of an outer cell wall and internal protoplasm. They
manufacture their own food from the surrounding environment, give off waste products,
and grow and reproduce. The life cycle of bacteria is made up of two distinct phases:
the active or vegetative stage, and the inactive or spore-forming stage.

Active or Vegetative Stage

During the active stage, bacteria grow and reproduce. These microorganisms multiply
best in warm, dark, damp, or dirty places where sufficient food is available.
When conditions are favorable, bacteria grow and reproduce. When they reach their
largest size, they divide into two new cells. This division is called mitosis. The cells that
are formed are called daughter cells. When conditions are unfavorable, bacteria die or
become inactive.

Inactive or Spore-Forming Stage

Certain bacteria, such as the anthrax and tetanus bacilli, form spherical spores with
tough outer coverings during their inactive stage. The purpose is to be able to withstand
periods or famine, dryness, and unsuitable temperatures. In this stage, spores can be
blown about and are not harmed by disinfectants, heat or cold.
When favorable conditions are restored, the spores change into the active or vegetative
form, then grow and reproduce.

Bacterial Infections

An infection occurs when body tissue are invaded by disease-causing or pathogenic
bacteria. There can be no bacterial infection without the presence of pathogenic
bacteria. The presence of pus is a sign of infection. Pus is a fluid product of
inflammation and contains white blood cells and the debris of dead cells, tissue
elements, and bacteria.
Staphylococci are among the most common human bacteria and are carried by about
a third of the population. Staph can be picked up on doorknobs, countertops, and other
surfaces, but is more frequently transferred through skin to skin contact, such as
shaking hands or using unclean implements. Antibiotics once controlled these bacteria,
but certain strains of staph are now resistant to the drugs. There is now a greater need
than ever for proper use of infection control measures in the cosmetology industry
because of these resistance bacteria.
A local infection, such as a pimple or abscess, is one that is confined to a particular part
of the body and in indicated by a lesion containing pus. A general infection results when
the bloodstream carries the bacteria or virus and their toxins (poisons) to all parts of the
body.




Syphilis is an example.


When a disease spreads from one person to another by contact, it is said to be
contagious or communicable. Some of the more common contagious diseases that will
prevent a cosmetologist from servicing a client are tuberculosis, common cold,
ringworm, scabies, and viral infections. The chief sources of contagion are unclean
hands and implements, open sores, pus, mouth and nose discharge, and shared
drinking cups and towels. Uncovered coughing or sneezing and spitting in public also
spread germs.

Viruses

A virus is a submicroscopic structure capable of infesting almost all plants and animals,
including bacteria. They are so small that they can even pass through the pores of a
porcelain filter. They are common colds, and other respiratory and gastrointestinal
(digestive tract) infections. Other viruses that plague humans are:




MUMPS




CHICKEN POX
SMALL POX RABIES YELLOW FEVER




HEPATITAS
INFLUENZA HIV which causes AIDS.

One difference between viruses and bacteria is that a virus lives only by penetrating
cells and becoming part of them, while bacteria are organisms that can live on their
own. It is for this reason that bacterial infections can usually be treated with specific
antibiotics while viruses are hard to kill without harming the body in the process.
Generally, viruses are resistant to antibiotics. Vaccination prevents viruses from
penetrating cells, by vaccinations are not available for all viruses.

Hepatitis

Hepatitis, a disease marked by inflammation of the liver, is caused by a bloodborne
virus similar to HIV in transmission. It is more easily contracted than HIV, however, as it
is present in all body fluids. Three types of hepatitis are of concern to a cosmetologist.

   1. Hepatitis A. The illness usually lasts about three weeks. Symptoms are similar to
      those of the flu. Adults often have yellowing of the skin or the eyes. The disease
      is spread through close household contact, such as common bathroom use; poor
      sanitation; poor personal hygiene, contaminated food, milk, water, and shellfish;
      infected food handlers; and sexual contact. A vaccine is available.
   2. Hepatitis B Standard. This illness can cause long-term hepatitis, cirrhosis, and or
      liver cancer. About half the people with the disease do not have symptoms,
      although the disease can mirror the flu. The disease is primarily transferred
      through sexual contact or parenteral exposure (piercing mucous membranes or
      skin barrier) to blood or blood products. A vaccine is available.
   3. Hepatitis C. The illness can progress slowly, and about one-third of those with
      the illness do not have symptoms, though symptoms can include fatigue and
       stomach pain. The disease is transferred through parenteral contact and sexual
       activity with infected partners. No vaccine is available.
HIV AIDS

HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) is the virus that causes AIDS (acquired Immune
Deficiency Syndrome). AIDS, the disease, breaks down the body’s immune system. HIV
is passed from person to person through blood and other body fluids, such as semen
and vaginal secretions. A person can be infected with HIV for up to 11 years without
having symptoms. Sometimes, people who are HIV-positive have never been tested
and do not know they are infecting other people.
The HIV virus is transmitted through unprotected sexual contact, the sharing of needles
by intravenous (IV) drug users, and accidents with needles in health-care settings. It
can enter the bloodstream through cuts and sores and can be transmitted in the salon
by a sharp implement. It is not transmitted by holding hands, hugging, kissing, sharing
food or household items like the telephone, or even toilet seats. There are not
documented cases of the virus being transmitted by food handlers, insects, or casual
contact.

How Pathogens enter the Body

Pathogenic bacteria or viruses can enter the body through:
      A break in the skin, such as a cut, pimple, or scratch
      The mouth (contaminated water or food)
      The nose (air)
      The eyes or ears
      Unprotected sex
The body fights infection by mean of:
      Unbroken skin, which is the body’s first line of defense
      Body secretions, such as perspiration and digestive juices
      White cells within the blood that destroy bacteria
      Antitoxins that counteract the toxins produced by bacteria and viruses

Bloodborne Pathogens

Disease-causing bacteria or viruses that are carried through body in the blood or body
fluids, such as hepatitis and HIV, are called bloodborne pathogens. If you accidentally
cut a client who is HIV-positive or is infected with hepatitis and you continue to use the
implement without cleaning and disinfecting it, you risk puncturing your skin or cutting
another client with a contaminated tool. Similarly, if you are shaving a client’s face or
neck with a razor or clipper blades and pick up body fluid from a blemish or open sore,
transmission is possible. Risks are also present when waxing and tweezing.
Parasites
Parasites are vegetable or animal organisms that live in or on another living organism
and draw their nourishment from that organism (referred to as a host). They are not
capable of sustaining their own life without a host.
Vegetable parasites or fungi, which include molds, mildews, and yeasts, can produce
contagious diseases, such as ringworm and favus, both skin diseases. Nail fungus can
be contracted through implements that have not been disinfected properly or by
moisture trapped under nail enhancements. Nail fungus is chronic and usually localized
but can spread to other nails and from client to client if implements are not disinfected
before and after each client. Treatment is generally applied directly to the affected area.
In serious cases, however, a physician’s care is required.
Animal parasites, such as head lice, are responsible for contagious diseases and
conditions. A skin disease caused by an infestation of head lice is called pediculosis
capitis. Scabies is another contagious skin disease and is caused by the itch mite,
which burrows under the skin.
Contagious diseases and conditions caused by parasites should never be treated in a
cosmetology school or salon. Clients should be referred to a physician. Contaminated
countertops should be cleaned with a pesticide or insecticide according to
manufacturer’s directions.

Immunity

Immunity is the ability of the body to destroy any bacteria that have gained entrance and
to resist infection in general. Immunity against disease can be natural or acquired and is
a sign of good health. Natural immunity is party inherited and partly developed through
hygienic living. Acquired immunity is immunity that the body develops after it overcomes
a disease, or through inoculation (such as vaccination).

Principles of Prevention

There is no better way for a salon to make a good first impression than to maintain the
highest lever of cleanliness. This makes a positive statement that fills clients with
confidence.
There is more to a clean salon, however, than a well-swept floor or vacuumed rugs.
Proper care must be taken to meet rigorous health standards. Otherwise, the salon
could be contributing to the spread of disease.
Controlling infection and disease is a vitally important aspect of the salon industry.
Clients depend on your to ensure their safety. One careless action could cause injury or
serious illness. Being a salon professional can be fun and rewarding, but it is also a
great responsibility. Fortunately, preventing the spread of dangerous diseases is not
hard to do if you know how to do it and, more important yet, if you practice what you
know.

Decontamination

Take a look around you. What do you see? No doubt, wherever you are, you are
looking at some sort of surface. It could be a table, the wall, the floor, the doorknob, or
your hand. Almost everything presents a surface of some kind. There surfaces may
seem clean to you, even sparkling, but no matter how clean they appear to the naked
eye, chances are they are contaminated. Surfaces of tools or other objects that are not
free from dirt, oils, and microbes are covered with contaminants, which are any
substances that can cause contamination. Many things can be contaminants, such as
hair left in a comb, makeup on a towel or brush, or nail dust on a file.
Tools and other surfaces in the salon can also be contaminated with bacteria, viruses,
and fungi. Even tools that appear to be clean are usually covered with these
microorganisms.
Of course, a salon can never be completely free from all contamination, and it would not
make sense to attempt such a goal. However, it is your responsibility as a salon
professional to be on constant alert for disease-causing contaminants.
The removal of pathogens and other substances from tools and surfaces is called
decontamination. Decontamination involves the use of physical or chemical means to
remove, inactivate, or destroy pathogens so that the object of decontamination:
sterilization, disinfection, and sanitation. Only disinfection and sanitation are required in
the salon.

Sterilization

Sterilization is the highest level of decontamination. It completely destroys every
organism on a surface, whether beneficial or harmful. Sterilization even kills bacterial
spores, the most resistant form of life on Earth. Methods of sterilization include the
steam autoclave and dry heat (a form of extreme heat).
Sterilization is a process used by dentists and surgeons, whose tools are designed to
break and penetrate the skin barrier. Estheticians also use needles and probes that
lance the skin, so they must follow the same sterilization procedures. Presterilized
disposable lancets or needles are a simpler solution to the issue of sterilization.
The word “sterilize” is often used incorrectly. For example, some practitioners tell clients
that they are “sterilizing the nail plate or skin.” This is impossible. Sterilizing the skin
would quickly kill it and would destroy the nail plate as well. We can only sterilize
surfaces that are not porous (having pores or openings that permit liquids or gases to
pass through). Metal implements are nonporous and can be sterilized, but wood
surfaces, which are porous, cannot. It short, sterilization is impractical and unnecessary
in salons.

Disinfection

Disinfection is a higher level of decontamination than sanitation. It is second only to
sterilization. Disinfection controls microorganisms on hard, nonporous surfaces such as
cuticle nippers and other salon implements.
Disinfectant provides the level of protection required by the salon to kill most organisms,
with one exception. Disinfection does not kill bacterial spores, but this is not necessary
in the salon environment. It is important only in hospitals and other health-care facilities
where instruments are used to penetrate or cut the skin. Lancets and other metal
implements used in advanced facial treatments should be sterilized, or disposable
implements should be used.
Disinfectants are chemical agents used to destroy most bacteria and some viruses and
to disinfect implements and surfaces. Disinfectants are not for use on human skin, hair,
or nails. Never use disinfectants as hand cleaners. Any substance powerful enough to
quickly and efficiently destroy pathogens can also damage skin.

Read Carefully Before Using

Manufacturers take great care to develop safe and highly effective systems. However,
just because something is safe does not mean that is cannot be dangerous if used
improperly. Any professional salon product can be dangerous if used improperly. Like
all tools, disinfectants must always be used in strict accordance with manufacturer’s
instructions.
All disinfectants must be approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and
each individual state. The disinfectant’s label must also have an EPA registration
number. Look for this number when choosing a disinfectant. It is the only way to ensure
that the EPA has the necessary test data on file and that the product has been proven
effective against certain organisms. The product label will also tell you exactly which
organisms the disinfectant has been tested for, such as HIV-1 or the Hepatitis B virus.
The law requires testing for specific organisms, or it should not appear on the label.
Besides the EPA registration number, federal law requires manufacturers to provide you
with important information in the form of a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS), along
with other important information, such as directions for proper use, safety precautions,
and a list of active ingredients. The MSDS provides all pertinent information on
products, ranging from content and associated hazards to combustion levels and
storage requirements. These sheets should be available for every product used in the
cosmetology school or salon, and may be obtained from the product’s distributor and/or
manufacturer. Operating without an MSDS poses a health risk to anyone in a salon who
comes into contact with hazardous materials.
Take the time to read all of this vital information. Only then will you be certain that you
are protecting yourself and your clients to the best of your ability.

OSHA

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was created as part of the
U.S. Department of Labor to regulate and enforce safety and health standards in the
workplace. Regulating employee exposure to toxic substances and informing
employees about the dangers of materials used in the workplace are key points of the
Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. This act established the Hazard
Communication Rule, which requires that chemical manufacturers and importers assess
the hazards associated with their products. Material Safety Data Sheets and product
labeling are two important results of this law.
The standards set by OSHA are particularly relevant to the cosmetology industry
because of the nature of the chemicals used. Issues having to do with the mixing,
storing, and disposal of chemicals; the general safety of the workplace; and, most
important, the right of the cosmetologist to know what is contained in the products she
uses all are regulated by OSHA standards.

Choosing a Disinfectant

Disinfectants are chemicals. To use a disinfectant properly, you must read and follow
the manufacturer’s instructions. Such variables as mixing precautions and exposure
times demand particular attention. The product label will explain what the disinfectant
has been tested for. To meet salon requirements, a disinfectant must have the correct
efficacy (effectiveness) to be used against bacteria, fungi, and viruses. A disinfectant
that is “Formulated for Hospitals and Health Care Facilities,” or a “Hospital Disinfectant,”
must be pseudomonacidal, in addition to being bactericidal, fungicidal, and virucidal. If a
disinfectant has been tested for additional organisms such as HIV-1, it will be stated on
the label. Check for the label number and efficacy standard on the label.
For bloodborne pathogens, OSHA issued a policy in 1997 stating that, in order to
comply with OSHA’s Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, the use of an EPS-registered
tuberculocidal disinfectant or an EPA-registered disinfectant labeled effective against
HIV and HBV is required. For this reason, when salon implements accidentally come
into contact with blood or body fluids, they should be cleaned and completely immersed
in an EPA-registered disinfectant that kills HIV-1 and Hepatitis B virus, or in a
tuberculocidal disinfectant. The National Interstate Council of State Cosmetology
Boards (NICS) follows this standard for examinations as well.

Proper Use of Disinfectants

Any item that is used on a client must be disinfected or discarded after each use. Items
that do not have the capacity to be disinfected, such as orange-wood sticks, must be
discarded. Combs, brushes, scissors, razors, clipper blades, nippers, electrodes, and
other commonly used, nonporous tools must be disinfected.
Ever the best disinfectants will not work well if mixed or used incorrectly. All implements
should be thoroughly cleaned before soaking to avoid contaminating the disinfecting
solution. Besides, a dirty jar of disinfectant would not fill your clients with confidence.
Implements must be completely submerged for proper disinfection.
Ultrasonic cleaners use high-frequency sound waves to create powerful, cleansing
bubbles in the liquid. The cleansing action is an effective way to clean tiny crevices that
are impossible to reach with a brush. Without an effective disinfectant solution,
however, these devices only sanitize implements.
Ultrasonic cleaners are a useful addition to your disinfection process, but are not
required. Many systems disinfect with great effectiveness without relying on such
devices. However, some salons feel that this added cleansing benefit is well worth the
extra expense. It also saves time by eliminating cleaning by hand.

Types of Disinfectants

There are a variety of disinfectants that the salon can choose from.

Quats

Quaternary ammonium compounds, commonly called quats, are a type of disinfectant
considered non-toxic, odorless, and fast-acting. Older formulas were not very effective
but the newer products, called dual quat formulas, and are dramatically more effective.
Most quat solutions disinfect implements in 10 to 15 minutes. Leaving some tools in the
solution for too long may damage them. Keep in mind that long-term exposure to any
water solution or disinfectant may damage fine steel. With today’s modern formulas,
however, corrosion of metal surfaces can be easily avoided, especially if you keep
implements separated while disinfecting. Metal implements such as scissors and nail
clippers should be oiled regularly to keep them in perfect working order.
Quats are also very effective for cleaning tables and countertops.

Phenols
Like quats, phenolic disinfectants, or phenols, have been used reliably over the years to
disinfect implements. Phenol is a caustic poison, but it can be safe and extremely
effective if used according to instructions. One disadvantage is that most rubber and
plastic materials may be softened or discolored by phenols. Phenols in 5 percent
solution are used mostly for metal implements.
Extra care should be taken to avoid skin contact with phenols. Phenolic disinfectants
can cause skin irritation, and concentrated phenols can seriously burn the skin and
eyes. Some are poisonous if accidentally ingested.

Alcohol and Bleach

The word alcohol is often misunderstood. There are many chemical compounds that
may be classified as alcohol. The three most widely used are methyl alcohol, ethyl
alcohol, and isopropyl alcohol.
In the salon, ethyl and isopropyl alcohol are sometimes used to disinfect implements. To
be effective, the strength of ethyl alcohol must be no less than 70 percent, and the
strength of isopropyl alcohol must be 99 percent. Since alcohol is not an EPA-registered
disinfectant, it is not permitted for use with implements in states requiring hospital
disinfection. This means it is not legal to use alcohol as a disinfectant in most states.
There are many disadvantages to using alcohols. They are extremely flammable,
evaporate quickly, and are slow-acting and less effective when compared to other
recommended disinfectants. Alcohols corrode tools and cause sharp edges to become
dull. They also discolor and damage the surface of floors and countertops. The vapors
formed on evaporation can cause headaches and nausea when inhaled in high
concentrations or after prolonged exposure.
Household bleach is an effective disinfectant, but shares some of the same drawbacks
as alcohols. Neither bleach nor alcohols are professionally designed and tested for
disinfection of salon implements. Bleach and alcohol may have been used extensively
in the past, but have since been replaced by more advanced and effective technologies.
Bleach is, however, a very effective laundering additive.
Although quats are perfectly suitable for cleaning any surface (unless otherwise
specified in the manufacturer’s directions), you may wish to clean floors, bathrooms,
sinks, and waste receptacles with a commercial cleaner such as Lysol or Pine-Sol. Both
are very effective disinfectants, but should not be used on salon implements. They are
general “household level” disinfectants and are not designed for professional tools.

Disinfectant Safety

Disinfectants are powerful, professional-strength tools that can be hazardous if used
incorrectly. Disinfectants can be poisonous if ingested and can cause serious skin and
eye damage, especially in a concentrated form. A good rule to remember is use caution!
In addition, you should:

      Always wear gloves and safety glasses when mixing chemicals with water
      Always add disinfectants away from children
      Never pour quats, phenols, formalin, alcohol, or any other disinfectants over your
       hands. This hazardous practice can cause skin irritation and increase the chance
       of infection. Wash your hands with soap and warm water and dry them
       thoroughly.
      Carefully weigh and measure all products to ensure that they perform at their
       peak efficiency.
      Never place any disinfectant or other product in an unmarked container.
       Disinfectants come in different forms such as ready-to-use sprays (for surface
       cleaning), liquid concentrate, and powders. Some disinfectants appear clear
       while others are a little cloudy.
      Always follow manufacturer's recommendations for mixing and using, and check
       the efficacy to make sure you are using the right disinfectant
      Avoid overexposure. Disinfectants are chemicals, and overuse is detrimental to
       the environment.

Jars and containers used to disinfect implements are often incorrectly called wet
sanitizers. Of course, the purpose of these containers is not to sanitize but to disinfect.
The disinfecting soak solution must be changed daily and kept free from debris unless
otherwise directed by the manufacturer’s instructions. Strict adherence to the principals
of good hygiene and disinfection must be maintained.

Disinfection Procedures

Always disinfect your tools or other implements according to the guidelines listed for
EPA wet disinfectants. This means complete immersion for the required amount of time.
The following are guidelines for specific salon materials.

Disinfecting Implements

Most tools and implements can be disinfected. These include combs, brushes, rollers,
picks, styling tools, scissors, tweezers, nail clippers, and some nail files.

   1. Pre-clean to remove hair, filings, and other such loose matter by scrubbing with
      soap and water
   2. Rinse thoroughly and pat dry with a clean towel
   3. Put on gloves, goggles, or safety glasses
   4. Mix disinfectant according to manufacturer's directions, always adding
      disinfectant to the water
   5. Using gloves or tongs completely immerse implements or tools and leave for the
      required amount of time, as per manufacturer's instructions.
   6. Remove implements with tongs, basket, or gloves so as not to contaminate the
      disinfectant
   7. Rinse thoroughly and dry
   8. Place disinfected implements in a clean, closed, dry, disinfected container

Disinfecting Linens and Capes

All linens should be used once and then laundered with bleach according to label
directions. Capes or drapes that come into contact with a client’s skin should be
laundered in the same matter.

Disinfecting Electrical Equipment

The contact points of equipment that cannot be immersed in liquid, such as hair
clippers, electrotherapy tools, and nail drills, should be wiped or sprayed with an EPA-
registered, hospital-grade disinfectant created especially for electrical equipment.
Electrical equipment must be kept in good repair.

Disinfecting Work Surfaces

Before and after each client, an EPA-registered, hospital-grade disinfectant should be
used on the work surface (manicure table, workstation, esthetic bed, and the like). The
disinfectant should be left on the surface the full amount of time prescribed by the
manufacturer’s directions. Remember to disinfect all surfaces. This includes doorknobs,
handles, and so on.
The shampoo bowl should be cleaned and the drain cleared of all hair after each client.
The neck of the bowl should be disinfected the same as other work surfaces.

Disinfecting Whirlpool Pedicure Foot Spas

When using whirlpool pedicure foot spas, you must follow proper disinfection
procedures to ensure proper maintenance of the equipment and to prevent the spread
of bacterial or parasitic disease. Take time to carefully read the manufacturer’s cleaning
instructions and ask your manufacturer and /or distributor for a demonstration as well.
Improperly disinfected equipment can harbor bacteria that may spread disease or
infection to clients, cosmetologists, or nail technicians who come into contact with it.


Blood Spill Disinfection

Blood spills occur when you or a client are accidentally cut with a sharp instrument. If a
blood spill should occur during a procedure, proper steps must be taken for the safety of
both people.

   1. If a cut is sustained, stop the service and clean the injured area
   2. Use a finger guard or gloves as appropriate
   3. Apply antiseptic and/or liquid or spray styptic without contaminating the container
   4. Apply antiseptic and/or liquid or spray styptic without contaminating the container
   5. Cover the injury with a Band-aid or other appropriate dressing
   6. Clean client and workstation as necessary
   7. Discard all disposable contaminated objects such as wipes or cotton balls by
      double-bagging (place the waste in a plastic bag and then in a trash bag). Use a
      biohazard sticker (red or orange) or a container for contaminated waste. Deposit
      sharp disposables in a sharps box.
   8. Remove your gloves. Wash your hands with soap and warm water before
      returning to service.
   9. All tools and implements that have come into contact with blood or body fluids
      must be disinfected by complete immersion in a EPA-registered, hospital-grade
      disinfectant that kills HIV-1 and Hepatitis B Virus or in a tuberculocidal
      disinfectant. Be sure to mix and use the disinfectant according to the
      manufacturer’s directions.

Because blood can carry many pathogens, you should never touch a client’s open sore
or wound.

OHIO LAWS AND RULES

Chapter 4713-1 Administration
4713-1-01 Definition of board of cosmetology.
(A) "The board of cosmetology," hereinafter referred to as the "Board" means those
members appointed by the governor of the state in accordance with Chapter 4713. of
the Revised Code who are vested with both statutory and discretionary authority.
(B) "One year," for purposes of computing work experience is equal to two-thousand
hours of employment.
(C) "Inspector" means all authorized agents of the "Board" who have the authority to
enter and make reasonable inspections of any facility during their regular hours of
business for the purpose of determining compliance with the "Board's" rules governing
the facility. The inspector shall prepare a written report of the inspection on forms
provided by the "Board". The report shall be signed by the inspector and by the facility
owner or their designated representative. A copy of the inspection report shall be left
with the owner or manager.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(19)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.01
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 1/26/97
4713-1-02 Appointing authority.
The administrative agency concerned with the practice of cosmetology shall be headed
by the executive director of the "Board". The executive director shall operate as the
chief administrator of the "Board's" daily transactions of an administrative nature in
accordance with all rules established by the "Board" for the governing of the "Board"
and the implementation or enforcement of rules and orders of the "Board".
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(19)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.06
Prior Effective Dates: 1/18/85, 12/17/89, 2/24/91, 1/26/97
4713-1-03 Application of rules.
All rules promulgated under agency level 4713 of the Administrative Code shall apply to
all types of licensed cosmetology facilities and licensees unless otherwise specified.
Out-of-state licenses are not valid in this state.
All cosmetologists must be licensed by the state of Ohio.
(A) All cosmetologists licensed in the state of Ohio must inform the board of
cosmetology of any change in personal or professional status that would affect their
ability to receive official correspondence related to their license.
(1) Notice of a change in status would include marriage, divorce, or official change in
name which would affect their license.
(2) Students in a licensed school of cosmetology who incur a name change during the
period of training need not provide such notice until at the time of application for the
state exam and/or license. Official documentation of the type of change and effective
date of the change must be provided with the exam or license application.
(B) Notice of a change in status of legal business ownership (formation or dissolution of
partnership, incorporation of business, or name change of business) should be made to
the board as soon as possible.
(C) Notice of a change in personal or business address must be provided to the board
within thirty days of the actual address change. Advanced notice of address change is
encouraged.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(1)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.20, 4713.28, 4713.30, 4713.31, 4713.39, 4713.44, 4713.48,
4713.58
Prior Effective Dates: 1/26/97, 8/1/99
4713-1-04 Public hearings.
(A) The procedure of the "Board" for giving public notice for the adoption, amendment,
or rescission of its rules shall be pursuant to section 119.03 of the Revised Code. The
"Board" shall provide a copy of a notice to any person who requests a copy in writing
and who pays a reasonable fee, not to exceed the cost of copying and mailing.
(B) The "Board" shall give public notice at least thirty days prior to the date set for the
public hearing by publication in the register of Ohio Such notice shall include:
(1) A statement of the "Board's" intention to consider the adoption, amendment, or
rescission of a rule;
(2) A synopsis of the proposed rule, amendment, or rule to be rescinded or a general
statement of the subject matter to which the proposed rule, amendment, or rescission
relates;
(3) A statement of the reason or purpose for adopting, amending, or rescinding the rule;
(4) The date, time and place of the hearing on the proposed action.
(C) The "Board" shall furnish the public notice required under section 119.03 of the
Revised Code and as described in paragraph (A) of this rule to any person who
requests a copy of such notice in writing and who pays a reasonable fee, not to exceed
the cost of copying and mailing.
(D) Prior to the effective date of the rule, amendment, or rescission, the "Board" shall
make a reasonable effort to inform those affected by the rule, amendment, or rescission
and to have available for distribution to those requesting it the full text of the rule as
adopted, amended, or rescinded.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)((19)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.08
Prior Effective Dates: 1/18/85, 12/17/89, 8/1/99, 1/17/02
4713-1-05 Sunshine rule.
(A) A notice of each regular or special meeting of the "Board" shall be filed forthwith by
the chairman of the "Board" with the executive director to the "Board", stating the time,
place, and purpose of each regular or special meeting of the "Board". Any person may
determine or obtain such information at the "Ohio State Board of Cosmetology, 1929
Gateway Circle, Grove City, Ohio 43123," as provided in paragraph (B) of this rule or by
telephoning (614) 466-3834.
(B) Any person may obtain a reasonable advance written notification of all meetings of
the "Board" at which any specific type of public business is to be discussed, or may
request notification by annually providing the executive director with self-addressed
stamped envelopes suitable for this purpose.
Effective: 08/11/2008
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/20/2008 and 08/11/2013
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(19)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.03
Prior Effective Dates: 1/18/85, 12/17/98, 2/24/91, 1/26/97
4713-1-06 Sale or transfer of license.
Any sale or any other type of transfer of any salon or school license is subject to the
prior approval of the "Board". The "Board" may deny any such sale or transfer if the
"Board" finds that any outstanding alleged violation exists, any fine if unpaid, or
suspension time has not been served.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(1), 4713.08(A)(19)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.41, 4713.44, 4713.64
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 2/24/91, 1/26/97
4713-1-07 Prohibited acts.
(A) The "Board" may refuse to issue or refuse to renew, or may fine, suspend and/or
revoke any license for any one or more of the following causes:
(1) Violation of any of the requirements for application of a license;
(2) Conviction of a felony or misdemeanor which was performed in the licensed facility,
or was otherwise related to their license;
(3) Immoral or unprofessional conduct;
(4) Gross incompetence;
(5) Advertising by means of false or deceptive statements;
(6) Obtaining a license or aiding or abetting one who is seeking a license through fraud
or deception;
(7) Obtaining money, or anything of value, by fraudulent misrepresentation in the course
of practice;
(8) Violation of any rule of the "Board";
(9) Failure to meet the industry's minimum standards of care;
(10) Failure to meet any of the requirements of licensure.
(11) Failure of a person to assist a "Board" inspector or interfere with a "Board"
inspector in identification of any individual believed by the inspector to be working in a
salon.
(B) A license shall not be issued to a salon or school which is attempting to sell,
transfer, or otherwise change ownership, if such is being attempted in order to
circumvent compliance with these rules or to avoid any penalty imposed by the "Board".
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(1)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.14, 4713.41, 4713.44
Prior Effective Dates: 12/17/89, 1/26/97, 1/17/02
4713-1-08 Chemicals, equipment and service approval.
All chemicals, and any equipment used in providing any cosmetology service, used in
any type of licensed salon or school, are subject to the approval of the "Board" to
ensure the health and safety of licensees and patrons.
Effective: 09/28/2008
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 07/14/2008 and 09/28/2013
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(1)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.35, 4713.41
Prior Effective Dates: 1/26/97
4713-1-10 Public forum.
The "Board" will regularly communicate to the licensees and public that all monthly
"Board" meetings are public meetings and they may request the opportunity to speak on
any issue of concern to them. The "Board" will communicate this information primarily
through the "Board" web page and the monthly Ohio Stylist and Salon Publication.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(19)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.03
Prior Effective Dates: 4/1/01, 1/10/04

Chapter 4713-3 Schools
4713-3-01 Opening school package.
An opening school package shall be submitted at least forty five days prior to the
opening of the school. The applicant must complete the application package on forms
provided by the "Board" and include the following.
(A) Names and addresses of all owners, shareholders, partners, limited liability
companies (LLC) and/or directors with a five percent share or larger of the business. If
any of the owners, shareholders, partners, limited liability companies and/or directors is
corporately owned the names and addresses must include the real peoples' names
through each layer of ownership. No owner or shareholder shall have a felony
conviction.
(B) A floor plan that meets the requirements of rule 4713-3-02 of the Administrative
Code.
(C) A proposed school calendar with schedule of classes both clinic and non-clinic for
the first year.
(D) A list of all equipment.
(E) A list of reference materials available to the students.
(F) A copy of the school's course outline, syllabus and a sample of lesson plans for
each program or branch of cosmetology to be taught at the school. A complete copy of
all lessons plans shall be available at the school at all times.
(G) Each school shall submit to the "Board" and maintain on file a copy of a "Board"
provided form for each instructor and administrator. Opening schools shall provide this
information within fourteen days of projected opening date and at least seven days prior
to meeting with the "Board" as required by rule 4713-3-07 of the Administrative Code.
Schools shall employ sufficient instructors to cover all programs scheduled or being
taught.
(H) A copy of all types of proposed advertisements for "Board" approval prior to the
release of the advertisements. All advertising for schools offering only single subject
programs identified in rule 4713-3-05 of the Administrative Code shall identify scope of
the program in all printed material including signage, catalogs, newspaper ads, radio &
television ads, and all other forms of public and private advertising. The "Board" will only
review for proper identification of services being provided by students and that it is a
school of cosmetology.
(I) Copies of the school's contracts, catalogue, policies of the school, refund policies,
assessments used for transfer of students, rules for governing students, monthly
reports, and time sheets for students' daily records in accordance with division (E) of
section 4713.44 of the Revised Code.
(J) A statement of financial responsibility demonstrating a financial worth sufficient to
establish a school and ensure the proper teaching of at least twenty five students. This
financial statement shall be prepared and reviewed by a certified public accountant.
This shall be filed with a financial operating plan for the first fiscal year's operation. This
financial responsibility statement is not required of a vocational program conducted by a
city, exempt village, local or joint vocational school district.
(1) The new school can demonstrate a financial worth sufficient in one of the following
three ways. Provide to the "Board" a bond for $35,000, a letter of credit for $35,000 or a
"letter of representation" from a certified public accountant that the new school has
assets above liabilities of at least $35,000.
(2) The new school can provide documents above for a lesser amount if their financial
plan for the school shows the school will require less funding during the first year
including at a minimum rent, salaries, etc.
(3) The financial requirements of this rule are required for the first two years of the
school's existence. If the school is in good standing with the "Board" after two years the
requirement is ended.
(K) A letter from a bonding company certifying that the statutory bonding requirements
of division (H) of section 4713.44 of the Revised Code shall be met upon approval and
licensure of the school by the "Board". Provide the actual bond at final inspection or
prior. If a bond is obtained to meet the requirements of paragraph (J)(1) of this rule that
bond shall meet this requirement as well.
(L) A certification from the state department of industrial relations or local building
inspection authority approving the plumbing and a copy of the final occupancy permit for
the building (may be provided at final inspection).
(M) A final inspection report from the "Board" verifying the statements made by the
applicants in their opening school package and ensuring compliance with all applicable
statutes and rules.
(N) Compliance with this rule is a continuing requirement of the school and upon
request by the "Board" a school shall provide satisfactory proof of continuous
compliance with this rule.
(O) Certification that no non-cosmetology services or business activity shall be
conducted in the school facility.
(P) All schools shall maintain the information required in the opening school package
current and available on site for review by inspectors at all time, except the financial
information, which shall be made available to "Board" staff upon request of the
executive director during the first two years of operation. The school can meet this
requirement by having the information readily available to the public on its web site and
referenced in its publications provided to students.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 5/1/03
4713-3-02 Floor plan requirements for schools.
(A) The applicant, for an opening school shall file with the "Board" a floor plan. All
submitted floor plans must meet with the approval of the "Board" based upon factors
such as: health, safety, sanitation, and sufficiency of equipment. A submission for a
newly licensed building for a school of cosmetology must include a drawing by an
architect to include their seal on the drawing or blueprint.
(B) An existing school desiring to alter their floor plan may amend a copy of the plan on
file with the "Board", so it would be reasonably to scale, unless building regulation
require a new plan, in which case they shall file a drawing by an architect to include
their seal on the drawing or blueprint.
(C) On an existing building previously licensed as a school of cosmetology but not
currently active an "existing conditions" drawing must be submitted with an architects
seal imprinted on the drawing.
(D) On a change of ownership where no significant structural or plumbing changes and
the existing floor plan in the school's file is accurate no additional floor plan is required.
(E) Minimum square footage for cosmetology schools are defined by type of school.
(1) Every full cosmetology school shall have at least three thousand square feet of
contiguous floor space. Such minimum floor space shall be comprised of the school's
office, student locker area, bathrooms, reception room, classrooms, facial room,
practice/demonstration room, clinic and dispensary.
(2) Every esthetic only school shall have at least two thousand five hundred square feet
of contiguous floor space. Such minimum floor space shall be comprised of the school's
office, student locker area, bathrooms, reception room, classrooms, practice/
demonstration room, clinic with appropriate facial rooms and dispensary.
(3) Every manicuring only school shall have at least two thousand square feet of
contiguous floor space. Such minimum floor space shall be comprised of the school's
office, student locker area, bathrooms, reception room, classrooms, practice/
demonstration room, clinic and dispensary.
(4) Every hair design only school shall have at least two thousand five hundred square
feet of contiguous floor space. Such minimum floor space shall be comprised of the
school's office, student locker area, bathrooms, reception room, classrooms, practice/
demonstration room, clinic and dispensary.
(5) Every natural hair styling only school shall have at least two thousand square feet of
contiguous floor space. Such minimum floor space shall be comprised of the school's
office, student locker area, bathrooms, reception room, classrooms, practice/
demonstration room, clinic and dispensary.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 5/1/03
4713-3-03 School layout.
(A) Every school shall be well lighted, well ventilated, able to maintain suitable room
temperature, and kept in an orderly and sanitary condition. The HVAC system shall be
certified to meet state building code for the use of the space as a school under rule
4101:2-39-03 of the Administrative Code (table 403.3).
(B) Every school shall maintain a practice/demonstration room, as well as a clinic
except in public schools in which there is a separation of freshman, sophomore, junior
and senior students, as defined by the school system, the clinic and the practice room
need not be maintained as separate rooms.
(C) The following clinic requirements shall be met:
(1) The clinic shall contain stations for instruction of students and shall for school's
offering cosmetology, hair design or natural hair styling programs be equipped with two
shampoo bowls per fifteen students in attendance at each session.
(2) The clinic rooms shall not be partitioned into booths; however, the clinic shall be
separated from the practice/demonstration room by at least eight foot high partitions
(3) Every school offering cosmetology, hair design or natural hair styling programs shall
have one clinic station for every two students in attendance at each clinic session. Such
clinic stations shall be equipped with mirrors, adjustable height chairs, and
accommodations for student's equipment and supplies for clinic practice.
(4) Esthetic and manicuring schools shall have at least one clinic station for each two
students equipped with appropriate tables, chairs and accommodations for student's
supplies and equipment.
(D) The practice room shall contain practice stations and for school's offering
cosmetology, hair design or natural hair styling programs equipped with at least one
shampoo bowl per fifteen students. Esthetic and nail only school shall have at least one
sink in the practice room.
(E) The school has the option of meeting the shampoo bowl requirements of this rule by
establishing a shampoo area separate from both clinic and practice rooms. The
shampoo area shall meet the number of shampoo bowls per student ratios and shall be
accessible from both the clinic and practice room without going through the other room.
(F) Facial rooms have the following requirements:
(1) Every school offering cosmetology or esthetics shall have a separate facial room,
which is properly equipped to provide a complete facial service including a sink with hot
and cold water.
(2) The facial room shall be separated from other rooms by partitions sufficient to
provide client privacy.
(3) Esthetic schools shall have at least one facial, waxing or make-up room or station
similarly equipped for each three students assigned to the practice room and/or clinic.
(4) Additional facial rooms in full cosmetology course schools may have a sink with hot
and cold running water in the room or a sink outside the room shall be within forty feet.
Cosmetology schools or esthetic only schools may divide the clinic into facial rooms that
meet the privacy concerns of their service clients. These divisions may be partitions that
are ceiling mounted movable curtains similar to hospital curtains or other flexible
dividers. Each such facial room shall be within forty feet of a sink with hot and cold
running water.
(G) Every school shall have a dispensary convenient to the other school rooms, which
shall be used for the storing and dispensing of supplies and the sanitizing of
instruments. The dispensary area shall be a minimum of twenty-four square feet and
equipped with a sink with hot and cold running water, wet sanitizers, and waste
containers. Every school shall have closed cabinets for clean towels and containers for
used towels. Every school shall maintain sufficient supplies for teaching purposes. In
addition to the designated dispensary area a school may have an additional area,
authorized for the primary purpose of sanitizing instruments.
(H) Every school shall maintain separate and clean toilet facilities for both men and
women, equipped with a water closet and hand washing facilities, including hot and cold
running water. The facilities shall be kept clean, sanitary and functional.
(I) Every school shall provide locker facilities or other secured enclosures for temporary
storage of personal effects for every student attending the school for the safekeeping of
their personal belongings. A minimum of one locker or other secured enclosure for
every two students shall be provided.
(J) Every school shall have an office, which shall contain at least one metal filing cabinet
for the safekeeping of its students' daily attendance records, permanent training
records, and state "Board" forms. Every school must keep, and make available for
inspection its time sheets, school monthly records, and state "Board" forms. Each
school shall keep records of its students for a period of five years from the date of
enrollment, except those students who have completed their appropriate hours of
training and have forwarded their applications for licensure to the "Board".
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 5/1/03
4713-3-04 Additional campus facilities.
(A) An additional campus facility is a supplemental training space located within two
miles of the original facility of the licensed school. Its purpose is to allow the licensed
school to provide adequate space to train students. A school is responsible and
accountable to the "Board" for its additional campus facilities. If the ownership or
address of the original school changes, licensure does not automatically continue for
the additional facility. An additional campus facility must bear the same name as the
original licensed school and its advertising sign must indicate its status as an additional
location of the school. These facilities shall only be approved for theory and/or practice
rooms and must meet school layout rule 4713-3-03 of the Administrative Code. No clinic
services shall be provided in additional facilities.
(B) Approval procedure: A school seeking to have an additional facility approved as part
of the main school must formally notify the "Board" in writing of such a request thirty
days prior to the start of classes in the facility. The notice must include a statement of
the distance between the main campus facility and the new additional facility along with
an AAA map, Internet mapping or other verification of same.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 5/1/03
4713-3-05 Signs and advertisements.
(A) The following sign requirements shall be met:
(1) The entrances to rooms shall be suitably marked with a sign reading "Practice room"
and "Clinic" or words to that effect.
(2) Every school shall maintain a sign using at least three inch tall letters, at the
entrance to the school, which reads "School of Cosmetology" or words to that effect. If a
school offers only a limited branch(es) of cosmetology the sign shall include, in the
same size letters, the words "Nails Only", "Esthetics only", "Hair Design only" or "Natural
Hair Styling only" or the appropriate words to that effect
(3) Every school shall have a sign clearly visible in the clinic and at the main entrance,
which reads "All Services Performed By Students" or words to that effect.
(4) Every school shall prominently display a sign in the room used for instructional
purposes, which reads "Student Work Only" or words to that effect.
(5) The "Board's" sanitary rules shall be posted in all clinics and classrooms.
(B) The following advertising requirements shall be met:
(1) School advertisements shall not contain statements calculated to represent the
services performed in the school clinic as comparable, in quality, to professional
services available in licensed beauty salons.
(2) New schools shall not advertise in the media until preliminary approval of their
application is complete including all items of the opening school package except names
of instructors and final building occupancy. Preliminary approval will not be granted
more than sixty days prior to expected construction completion date assuming Board
staff is convinced that that date is realistic. "Opening soon" signs and all advertisements
prior to issuance of a license shall include the statement: "No students shall enroll or
sign a contract until the school's license has been approved."
(3) Clinic service advertisements must clearly reflect that "all services are performed by
students" or words to that effect.
(4) Upon the request of the "Board", a school must promptly furnish the "Board" with a
copy of any advertisement or solicitation.
(5) No cosmetology program shall be established, offered, or given for a charge, fee, or
other contribution; no certificate, diploma, degree, or other written evidence of
proficiency or achievement shall be offered whether in a specified place, by
correspondence, or any other means of communication, or awarded; and no student
enrollment solicited in any cosmetology program through advertising, agents, mail
circulars, or other means, until the person planning to offer or offering such programs
has obtained a school license per section 4713.44 of the Revised Code.
(6) Any advertisement or piece of promotional literature written or used by a school
holding a license with the board must carry the name and address as listed on its
license.
(7) No school or its agents shall advertise or imply that the school is "recommended" or
"endorsed" by the board. If reference is made to the license issued by the board, this
official reference shall only read, " Licensed by the Ohio State Board of Cosmetology."
All schools advertising that they are accredited or offer grants from the United States
department of education (USDOE) shall follow the accrediting agency and/or USDOE
laws and rules as to advertisements.
(8) Any advertisement or piece of promotional literature written or used by a private
school including photographs, cuts, engravings, or illustrations in bulletins, sales
literature, or otherwise must be completely truthful and must be prepared and presented
in such a manner as to avoid leaving any false or misleading impressions with respect
to the school, its personnel, its courses and services, or the occupational opportunities
for its graduates.
(9) Career technical schools may advertise to the students of its school or its feeder
schools per Ohio department of education rules and regulations.
(10) A guarantee of graduation for students or of placement for graduates shall not be
promised or implied by any school, agent, or representative thereof. No school in its
advertising or through its representatives or agents shall guarantee or imply the
guarantee of employment before enrollment, during the pursuance of the course, or
after the course is completed. No school shall guarantee any certain wage, or imply
earnings greater than can be documented.
(11) No owner, partner, officer, employee, agent, or other person acting on behalf of any
school shall make any fraudulent statement, misrepresentation, or misleading statement
of fact.
(12) Private schools using classified columns of newspapers or other publications to
procure students must use only such as are headed by "education," "schools,"
"instruction." "Help wanted," "employment," or "business opportunities," classifications
may be used only to procure employees or agents for the school.
(13) All schools that advertise that they are endorsed by any business establishment,
manufacturer, organization or individual engaged in the cosmetology field shall maintain
written evidence of that fact on site at the school dated prior to any advertisements.
(14) Schools shall not solicit any student who is currently enrolled in another Ohio
licensed cosmetology school.
HISTORY: Eff 5-1-03; 8-1-04
Rule promulgated under: RC 119.03
Rule authorized by: RC 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule amplifies: RC 4713.44, 4713.45
Replaces: 4713-3-08
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
4713-3-06 Training records and student review.
A complete training record for each student, or as a minimum, a withdrawal or transfer
form, which shows the number of hours or credits completed and passed in each major
subject area shall be kept by the school for a minimum of five years from the date of
enrollment or until such records are transferred to the "Board", whichever occurs first,
Schools may keep these records at offices located outside the school's training facilities
if transmission of the records, by computer terminal or fax machine to the training facility
is possible. Such records shall be available upon request by the "Board" or its
authorized agent. All records relating to a student's contractual agreements, attendance
and progress shall be made available to the student within ten days after receipt of a
written request for review of the records. If a copy of the students record is requested a
nominal charge per page may be charged. The review by any student to whom the
specific records relate shall occur during regular school office hours. A school official
may be present during any records reviews in order to ensure the integrity of the record.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 5/1/03
4713-3-07 Applicant's presence required.
(A) If requested by the "Board", the applicants or persons responsible for the operation
of proposed school shall be present for "Board" questioning on the date scheduled for
"Board" action upon their application. The "Board" shall notify the applicant by
registered mail, return receipt requested, in sufficient time prior to the "Board" meeting.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 5/1/03
4713-3-08 Final licensure.
(A) No license shall be issued unless the "Board" finds that the applicant possesses the
financial responsibility and experience necessary to operate a school. Any false or
misleading statements or any misrepresentations shall justify denial of license.
Applicants shall not advertise or open for instruction of students nor enroll students until
the "Board" has granted licensure. No approval shall be granted unless the "Board"
finds that all rules have been complied with by all parties to the application.
HISTORY: Eff. 5-1-03; 8-1-04
Rule promulgated under: RC 119.03
Rule authorized by: RC 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule amplifies: RC 4713.44, 4713.45
Replaces: 4713-3-10
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
4713-3-09 School transfers, change of ownership or discontinuance of operation.
Every license issued to a school is valid only for the location named on the license and
is not transferable. School owners shall notify the "Board" in writing of the sale, transfer,
or change of ownership within thirty days prior to a transfer, or change of ownership.
Any intention of a school to discontinue its operation must be made to the "Board" at
least sixty days prior to the final date of operation. Any school, which closes for
business, shall forward to the "Board" a complete, notarized training record for each
student within fourteen days of the completion of any training hours by any student.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 5/1/03
4713-3-10 Licenses shall be conspicuously displayed.
A current school license and each instructor's license and the appropriate regular or
managing license for each appropriate apprentice instructor shall be conspicuously
displayed for public view in the school.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 5/1/03
4713-3-11 Cancellation, settlement and refund.
The institution shall state its policy and schedule of refund in clear language that can be
easily understood. The policy shall apply to all terminations for any reason, by either
party including student decision, course cancellation and school closure. Accredited
schools shall adhere to the refund policy of their accrediting institution. All other schools
shall adhere to the following refund requirements.
(A) The intent of the "Board" refund policy is to see that each applicant/student is
assured minimum conditions of refund. When calculating refunds, the school shall use
the policy mandated by this rule unless a federal or accrediting agency policy applies.
No institution is restricted to the minimum specific conditions stated here; only that its
policy is at least as liberal to the student as this one
(1) An applicant or student (or the parent/guardian if the applicant or student is a minor)
may cancel enrollment at anytime by informing the school in writing.
(2) The ending date for refund computation purposes is the last date of physical
attendance by the student.
(3) Enrollment time means the total scheduled days for credit or clock hours that have
elapsed between the first day of class and the ending date.
(4) Total tuition is the amount stated on the contract or enrollment attributed to the
program or course in which the student is enrolled.
(5) Program or course length is a period in clock hours for a clock hour program or
calendar time for a credit hour program as specified in the contract or enrollment
agreement.
(6) All refunds due shall be issued within thirty days of either cancellation by the student
or termination by the school.
(a) In addition to other charges and fees, the student may be charged a withdrawal fee
of no more than one hundred and fifty dollars.
(b) The percentage of clock hours that have elapsed is calculated by dividing the
enrollment time by the course or program length, then by multiplying the result by one
hundred. The percentage of credit hours that have elapsed is calculated by dividing the
scheduled days attended by the total scheduled days in the quarter or semester, then
multiplying by one hundred.
(c) If the percentage of clock hours or credit hours that have elapsed is less than five
per cent, the tuition due is calculated by multiplying the total tuition due by twenty per
cent.
(d) If the percentage of clock hours or credit hours that have elapsed is at least five per
cent, but less than ten per cent, the tuition due is calculated by multiplying the total
tuition by thirty per cent.
(e) If the percentage of clock hours or credit hours that have elapsed is at least ten per
cent, but less than fifteen per cent, the tuition due is calculated by multiplying the total
tuition by forty per cent.
(f) If the percentage of clock hours or credit hours that have elapsed is at least fifteen
per cent, but less than twenty five per cent, the tuition due is calculated by multiplying
the total tuition by forty five per cent.
(g) If the percentage of clock hours or credit hours that have elapsed is at least twenty
five per cent but less than fifty per cent the tuition due is calculated by multiplying the
total tuition due by seventy per cent.
(h) If the percentage of clock hours or credit hours that have elapsed is fifty per cent or
greater, the total tuition is due in full.
(7) The cancellation date shall be the postmarked date if mailed, or the delivery date, if
delivered in person. The termination date shall be the date of formal termination by the
school, the thirtieth day of consecutive unexcused absence, or the scheduled return
date for a student who does not return from an official leave of absence.
(8) If the school ceases to offer instruction after the student begins training, the student
shall be entitled to a pro-rata refund of tuition based upon enrollment time. If the course
is canceled before beginning training, the student shall be entitled, at the option of the
school, to either a full refund of all money paid to the school, or completion of the course
at another location.
(9) All extra costs, such as books, equipment, graduation fees, etc., which are not
included in the tuition price, shall be stated in the catalog and contract and any non-
refundable items will be identified.
(10) An institution may charge a non-refundable application fee. This charge shall be
clearly stated in both the school's catalog and contract.
(11) Any termination/withdrawal fee shall be identified in the catalog and on the contract
and may not exceed one hundred and fifty dollars.
(B) The enrollment agreement shall clearly outline the obligations of both the institution
and the student, and provide details of the cancellation and settlement policy of the
institution. A copy of the enrollment agreement and other data covering student costs
shall be furnished to the applicant before any payment is made. No enrollment
agreement is binding until it has been accepted in writing by an appropriate official at
the institution. The institution's cancellation and settlement policy shall also be printed in
the school catalog see rule 4713-3-12 of the Administrative Code
(C) The collection procedures shall reflect good taste and sound, ethical business
practices. The name of the "Board" shall not be used in the institution's refund policy nor
in any of its collection efforts.
(D) If a school closes permanently and ceases to offer instruction after students have
enrolled, or if a course is canceled after students have enrolled and instruction has
begun, the school shall make arrangements for students or implement any applicable
teach-out agreement in compliance with the following requirements.
(1) The arrangements or agreement shall offer the student a reasonable opportunity to
promptly resume and complete the canceled course(s) of study or a substantially similar
course of study at an institution (or institutions) which offer similar educational
programs.
(2) The arrangements or teach-out agreement should be performed by an institution in
the same geographic area as the closing school.
(3) The original school shall notify affected students individually of the availability and
total cost of the arrangement or teach-out agreement, and diligently advertise such
availability. The agreements among institutions may provide that these notices may be
sent by the school(s) that are accepting students from the original school.
(4) The school that is closing or has closed shall submit to the "Board" a list of all
students who were enrolled at the time of closure, and indicate on it the arrangements
made for each student to complete his or her education.
(5) Students shall receive a pro-rata refund of tuition.
(6) The original school shall dispose of school records per rule 4713-3-09 of the
Administrative Code.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 5/1/03
4713-3-12 School catalogue requirements.
The catalogue shall include the following information:
(A) Name and address of the institution for each location.
(B) Date of publication.
(C) The admission requirements (criteria) used by the institution for each course. The
institution's admission policy must comply with the "Board's" laws and rules.
(D) The name of each course and the name, nature and level of occupations for which
training is provided must be identified.
(E) Length of course: Number of clock hours, credit hours, or competencies in each
course offered by the institution in sufficient detail to show the scope and sequence of
units included. (Clearly identify the coverage of each course).
(F) Description of the institution's general facilities and equipment.
(G) The grading system used by the institution. Identify the full range of grades that
students may earn. (Must be consistent with the institution's satisfactory progress
policy).
(H) Graduation requirements for each course. List any special conditions or
requirements.
(I) Type of document (certificate, diploma, etc.) awarded upon graduation from each
course.
(J) Refund policy: Refund policy must comply with rule 4713-3-11 of the Administrative
Code or its accrediting agency, if any.
(K) Employment assistance: A clear statement that the institution does not guarantee
employment. Extent and nature of employment assistance.
(L) A school calendar of beginning dates of classes for each course. Indicate holidays
and school closures.
(M) Statement that the institution does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, age,
color, ethnic origin, or religion.
(N) Name of the legal entity that owns the school.
(O) The institution's policy guaranteeing the right of students to gain access to their files.
(P) The institution's policy for releasing information about an individual student.
(Q) Scholarship and fee waiver policies (if applicable).
(R) Specifics describing the extent of other available services, such as housing (if
applicable), career counseling, etc.
(S) The address, and telephone number of the Ohio state board of cosmetology, as well
as the name, address and telephone number of the agency which accredits the
institution, if applicable.
(T) Policies related to tardiness, excused and unexcused absences, make-up work,
conduct, termination and other rules and regulations of the institution.
(U) Names of administrative staff and faculty.
(V) Costs for each course:
(1) Tuition - total tuition for each course.
(2) Books and supplies - must be actual cost to the student.
(3) Application or enrollment fee for each course (must be separately identified).
(4) Other costs.
(5) Payment - methods and terms of payment of monies owed to the institution must be
identified
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 5/1/03
4713-3-13 School contract requirements.
Prior to the first day of class, the institution, shall obtain a fully-executed written
contract, or enrollment agreement for each prospective student, which at a minimum
contains:
(A) Legal name of the school.
(B) Obligations of the school and student.
(C) Program length, name and starting date.
(D) Full cost of the course.
(E) Payment terms.
(F) Refund policy.
(G) The school's cancellation and settlement policy including notification that the
enrollment agreement may be canceled by submitting written notice within three
business days pursuant to rule 4713-3-11 of the Administrative Code.
(H) Number of clock or credit hours in the program including the number of weeks or
months necessary to complete the program.
(I) Signature of applicant and date signed.
(J) Notice to student concerning their ability to file a complaint with the state "Board" of
cosmetology including "Board's" address and telephone number.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 5/1/03

Chapter 4713-5 School Administration
4713-5-01 Definitions.
(A) "Certified" means a student has successfully completed and passed the theory and
a practical test for a specific service and is authorized to perform that service on
patrons.
(B) "Quarter" means a period of no less than ten weeks.
(C) "Semester" means a period of no less than fifteen weeks.
(D) "Course" means a separate component of study contained within the program for
which a student earns credits or hours.
(E) "Program" means the aggregate of individual courses or hours that qualify a person
to take a licensing examination.
(F) "State credentialed teacher" means a person recognized by the Ohio department of
education as a certified/licensed teacher or a recognized member of the faculty of a
college or university or an individual holding at least a bachelors degree in the subject to
be taught.
(G) "Withdrawn student" means any student who ceases instruction in a school prior to
graduation.
(H) "ODE" means the Ohio department of education.
(I) "IEP" means an individual education plan.
(J) "Course outline" means an outline of the program offering that summarizes each of
the subjects included in the program with hours devoted to theory and clinic within each
subject.
(K) "Clock hour" means a period scheduled for a theory lecture of at least fifty minutes
or scheduled clinic time in actual sixty minute segments including any break time
allowed in the school's student policies.
(L) "Last fifty hours" means the last fifty hours of a cosmetology, esthetics, or hair
design course required to complete the program in which the student is enrolled.
(M) "Transcript" means a form or letter signed by a school official certifying final grades
for all courses applicable to a program of study.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 8/5/01, 5/1/03
4713-5-02 Program requirements.
Proprietary schools have sole discretion as to offering clock or credit hour programs.
Career technical schools shall comply with ODE/"Board" cosmetology program course
outlines.
(A) Prior to implementation all schools shall submit course outlines for any and all
courses taught within a program for "Board" approval.
(B) Upon enrolling in a school of cosmetology, a cosmetology student shall be assigned
to study theory and perform nonclinic practice. A student shall not perform any service
on a patron until they are certified to do so.
(C) All schools shall ensure each program offered is comprised of at least twenty-five
per cent theory and nonclinic practice.
(D) All schools shall ensure each program offered is comprised of at least fifty per cent
clinic work performed on patrons, other students or mannequins. For clock hour schools
at any time patrons are not available the student shall receive credit for clinic work so
long as the student is actively engaged in training within the clinic related to the course
of study.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 1/26/97, 8/1/99, 8/5/01, 5/1/03
4713-5-03 Required course outlines.
The "Board" approved course outlines for each program shall be provided to a school
upon its request. Changes to the "Board" approved program course outlines shall be
provided to each school. Each school shall use the "Board" approved program course
outlines or submit their school's proposed course outlines for "Board" approval. Career
technical schools shall also receive ODE approval for any program course outline
changes or program additions.
(A) All career technical schools shall use course outlines specified by ODE and
approved by the "Board". All career technical schools shall schedule an equivalent
number of program course hours as the clock hour requirements for the course outlines
to ensure the opportunity for students to complete and pass the program. This
requirement shall be effective for the 2003/2004 school year and optional for the
2002/2003 school year. Career technical schools shall meet the program requirements
below:
(1) The total time scheduled for the cosmetology program shall be at least fifteen
hundred hours and sufficient to complete and pass the approved course outlines.
Cosmetology students shall successfully complete and pass the cosmetology program
course outlines and a maximum of four academic courses that meet state curriculum
minimum graduation requirements and are taken during the time the student is enrolled
in the cosmetology program. The academic courses to be taken during the time the
student is enrolled in the cosmetology program can include any of the courses in
paragraph (A)(3) of this rule, or if student is on an IEP, as required by the IEP. For
example, a school with only a two and a half hour cosmetology laboratory has nine
hundred hours scheduled plus four academic courses of four hundred and eighty hours
and with one hundred twenty hours of internship or other cosmetology related time
equals fifteen hundred hours (a school that struggles to meet the fifteen hundred hour
requirement should consider offering the hair design program instead); a school with a
two and a half hour lab and a forty minute related class scheduled has eleven hundred
forty hours in cosmetology course plus two academic classes for two hundred forty
hours and one hundred twenty hours of internship or other cosmetology related time to
equals fifteen hundred hours. A school could have three hour labs and one hour related
for fourteen hundred forty hours plus sixty hours of internship or other cosmetology
related time and no academics to equal fifteen hundred hours. Each school shall file
their schedule to meet the fifteen hundred hour program requirement with the "Board".
(2) The total time scheduled for the hair design program shall be at least twelve hundred
hours and sufficient to complete and pass the approved course outline. Hair design
program students shall complete and pass hair design oourse outlines and a maximum
of four academic courses that meet state curriculum minimum requirements and are
taken during the time the student is enrolled in the hair design program. The academic
courses to be taken during the time the student is enrolled in the hair design program
can include any of the courses in paragraph (A)(3) of this rule, or if student is on an IEP,
as required by the IEP.
(3) The four academic courses from the following list shall be the only courses counted
in paragraph (A)(1) or (A)(2) of this rule. Algebra I, algebra II, geometry, pre-calculus,
calculus, biology, advanced biology, anatomy & physiology, physical science, chemistry,
physics, other math or science courses accepted as meeting graduation requirements
of twenty-one carnegie units, english 11, english 12, other english courses and/or
business technology, or as required by the IEP.
(B) All private schools offering credit hour courses shall meet the requirements for each
program to be offered as listed below. Each quarter or semester shall have a specified
beginning and ending date. In exceptional cases a private school may assign a student
a grade of incomplete and assign a specified period of time to complete and pass the
course per school policy.
(1) Cosmetology program credit hour students shall complete and pass seventy-five
quarter or fifty semester credit hours to meet the requirements of division (F) of section
4713.28 of the Revised Code. Combined cosmetology and manager program credit
hour students shall complete and pass ninety quarter or sixty semester credit hours to
meet the requirements of division (F) of section 4713.28 and division (E) of section
4713.30 of the Revised Code.
(2) Hair design program credit hour students shall complete and pass sixty quarter or
forty semester credit hours to meet the requirements of division (H) of section 4713.28
of the Revised Code. Combined hair design and manager program credit hour students
shall complete and pass seventy-two quarter or forty-eight semester credit hours to
meet the requirements of division (H) of section 4713.28 and division (G) of section
4713.30 of the Revised Code.
(3) Esthetician program credit hour students shall complete and pass thirty quarter or
twenty semester credit hours to meet the requirements of division (G) of section
4713.28 of the Revised Code. Combined esthetician and manager program credit hour
students shall complete and pass thirty-seven and one half quarter or twenty semester
credit hours to meet the requirements of division (G) of section 4713.28 and division (F)
of section 4713.30 of the Revised Code.
(4) Natural hair stylist program credit hour students shall complete and pass twenty-two
and a half quarter or fifteen semester credit hours to meet the requirements of division
(J) of section 4713.28 of the Revised Code. Combined hair design and manager
program credit hour students shall complete and pass thirty quarter or twenty semester
credit hours to meet the requirements of division (J) of section 4713.28 of the Revised
Code and division (I) of section 4713.30 of the Revised Code.
(5) Manicurist program credit hour students shall complete and pass ten quarter or
seven semester credit hours to meet the requirements of division (I) of section 4713.28
of the Revised Code. Combined manicurist and manager program credit hour students
shall complete and pass fifteen quarter or ten semester credit hours to meet the
requirements of division (I) of section 4713.28 and division (H) of section 4713.30 of the
Revised Code.
(C) All private schools offering clock hour courses shall meet the requirements for each
program to be offered as required by sections 4713.28 and 4713.30 of the Revised
Code Clock hour schools may authorize excused absences during the last ten per cent
of a program for students up to a maximum of fifty hours of cosmetology, hair design or
esthetics and a maximum twenty-five hours of natural hair design or manicuring in order
to allow a student to make a pre-scheduled graduation date if they have passed and
completed the whole program of study.
(D) Career technical schools may contract with proprietary schools for students to
complete and pass portions of the course outline units in order to complete and pass
course work and obtain full credit for the cosmetology course for the year. Career
technical schools are responsible for student outcomes unless the contract states
otherwise.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 1/26/97, 8/5/01, 5/1/03
4713-5-04 Operational rules.
Every school shall post or disseminate a daily schedule of classes showing the subjects
for that day. These daily schedules shall be retained for no less than the previous six-
month period. The "Board" may require, upon written notification to a school, that the
daily schedules be retained for a period exceeding the previous six-month period. A
proprietary school may conduct day and night courses. Career technical schools may
only offer adult education with ODE approval. The "Board" shall be notified of which
nights per week classes will be conducted. Clock hour students shall be scheduled to
be in attendance a minimum of three hours in any one day.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 1/26/97, 8/5/01
4713-5-05 Charges for services.
The licensee of an operating school may charge for cosmetological services rendered to
the public in the school clinic.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 1/26/97
4713-5-06 Restriction of activities.
Schools shall restrict the activities performed to the teaching of the practice of
cosmetology as defined in division (A) of section 4713.01 of the Revised Code and
related practices and services.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 1/26/97
4713-5-07 Postgraduate classes.
Postgraduate classes are those classes, which are taught to any licensee that do not
lead to a cosmetology license. Postgraduate classes may be provided by school's
licensed under this chapter or by any other person or entity. Postgraduate classes
conducted in licensed schools shall maintain the required student teacher ratio as
established in rule 4713-5-17 of the Administrative Code. Postgraduate classes may
qualify as continuing education provided that the offered class satisfies the
requirements of Chapter 4713-21 of the Administrative Code.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 1/26/97, 5/1/03
4713-5-08 School rules.
Any rules originally filed with the "Board" governing student procedures which are
subsequently changed must be filed with the "Board". Changes to school rules must
comply with all the requirements of Chapter 4713. of the Revised Code and the
Administrative Code promulgated thereunder. Schools may meet this requirement by
providing the "Board" with their web site where the rules are available on the Internet.
These documents shall be readily available and referenced in applicable student
literature.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 9-5-77, 12-17-89, 1-26-97, 5-1-03
4713-5-09 Enrollment procedure.
(A) All enrollments shall be typewritten, legibly printed in ink on forms provided by the
"Board" or submitted by electronic medium as required by the "Board" and shall be filed
at the "Board's" office in Columbus with the first month/quarter/semester hour/credit
report following enrollment or within thirty days whichever is less. The "enrollment date"
shall be that date upon which the student begins training and is not necessarily the date
upon which the student contracts with the school for training. The enrollment card shall
be signed by the student on the enrollment date and the card shall contain the following
statement: "any person performing cosmetology services without a license may be
prosecuted, enjoined or penalized under sections 4713.14, 4713.15, 4713.64 and
4713.99 of the revised code and may also result in the denial of A student's application
for licensure." When electronic medium submittal is approved these cards shall be
maintained on file at the school. Once electronic submissions are implemented students
shall be assigned their permanent "Board" identification number.
(B) Non-resident and/or alien students must provide proof of residency and/or authority
to earn income in order to receive cosmetology training and/or licensure in Ohio.
(1) Prior to beginning training at a licensed school of cosmetology, such proof of
residency and/or authority to earn income must be verified by the school.
(2) Questions on acceptability of any such documentation may be referred to the
"Board" for further research or resolution.
(3) Such proof of residency or authority to earn income must be maintained as a part of
the formal student file and submitted with the student's application to take the state
exam. A license to practice cosmetology services shall not be issued without this
required documentation.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 1/26/97, 8/1/99, 5/1/03
4713-5-10 Daily and monthly records.
(A) On forms satisfactory to the "Board", a school shall maintain records for each
student providing the student's full legal name, and the date of enrollment. Each school
shall maintain a copy of each student's records at the school for a period of no less than
six months following a student's graduation, discontinuance or transfer. The "Board"
may require, upon written notification to a school, that a copy of the student's records be
maintained for a period exceeding six months.
(1) Clock hour schools shall maintain a record of all training including the students' total
hours received each day and the cumulative hours accrued in the program of study. The
school shall have on file documentation that clearly indicates the students' progress by
major subject area toward completion of a "Board" approved course outline. If
requested by an inspector or the "Board" that documentation shall be available in the
school within an hour of request. The documentation shall include written and practical
examination results of the students' progress by major subject area of the school's
course outline. Such documentation shall also include indicators of progress in clinic
and non-clinic assignments.
(2) Credit hour schools and career technical schools shall maintain documentation of all
quizzes, tests, papers, certifications or other items that provide evidence of having
successfully completed and passed a program or course for each student.
(3) Internship credit shall be likewise documented.
(B) On forms provided by the "Board", or acceptable to the "Board", each school shall
file a report with the "Board" as required in this rule. The report shall be typewritten with
the students' names listed in alphabetical order and filed with the "Board" as required.
Transcripts required for minor students shall have parental release signatures on file at
the school as required by the privacy act. Once the "Board" approves electronic
reporting the same information shall be submitted in delimited text files instead of paper
format. When the "Standard Renewal System electronic" (SRSe) becomes available
documentation of hours or credits shall be accomplished through the directions provided
by the "Board" for SRSe reporting of student progress.
(1) Clock hour schools shall report no later than the twentieth day of the following month
the number of hours of instruction obtained by each student each month and the total
hours credited since the date of enrollment.
(a) Schools may award hours to students that are obtained outside the school during
official visits to cosmetology related activities that provide specific training related to the
school's course outline.
(b) Notice of such official visits/trips shall be sent to the "Board" thirty days in advance
of the visit.
(c) The request shall list the date, time, location and number of hours to be credited to
cosmetology study.
(d) "Board" approval of such requests is not required; however, the "Board" reserves the
right to challenge official visits/tours to activities not directly related to cosmetology
study. Final determination of award of hours associated with such trips/visits shall be
made by the "Board."
(e) In all cases, a licensed cosmetology instructor from the school must be present with
the students.
(2) Credit hour schools shall report transcript information for each student by the
twentieth day following the end of each quarter or semester as applicable.
(a) Credit hour schools may utilize out of school trips that provide direct applicability to
course outlines.
(b) Schools shall notify the "Board" of all trips with a thirty-day advance notice.
(c) In all cases, a licensed cosmetology instructor from the school shall be present with
the student(s).
(3) Career technical schools shall report transcript information for each student by the
twentieth day following the end of each semester.
(a) Career technical schools may utilize out of school functions that provide learning
opportunities that directly align with approved course outlines.
(b) Schools shall notify the "Board" of all trips with a thirty-day advance notice.
(c) In all cases, a state credentialed teacher from the school shall be present with the
student(s).
(C) If a dispute arises between a student and a school over the number of hours or
credits obtained by the student, upon notification by the "Board", the school shall
immediately certify to the "Board" a copy of the student's records listing the daily
number of hours obtained by the student in each major subject area or program/course
credits earned. The "Board" shall then resolve the discrepancy by examining the
school's records and any information submitted by the student.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 1/26/97, 8/1/99, 5/10/01, 5/1/03
4713-5-11 Final training records.
(A) A final training record of each student at a school shall be prepared and forwarded
along with the student's application for licensure to the "Board" immediately upon the
student's successful completion and passing of the program. The school shall certify to
the "Board" a detailed record or grade transcript of the student's training upon
successful completion of the program including the hours, credit hours or ODE/"Board"
approved course outlines of training required by section 4713.28 and/or 4713.30 of the
Revised Code. The record shall become a part of the student's application to take the
"Board" examination for their program of study as a prerequisite to receiving any
license. When the "Standard Renewal System electronic" (SRSe) becomes available
final training records reporting of hours or credits shall be accomplished through the
directions provided by the "Board" for SRSe reporting.
(B) Career technical schools may submit final grades when the seniors' academic
courses are in a complete and passed status, if required as part of the cosmetology
fifteen hundred or twelve hundred hour program, and the student has completed and
passed the cosmetology curriculum and competencies.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 2/24/91, 1/26/97, 8/5/1, 5/1/03
4713-5-12 Inspection of records.
All school and student records required to be maintained by a school under Chapters
4713-3 and 4713-5 of the Administrative Code, shall be available for inspection and
copying by any "Board" inspector during any "Board" inspection or upon request of the
"Board". All records needed by the inspector or "Board" representative shall be available
within an hour of a request or a violation of this rule exists.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 9-5-77, 12-17-89, 2-24-91, 1/26/97, 5/1/03
4713-5-13 Transfer procedure.
(A) A student, currently or previously enrolled in a school of cosmetology who intends to
transfer to another licensed school, shall first notify, in writing, the "Board", and the
school in which the student is enrolled, of their intention to transfer. The "Board" shall, in
writing, notify the original school to certify the training received by the student in that
school. The certification shall be on forms furnished by the "Board" and shall be
submitted to the "Board" within thirty days of the request by the student or "Board".
When the certification of training is received, the "Board" shall notify the school to which
the student wishes to transfer of the number of hours or credits approved. If the student
has not completed their contractual obligations to pay fees, tuition, etc. the school may
withhold all transcript information until the contract is in good standing. If the original
school refuses for reasons other than contractual financial obligations to transfer a
student's record, the "Board", or it's authorized agent, may obtain the record from the
original school in order to establish the hours or credits earned for the student. Any
student wishing to transfer schools shall not accure any credit for training at the new
school until the "Board" has submitted the student record to the new school.
(1) Clock hour to clock hour transfers shall not exceed one hour for one hour.
(2) Clock hour to credit hour transfers shall not exceed a twenty to one basis but shall
be evaluated for applicability within the course outlines of the receiving school for
conversion of credit for whole courses within the program currently offered by the
school.
(3) Clock hour or credit hour career technical school transfers to other career technical
schools shall be evaluated by assessment of the students knowledge and program work
with the ODE/"Board" approved course outlines for appropriate credit granted.
(4) Credit hour to clock hour transfers shall not exceed a twenty hours per credit basis
for successfully completed and passed courses only.
(5) Career technical school to proprietary school clock hour transfers shall be for
successfully completed and passed courses only
(6) Career technical school to proprietary school credit hour transfers shall be for
successfully completed and passed courses only and shall not exceed twenty-five credit
hours per year.
(B) The "Board" may waive the thirty day requirement for any student transferring from a
career technical program in this state.
(C) A student who desires to transfer to another approved program of study within the
cosmetology offerings at their school, another school, or from another state shall
receive only those hours or credits from the current program of study that directly apply
to the new program of study. Not all hours within a designated program of study shall be
transferable to another program of study. In a dispute over the number of hours or
credits eligible for transfer the "Board" training division shall verify the number of eligible
hours or credits within the program that may be transferred per paragraph (A) of this
rule. Of the hours or credits available for transfer the receiving school shall determine
the number of hours or credits it is willing to accept and so notify the student prior to a
contract being signed.
(D) Any student attending a school licensed in another state of the United States or the
District of Columbia may transfer their certified hours of instruction to Ohio and be given
credit not to exceed one-hour for one-hour basis for clock hour schools, provided that
those hours meet the statutory limitations outlined in section 4713.28 of the Revised
Code and rules 4713-5-01 to 4713-5-03 of the Administrative Code. Career technical
schools shall give a performance examination before awarding any credit toward the
course outline approved by ODE/"Board". Credit hour schools shall assess the clock or
credit hours completed and award credit as it fits their approved course outlines.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 2/24/91, 1/26/97, 8/5/01, 5/1/03
4713-5-15 Withdrawn students.
The school shall maintain a withdrawn student's records showing a breakdown of the
completed and passed instruction for a period of five years or until such records are
transferred to the "Board", whichever occurs first. If a withdrawn student re-enrolls at the
same school, a new enrollment card shall be submitted by the school stating that the
student has re-enrolled. If a withdrawn student re-enrolls in a school other than the
original school, the withdrawn student's hours or credits shall be transferred per rule
4713-5-13 of the Administrative Code. Schools shall report all withdrawn students within
sixty days or with the next months, quarter's or semester's report required by rule 4713-
5-10 of the Administrative Code, whichever occurs first. If the SRSe system has been
implemented reporting shall be accomplished per procedures established by the
"Board".
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 1/26/97, 8/5/01, 5/1/03
4713-5-16 School shall maintain binder for state "Board" notifications.'.
All schools shall maintain a binder for the "Board's" rules and all notices issued by the
"Board". This requirement can be met by maintaining electronic records access on
school computers or web site.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 1/18/85, 12/17/89, 1/26/97, 5/1/03
4713-5-17 Licensed instructors on premises.
The holder of a license for the operation of a school shall provide during all school hours
"Board" licensed instructor(s). There shall be a minimum of one instructor for each
twenty-five students or part thereof in attendance. Anytime clinic and classroom are
conducted concurrently at least two instructors must be present.
(A) Schools may count a state credentialed teacher in math, English and/or science as
a "Board" licensed instructor when they are teaching those areas of the cosmetology
course outlines for which they are licensed/certified.
(B) One cosmetology clinic instructor shall be required for each twenty-five students or
part thereof during clinic hours.
(C) The instructors counting toward student ratios shall be qualified to teach those
students present. For example, a manicuring instructor shall not count toward
cosmetology students present. Appropriately licensed instructors shall be present for all
students assigned. A manicuring, esthetics, hair design or natural hair stylist instructor
may count toward cosmetology student ratios only when teaching their particular
specialty to cosmetology students.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 1/26/97, 7/1/00, 8/5/01, 5/1/03
4713-5-18 Apprentice instructor.
On the date that an apprentice instructor begins instructor training in a licensed school,
the school shall certify the name of such apprentice instructor to the "Board" along with
the date on which the instructor training began. The school shall employ at least one
licensed instructor for each apprentice employed in direct supervision of students and
used as a factor in the instructor-student ratio of the school. Apprentice instructors shall
have a similarly licensed or cosmetology instructor providing oversight when in direct
supervision of students. Instructor information shall be provided on forms provided by
the "Board" or through SRSe procedures as established by the "Board".
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 2/24/91, 1/26/97, 5/1/03
4713-5-19 List of instructors to be filed with "Board".
Schools shall file with the "Board" a list of persons engaged as licensed instructors. Any
changes in the school's staff of instructors shall be reported to the "Board" within thirty
days. These lists shall be provided on forms provided by the "Board" or through SRSe
procedures established by the "Board".
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 1/26/97, 5/1/03
4713-5-20 Duty of instructors.
All persons engaged in a school as licensed instructors who are included in the student-
teacher ratio shall only instruct students in the theory and practice of the respective
branches of cosmetology and related endeavors. Career technical cosmetology
teachers may be assigned other school duties when not actively engaged with a
cosmetology laboratory related class.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 1/26/97, 5/1/03
4713-5-21 Instructor or apprentice instructor restrictions.
No one including an instructor, or apprentice instructor shall perform cosmetological
services for the public in a licensed school, except those persons enrolled as students
unless the instructor or apprentice instructor is demonstrating to a student with services
to a patron.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 1/26/97
4713-5-22 Students not to be compensated with wages.
No student shall be paid for the performance of services upon a patron or upon another
student..
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 1/26/97
4713-5-23 Clinic service assignments.
Clinic services shall be equitably assigned to all students in a manner to provide clinic
practice on a basis of student training needs. However, any student who has not been
certified for any procedures is not permitted to practice in this room when patrons are
being served in the clinic laboratory. Students may practice on the public any service for
which they have been certified.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 2/24/91, 1/26/97, 8/5/01, 5/1/03
4713-5-25 Temporary permit.
The following individuals are eligible for a temporary work permit; students approved for
examination for licensure; out-of-state licensees who are required to take the
examination for licensure; lapsed licensees upon application to take the examination;
and, escrowed licensees for thirty days from the date of receipt at the "Board" of an
application for a temporary work permit. The following individuals are eligible for a
temporary special occasion work permit: licensees from foreign states with at least five
years experience.
(A) Temporary work permits for examination applicants and escrowed licensees.
(1) Every applicant who desires to practice cosmetology or a branch thereof prior to
examination shall obtain a temporary work permit from the "Board". The temporary work
permit authorizes the holder thereof to engage in the practice of cosmetology under the
supervision of an appropriate board licensee up to the date of examination. Such
temporary work permit may be extended one time by the "Board"; however, no person
is entitled to more than one temporary work permit and candidates are not permitted to
practice cosmetology beyond the date of the extension. The applicant shall sign an
affidavit that should they fail the examination and fail to notify the salon owner of that
fact then, they will be ineligible to take the examination again for one year.
(2) The temporary permit shall be mailed to the salon in which the applicant has
arranged to work and said salon identification number shall be included on the
application. The salon shall be notified of the results of the examination. If a temporary
permit application is submitted without a salon listed, the permit shall be held at the
Board until such time as the salon name and identification number are provided at
which time the permit shall be mailed to the salon.
(3) The temporary permit will be turned in to the "Board" on the date of the examination.
(4) On the date of examination, the work permit may be extended to a "Board"
determined date which will allow the candidate to continue to work pending receipt of
their examination results or their license assuming they passed the examination. The
extended work permit will be authenticated with the "Board" seal and candidates will not
be permitted to practice cosmetology services beyond this "Board" determined date
without a license.
(5) Temporary permit holders who do not take the state examination on the scheduled
date can no longer perform cosmetology services under that temporary permit and must
return this permit to the "Board" offices. That temporary permit may be extended one
time only prior to a rescheduled examination and shall be physically presented at the
Board for extension. The applicant shall have the extended temporary permit in hand at
the salon in order to provide services.
(6) Temporary permit holders who fail the state exam are ineligible to work on that
temporary permit once they have been notified by the "Board" that they have failed the
state exam.
(a) The temporary permit must be immediately returned to the "Board".
(b) Temporary permit holders who do not return the work permit to the "Board" will not
be rescheduled for the exam until the temporary permit has been returned to the
"Board".
(c) Temporary permits may be returned to the "Board" with the exam reschedule
application.
(B) Salons are eligible for one special occasion work permit per individual licensee per
year. All documents shall be provided in English or with a certified English translation.
Each salon that desires a temporary special occasion work permit shall provide the
following:
(1) Pay a fee of fifty dollars.
(2) A copy of the license from the licensee's state. If they are from a foreign country that
does not license the cosmetology field, they shall provide documentation of professional
experience.
(3) The dates requested for the special occasion work permit not to exceed one month.
(4) The salon "Board" identification number.
(5) Proof that the licensee has at least five years experience in their field (as required on
the application).
(6) Proof of eligibility to work for non-citizens of the USA.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 1/26/97, 8/1/99, 8/5/01, 5/1/03
4713-5-26 Inspection of schools.
All authorized agents of the "Board" shall have the authority to enter and make
reasonable inspections of any school during its regular business hours for the purpose
of determining whether or not the school is in compliance with all statutes and rules.
Persons duly authorized to make an inspection of schools shall prepare a report of the
inspection on forms provided by the "Board". The report shall be signed by the inspector
and by the owner of the school or by a person authorized to sign for the owner. A copy
of the inspection report shall be left with the owner or manager. Career technical and
credit hour schools shall provide the "Board" thirty days advanced notice of scheduled
final exams for each quarter, semester or other term as applicable.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 2/24/91, 1/26/97, 8/5/01
4713-5-27 Sanitation.
(A) All schools must follow all of the sanitation statutes and rules governing beauty
salons, except that small working area waste containers, used in the schools, do not
need to be covered. All students shall wear clean outer garments and clean shoes while
attending school and comply with all of the school's rules regarding sanitation and attire.
(B) All students shall wear professional clothing at all times and when scheduled to take
the state exam at the "Board" exam center.
(1) A clean outer garment and closed toed clean shoes are required.
(2) Students wearing shorts, mini-skirts, tank tops, halter tops, midriff type tops, T-shirts
with graphics unrelated to a school or salon, or torn and tattered clothing shall not be
admitted to the test center.
(3) Students not admitted to the test center shall be dismissed, required to reschedule
for the state exam, and shall be required to pay a reschedule fee.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/07/2004 and 05/01/2009
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.44, 4713.45
Prior Effective Dates: 1/26/97, 8/1 99, 8/5/01

Chapter 4713-6 Internship Program
4713-6-01 Internship program definitions.
(A) "Good standing" means the following:
(1) The licensee maintains a valid, current cosmetology, esthetician, hair design, natural
hair stylist or manicurist license issued by the "Board".
(2) There is no current or pending discipline against the license.
(3) The licensee has no unpaid fine issued pursuant to section 4713.17 of the Revised
Code.
(B) "Appropriate training" means the student intern has completed at least fifty percent
of the required minimum practical operations and minimum hours of technical instruction
set forth in division (F), (G), (H), (I), or (J) of section 4713.28 of the Revised Code.
(C) "Chemical treatment" means any product or procedure, including the preparation
and/or application of the product, that alters or changes the molecular structure of the
hair, skin or nails through the chemical treatments. These treatments may include, but
are not limited to the following:
(1) Permanent waving
(2) Soft permanent waving
(3) Chemical straightening
(4) Sodium hydroxide and other base solutions
(5) Hair coloring and bleaching (semi-permanent and permanent)
(6) Chemical skin peel products
(7) Depilatory products
(8) Lash and brow tinting products
(D) "Direct and immediate supervision" means the student intern shall work on a paying
client, only in an assisting capacity, when a designated licensee is present to oversee
the work process. The tasks performed by the student intern shall be within the scope of
practice of the designated licensee who is supervising the student intern.
(E) "Directly supervised" means the student intern shall not use or apply chemical
treatments unless a designated licensee is present to oversee the work process. The
tasks performed by the student intern shall be within the scope of practice of the
designated licensee who is supervising the student intern.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.28(F)(G)(H)(I)(J), 4713.44(A)
Prior Effective Dates: 4/1/01, 1/10/04
4713-6-02 Eligible participants.
(A) All schools in good standing with the "Board" may participate in the internship
program at their sole discretion. Schools may direct and set limits on total hours and
days of the week.
(B) Students shall have completed at least fifty per cent of their base license course
outlines before they shall participate as an intern. The following additional restrictions
apply:
(1) Interns with less than seventy percent of their program complete shall not provide
chemical services.
(2) Students shall be in good standing at the school.
(3) Students shall have written permission from their parents, if they are minors.
(4) Students shall have met the schools eligibility requirements.
(C) Salons shall have a managing cosmetologist who has five years of experience or at
least one other licensee with five or more years of experience present when an intern is
present. All salons with a managing cosmetologist with five years of experience or more
may have one intern present at a time. To have more than one intern present the salon
shall have one matching licensee present for each intern.
(D) Schools or salons that violate any part of Chapter 4713-6 of the Administrative Code
shall be ineligible to participate in the internship program.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.28(F)(G)(H)(I)(J), 4713.44(A)
Prior Effective Dates: 4/1/01, 1/10/04
4713-6-03 Notification of participation in the cosmetology internship program.
Schools and salons participating in the cosmetology internship program shall submit a
copy of their written agreement to the "Board". Notification of participation shall be
updated annually to allow for continued participation in the program. The "Board" shall
review school and salon licenses for "good standing" upon notification of participation
and throughout the year.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.28(F)(G)(H)(I)(J), 4713.44(A)
Prior Effective Dates: 4/1/01
4713-6-04 School-salon internship agreement.
The school and salon shall have a written agreement to delineate responsibilities, which
shall include the following at minimum:
(A) A private school representative shall visit salon at least once each fifty hours or part
thereof of the internship, if the student is not returning to school during the internship.
(B) A public career-technical cosmetology instructor shall visit the salon at least once
each fifty hours or part thereof of the internship, if the student is not returning to school
during the internship.
(C) Salon licensees shall assess student capabilities before allowing them to work on
customers. Salons shall provide a written assessment on forms provided by the
"Board". All assessments of hours shall be done in increments of not more than fifty
percent of the total hours of the internship not to exceed fifty hours or at the end of the
internship, whichever is less.
(D) Salons shall inform all clients of student's intern status before student provides any
services including students wearing a "Board" id on their outer garment.
(E) Students shall be in a non-pay status only.
(F) Students shall be required to maintain a daily journal of services, jobs, tasks, etc.
Performed during the internship. The salon should sign off or initial each page to verify
the accuracy of the entries. The school shall review the journal on a regular basis for
evaluation purposes.
(G) Salons shall use a sign in/out form provided by the "Board" to track each intern's
hours in association with the student journal. Salons shall ensure that each intern is at
all times under the "direct and immediate supervision" as defined in paragraph (D) of
rule 4713-6-01 of the Administrative Code.
(H) The school and the salon shall have a signed training agreement and a completed
training plan on file.
(I) Schools shall require salons to participate in an orientation session to discuss the
intern program before students shall go to the salon.
(J) Students shall be scheduled for at least three hours and not exceed an aggregate
eight hours per day as required by section 4713.32 of the Revised Code.
(K) The agreement shall have a non-discrimination clause.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.28(F)(G)(H)(I)(J), 4713.44(A)
Prior Effective Dates: 4/1/01, 1/10/04
4713-6-05 Student identification.
(A) While working in an approved salon, all students participating in the internship
program shall wear a visible "Board" identification card (nametag with "student intern",
name and picture) on their outer garment.
(B) The "Board" shall provide the forms and requirements for student identification
cards.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.28(F)(G)(H)(I)(J), 4713.44(A)
Prior Effective Dates: 4/1/01
4713-6-06 Internship course outline for cosmetology/hair design students.
(A) Total clock hour credit toward graduation for a student intern participating in a
cosmetology/hair design internship program is limited to a maximum of ten percent of
course hours. Hair design students are ineligible for the manicuring and facial hours
listed below.
(B) For purposes of this section, technical instruction shall mean instruction by
demonstration, lecture, student intern participation or examination. Practical operations
shall mean the actual performance or participation by the student intern of a service on
another person. The desired maximum technical instruction and practical operations to
be covered in the internship program for cosmetology/hair design student interns, as
well as the credit that could be gained in each area are listed below. No salon shall
provide training for services not provided as a normal course of their business.
Subject Maximum hours of technical instruction Maximum practical operations
Client safety/OSHA/MSDS 4 Required 2
Disinfection and sanitation 4 2
Shampoo 25 25
Hair styling 25 50
Press and curl 2 6
Chemical control 25 55
Haircutting 25 55
Haircoloring and bleaching 25 25
Scalp and hair treatments 4 4
Facials (manual) 4 4
Facials (electrical) 4 4
Facials (chemical) 4 4
Eyebrow arching & hair removal 4 4
Makeup 4 4
Manicuring (water and oil) 4 4
Pedicure 4 4
Acrylic nails 4 10
Artificial nail tips 4 10
Nail wraps and repair 4 4
Business technology 10 10
Customer service 10 10
Retail inventory 10 10
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.28(F)(G)(H)(I)(J), 4713.44(A)
Prior Effective Dates: 4/1/01, 1/10/04
4713-6-07 Internship course outline for skin care students.
(A) Total clock hour credit toward graduation for a student intern participating in a skin
care internship program is limited to a maximum of ten percent of hours.
(B) For purposes of this section, technical instruction shall mean instruction by
demonstration, lecture, student intern participation or examination. Practical operations
shall mean the actual performance or participation by the student intern of a service on
another person. The desired maximum technical instruction and practical operations to
be covered in the internship program for skin care student interns, as well as the credit
that could be gained in each area are listed below. No salon shall provide training for
services not provided as a normal course of their business.
Subject Maximum hours of technical instruction Maximum practical operations
Client safety/OSHA/MSDS 4 Required 4
Disinfection and sanitation 4 4
Facials - manual 25 25
Facials - electrical 15 15
Facials - chemical 15 15
Eyebrow arching & hair removal
(Tweezers) 6 8
(Wax and depilatories) 12 12
Make up 12 12
Business technology 4 4
Customer service 4 4
Retail inventory 4 4
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.28(F)(G)(H)(I)(J), 4713.44(A)
Prior Effective Dates: 4/1/01, 1/10/04
4713-6-08 Internship course outline for manicure students.
(A) Total clock hour credit toward graduation for a student intern participating in a nail
care internship program is limited to a maximum of ten percent of hours.
(B) For purposes of this section, technical instruction shall mean instruction by
demonstration, lecture, student intern participation or examination. Practical operations
shall mean the actual performance or participation by the student intern of a service on
another person. The desired maximum technical instruction and practical operations to
be covered in the internship program for manicuring student interns, as well as the
credit that could be gained in each area are listed below. No salon shall provide training
for services not provided as a normal course of their business.
Subject Maximum hours Of technical Instruction Maximum Practical Operations
Client safety/osha/msds 4 Required 2
Disinfection and sanitation 2 3
Water and oil manicures 6 9
Pedicures 6 5
Acrylic nails 10 12
Artificial nail tips 10 12
Nail wraps and repair 5 6
Business technology 4 4
Customer service 4 4
Retail inventory 4 4
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.28(F)(G)(H)(I)(J), 4713.44(A)
Prior Effective Dates: 4/1/01, 1/10/04
4713-6-09 Internship course outline for natural hair stylist students.
(A) Total clock hour credit toward graduation for a student intern participating in a
natural hair stylist internship program is limited to a maximum of ten percent of hours.
(B) For purposes of this section, technical instruction shall mean instruction by
demonstration, lecture, student intern participation or examination. Practical operations
shall mean the actual performance or participation by the student intern of a service on
another person. The desired maximum technical instruction and practical operations to
be covered in the internship program for natural hair stylist student interns, as well as
the credit that could be gained in each area are listed below. No salon shall provide
training for services not provided as a normal course of their business.
Subject Maximum hours of technical instruction Maximum practical operations
Client safety/OSHA/MSDS 4 Required 2
Disinfection and sanitation 2 3
Shampoo 10 25
Hair art-beads, ribbons, etc. 10 25
Braiding 25 35
Additions 10 25
Braid removal 10 25
Business technology 4 4
Customer service 4 4
Retail inventory 4 4
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08(A)(13)
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.28(F)(G)(H)(I)(J), 4713.44(A)
Prior Effective Dates: 4/1/01, 1/10/04


Chapter 4713-7 Exams
4713-7-01 Notarization and processing of applications for examination.
All applications for examination for any branch of cosmetology shall be made upon
forms supplied by the "Board". All statements made on the application form shall be
subscribed and sworn to by the applicant and attested to under seal by a notary public.
After approval by the "Board", the applicant will receive a date upon which they are
scheduled to take the examination and an examination number, which the applicant
shall bring to the examination. Upon implementation of electronic or online application
process the oath required by section 4713.20 shall be completed through state
approved language in lieu of a notary public.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC4713.08(A(3)
Rule Amplifies: RC4713.20
Prior Effective Dates: 11/1/84, 12/17/89, 1/26/97, 4/1/00, 1/10/04
4713-7-02 No communication between applicants during examination.
Each examinee shall sit at an individual table or desk. The examinees shall not
communicate with other examinees during the examination and they shall not have any
written material, unless provided by the "Board". Pagers, cell phones, calculators or
other electronic devices are prohibited within the examination area. Anyone found
violating any rule or participating in any other type of misconduct shall be dismissed and
the applicant shall automatically fail the examination.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC4713.02
Rule Amplifies: RC4713.04
Prior Effective Dates: 11/1/84, 12/17/89, 1/26/97, 4/1/00
4713-7-03 Examination rooms.
The examination rooms shall be closed to everyone except examinees, examiners,
models and members of the "Board" unless otherwise permitted by the "Board".
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC4713.02
Rule Amplifies: RC4713.06
Prior Effective Dates: 11/1/84, 12/17/89, 2/24/91, 1/26/97
4713-7-04 Content of examinations.
The examination for each branch of cosmetology may not be confined to any specific
system or method. The examination shall be consistent with the prescribed curriculum
for each branch of cosmetology for licensed cosmetology schools of this state, and may
include practical demonstrations and written and oral tests as the "Board" deems
appropriate.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC4713.02
Rule Amplifies: RC4713.06
Prior Effective Dates: 11/1/84, 12/17/89, 1/26/97, 4/1/00
4713-7-05 Language requirements.
All oral and written directions for taking the practical and written licensing examinations
given by the "Board" shall be provided in English. No translators or study aids shall be
permitted. The "Board" shall provide to an applicant, who is licensed or registered in
another state or country per section 4713.34 of the Revised Code, a written examination
in any language available from the "Board"s" contracted national examination provider
at the examinees request. All requests shall be made with the original application for
examination or at least two weeks prior to the scheduled examination date.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC4713.08(A(3)
Rule Amplifies: RC4713.24, 4713.20
Prior Effective Dates: 11/1/84, 12/17/89, 1/26/97, 1/10/04
4713-7-06 Necessary material for examination.
(A) Each examinee shall possess the necessary materials requested by the "Board" for
the examination. Models must be able to completely accommodate the examinee in all
of the testing areas necessary to include hair of sufficient length to permit a basic cut,
permanent wave and curl, and nails long enough to properly demonstrate polish
technique. Every model shall be at least fourteen years of age. Mannequins, if used for
a basic haircut, must be uncut.
(B) Persons who have attended any cosmetology courses, or been licensed to practice
cosmetology or any branch of cosmetology in any jurisdiction are not eligible as models
for any examination. Failure to abide by this rule will result in immediate dismissal of the
applicant and the entire examination shall be voided.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC4713.02
Rule Amplifies: RC4713.06
Prior Effective Dates: 11/1/84, 12/17/89, 1/26/97, 4/1/00
4713-7-07 Examination grading system.
To receive a passing score on any branch of cosmetology examination, the applicant
must attain at least a seventy-five score on both the written and practical examinations
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC4713.02
Rule Amplifies: RC4713.06
Prior Effective Dates: 11/1/84, 12/17/89, 1/26/97, 4/1/00
4713-7-08 Failure of applicants.
Applicants failing to pass their first or second examination may receive a rescheduled
examination date no sooner than two weeks following that examination, and shall retake
the written and/or practical on which they received a score of less than seventy five.
Except those failing a manager's examination, all applicants failing to pass a third
examination shall not be rescheduled to take a fourth examination until completion of
additional instruction in a licensed school as outlined below. Applicants failing to pass
the examination shall pay an examination fee for each succeeding examination.
(A) Manicurists who fail the test for the third time will be required to take 10 hours
additional instruction in theory, rules, sanitation, etc. If they fail the written section and
10 hours in manicuring clinic if they failed the practical. These hours may be met
through an equivalent credit hour course.
(B) Estheticians who fail the test for the third time will be required to take 30 hours
additional instruction in theory, rules, sanitation, etc. If they fail the written section and
30 hours in esthetics clinic if they failed the practical. These hours may be met through
an equivalent credit hour course.
(C) Natural hair stylists who fail the test for the third time will be required to take twenty-
two and a half hours additional instruction in theory, rules, sanitation, etc. If they fail the
written section and twenty-two and a half hours in hairbraiding clinic if they failed the
practical. These hours may be met through an equivalent credit hour course.
(D) Hair designers who fail the test for the third time will be required to take 60 hours
additional instruction in theory, rules, sanitation, etc. If they fail the written section and
60 hours in hair design clinic if they failed the practical. These hours may be met
through an equivalent credit hour course.
(E) Cosmetologists who fail the test for the third time will be required to take seventy-
five hours additional instruction in theory, rules, sanitation, etc. If they fail the written
section and seventy-five hours in cosmetology clinic if they failed the practical. These
hours may be met through an equivalent credit hour course.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC4713.08(A)(3)
Rule Amplifies: RC4713.24, 4713.20
Prior Effective Dates: 11/1/84, 12/17/89, 4/1/00, 1/10/04
4713-7-09 Reciprocity.
(A) Upon application to the "Board", as provided in section 4713.34 of the Revised
Code, accompanied by the required license fee, a person who is licensed or registered
as a cosmetologist or in any branch of cosmetology under the laws of any other state or
country, or territory of the United States, or District of Columbia (hereinafter "foreign
state") may be granted reciprocity and a license to practice cosmetology, or said branch
there to, without requirement of examination if the following are established:
(1) The foreign state from which the person originally obtained his/her cosmetology or
branch of cosmetology license or registration shall have substantially equal or greater
licensing requirements than those required in the state of Ohio for licensing of
cosmetologist or said branches; or the foreign state must have a written reciprocity
agreement with Ohio; or the applicant shall have at least five years of experience in a
salon;
(2) The foreign state must extend similar reciprocity to the state of Ohio;
(3) That the applicant be eighteen years of age or older;
(4) That the applicant be of good moral character;
(5) The "Board" may require a written & practical examination of any licensee type at its
sole discretion, for example all cosmetologists or manicurists.
(6) All applicants for reciprocity with five or more years of experience shall be eligible for
licensure upon successfully passing the Ohio manager's examination.
(B) Upon application to the "Board" as provided in section 4713.34 of the Revised Code,
accompanied by the required license fee, a person who engaged in cosmetology or in
any branch of cosmetology from a state or country, or territory of the United States, or
District of Columbia (hereinafter "foreign state") that did not license or register said
cosmetologist or said branch thereto, may be granted reciprocity and a license to
practice cosmetology or said branch thereto, with examination if at the "Board's"
discretion the following conditions are established:
(1) This provision only applies if the state, territory or foreign government does not
license occupations licensed by Ohio;
(2) That the applicant be eighteen years of age or older;
(3) That the applicant be of good moral character;
(4) All applicants for all license types shall be required to pass the appropriate written
and practical examination.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC4713.08(A)(6)
Rule Amplifies: RC4713.34
Prior Effective Dates: 1/26/97, 7/1/00, 1/10/04
4713-7-10 Cosmetology licenses.
The following cosmetology licenses are defined as subsets of the existing license in
Revised Code 4713.04.
(A) Hair designer is a cosmetologist license that includes training in hair services only.
Applicants for this license must meet all qualifications for the cosmetologist license
except applicants shall have received at least twelve hundred hours of instruction in hair
servicing aspects only of cosmetology.
(B) Managing hair designer is a managing cosmetologist license that allows a hair
designer to operate a beauty salon designated in O.A.C. 4713-11-01(C)(5). applicants
for this license shall meet all requirements of the managing cosmetologist license
except that at least two hundred and forty hours of training shall be required per the
"Board" approved curriculum.
(C) Hair designer instructor is a cosmetology instructor license that allows the instructor
to teach only hair aspects of cosmetology. Applicants must meet all requirements of a
cosmetology instructor license except that at least eight hundred hours of training shall
be required per the "Board" approved curriculum.
(D) Managing natural hairstylist is a managing cosmetologist license that allows a
natural hairstylist to operate a beauty salon designated in O.A.C. 4713-11-01(C)(4).
Applicants for this license shall meet all requirements of the managing cosmetologist
license except that at least one hundred and fifty hours of training shall be required per
the "Board" approved curriculum.
(E) Natural hairstylist instructor is a cosmetology instructor license that allows the
instructor to teach only hairbraiding aspects of cosmetology. Applicants must meet all
requirements of a cosmetology instructor license except that at least four hundred hours
of training shall be required per the "Board" approved curriculum.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC4713.02
Rule Amplifies: RC4713.04
Prior Effective Dates: 11/1/84, 12/17/89, 4/1/00
4713-7-12 Additional training for students with expired hours.
Applicants who have completed any hours for any branch of cosmetology and some of
whose hours have expired due to the five year limit in section 4713.32 of the Revised
Code will retain hours after five years as delineated below.
(A) Whatever hours a candidate may have are whole (one hundred per cent) until the
end of the five year period.
(B) Candidates then start losing twenty per cent of their hours per year following the five
year period.
(1) Students will keep: eighty per cent of hours that are between five and six years old;
sixty per cent of hours that are between six and seven years old; forty per cent of hours
that are between seven and eight years old; and twenty per cent of hours that are
between eight and ten years old.
(2) Thus a student completing a fifteen hundred hour program with all hours over five
years but less than six years old would need an additional three hundred hours to be
eligible to apply to take the licensing examination.
(3) A student with one thousand hours toward a fifteen hundred hour program that were
all between six and seven years old would lose four hundred hours and need nine
hundred hours to be eligible to apply to take the licensing examination.
(4) A student with fifteen hundred hours of which only five hundred are over five years
old and not over six years old would lose one hundred hours and need one hundred
new hours to be eligible to apply to take the licensing examination..
(5) A student whose hours are all more than ten years old would lose all hours.
(C) Students shall have one year from the re-enrollment date in school for each five
hundred hours or part thereof to complete the additional hours and schedule their
licensing exam.
(D) Should students fail to complete the program in the allotted time frame of
subparagraph (4) above a new calculation of expired hours shall be completed and a
new school enrollment put in place to document that change.
HISTORY: Eff 4-1-05
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(4)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.32
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 04/01/2010


Chapter 4713-8 Standards of Safe and Effective Practice
4713-8-01 General information.
(A) The purpose of this chapter is to establish:
(1) Minimal acceptable standards of safe and effective cosmetology practice for a
cosmetologist, hair designer, esthetician, natural hair stylist and manicurist in a salon;
(2) Criteria for the "Board" to evaluate:
(a) Safe and effective cosmetology practice; and
(b) Adherence to acceptable and prevailing standards of cosmetology practice.
(B) The "Board" may determine adherence to acceptable and prevailing standards of
safe cosmetology practice by using:
(1) "Board" member expertise;
(2) An expert witness;
(3) Current cosmetology or related literature which emanates from a recognized body of
knowledge;
(4) Position statements, standards for practice, or guidelines for practice from nationally
recognized cosmetology entities; or
(5) Other recognized sources which may provide the appropriate expertise or
information.
(6) When determining adherence the "Board" shall ensure that all practices are within
the definition of that branch of cosmetology as defined in section 4713.01 of the
Revised Code.
(C) For purposes of this chapter, the following definitions shall apply:
(1) "Exfoliation" means the sloughing off of non-living (dead) skin cells by very
superficial and non-invasive means.
(2) "Non-invasive" means confined to the nonliving cells of the epidermis specifically the
stratum corneum layer. Living cells must never be altered, cut or damaged. During
services performed by individuals licensed in this chapter at no time should the basal
layers be compromised.
(3) "Client" means the recipient of cosmetology services, which may include an
individual, a group, or a community.
(4) "Cosmetology Service" means any service provided to a client within the scope of
practice of the individual license types of the "Board".
(5) "Advanced Practice" means any cosmetology service not taught in basic
cosmetology school courses that require postgraduate training such as chemical or
mechanical exfoliation, body treatments, clipper cuts, or other advanced manual,
chemical or mechanical techniques.
(6) "Therapy" means a non-invasive, non-medical and non-healing service such as
aroma therapy or other relaxation services.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08(A)(1)
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.01, 4713.15
Prior Effective Dates: 1/10/04
4713-8-02 Board consideration of a violation of a standard of cosmetology practice.
(A) A "Board" licensee who does not practice cosmetology services according to
acceptable and prevailing standards of safe cosmetology care, as set forth in this
chapter, may be subject to discipline by the "Board" as established in section 4713.64 of
the Revised Code per Chapter 119. of the Revised Code and with paragraph (B) of this
rule.
(B) The "Board" may consider mitigating circumstances when making a decision
regarding charges, disciplinary action, or referral to a non-disciplinary program.
(1) Whether the act is willful, intentional, irresponsible, or unintentional;
(2) The frequency of the occurrence of the act at issue;
(3) Whether the act represents a pattern of commissions or omissions;
(4) The outcome of a licensee's actions; or
(5) The level of harm or potential harm to a client.
(C) The "Board" grants the authority to the executive director to oversee the inspection
process and to initiate disciplinary proceedings pursuant to paragraph (A) of this rule
and to issue notices of violation in accordance with Chapter 119. of the Revised Code.
Following the Chapter 119. administrative process, and in accordance with Chapter
119. of the Revised Code, the "Board" will determine whether a "Board" licensee has
committed a violation of Chapter 4713. of the Revised Code or the administrative rules
promulgated under that chapter, and whether it will impose a sanction when violations
have been determined by the "Board" to have been committed.
Effective: 08/11/2008
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/20/2008 and 08/11/2013
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(1)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.01, 4713.15
Prior Effective Dates: 1/10/04
4713-8-03 Standards relating to competent practice as a cosmetologist.
(A) A cosmetologist shall provide cosmetology services within the scope of practice of
cosmetology for a cosmetologist as set forth in section 4731.01 of the Revised Code
and the rules of the "Board".
(B) A cosmetologist shall maintain knowledge of the duties, responsibilities, and
accountabilities of practice and shall practice in accordance with the following:
(1) The laws regulating the practice of cosmetology;
(2) The rules of the "Board";
(3) Any other applicable federal and state laws and rules; and
(4) Position statements, standards for practice, or guidelines for practice from nationally
recognized professional cosmetology entities; provided these statements, standards, or
guidelines are consistent with existing laws or rules.
(C) A cosmetologist shall demonstrate competence and accountability in all areas of
practice in which the cosmetologist is engaged which includes, but is not limited to, the
following:
(1) Consistent performance of all aspects of cosmetology services according to
acceptable and prevailing standards; and
(2) Appropriate recognition, referral or consultation, and intervention, when a
complication arises during or after the performance of a specific service or procedure.
(D) A cosmetologist may provide advanced cosmetology services provided:
(1) The cosmetologist obtains appropriate education, which emanates from a
recognized body of knowledge relative to the cosmetology service to be provided;
(2) The cosmetologist demonstrates appropriate knowledge, skills, and abilities to
provide the cosmetology service;
(3) The cosmetologist maintains documentation satisfactory to the "Board" of meeting
the requirements set forth in Paragraphs (D)(1) and (D)(2) of this rule;
(4) The cosmetology service does not involve a function or procedure, which is
prohibited by any other law or rule and does not exceed the definition of the practice of
cosmetology in section 4713.01 of Revised Code.
(E) Cosmetologists shall not provide any service that claims to have a medical or
healing benefit. The scope of practice is limited to beautification and relaxation services
only. The scope of practice is limited to non-invasive services only. Services offered
using the term therapy shall be within the meaning defined in rule 4713-8-01(C)(6) of
the Administrative Code.
(F) Cosmetologists may exfoliate stratum corneum cells only. With proper postgraduate
training cosmetologists may use any chemical, mechanical or electrical service that only
exfoliates cells of the stratum corneum. Proper graduate training from the manufacturer
or the manufacturer#s certified representative shall be required prior to service to the
public. The manufacturer#s certificate of training shall be displayed in a publicly
conspicuous place.
(G) Cosmetologists may use a lancet to enhance the opening in a comedo or to create
a small opening in the dead surface corneum to facilitate extraction of a milia in order to
better extract the contents. Cosmetologists shall not pierce the stratum corneum or use
a lancet for any other purpose. Cosmetologists shall not perform a comedo
enhancement or milia extraction with a lancet unless they have had specific
documented training for this procedure. Only sterile, one-use, disposable lancets shall
be used and they shall be disposed of in a "sharps box" medical waste container.
(H) Cosmetologists may perform services that are unregulated by the state in salons
upon completing postgraduate training for those services as established by policy of the
Board and required by rule 4713-13-12 of the Administrative Code. These services
include but are not limited to body wraps, ear piercing, hypnosis for relaxation, etc.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08(A)(1)
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.01, 4713.15
Prior Effective Dates: 1/10/04
4713-8-04 Standards relating to competent practice as an esthetician.
(A) An esthetician shall provide cosmetology services within the scope of practice of
esthetics for an esthetician as set forth in section 4713.01 of the Revised Code and the
rules of the "Board".
(B) An esthetician shall maintain knowledge of the duties, responsibilities, and
accountabilities of practice and shall practice in accordance with the following:
(1) The laws regulating the practice of esthetics;
(2) The rules of the "Board";
(3) Any other applicable federal and state laws and rules; and
(4) Position statements, standards for practice, or guidelines for practice from nationally
recognized professional esthetic entities; provided these statements, standards, or
guidelines are consistent with existing laws or rules.
(C) An esthetician shall demonstrate competence and accountability in all areas of
practice in which the esthetician is engaged which includes, but is not limited to, the
following:
(1) Consistent performance of all aspects of esthetic services according to acceptable
and prevailing standards; and
(2) Appropriate recognition, referral or consultation, and intervention, when a
complication arises during or after the performance of a specific service or procedure.
(D) An esthetician may provide advanced esthetic services provided:
(1) The esthetician obtains appropriate education, which emanates from a recognized
body of knowledge relative to the esthetic service to be provided;
(2) The esthetician demonstrates appropriate knowledge, skills, and abilities to provide
the cosmetology service;
(3) The esthetician maintains documentation satisfactory to the Board of meeting the
requirements set forth in Paragraphs (D)(1) and (D)(2) of this rule;
(4) The esthetician service does not involve a function or procedure, which is prohibited
by any other law or rule and does not exceed the definition of the practice of esthetics in
section 4713.01 of Revised Code.
(E) Estheticians shall not provide any service that claims to have a medical or healing
benefit. The scope of practice is limited to beautification and relaxation services only.
The scope of practice is limited to non-invasive services only. Services offered using the
term therapy shall be within the meaning defined in rule 4713-8-01(C)(6) of the
Administrative Code.
(F) Estheticians may exfoliate stratum corneum cells only. They may use any chemical,
mechanical or electrical service that only exfoliates cells of the stratum corneum. Proper
graduate training from the manufacturer or the manufacturer#s certified representative
shall be required prior to service to the public. The manufacturer#s certificate of training
shall be displayed in a publicly conspicuous place.
(G) Estheticians may use a lancet to enhance the opening in a comedo or to create a
small opening in the dead surface corneum to facilitate extraction of a milia in order to
better extract the contents. Estheticians shall not pierce the stratum corneum or use a
lancet for any other purpose. Estheticians shall not perform a comedo enhancement or
milia extraction with a lancet unless they have had specific documented training for this
procedure. Only sterile, one-use, disposable lancets shall be used and they shall be
disposed of in a "sharps box" medical waste container.
(H) Estheticians may perform services that are unregulated by the state in salons upon
completing postgraduate training for those services as established by policy of the
Board and required by rule 4713-13-12 of the Administrative Code. These services
include but are not limited to body wraps, ear piercing, hypnosis for relaxation, etc.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08(A)(1)
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.01, 4713.15
Prior Effective Dates: 1/10/04
4713-8-05 Standards relating to competent practice as a hair designer.
(A) A hair designer shall provide cosmetology services within the scope of practice of
hair design for a hair designer as set forth in section 4731.01 of the Revised Code and
the rules of the "Board".
(B) A hair designer shall maintain knowledge of the duties, responsibilities, and
accountabilities of practice and shall practice in accordance with the following:
(1) The laws regulating the practice of hair design;
(2) The rules of the "Board";
(3) Any other applicable federal and state laws and rules; and
(4) Position statements, standards for practice, or guidelines for practice from nationally
recognized professional cosmetology or hair design entities; provided these statements,
standards, or guidelines are consistent with existing laws or rules.
(C) A hair designer shall demonstrate competence and accountability in all areas of
practice in which the hair designer is engaged which includes, but is not limited to, the
following:
(1) Consistent performance of all aspects of hair design services according to
acceptable and prevailing standards; and
(2) Appropriate recognition, referral or consultation, and intervention, when a
complication arises during or after the performance of a specific service or procedure.
(D) A hair designer may provide advanced hair design services provided:
(1) The hair designer obtains appropriate education, which emanates from a recognized
body of knowledge relative to the hair design service to be provided;
(2) The hair designer demonstrates appropriate knowledge, skills, and abilities to
provide the hair design service;
(3) The hair designer maintains documentation satisfactory to the "Board" of meeting
the requirements set forth in Paragraphs (D)(1) and (D)(2) of this rule;
(4) The hair designer service does not involve a function or procedure, which is
prohibited by any other law or rule and does not exceed the definition of the practice of
hair design in section 4713.01 of Revised Code.
(E) Hair designers shall not provide any service that claims to have a medical or healing
benefit. The scope of practice is limited to beautification and relaxation services only.
The scope of practice is limited to non-invasive services only. Services offered using the
term therapy shall be within the meaning defined in rule 4713-8-01(C)(6) of the
Administrative Code.
(F) Hair designers may perform services that are unregulated by the state in salons
upon completing postgraduate training for those services as established by policy of the
Board and required by rule 4713-13-12 of the Administrative Code. These services
include but are not limited to body wraps, ear piercing, hypnosis for relaxation, etc.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08(A)(1)
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.01, 4713.15
Prior Effective Dates: 1/10/04
4713-8-06 Standards relating to competent practice as a natural hair stylist.
(A) A natural hair stylist shall provide cosmetology services within the scope of practice
of natural hair styling for a natural hair stylist as set forth in section 4731.01 of the
Revised Code and the rules of the "Board".
(B) A natural hair stylist shall maintain knowledge of the duties, responsibilities, and
accountabilities of practice and shall practice in accordance with the following:
(1) The laws regulating the practice of natural hair styling;
(2) The rules of the "Board";
(3) Any other applicable federal and state laws and rules; and
(4) Position statements, standards for practice, or guidelines for practice from nationally
recognized professional cosmetology or natural hair stylist entities; provided these
statements, standards, or guidelines are consistent with existing laws or rules.
(C) A natural hair stylist shall demonstrate competence and accountability in all areas of
practice in which the natural hair stylist is engaged which includes, but is not limited to,
the following:
(1) Consistent performance of all aspects of natural hair styling services according to
acceptable and prevailing standards; and
(2) Appropriate recognition, referral or consultation, and intervention, when a
complication arises during or after the performance of a specific service or procedure.
(D) A natural hair stylist may provide advanced natural hair styling services provided:
(1) The natural hair stylist obtains appropriate education, which emanates from a
recognized body of knowledge relative to the natural hair styling service to be provided;
(2) The natural hair stylist demonstrates appropriate knowledge, skills, and abilities to
provide the cosmetology service;
(3) The natural hair stylist maintains documentation satisfactory to the "Board" of
meeting the requirements set forth in paragraphs (D)(1) and (D)(2) of this rule;
(4) The natural hair stylist service does not involve a function or procedure, which is
prohibited by any other law or rule and does not exceed the definition of the practice of
natural hair styling in section 4713.01 of Revised Code.
(E) Natural hair stylists shall not provide any service that claims to have a medical or
healing benefit. The scope of practice is limited to beautification and relaxation services
only. The scope of practice is limited to non-invasive services only. Services offered
using the term therapy shall be within the meaning defined in rule 4713-8-01(C)(6) of
the Administrative Code.
(F) Natural hair stylists may perform services that are unregulated by the state in salons
upon completing postgraduate training for those services as established by policy of the
"Board" and required by rule 4713-13-12 of the Administrative Code. These services
include but are not limited to body wraps, ear piercing, hypnosis for relaxation, etc.
Effective: 09/28/2008
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 07/14/2008 and 09/28/2013
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(1)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.01, 4713.15
Prior Effective Dates: 1/10/04
4713-8-07 Standards relating to competent practice as a manicurist.
(A) A manicurist shall provide cosmetology services within the scope of practice of
manicuring for a manicurist as set forth in section 4731.01 of the Revised Code and the
rules of the "Board".
(B) A manicurist shall maintain knowledge of the duties, responsibilities, and
accountabilities of practice and shall practice in accordance with the following:
(1) The laws regulating the practice of manicuring;
(2) The rules of the "Board";
(3) Any other applicable federal and state laws and rules; and
(4) Position statements, standards for practice, or guidelines for practice from nationally
recognized professional cosmetology or manicuring entities; provided these statements,
standards, or guidelines are consistent with existing laws or rules.
(C) A manicurist shall demonstrate competence and accountability in all areas of
practice in which the manicurist is engaged, which includes, but is not limited to, the
following:
(1) Consistent performance of all aspects of manicuring services according to
acceptable and prevailing standards; and
(2) Appropriate recognition, referral or consultation, and intervention, when a
complication arises during or after the performance of a specific service or procedure.
(D) A manicurist may provide advanced manicuring services provided:
(1) The manicurist obtains appropriate education, which emanates from a recognized
body of knowledge relative to the cosmetology service to be provided;
(2) The manicurist demonstrates appropriate knowledge, skills, and abilities to provide
the cosmetology service;
(3) The manicurist maintains documentation satisfactory to the "Board" of meeting the
requirements set forth in Paragraphs (D)(1) and (D)(2) of this rule;
(4) The manicurist service does not involve a function or procedure, which is prohibited
by any other law or rule and does not exceed the definition of the practice of manicuring
in section 4713.01 of Revised Code.
(E) Manicurists shall not provide any service that claims to have a medical or healing
benefit. The scope of practice is limited to beautification and relaxation services only.
The scope of practice is limited to non-invasive services only. Services offered using the
term therapy shall be within the meaning defined in rule 4713-8-01(C)(6) of the
Administrative Code.
(F) Manicurists may perform services that are unregulated by the state in salons upon
completing postgraduate training for those services as established by policy of the
"Board" and required by rule 4713-13-12 of the Administrative Code. These services
include but are not limited to body wraps, ear piercing, hypnosis for relaxation, etc.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08(A)(1)
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.01, 4713.15
Prior Effective Dates: 1/10/04
4713-8-08 Services rendered in an unlicensed facility; Temporary special event permits.
(A) No person shall offer or render any of the services encompassed within the
definition and rules of the Board of Cosmetology in a place which is not licensed as a
salon or school except that a practicing licensee may render the services for which he
or she is licensed to offer on a limited and temporary basis if the licensee applies for
and receives a temporary special event permit.
(B) Temporary special event permits shall be approved by the Executive Director, or his
or her designee. Temporary special event permits are only valid for one event lasting no
more than forty-eight (48) hours. Multiple events require the licensee to apply for and
receive a separate temporary special event permit for each event.
(C) The types of special events contemplated by this rule include, but are not limited to:
charity events, on-location bridal parties, bridal shows and on-location spa parties.
Requests that vary from these listed examples must be approved by the Board by a
majority vote of a quorum of the board members. Individual licensees and salon
licensees are permitted to request special event permits.
(D) At a minimum, in the application for a temporary special event permit, the licensee
must provide the type of event, date of event, time of event, location of event, and the
names and license numbers of the licensees performing the services during the event.
(E) Licensees shall be responsible for ensuring that they are fully supplied and
equipped when they perform services outside a licensed facility, in addition to ensuring
compliance with the safety and sanitation laws and rules of the Board.
(F) The Board expressly reserves the right to inspect special events at random and
without notice.
Effective: 09/28/2008
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 09/28/2013
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(1)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.35

Chapter 4713-11 Salons
4713-11-01 APPLICATION FOR OPERATION OF BEAUTY SALON.
All applicants for a license for the operation of a salon under provisions of Chapter
4713. of the Revised Code, shall apply on forms supplied by the "Board" for the
operation of a salon and for the procedures to follow in making application for licensure.
No salon shall begin operating or providing services to the public until the proper license
is obtained and displayed. Applications for licensure of a salon are valid for ninety days
after approval by the Board, failure to obtain an approved inspection or temporary
certificate for operation within the ninety days shall invalidate the application and require
new application and fee.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08(A)(1)
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.41
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 2/24/91, 1/26/97, 4/1/00, 1/10/04
4713-11-02 Floor plan and zoning approval.
Applicants for the first five types of beauty salons designated in OAC 4713-11-01 must
meet the following requirements:
(a) The floor plan shall be drawn to scale, showing in detail the size of the premises,
and each room contained therein, and describe any areas accessible to the salon
through doors or any other openings, all equipment, and all plumbing fixtures. This floor
plan shall be legible and clearly labeled.
(b) Whenever a licensed salon desires to alter the original floor plan filed with the
"Board", or desires to add other services, an approval of the proposed revised floor plan
shall be obtained from the "Board" prior to commencing any such construction or the
offering of other services.
(c) All salons attached to a residence shall additionally indicate in their floor plan the
exact location of salon and living quarters and obtain proper approval from the local
zoning "Board" indicating that cosmetology may be practiced in that location.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.02
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.13
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 2/24/91, 1/26/97, 4/1/00
4713-11-03 Water supply; waste disposal.
Every salon facility shall be equipped with an adequate supply of hot and cold running
water and proper plumbing. Every salon facility shall adhere to the following standards
promulgated by the Ohio department of health:
(A) Safe water supply shall be provided;
(B) Sewage and other liquid wastes shall be disposed of in a sanitary manner;
(C) The storage and collection of solid waste shall be conducted so as to avoid creation
of health hazards, rodent harborages, insect breeding areas and accidents;
(D) Solid waste shall be stored in waste containers;
(E) Solid wastes shall be collected at least once each week.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.02
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.14
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 2/24/91, 1/26/97, 4/1/00
4713-11-04 Permits.
All salon facilities shall comply with all requirements and/or permits required by
state,local and federal regulations if applicable.
Replaces: 4713-11-04
Effective: 10/31/2006
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.14
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 2/24/91, 1/26/97, 4/1/00
4713-11-05 Restrooms.
All salon facilities shall be equipped with at least one restroom , including a toilet and
hand-washing sink with hot and cold running water. The restroom shall be kept clean,
sanitary and functional at all times. The restrooms shall have a pump soap container,
covered waste containers with solid sides or liner, and paper towel dispenser or
equipment for hand-drying. Salons located in a mall, office building or nursing home
with available public restrooms do not need a separate restroom internal to the salon.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.02
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.13
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 2/24/91, 1/26/97, 4/1/00
4713-11-06 Cosmetological substance storage.
All locations where cosmetology services are performed shall designate a cabinet or
other similar storage container or units that are adequate to safely store chemicals,
covered wet sanitizers and other cosmetological substances. The size of the
cosmetological substance storage containers should be adequate to provide for the
number of licensees providing services and square footage of the location. Any
deviations from this standard are subject to a vote by the members of the Board.
Examples include but are not limited to: color bars, cabinets and storage closets.
Replaces: The original text of 4713-11-06 is being replaced because at least 50% of the
language has been changed.
Effective: 09/28/2008
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 09/28/2013
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(1)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.41
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 2/24/91, 1/26/97, 4/1/00, 1/10/04
4713-11-07 Display of sign.
Every establishment licensed by the "board" shall display a sign at its main entrance
which will be clearly visible from the street using at least three inch tall letters, stating
the name of business as submitted on application, except that in the case of a beauty
salon located within a department store or shopping center the sign may be displayed at
the entrance to the beauty salon.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08(A)(1)
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.41
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 2/24/91, 1/26/97, 4/1/00, 1/10/04
4713-11-08 Resident salons and mobile home salons.
Except for beauty salons licensed prior to September 5, 1977, salons shall maintain a
separate entrance which shall not open off the living quarters, and which shall not have
any doors, openings, or any other access leading to the living quarters or residential
areas. Entrance through garages or any other rooms into the salon shall not be
permitted. Mobile homes, motor homes, trailers or any type of recreational vehicle are
not designed for commercial use under the Ohio building codes and therefore prohibited
for licensure as any type of salon or tanning facility.
Effective: 10/31/2006
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 09/08/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.14
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 1/26/97
4713-11-09 Exhaust fumes from service areas.
In any facility licensed as a salon by the "Board," the service area must be equipped
with properly maintained exhaust fans or air filtration equipment that meets local and
state building codes. The Ohio building code that applies is rule 4101:2-39-03 of the
Administrative Code (Table 403.3).
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.02
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.14
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 2/24/91, 1/26/97, 7/1/00
4713-11-10 Service Listing.
(A) If a salon provides any non-cosmetology services the salon shall post a listing of all
services provided, and the regulatory agency that provides oversight of said services, if
any. The certificates of specialized training of the providers, if any, shall be posted in the
area where services are being provided within the salon. Only "Board" licensees as
required by rules 4713-8-03 to 4713-8-07 of the Administrative Code or licensees of
other Ohio regulatory boards shall provide all non-regulated services. The services
listing shall be posted in a conspicuous public place in the salon. The salon may on
forms provided by the "Board" or an equivalent document make the listing. The listing
shall have three columns:
(1) The services provided:
(2) The regulatory agency for that service;
(3) The license type of providers.
(B) If the service is unregulated the third column should list the "Board" licensee or other
Ohio board licensee providing the service with a statement that the provider meets the
minimum training requirements of the "Board" for that service. All services in the salon
shall be provided by "Board" licensees or other Ohio board licensees only.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08(A)(1)
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.41
Prior Effective Dates: 1/17/02, 5/1/04
4713-11-11 GLAMOUR PHOTOGRAPHY SERVICES.
All cosmetology services performed in conjunction with glamour photography services
shall be provided only in a licensed salon.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08(A)(7)
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.41
Prior Effective Dates: 1/10/04
4713-11-12 Non-Cosmetology Ohio Professional Regulatory Board Licensees.
All licensees from any Ohio professional regulatory board are eligible to work in salons
in keeping with the laws and rules of their governing boards. Any issue that arises
concerning a licensee shall be referred to the appropriate governing board.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08(A)(11), 4713.08(A)(12)
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.41, 4713.42
Prior Effective Dates: 1/10/04

Chapter 4713-13 Beauty and Nail Salon Licensing
4713-13-01 Change of ownership.
Salon facility licenses are not transferable from one address to another, or from one
owner to another. A new salon license application must be filed within thirty days of any
change of ownership. salons are permitted to open or offer services while the
application is processed and are subject to the "Board's" approval under the rules
contained in Chapter 4713-1 of the Administrative Code. Any salon with an
administrative action(s) pending cannot transfer a license until the administrative
action(s) is resolved.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.02
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.16
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 2/24/91, 1/26/97, 7/1/00
4713-13-02 Independent contractor.
(A) Independent contractors, formerly known as "booth renters", will receive
independent contractor licenses that meet the following criteria:
(1) Addressed to the licensee's home address.
(2) The license must be posted at all times with the individuals cosmetology or branch of
cosmetology license in the salon where they are working.
(3) These licensees will be a different color from other salon licenses.
(4) Applicants must have an active manager's license for the appropriate branch of
cosmetology.
(5) This license authorizes the individual to work in any "Board" licensed salon, which
includes their branch of cosmetology.
(B) Where a license for an independent contractor has been issued, the "Board" shall
hold the individual independent contractor and the salon owner responsible for the
compliance with all cosmetology statutes and rules as follows:
(1) Salon owner is responsible for all common areas and any employee areas.
(2) Independent contractors are responsible for own station areas permanently
assigned and any being used when inspection occurs.
(3) Independent contractors are equally responsible for common areas when present.
Effective: 09/28/2008
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 07/14/2008 and 09/28/2013
Statutory Authority: 4713.08(A)(9)
Rule Amplifies: 4713.39
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 2/24/91, 1/26/97, 4/1/00, 1/10/04
4713-13-03 Necessity of managers.
(A) A licensee with an active manager license shall be present in a salon at all times in
which a salon is open except that a manager may be absent from a salon for a period of
sixty minutes two times a day so long as the manager is readily accessible by phone, or
the equivalent, and can return to the salon within thirty minutes. A manager must return
to the salon when requested by a "Board" inspector, when requested by an employee,
and whenever any situation arises which may affect any persons safety.
(B) A business establishment that is engaged primarily in retail sales but is also licensed
as a salon shall have a person holding a current, valid managing license for that type of
salon in charge of and in immediate supervision of the cosmetology services during
active, posted or advertised service hours.
(C) A primarily retail salon is defined as one that has at least fifty percent of square
footage devoted to retail sales and which is open for salon services at least seventy-five
percent of the hours the retail facility is open.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08(A)(1)
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.41
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 2/24/91, 1/26/97, 5/1/04
4713-13-04 Licenses must be conspicuously displayed.
(A) All persons practicing any branch of cosmetology must conspicuously display a
current "Board" license with a recent, not more than five years old, approved
photograph for inspection by authorized agents of the "Board".
(B) Each salon owner shall be responsible for hiring only individuals licensed by the
"Board" and shall require that all persons employed for cosmetological services hold a
current applicable and valid Ohio license.
(C) Salon owners who employ persons holding a temporary work permit, are
responsible for ensuring that the work permit holder has a current, valid, and
conspicuously displayed work permit.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.02
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.16
Prior Effective Dates: 1/18/85, 12/17/89, 2/24/91, 1/26/97, 4/1/00
4713-13-05 Inspection of salons.
All authorized agents of the "Board" shall have the authority to enter and make
reasonable inspections of any salon during its regular business hours for the purpose of
determining whether or not the "Board's" rules are being observed. If no hours of
operation are posted and the salon's doors are unlocked an inspector may conduct an
inspection and the salon will be deemed as "open for business". Persons duly
authorized to make an inspection of salons shall prepare a report of the inspection on
forms provided by the "Board". The report shall be signed by the inspector and by the
owner of the salon or by a person authorized to sign for the owner. A copy of the
inspection report shall be left with the owner or manager of the salon.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.02
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.02
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 2/24/91, 1/26/97, 4/1/00
4713-13-06 Licensee list.
The owner, manager, or person in charge of each licensed cosmetology facility shall do
the following:
Make available upon request of a board inspector a current list, on a form prescribed by
the board, containing the name of each person employed by or leasing space in the
salon, the type of license(s) that each person holds, the identification number of each
such license(s), and current address.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.02
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.02
Prior Effective Dates: 4/1/00
4713-13-09 Retailing of items in salons.
Salons may retail any legal merchandise in their salon as long as the merchandise does
not create a health, safety or sanitation problem.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.02
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.14
Prior Effective Dates: 4/1/01
4713-13-10 Demonstrations at trade shows and other events.
Services on the public shall not be performed at trade shows or other public events.
Demonstrations on models are allowed. Models shall have a written contract with a
performance payment.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 08/29/2005 and 03/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.02
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.14
Prior Effective Dates: 4/1/01
4713-13-11 Other business co-located in a licensed facility. [Rescinded]
Rescinded eff 9-28-08
4713-13-12 Special services certification.
(A) As used in this rule, "A special service" means any procedure, and the devices used
to perform the procedure, which cause entry into skin, or the application of chemicals,
electricity, or non-medical cosmetological service to skin or hair, for example,
microdermabrasion, ear piercing, etc.
(B) Salons and schools shall not provide any special service until the "Board" has
reviewed and approved the service for use in licensed salons and schools. A request to
review a special service shall be made to the "Board" on forms provided by the "Board".
(C) The "Board" at the time of approval will provide requirements for use of each
specific device and procedure covered by this rule which must be followed by the
licensed salons and schools; in addition the salons and schools must comply with the
following general requirements:
(1) Salon and school owners must ensure only licensees who have received approved
manufacturers training are permitted to operate devices.
(2) Each individual trained must have a certificate of training for the device from the
manufacturer or the manufacturers' authorized representative posted in the room in
which services are provided.
(3) Operators must comply with manufacturers' directions in the use of all equipment
and products.
(4) Operators must advise clients of the necessity of any manufacturers' recommended
follow-up care, such as sunscreen protection, etc.
(5) Only licensed salons or schools may provide the "Board" approved special service.
(6) Products and devices used in salons and schools must meet all federal drug
administration, cosmetic ingredient review and/or guidelines of the esthetics
manufacturers and distributors alliance of the American beauty association.
(D) "Board" licensees and other Ohio professional board licensees may provide
permanent makeup services in a salon if they comply with all of the following
requirements.
(1) The salon shall obtain an approval to operate a business that offers tattooing
services from the board of health of the city or general health district in which the
business is located and comply with all requirements of Chapter 3730. of the Revised
Code and Chapter 3701-9 of the Administrative Code.
(2) All licensees providing permanent makeup services shall have available in the salon
documented completion of a minimum of a sixty hour training program approved by a
majority vote of a quorum of the board members.
Effective: 08/11/2008
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/20/2008 and 08/11/2013
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.02
Rule Amplifies: 4713.14
Prior Effective Dates: 4/1/01, 2/1/05

Chapter 4713-15 Sanitation; Communicable Diseases
4713-15-01 General sanitation.
The entire licensed facility, including all equipment, employees, and implements
contained therein must be continually maintained in a sanitary manner satisfactory to
the "Board".
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.41
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 1/26/97
4713-15-02 Methods of sanitizing.
Any implements to be used on any patrons shall be properly sanitized. All methods of
sanitation shall be bacteriologically effective and all commercially prepared sanitizing
agents shall be used in accordance with manufacturer's instructions.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.41
Prior Effective Dates: 1/18/85, 12/17/89, 1/26/97
4713-15-03 Disinfection of implements and spills; blood and body fluids.
(A) Disinfectants are inactivated and ineffective when visibly contaminated with debris,
hair, dirt, particulates and/or when heavily soiled. Thus, implements and surfaces shall
first be thoroughly cleaned prior to disinfection. Disinfectants shall be prepared fresh
daily or more often if solution becomes diluted or soiled. Contact time: Leave surface
wet or completely immersed, if possible, for a ten-minute contact time or longer as
required by manufacturer for disinfecting against "HIV", "HBV", and all other viruses,
bacteria, and fungi. In all cases the disinfectant used shall be in accordance with the
manufacturer's recommendation or other guidance in this rule.
(B) All used implements shall first be cleaned of visible dirt, debris and/or bodily fluids
with warm soapy/detergent water and then disinfected by completely immersing in an
"appropriate disinfectant".
(1) All non-porous implements, which come in contact with intact skin, shall be
thoroughly cleaned before immersion in an "appropriate disinfectant". An "appropriate
disinfectant" for objects, which come in contact with intact skin is an environmental
protection agency registered, hospital grade bactericidal (esp. pseudomonacidal),
virucidal, and fungicidal that is mixed and used according to the manufacturer's
directions or household bleach in a ten percent solution for ten minutes.
(2) All non-porous implements, which have come in contact with blood or body fluids,
shall be thoroughly cleaned before immersion in an "appropriate disinfectant". An
"appropriate disinfectant" includes an environmental protection agency registered
tuberculocides or products registered against "HIV/"HBV" or household bleach in a ten
percent solution for ten minutes. For personal protection against blood-borne
pathogens, cleanup should always be done wearing protective gloves and also gowns,
and eye protection for large spills. All implements, which have come in contact with
blood or body fluids, shall be disinfected by complete immersion in an "appropriate
disinfectant".
(C) Any non-porous surface that comes in contact with blood or body fluids shall first be
cleaned with warm soapy/detergent water, and then an "appropriate disinfectant" shall
be used. An "appropriate disinfectant" for surfaces, which have come in contact with
blood or body fluids, include environmental protection agency registered tuberculocides
or products registered against "HIV"/"HBV" or household bleach in a ten percent
solution for ten minutes. For personal protection against blood-borne pathogens,
cleanup should always be done wearing protective gloves and also gowns, and eye
protection for large spills.
(D) Household bleach is an effective disinfectant for all purposes in a salon. Bleach
solutions shall be mixed daily and used in a ten to one solution (nine parts tap water
and one part bleach). Bleach shall be kept in a closed covered container and not
exposed to sunlight. Bleach may produce eye irritation or mouth, esophageal, and
gastric burns. Bleach is corrosive to metals. Bleach vapors might react with vapors from
other chemicals, and therefore should not be placed or stored near other chemicals
used in salons (i.e. acrylic monomers, alcohol, other disinfecting products, or near
flame). Used or soiled bleach solution shall be discarded every day by pouring down
sink basin or toilet bowl.
(E) All bottles and/or containers other than the original manufacturers' container used
for application of "appropriate disinfectant" shall be properly labeled as to contents,
percentage solution and date mixed.
(F) Cleanup items from minor cuts shall be double bagged or placed in biohazard
containers, regardless of quantity. Double bagging could mean use a zip lock baggie for
the waste, and then put the baggie in a normal trash bag. If the spill or cleaning
materials are of a relatively larger volume, those materials used to clean spills, which do
contain blood spills or bodily fluids, shall be weighed logged on a disposal log sheet and
double bagged for disposal in the normal trash. If in doubt of what to do, call the local
health board for directions.
(G) All food and drug administration designated "medical devices" shall only be
disinfected by appropriate environmental protection agency approved disinfectants, for
example microdermabrasion service wand, tip or head.
(H) Environmental protection agency approved disinfectants are indicated by their
registration number on the product label and the manufacturer's directions for use shall
always be followed.
Effective: 08/11/2008
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 05/20/2008 and 08/11/2013
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: 4713.41
Prior Effective Dates: 11/1/84, 12/17/89, 1/26/97, 4/1/01, 1/17/02, 1/10/04, 5/1/04
4713-15-04 Shampoo bowls.
All shampoo bowls, shampoo boards, cups, or similar items shall be sanitized after each
use.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.41
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 1/26/97
4713-15-05 Proper protection of neck.
No shampoo apron, hair cloth, or similar article shall be placed directly against the neck
of the patron, and they shall be kept from direct contact with the patron by means of a
paper neck band or clean towel. No neck band of paper or cloth shall be used more
than once. No towels shall be used more than once without proper laundering.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.41
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 1/26/97
4713-15-06 Use of creams.
All creams and other semi-solid substances shall be removed from containers with a
clean sanitized spatula. Spatulas made of a washable nonabsorbent material shall be
sanitized before being used again. Spatulas made of wood shall be discarded after one
use.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.41
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 1/26/97
4713-15-07 Use of styptics.
Styptics to arrest bleeding shall be used only in liquid or powder form and shall be
applied by clean gauze, cotton, or any other sanitary item.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.41
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89
4713-15-08 Special solution containers.
All cosmetologists shall use product containers to prevent the contamination of unused
solution.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.41
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 1/26/97
4713-15-09 Use of powder.
All powder shall be dispensed from a shaker or similar receptacle and shall be applied
with disposable puffs or cotton pledgets, or other disposable applicators.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.41
Prior Effective Dates: 1/18/85, 12/17/89
4713-15-10 Walls and floors.
Walls, floors and fixtures shall be sanitary and kept clean at all times. Floor covering
shall be totally nonabsorbent and extend at least in a three foot radius from the center of
any styling or shampoo service chair.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.41
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 1/26/97
4713-15-11 Proper laundering methods.
All cloth towels, robes, and similar items shall be laundered in a washing machine with
laundry detergent and chlorine bleach used according to manufacturer's directions for
sanitation purposes. A closed dustproof cabinet must be provided for clean towels and
linen, and a closed dustproof hamper or receptacle must be provided for all soiled
towels and linens.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.41
Prior Effective Dates: 11/1/84, 12/17/89, 1/26/97, 4/1/01
4713-15-12 Personal hygiene.
Every person engaged in the practice of cosmetology or any of its branches shall
thoroughly cleanse his or her hands with soap and water or an alcohol-based handrub
immediately before serving each patron. All licensees shall wear a clean washable outer
garment while serving a patron in a salon. No licensees shall carry or store instruments
in their pockets, in a belt, in a leather case or in an apron.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.41
Prior Effective Dates: 1/18/85, 12/17/89, 2/24/91, 1/26/97, 4/1/01
4713-15-13 Contagious/communicable diseases.
(A) No patron with definite open sores, exhibiting symptoms of infectious or contagious
disease or disorder of the skin, or parasitic infestations will be served unless written
permission from a physician has been secured.
(B) No licensee who knowingly has an infectious or contagious disease, or parasitic
infestation, in a communicable stage shall give service in a salon.
(C) The "Board" shall have the right to require a physical examination of any person
employed in any salon who is suspected of having a contagious or infectious disease,
or parasitic infestation, in a communicable stage.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.08
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 2/24/91, 1/26/97
4713-15-14 Policy on prohibiting animals.
Dogs (except dogs providing assistance to individuals with physical handicaps) cats,
birds, or other animals shall not be permitted in a cosmetology salon. This definition
does not include fish, in an aquarium, provided they are maintained in a sanitary
condition.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.41
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 1/26/97
4713-15-15 Equipment sanitation.
All equipment used in a salon shall be maintained in a sanitary manner. Salons shall
maintain a copy of the manufacturer's/ owner's manual for all equipment in service.
(A) Electrical equipment, (whether professional or consumer design) which provides
circulating, whirlpool or vacuum effects, (for example, all microdermabrasion machines,
facial machines, pedicure stations, nail drills and body treatment equipment) shall be
cleaned and disinfected after each use. Such equipment shall also be flushed, cleaned
and disinfected on a bi-weekly schedule. A record of such cleaning shall be kept on
forms provided by the "Board" and available upon any salon inspection. The bi-weekly
cleaning shall include the use of a hospital grade disinfectant, ten per cent bleach
solution or an equivalent solution approved by the "Board" and circulated through the
machine for the minimum time recommended by the manufacturer.
(B) Heated electrical equipment such as, all types of thermal irons, pressing combs and
stoves are sanitized by the heat source. Unheated parts of such equipment shall be
cleaned and disinfected as well, according to manufacturers' recommendations.
(C) Any other electrical equipment, including clippers and attachments shall be cleaned
and disinfected after each use. Electrical clipper blades and attachments shall be
disinfected using the following method:
(1) Remove hair and/or all foreign matter;
(2) Completely saturate clipper blade and attachment with an EPA-registered high-level
disinfectant solution, spray, or foam used according to the manufacturer's instructions.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.41
Prior Effective Dates: 1/10/04
4713-15-16 Food in a salon.
Salons offering food shall comply with local health board requirements.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.41
Prior Effective Dates: 1/10/04
4713-15-17 Rooms Used For Massage.
Rooms used for massage services may be used for other compatible services such as
esthetics as long as no sanitary problems result. If cosmetic therapy, massage therapy,
or other professional service is provided at the salon under section 4713.42 of the
Revised Code, sanitize all instruments and supplies used in the cosmetic therapy,
massage therapy, or other professional service.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08(A)(12)
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.41, 4713.42, 4713.56
Prior Effective Dates: 1/10/04

Chapter 4713-19 Permit Application and Renewal Procedures for Tanning Facilities
4713-19-01 Necessity of permit.
All tanning services provided by ultraviolet means for public consumption as defined in
section 4713.25 of the Revised Code shall be performed in facilities duly approved and
issued a permit by the "Board". Tanning permits are non-transferable. Tanning beds in
residences used soley by the immediate family do not require a license.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.41
Prior Effective Dates: 9/5/77, 12/17/89, 1/26/97
4713-19-02 Definitions.
As used in Chapter 4713-19 of the Administrative Code:
(A) "Consumer" or "Patron" means any member of the public who is provided access to
a tanning facility for free or in exchange for a fee or other compensation or any
individual who, is afforded use of a tanning facility as a condition or benefit of
membership or access;
(B) "Other compensation" means the payment or exchange of goods, services, or
anything of value for use of the tanning facility or facilities;
(C) "Tanning facility" or "tanning facilities" means a business that contains a room or a
booth open to the public which houses ultraviolet lamps or products containing such
lamps intended for the irradiation of any part of the living human body for cosmetic or
nonmedical-related purposes;
(D) "Tanning equipment" means sunlamp products, and ultraviolet lamps or any other
mechanisms used intended to induce skin tanning through the irradiation of any part of
the living human body;
(E) "Operator" and "Employee" means any person designated by the permit holder for
the facility to assist and instruct the public in the correct operation of the tanning facility;
an "operator" or "employee" who is under the age of eighteen shall be under the
immediate supervision of a licensed cosmetologist, "operator" or "employee" who is at
least eighteen years of age;
(F) "Ultraviolet radiation" for purposes of this chapter shall be referred to as follows:
(1) "UVA (ultraviolet A) radiation" means radiation in the wavelength between three
hundred twenty to four hundred nanometers (one-billionth).
(2) "UVB (ultraviolet B) radiation" means radiation in the wavelength between two
hundred eighty to three hundred twenty nanometers (one-billionth).
(3) "UVC (ultraviolet C) radiation" means radiation in the wavelength between two
hundred and two hundred eighty nanometers (one-billionth).
(G) "Formal training" means a course of instruction approved by the "Board" conducted
or presented under either classroom conditions, via Internet or correspondence course
by a company employing persons possessing adequate knowledge and experience to
offer a curriculum, associated training, and certification testing pertaining to and
associated with the correct use of tanning equipment. Training shall cover ultraviolet
radiation and effects on the skin, photosensitivity, skin typing, FDA and state
regulations, eye protection, and equipment and maintenance.
(H) "Tanning Operator's Certificate" means a certificate issued by an authorized
provider to each person who successfully completes and passes the tanning test
following a formal training course and is valid for four years from the date of issuance.
Certificates issued by subsequently approved authorized providers prior to the
commencement of this requirement shall also be valid.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.48
Prior Effective Dates: 12/17/89, 1/26/97, 8/1/99, 4/1/01, 1/17/02
4713-19-03 Permit fees.
All tanning permit applications must contain a check payable to the "Treasurer of State
of Ohio" in the following amounts:
(A) Original permit fees are sixty-five dollars.
(B) Renewal permit fees are fifty dollars.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.48
Prior Effective Dates: 1/8/85, 12/17/89, 12/26/97, 7/1/00
4713-19-04 Installation of equipment.
No tanning equipment shall be installed in any tanning facility, unless the equipment
and facilities have been found to be in compliance with the following standards:
(A) Each tanning bed shall be located in a separate room with a lockable door to
provide privacy;
(B) Each sunlamp product shall incorporate a timing device with multiple timer settings
adequate for the manufacturer's recommended exposure intervals to produce the
expected results;
(C) Each assembly of tanning equipment shall be equipped with a timer which complies
with the requirements of 21 CFR part 1040, Section 1040.20(C)(2). The maximum timer
interval shall not exceed the manufacturer's maximum recommended exposure time. No
timer interval shall have an error exceeding plus or minus ten per cent of the maximum
timer interval for the product. After April 1, 2001 each new tanning facility shall install
remote timer controls such that clients who are tanning can not reset the timer from
inside the tanning room/booth. All existing permit holders shall have remote timers
installed within one hundred eighty days of the effective date of this rule;
(D) Each sunlamp product shall incorporate a control on the product to enable the user
to manually terminate radiation without pulling the electrical plug or coming in contact
with the ultraviolet lamp;
(E) The permit holder shall provide protective eyewear to each consumer for use during
any use of tanning equipment. This protective eyewear shall meet the requirements of
21 CFR part 1040, Section 1040.20(C)(5). The permit holder shall ensure that the
protective eyewear required by this rule is properly sanitized before each use, is not
altered in any way, and shall not rely upon exposure to the ultraviolet radiation produced
by the tanning equipment itself to provide such sanitizing and be adequate for the
protection of the consumer's eyes;
(F) Each ultraviolet lamp contained within the sunlamp product shall be shielded so as
to not come into any contact with the user. Two one-piece transparent covers, top and
bottom, shall be used for this purpose and the covers shall not contain cracks or breaks
in their surfaces;
(G) Each booth-type sunlamp product shall provide a handrail for use during operation
of the tanning facility. Each tanning facility shall have, clearly marked, the appropriate
position the user is to assume prior to operation and comply with all other applicable
statutes and rules governing tanning equipment. Each booth must be housed in a
separate room unless the booth also incorporates a dressing area in its design;
(H) Each sunlamp product shall prominently display the following label:
"Danger - ultraviolet radiation. Follow instructions carefully. Do not enter without
protective eyewear."
(I) Each tanning facility shall be so equipped to dissipate heat so that the interior
temperature does not exceed one hundred degrees fahrenheit or thirty-four degrees
centigrade. Every tanning room within the facility shall have a thermometer mounted at
five feet above the floor. Adjacent to the thermometer shall be a sign that states:
patrons shall not tan if temperature is at one hundred degrees or higher! Please report
excessive heat to the operator immediately;
(J) The permit holder shall replace ultraviolet lamps, bulbs, and filters at such frequency
or after such duration of use as may be recommended by the manufacturer of such
lamps, or bulbs, or filters; and these items shall be replaced as soon as they become
defective or damaged. Only those lamps, bulbs or filters, meeting the requirements of
the United States food and drug administration for any particular bed may be used in its
operation, and the facility must maintain the manufacturer's recommendation on file in
the facility.
(K) Each tanning bed shall have the UV bulbs installed such that the bulb information is
readily available for the Board inspector to verify that information on the bulb matches
the manufacturer's recommended bulb list. For any tanning device that does not meet
this requirement the owner shall remove the shielding in order that the inspector can
easily verify UV bulb compatibility.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.48
Prior Effective Dates: 1/8/85, 12/17/89, 2/24/91, 1/26/97, 1/17/02, 1/10/04, 5/1/04
4713-19-05 Operation of equipment.
(A) Where applicable, each tanning facility shall have on duty at all times an operator
trained per rule 4713-19-14 of the Administrative Code in the correct operation of the
facility so as to be able to inform and assist the public in its proper use. Such operator
shall be stationed in the immediate vicinity of any such equipment and closely monitor
the services being provided to each patron.
(B) Each operator shall perform the following functions as a precondition to access of
the tanning facility to the public:
(1) The operator shall provide to each person desiring to use a tanning facility
presanitized units and protective eyewear;
(2) The operator shall establish the time period for the initial exposure and each
subsequent exposure until the time as the individual has reached their maximum
radiation level;
(3) The operator shall instruct the user on the position of the safety railing in booths; and
the manual switching device to terminate the radiation in case of an emergency;
(4) The operator shall inspect the facility to ensure that the floors are dry. Floors are to
be made dry prior to each individual's use. Non-absorbent and non-carpeted flooring or
rubber or plastic mats shall be in place where the patron enters or exits the bed. These
mats shall be sanitized after each patron's use;
(5) The operator shall post signs, immediately adjacent to each unit of tanning
equipment, warning consumers of the potential effects of radiation on persons taking
medication and the possible relationship of radiation to skin cancer.
(6) Permit holder shall perform timer checks on beds with mechanical timers every time
bulbs are changed, but at least annually and maintain documentation of the timer
checks. Timer checks are not required for beds with digital timers.
(C) Each assembly of tanning equipment shall be restricted for use by only one
consumer at a time. No person shall be permitted in any room where tanning equipment
is operating while someone else is tanning.
(D) Each tanning facility shall have an owner's manual for each tanning device, which is
providing services to patrons.
(E) A written report of any alleged tanning injury shall be forwarded to the "Board" within
five working days of its occurrence or knowledge thereof. The report shall include:
(1) The date of alleged injury and name of the affected individual;
(2) The name, location and permit/identification number of the tanning facility involved
and the name of the operator who assisted the customer;
(3) The nature of the alleged injury and duration of the tanning exposure;
(4) Name and address of the health care provider, and treatment, if any; and
(5) Information on the device involved, such as the manufacturer, model number, lamp
used, and any other information considered relevant to the situation by the "Board".
(6) A copy of the affected individual's tanning card or computerized card information.
(F) The most recent "Board" inspection form shall be posted in a publicly conspicuous
place adjacent to the facilities license.
(G) The skin type of each patron shall be documented on the tanning record for each
individual patron. Only certificated operators shall determine skin type on a new patron's
first visit and determine proper tanning periods and frequency.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.48
Prior Effective Dates: 1/8/85, 12/17/89, 1/26/97, 4/1/01, 1/17/02
4713-19-06 Sanitation.
(A) No article or equipment shall be used or offered for use by a patron unless that
article has first been sanitized with a viricidally effective product including all eyewear
used by the patron.
(B) Walls, floors, and fixtures shall be sanitized and kept clean at all times in the entire
tanning facility.
(C) A clean sanitary towel shall be provided to all patrons using tanning facilities. A
closed dustproof cabinet must be provided for clean towels, and linen and a covered
hamper or receptacle must be provided for all soiled towels and linen.
(D) All tanning facilities shall be equipped with toilet facilities and dressing rooms. Toilet
facilities shall include a water closet and hand washing sinks, including hot and cold
running water, pump soap, and a paper towel dispenser or equivalent hand drying
equipment. All toilet facilities and dressing rooms shall be kept clean, sanitary, and
functional at all times.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.48
Prior Effective Dates: 1/8/85, 12/17/89, 2/24/91, 1/26/97
4713-19-07 Display of sign.
Every establishment licensed to provide tanning services shall display at its main
entrance a sign of appropriate size which will be clearly visible from the street which
states "tanning facility" or words having the same meaning, except that in the case of a
tanning facility located within a department store, health club or athletic facility or
shopping center, the sign may be displayed inside at the entrance to the tanning facility.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.48
Prior Effective Dates: 1/8/85, 12/17/89, 1/26/97
4713-19-08 Resident tanning facilities.
(A) Tanning facility rooms in a residential building and being used by consumers shall
maintain a separate entrance, which shall not open directly into any part of the dwelling
including the garage.
(B) Mobile homes, motor homes, trailers or any type of recreational vehicle, shall be
permanently set on a foundation and comply with the requirements of Chapter 4713-19
of the Administrative Code, in order for their rooms to be approved for tanning services.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.48
Prior Effective Dates: 1/8/85, 12/17/89, 1/25/97, 4/1/01
4713-19-09 Records keeping.
(A) The operator of a tanning facility shall maintain a record for each individual patron
which includes dates exposed, length of exposure, and other required data. This record
shall be completed and initialed by the patron prior to each tanning session, and must
be kept on file for one year from the date of the patron's last exposure. The record shall
include the following:
(1) Date of most recent exposure to UVA/UVB;
(2) Acknowledgment that the patron has reviewed the photosensitive drug list;
(3) Acknowledgment of receipt of protective eyewear;
(4) Acknowledgment that the patron has been advised of maximum exposure time for
the session in the unit to which the patron has been assigned;
(5) This record shall also include the following warning: "some harmful changes which
may be caused by repeated overexposure to UVA/UVB radiation include cataracts, skin
cancer, premature aging and possible photosensitive reactions when using perfumes,
cosmetics and certain drugs, including some antibiotics and birth control pills."
(6) All customers shall have their skin type computed and annotated on their customer
card prior to their first tanning session.
(B) If the patron is under eighteen years of age, the operator shall obtain the written
consent from the parent or legal guardian of the patron prior to any tanning session.
This written consent shall be signed at the licensed location, and shall specify the
number of sessions consented to, and shall become part of the record of the patron.
The minor patron may then alone sign the patron card for the remainder of the
consented sessions.
(C) Tanning facilities which maintain records on computer or data processing equipment
may use a single data sheet for all patrons tanning in a single day provided that the data
is then transferred daily to each individual's permanent file.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08(A)(16)
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.48
Prior Effective Dates: 1/8/85, 3/16/90, 2/24/91, 1/26/97, 1/17/02, 1/10/04
4713-19-10 Floor plans.
(A) All tanning facility applications shall indicate in a drawing submitted to the "Board"
the following:
(1) The exact location of the tanning facility in relation to any living quarters;
(2) The location of rooms/booths with tanning equipment;
(3) The location of entrance, all doors, and windows;
(4) Walls and partitions shall be non-transparent and of sufficient height and rigidity as
to provide proper privacy;
(5) Location of the tanning facility rest room(s).
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.48
Prior Effective Dates: 1/26/97, 4/1/01
4713-19-11 Policy on prohibiting animals.
Dogs (except dogs providing assistance to individuals with physical handicaps) cats,
birds, or other animals shall not be permitted in a tanning facility. This definition does
not include fish, in an aquarium, provided they are maintained in a sanitary condition.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.48
Prior Effective Dates: 1/26/97
4713-19-12 Change of ownership.
Tanning facility licenses are not transferable from one address to another or from one
owner to another. A new tanning license application shall be filed within thirty days of
any change of ownership. Tanning facilities are permitted to open or offer services while
the application is processed and are subject to the "Board's" approval per rule 4713-1-
06 of the Administrative Code. Any tanning facility with an administrative action pending
cannot transfer a license until the administrative action is resolved.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.48
Prior Effective Dates: 4/1/01
4713-19-13 Tanning beds in salons.
Salons that have tanning facilities that are subsequently closed shall remove tanning
beds from the view and access of the public.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.48
Prior Effective Dates: 4/1/01
4713-19-14 Training of operators and employees.
(A) Each tanning facility shall have an operator on duty at all times that possesses a
valid and current certificate of formal training, as defined in rule 4713-19-02 of the
Administrative Code. Formal training courses for operators must meet the requirements
of paragraph 4713-19-02(G) of the Administrative Code. Proof of training must be
maintained within the facility and be available for inspection.
(B) In addition to the requirements of paragraph 4713-19-02(G) of the Administrative
Code, each formal training course shall meet the following requirements:
(1) Each course shall be at least four hours in length. This four hours shall not include
items such as registration, lunch, marketing, profit-making strategies, advertising and
accounting, taking a test, or similar functions:
(2) Each course shall include written material which covers the required subjects, such
as core training manual; audio-visual presentations which cover the required subjects,
such as slides or videos; copies of the "Board" rules and copies of Title 21, Code of
Federal Regulations, Part 1040, Section 1040.20; and a question and answer period for
trainees;
(3) Courses may be offered via web based or correspondence course. However, the
person taking the course shall take a monitored written examination in order to receive
their certificate of completion. The monitoring process for the examination shall be
approved by the "Board" as part of the education course approval;
(4) Each course will be processed through the "Board's" continuing education (CE)
process. Individual licensees of the "Board" shall receive CE credit whether or not they
pass the test per rule 4713-21-09 of the Administrative Code, however, if they fail the
test, they shall not be granted a certified operator certificate.
(C) Each employee who assists customers or operates tanning devices shall be trained
on proper operation and maintenance of tanning devices. The operator of the tanning
facility is responsible for training those employees or ensuring that those employees
take an approved training course. When the operator provides employee training, that
training shall include:
(1) Review of the requirements of Chapter 4713-19 of the Administrative Code;
(2) Procedures for correct cleaning, sanitizing and operation of the device;
(3) Recognition of overexposure or similar injury;
(4) Review of manufacturer's procedures for operation and maintenance of tanning
devices;
(5) Medical aspects of ultraviolet radiation, maximum allowable time of exposure, and
determination of human skin types as it relates to compliance use of the FDA exposure
schedule; and
(6) Emergency procedures in case of overexposure or injury.
(D) Operators and other facility personnel who must comply with the training
requirements of this chapter, must complete the required training according to the
following:
(1) Operators hired on or after the effective date of this chapter must complete the
required training prior to taking charge of a facility;
(2) All Operators hired before the effective date of this chapter shall have a period of
one hundred eighty days after the effective date of this chapter to successfully complete
the required formal training.
(E) Any individual or organization requesting the "Board" to review their training courses
for compliance with the requirements of this rule shall submit copies of their training
materials to the "Board" prior to providing that training in Ohio. The materials submitted
shall include credentials of trainers and persons compiling the training materials, a copy
of the classroom or correspondence course curriculum, copies of written materials to be
received by trainees, and a statement indicating the length of time a
classroom/Internet/correspondence course will be conducted. The "Board" shall review
the materials and inform the applicant of its findings within thirty days from receipt of all
training materials. When changes are made to a training course that has been reviewed
and accepted by the "Board", those changes should also be submitted to the "Board" for
review.
(F) Inspectors shall have a preset list of questions, which they shall use to ask
operators/employees at tanning facilities basic questions covered in the course above.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.48
Prior Effective Dates: 1/17/02

Chapter 4713-21 Continuing Education
4713-21-01 Purposes.
The purpose of Chapter 4713-21 of the Administrative Code is to establish:
(A) Standards for a continuing education program designed to further professionally
educate "Board" licensees as it relates to the consumers of Ohio and the services being
provided to them by the licensees;
(B) License renewal procedures applicable to providing proof of completion of any
continuing education requirements;
(C) Procedure for granting a waiver and extension period for completing any continuing
education requirements;
(D) Procedure for placing a license in escrow and later restored;
(E) A continuing education requirement notification process;
(F) Application criteria and procedures for eligible offering entities desiring to offer
continuing education courses;
(G) Criteria for continuing education courses, course instructor(s), and eligible offering
entities to be approved, denied approval, and have approval withdrawn, suspended or
revoked.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08, 4713.09
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713
Prior Effective Dates: 6/15/95, 1/26/97
4713-21-02 Definitions.
As used in Chapter 4713.21 of the Administrative Code:
(A) "Biennial licensing period" means the two-year period beginning on the thirty-first
day of January of an odd-numbered year and ending on the thirtieth day of January of
the next odd-numbered year;
(B) "Eligible offering entity" means a nonprofit professional association, college or
university, vocational school, postsecondary proprietary school of cosmetology licensed
by the "Board", manufacturer of supplies or equipment used in the practice of
cosmetology, the state "Board" or an agent of the "Board" any individual or entity which
owns and operates five or more licensed salons, or that employs at least fifty licensees.
Any individual or entity not meeting this definition may petition the "Board" for review
and approval from the "Board" in order to be considered an "Eligible Offering Entity."
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08, 4713.09
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713
Prior Effective Dates: 6/15/95, 1/26/97
4713-21-03 Continuing education requirements.
(A) Licensees shall be exempt from all continuing education requirements until the
biennial licensing period commencing after their initial licensure.
(B) The continuing education requirement for all licensees is eight hours per biennium.
No licensee shall receive credit for identical course instruction completed during the
biennial licensing period. Licensees holding both a manager and instructor license shall
need eight hours for each license beginning with the renewals after January 2005.
Instructor hours shall be from an approved instructor CE list promulgated by the Board.
(C) Courses completed prior to an individual being licensed by the "Board" do not
qualify for continuing education credit. A licensee shall not receive continuing education
credit for any course given in the state of Ohio that does not have the prior approval of
the "Board".
(D) Any licensee holding multiple branch of cosmetology licenses must complete the
continuing education requirements for each branch license.
(E) The "Board" shall encourage all continuing education eligible offering entities to offer
the courses in as many different locations as possible. All continuing education eligible
offering entities shall allow any and all official representatives and employees of the
"Board" entrance into any "Board" approved continuing education requirement course at
no cost to the "Board".
(F) The "Board" shall keep a current roster of approved continuing education courses,
which shall include an explanation of any and all course prerequisites required for
admission into the course offering. Copies of the roster shall be available to licensees
and the public at the "Board".
(G) Current licensees shall be able to receive continuing education credit for classes
completed in a school of cosmetology.
(H) Licensees age sixty-five or older prior to the beginning of a renewal period are
exempt from the requirement to obtain continuing education requirements for renewal of
their active license.
(I) Out-of-state continuing education hours shall be submitted for approval to the
"Board" within thirty days of completing the course in order to be acceptable in meeting
biennial requirements.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08, 4713.09
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713
Prior Effective Dates: 6/15/95, 1/26/97, 4/1/01, 1/10/04, 5/1/04
4713-21-04 Licensure renewal procedures.
(A) After the completion of the continuing education requirements for any biennial
licensing period, the licensee shall complete a continuing education approval form to be
furnished by the "Board" and forward it to the "Board" with the licensee's license
renewal application and include the renewal fee established under section 4713.10 of
the Revised Code.
(B) The licensee must provide satisfactory proof of completion of any applicable
continuing education requirement or prove that a waiver or extension was received
pursuant to divisions (b) and (c) of section 4713.11 of the Revised Code prior to the
"Board's" renewal of the license.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08, 4713.09
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.60
Prior Effective Dates: 6/15/95, 1/26/97
4713-21-05 Continuing education extension program.
The licensee, upon receiving an extension, shall complete and satisfactorily prove
completion of any required continuing education requirements by submitting such proof
of completion to the "Board" by a date specified by the "Board".
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08, 4713.09
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.60
Prior Effective Dates: 6/15/95, 1/26/97
4713-21-06 Licensure escrow or inactive procedure.
(A) A licensee may apply to the "Board" to have their license placed in escrow. The
licensee shall be required to pay the renewal fee to obtain an escrowed license.
(B) Licensees with escrowed licenses must pay a thirty dollar licensing fee per divisions
(D) and (H) of section 4713.10 of the Revised Code to remove their license from escrow
and provide proof of the appropriate continuing education hours.
(C) All licensees not currently engaged in the practice of cosmetology and who do not
hold an escrowed license, shall pay all lapsed renewal fees and submit proof
satisfactory to the "Board" of the completion of eight hours of continuing education prior
to having their license restored to active status.
(D) Any licensee who has held an inactive license for more than two years and holds an
escrowed license may have their license restored without passing an examination and
by paying any applicable fees and providing proof of satisfactory completion of sixteen
hours of continuing education.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08, 4713.09
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713
Prior Effective Dates: 6/15/95, 1/26/97, 4/1/01
4713-21-07 Continuing education requirement notification procedures.
The "Board" shall inform each affected licensee of the continuing education requirement
that applies to the next biennial licensing period by including a notification in the
issuance of each renewed license.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08, 4713.09
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.59
Prior Effective Dates: 6/15/95, 1/26/97
4713-21-08 Application criteria and procedures for continuing education course
approval.
(A) All continuing education courses and instruction shall be designed to further
professionally educate "Board" licensees as it relates to the consumers of Ohio and the
services being provided to them by the licensees.
(B) Application for course approval shall be completed on forms provided by the "Board"
and demonstrate that the applicant is:
(1) An eligible offering entity as defined pursuant to paragraph (C) of rule 4713-21-02 of
the Administrative Code;
(2) Submitting a forty dollar per course non-refundable processing fee;
(3) Submitting the form to the "Board's" office at least thirty days prior to the proposed
initial date of the course offering;
(4) Proposing a course offering which is in compliance with the requirements of division
(B) of section 4713.62 of the Revised Code.
(C) The following offerings shall not be approved by the "Board" for continuing
education credit:
(1) That portion of any offering devoted to any breaks including: breakfast, lunch, and
dinner or other refreshments;
(2) Any application, which fails to meet the standards of this rule.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08, 4713.09
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.62
Prior Effective Dates: 6/15/95, 1/26/97, 4/1/01, 1/10/04
4713-21-09 Criteria for continuing education: courses, course instructors and eligible
offering entities to be: approved, denied approval, have approval, withdrawn, revoked or
suspended.
(A) Programs shall not be approved by the "Board" in segments of less than one hour.
(B) No approved eligible offering entity shall certify to attendance of a person who was
not physically present during at least ninety per cent of the offering time. All offerings
must be successfully completed.
(C) An eligible offering entity shall maintain for four years a record of attendance of each
person attending an offering including the following information:
(1) "Board" approved certificate number;
(2) Name and "Board" identification number of attendee;
(3) Offering, title and description;
(4) Hours of attendance;
(5) Date of offering;
(6) Name, address, and signature of verifier in employ of eligible offering entity;
(7) The eligible offering entity shall certify the items enumerated above and furnish a
copy to the attendee within thirty days after completion of the offering.
(D) Course offerings by individuals or entities whose principal residence or place of
business is not located in the state of Ohio or course offerings by foreign corporations
as defined by section 1703.01 of the Revised Code shall be approved if they comply
with the requirements contained herein.
(E) Each continuing education course shall be open to all "Board" licensees on an equal
basis. Course attendance may be restricted to licensees due to valid course
prerequisites for admission or by the maximum number of participants allowable as
determined by the eligible offering entity and fully disclosed during the application
criteria and procedures for continuing education course approval.
(F) Passage of an examination by a licensee shall not be a requirement for successful
completion of a continuing education course attended in person. Correspondence and
Internet continuing education courses shall have an examination or methodology built in
to the course to verify the course material has been completed.
(G) Each eligible offering entity shall notify the "Board", at least one day in advance, of
the addition of an offering date for an approved course. The eligible offering entity shall
also notify the "Board", at least one day in advance, of all course changes including
locations, times, changes in course content or changes of course instructors.
(H) Each eligible offering entity shall submit to the "Board", within fifteen days after
completion of each course offering, a list of licensees who successfully completed the
course. Once the "Board" has established electronic files, this data must be submitted in
electronic form via email, diskette, CDROM or other readable computer form in a text
file with data separated by commas. The list shall include for each licensee:
(1) Course title;
(2) Date conducted;
(3) Address location where the course was conducted;
(4) Licensee name;
(5) Licensee "Board" identification number;
(6) Course certification number;
(7) CE hours earned.
(I) The "Board" may suspend, revoke, or deny the approval of an instructor or eligible
offering entity, which fails to comply with any provisions of these rules. Written notice of
the suspension, denial, or revocation shall be given, stating the reason therefor.
(J) Any aggrieved eligible offering entity, instructor, or licensee may request a hearing
pursuant to Chapter 119. of the Revised Code. Until the "Board" has issued its final
order as a result of any denial of approval no course, in question, shall be purported, to
licensees, that it has been approved for continuing education credit.
R.C. 119.032 review dates: 12/23/2005 and 01/31/2010
Promulgated Under: 119.03
Statutory Authority: RC 4713.08, 4713.09
Rule Amplifies: RC 4713.62
Prior Effective Dates: 6/15/95, 1/26/97, 4/1/01, 1/10/04

				
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