Reading Pretest - Unit 1 by RTZ4ZI

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									Reading Posttest - Unit 1                            Name______________________________

Directions: Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.

                                        Moon River & Me
                                         By Megan Monroe
        Grandma sat in the back of the canoe and steered while I paddled. “Pull down hard then
lift your paddle,” she said. “We’re moving against the current. Coming back won’t be so hard.”
        We were on the river that connected Tybee Island to Savannah. Grandma, who owned a
home on Tybee, had gotten me up early so we could “take an adventure.”
        “Look, Megan, in the tree.” Grandma pointed with her oar to a huge oak, its roots
twisting out of the ground into the water. There, on a shaded branch high in the tree, stood a
great horned owl.
        “Oh, Grandma, will it hurt us?”
        “No, dear. It’s sleeping. Owls are hunters of the night. They eat little creatures, like
rabbits, mice, and small birds.”
        I’d read about owls in the Harry Potter books, but I don’t think I had ever actually seen
one before. But Grandma had assured me I was safe, so I calmed down. Somehow, being with
Grandma was always magical.
        “And over there,” Grandma added, “is a blue heron. It doesn’t want to be around us.”
        Just where the river bent in another direction, the heron lifted its wings, tucked its long
legs under its body, and flew away.
        I was down at Grandma’s for three weeks while my parents were in Europe. Dad had
been working long hours and was on the road a lot of the time. Mom’s a school teacher and had
the summer off. She had been after Dad for years to take this vacation. I was glad they didn’t
invite me––it meant three fun weeks with Grandma.
        A black snake squiggled in the water, and I felt a little scared again. “Grandma, is that
snake poisonous?”
        “Maybe,” she said unworriedly. “But we won’t bother him, and I’m sure he won’t bother
us.”
        Grandma knew all about the creatures that lived along the river. She had grown up in
Savannah and had spent her summer on Tybee Island.
        “See that home over there?” said Grandma, pointing to a big house hidden among trees,
not far from the river. “I don’t know who lives there now, but many years ago, a family lived
there during the summer. The boy in the family grew up and became a famous songwriter.”
        “Do I know any of his songs?” I asked.
        She smiled. “Probably not.”
        “What was this boy’s name?” I asked. I was really more concerned about wild creatures,
but Grandma had that sound in her voice like she was remembering her days as a girl, and those
stories made both of us happy.
        “Johnny Mercer,” said Grandma. “I never met him. He was gone by the time I lived on
Tybee. But as far as music goes, he was the cream of the crop, and one of his songs was about
this river.”
        Grandma hummed the song in a sweet soprano voice, then said, “Fifty years ago, I’d
canoe on the river. It was called the Back River then. Then Johnny Mercer’s song, ‘Moon
River,’ came out. Next thing I know, people started calling this Moon River.” Grandma giggled
at the wonder of it all. Suddenly she seemed even younger than me.
        We came to the area where a trail met the river’s edge. Grandma took over the paddling
and got us to a landing. She had brought two forked sticks––“to ward off any creatures”––and
some bug spray, “because you never know this time of year.”
        As we pulled the canoe onto shore, she started singing again: “We’re after the same
rainbow’s end / My huckleberry friend / Moon River and me.”
        Then she laughed. Her eyes filled with tears, and I swear she blushed.
        “It was so long age when I first started coming here,” said Grandma. “I was a young girl
who believed that life would lead me to many strange and wonderful places.” She shook her
head, then handed me a stick. “But it brought me back to the island, and now I have you. A
pretty good deal, I’d say.”
        We went hiking to find berries. I wasn’t afraid any more, and I started to hum the song.
I couldn’t hum it like Grandma, but I liked the sound of my voice.

   1. The author let readers know that this story is set in the present by
         A. mentioning the Harry Potter books.
         B. saying her grandmother likes Johnny Mercer’s music.
         C. discussing her mother and father’s three-week trip to Europe.
         D. including dialogue about snakes, herons, and the great horned owl.

   2. What is the MAIN reason the author spends three weeks with her grandmother?
        A. She wants to visit Tybee Island.
        B. Her parents are on vacation in Europe.
        C. She is interested in learning about Johnny Mercer’s music.
        D. She needs to write about the Moon River for a school assignment.

   3. What is the author’s MAIN reason for writing “Moon River & Me?
        A. to inform readers about Johnny Mercer’s music.
        B. to persuade readers to vacation on Tybee Island.
        C. to entertain readers with an interesting story.
        D. to complain about all of the dangerous creatures that live in the Tybee River.

   4. When the narrator’s grandmother says, “But as far as music goes, he was the cream
      of the crop,” she means that Johnny Mercer’s music was
          A. some of the best.
          B. not very popular.
          C. about men and women working on farms.
          D. only appreciated by people who live in Georgia.

   5. What is the theme of “Moon River & Me”?
        A. Vacations are very different today than they were in the past.
        B. People write songs in order to make better sense of the world around them.
        C. Animals in the wild are usually more nervous about us than we are about them.
        D. Spending time with someone you love can make you feel safe and happy, no
            matter the situation.
   6. When she returns home from visiting Grandma, the narrator is likely to
        A. ask her parents if she can take singing lessons.
        B. tell her parents she doesn’t want to visit Tybee Island anymore.
        C. call the local zoo and ask for information about snakes and owls.
        D. tell her parents about the cool story Grandma told her and ask if they know the
           song “Moon River.”

   7. Which statement would the narrator of the passage be MOST LIKELY to make?
        A. Paddling down the river isn’t very fun.
        B. Johnny Mercer is one of the most beloved singers today.
        C. I love hearing stories about when my grandma was a girl.
        D. The great horned owl is the coolest creature in Georgia.

   8. What does the narrator mean when she says, “Suddenly [Grandma] seemed even
      younger than me”?
         A. Grandma is acting very immature.
         B. Grandma has magically become younger.
         C. Grandma is trying to imitate what she sounded like when she was a child.
         D. Grandma sounds more youthful when she tells stories about her girlhood.


Directions: Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.

                               Mary Bethune: Leading the Way
                                      By Kerrie Elliott

        The first time Mary Jane McLeod saw the new school she would attend in Mayesville,
South Carolina, she thought she might burst with excitement. Mary felt fortunate, too, because
she was the only member of her family who could attend the school. Mary’s brothers and sisters
had to stay home to work on the family’s cotton farm. And Mary’s parents had never been to
school––they had grown up as slaves.
        Mary’s parents bought their farm when they were freed from slavery after the Civil War.
Mary and her brothers and sisters had to pitch in and help on the farm. If everyone did not work
together, the McLeod family might lose its only source of income.
        Mary was always thankful that she was given the chance to learn instead of having to
work in the fields all day. She felt that all children should have the opportunity to go to school.
When she grew up, Mary became a teacher and dedicated her life to education.
        At the age of 24, Mary married Albert Bethune. Albert was also a teacher, and together
they opened their own school in Daytona Beach, Florida. They named it the Daytona Normal
and Industrial School. At first, Mary and Albert had only one student, but they did not become
frustrated, and they did not give up. After just two years, the Daytona school grew faster than a
wild flower to 250 students.
        Mary wanted to teach as many students as she could in her new school. All of the
students at the Daytona school were girls. At that time, many families felt that girls should stay
home and work. But Mary knew that education was also important, and she encouraged girls to
attend school.
        The Daytona Normal and Industrial School continued to grow. In 1923, it joined another
school to become Bethune-Cookman College. Mary served as president of the Daytona school,
then the college, from 1904 until 1942.
        People across the country began to know Mary by name because she did so many things
to help African American children go to school. She became an important leader in education,
winning many honors and awards. From 1935 to 1944, Mary worked as a special adviser to
President Franklin D. Roosevelt on issues that were important to African Americans. She also
served as an adviser to three other presidents.
        Today, almost all children in the United States are given the opportunity to go to school.
For this, we should thank Mary Bethune and people like her, who worked to make education
available to all Americans.

   9. What happened FIRST?
        A. People around the country knew of Mary’s work.
        B. Mary worked as an adviser to the president.
        C. Mary’s school changed its name.
        D. Mary and Albert got married.

   10. What is the MAIN reason Mary wanted to become a teacher?
         A. She didn’t want to work on a cotton farm.
         B. She wanted to make more money for her family.
         C. She wanted to spend her life helping people learn.
         D. She wanted to meet and work with President Roosevelt.

   11. What is the topic sentence of the fourth paragraph?
         A. And Mary’s parents had never been to school––they had grown up as slaves.
         B. At the age of 24, Mary married Albert Bethune.
         C. Mary wanted to teach as many students as she could in her new school.
         D. She also served as an adviser to three other presidents.


“After just two years, the Daytona school grew like a wild flower.”

   12. What type of figurative language is used in the sentence above?
         A. metaphor
         B. hyperbole
         C. simile
         D. personification

   13. How has Mary Bethune’s work affected children today?
         A. Every child in the United States can get an education.
         B. They no longer have to help their parents do house work.
         C. They can choose where they want to go to school.
         D. Children must finish their chores before they can go to school.
   14. What allowed Mary’s parents to buy a farm?
         A. The Civil War ended slavery.
         B. Mary’s parents had a lot of money.
         C. Mary gave them money she earned from teaching.
         D. Mary’s parents got good jobs after they went to her school

   15. What is the main idea of this passage?
         A. Mary McLeod married Albert Bethune when she was 24.
         B. Mary Bethune started a school and made important changes to the educational
             system in the United States.
         C. Mary Bethune and her husband started a school that wasn’t popular at first, but
             grew very quickly.
         D. Mary Bethune was the only member of her family that could attend school.


Directions: Read the passage and answer the questions that follow.

                                      October Nights
                                     By Tiffany Carlisle

                            I love October nights in bed
                            Snuggled beneath the sheets and spread,
                            As the wind goes dancing and clouds are shred
                            And shadows are sweeping around my head.

                            I love to watch the old leafless trees
                            Shake gnarled elbows and rickety knees
                            In the howl of autumn’s keen, crisp breeze,
                            Which has stolen their red and golden leaves.

                            I love the wind when it rants and roars,
                            Knocking at windows and shaking doors.
                            I love to listen as it explores,
                            With a series of snorts and grunts and snores.

                            And when I watch closely—I often do—
                            I can see clouds playing peekaboo
                            With the bone-white moon in my window view.
                            (If you look closely, you’ll see them, too.)

                            I love to be safe and snug in my room
                            As winds are moaning their songs of doom,
                            And the moon is sweeping the night’s gray gloom
                            Beneath my bed with her silver broom.
“I love to watch the old leafless trees
Shake gnarled elbows and rickety knees”

   16. What part of a tree is the poet comparing to gnarled elbows and rickety knees in the
       above lines?
          A. bark
          B. roots
          C. leaves
          D. branches

   17. What is the rhyme scheme of “October Nights”?
         A. aabb
         B. aaaa
         C. abab
         D. abba

   18. What time of year is this poem set?
         A. spring
         B. summer
         C. fall
         D. winter

   19. When the speaker says, “And the moon is sweeping the night’s gray gloom /
       Beneath my bed with her silver broom,” she means that
          A. moonlight is flooding the room.
          B. the moonlight is becoming dimmer.
          C. the moon is shining only under her bed.
          D. the moon is mopping the bedroom floor.

   20. Which of the following is an example of personification?
         A. I love to be safe and snug in my room
         B. I love the wind when it rants and roars
         C. (If you look closely, you’ll see them, too.)
         D. Snuggled beneath the sheets and spread

   21. Which of the following is an example of imagery?
         A. I love October nights in bed
         B. I love to listen as it explores,
         C. With the bone-white moon in my window view.
         D. I love to be safe and snug in my room

   22. Which of the following BEST describes how the speaker feels at the end of the poem?
         A. secure
         B. lonely
         C. anxious
         D. frightened
Unit 1 Posttest Key

   1. A
   2. B
   3. C
   4. A
   5. D
   6. D
   7. C
   8. D
   9. D
   10. C
   11. B
   12. C
   13. A
   14. A
   15. B
   16. D
   17. B
   18. C
   19. A
   20. B
   21. C
   22. A

								
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