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					AP Lang & Comp
Valley H.S.
Milburn
                                     From Understanding Comics, Scott McCloud

   1. Scott McCloud announces in his title that he wants to help the reader “understand comic.” What features of
      comics does McCloud explain: How do the features of the comic strip form itself aid in that explanation?

   2. Choose a frame in which you think word and image work well together, and analyze why they do so. Use one or
      more of McCloud’s categories of analysis.

   3. Using the categories that McCloud introduces in the second half of this selection, analyze how a comic strip in
      your local newspaper (or comics with which you may be familiar) works. If relevant, suggest how it might work
      even better.

   4. Think about lecture notes that students take. In your opinion, who doodles the most, boys or girls? What
      purposes do your little cartoons and doodles serve? Is it bad to draw cars or teddy bears on the margins of our
      physics notes? Is it bad not to?

   5. Do you think students should be able to turn in a research project as a series of original comic pages instead of
      written prose? Make a T-chart of the pros and cons. Think of Art Spiegelman’s Maus or Marjane Sartrapi’s
      Persepolis. Can comics deal with mature subjects and great philosophical problems? Are comics the new novels?
      Justify your thoughts with examples from your experiences.




AP Lang & Comp
Valley H.S.
Milburn
                                     From Understanding Comics, Scott McCloud

   1. Scott McCloud announces in his title that he wants to help the reader “understand comic.” What features of
      comics does McCloud explain: How do the features of the comic strip form itself aid in that explanation?

   2. Choose a frame in which you think word and image work well together, and analyze why they do so. Use one or
      more of McCloud’s categories of analysis.

   3. Using the categories that McCloud introduces in the second half of this selection, analyze how a comic strip in
      your local newspaper (or comics with which you may be familiar) works. If relevant, suggest how it might work
      even better.

   4. Think about lecture notes that students take. In your opinion, who doodles the most, boys or girls? What
      purposes do your little cartoons and doodles serve? Is it bad to draw cars or teddy bears on the margins of our
      physics notes? Is it bad not to?

   5. Do you think students should be able to turn in a research project as a series of original comic pages instead of
      written prose? Make a T-chart of the pros and cons. Think of Art Spiegelman’s Maus or Marjane Sartrapi’s
      Persepolis. Can comics deal with mature subjects and great philosophical problems? Are comics the new novels?
      Justify your thoughts with examples from your experiences.

				
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posted:2/7/2013
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