Measuring Educational Progress_ A Birth to Eight

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					 Building Birth-Eight Information Systems:
Strengthening the Focus on Early Childhood

     BUILD Initiative Webinar
                    with

    Charles Bruner & Ralph Smith



                 October 2010
Building 0-8 Information Systems:
   Strengthening the Focus on
         Early Childhood


                Charles Bruner
         Child and Family Policy Center &
                 BUILD Initiative
                   May 2011
    Developing 0-8 Information Systems:
              Basic Resources
• Developing Information
  Systems
   – Comprehensive Efforts (SRII,
     NNIP, DQC, ET, Early
     Childhood Data Collaborative)
   – Best Practices
   – Integrated Approaches Spanning
     0-8
• Next Steps
• Web Links
• Checklist
       Questions You Sent In
• How do you address the challenge of using “education”
  data (3rd grade reading scores) without losing the
  “health/public health” focus/role?
             Penny Hatcher, Supervisor of Child Health Programs, MN Department of
               Health



• What do we know about the skills needed in pre-k that
  prepare children for reading in kindergarten to third
  grade? What should be the focus of early childhood
  teachers to build the continuum?
             Ana Berdecia, Senior Fellow/Director, Thomas Edison State College, NJ
         Why School Readiness and
          Third Grade Reading?

1. Half of subsequent school difficulties/failure can be
   predicted by what children know and can do at the
   time of school entry.
2. Failure to be reading proficiently by the end of third
   grade is even more highly predictive of subsequent
   school failure; reading becomes fundamental to
   learning after that point.
3. The kids of greatest concern are mostly the same
   kids, and they need mostly the same things to
   succeed across the age span (0-8).
     What Matters for School Readiness
 Matters for Third Grade Reading Proficiency
(and requires state and community information to address)

  • A healthy start matters (birth to two years critically
    important)
  • Parenting, health, early care environments, and early
    learning opportunities matter
  • Addressing cognitive and non-cognitive development
    (five domains) matters
  • Neighborhood/community matters
  • Participation and inclusion matter
  • Investments and quality matter
 What National Information Shows – The
  Prevalence of Risk/Adverse Outcomes
• 20-40% of births to families with significant concerns
• 13% of six month-2 year olds with developmental delays
  eligible for Part C
• 19% of 2-5 year olds with diagnosable mental disorders
• Profound gaps in language and literacy development
  exist at 36 months of age
• 20% of children start school behind on more than one
  dimension (cognitive, social/emotional, physical)
• 30% of fourth graders are not at basic reading level
• One-fifth to one-third of all kids are not getting all they
  need to succeed at even a basic level.
    State Birth to Eight Development System
                                                                          All children should have access to
                                                                          early care and education opportunities
All children should have comprehensive         Early                      in nurturing environments where they
health services that address vision,                                      can learn what they need to succeed in
hearing, nutrition, behavioral, and oral     Learning/                    school and life. All children should be
health as well as medical health needs.                                   in high performing community schools
                                                                          for their elementary school years.
                                            Education

                    Health,
                    Mental                                                Family
                  Health and                                             Support
                   Nutrition

                                              Special                   All families should have economic and
All children with special needs                                         parenting supports to ensure all
should be identified as early as           Needs/ Early                 children have nurturing and stable
possible, assessed, and receive                                         relationships with caring adults.
appropriate services.                      Intervention

                Source: Early Childhood Systems Working Group. 2006. ADAPTED in underline.
   Contributions to Closing the Gap: 0-5

15-25%                               20-30% high
comprehensive,            Early
                                     quality early
prenatal -early         Learning     childhood
children’s health                    education
care


           Health,
           Mental                     Family
         Health and                  Support
          Nutrition

5-10% timely
interventions for
                         Special     40-60% family
                      Needs/ Early   strengthening and
MH, DD, & CW
                                     village building
Services              Intervention
  Contributions to Closing the Gap: 6-8

                         Early      35-55% high
                                    performing
10-15% children’s      Learning     community schools
health care



          Health,
          Mental                     Family
        Health and                  Support
         Nutrition

 5-10% timely                          30-40% family
                        Special        strengthening and
 interventions for
 MH, DD, & CW        Needs/ Early      village building
 Services            Intervention
   Key Role of Using K-3 Data with
  Early Childhood Program Data for
        Birth to Five Purposes
• Data at kindergarten entry provides both an
  “outcome for earlier actions” and a way to
  calculate earlier participation rates by
  subpopulations.
• Data in 1st-3rd grade can serve as lagging
  indicators of school readiness and suggest
  degree of sustainability of gains among different
  populations and for specific programs.
One Approach: Visioning and Developing an
   Ideal 0-8 Child Information System
• Comprehensive (all systems serving children)
    – Health coverage, utilization, and health outcomes
    – Participation in early childhood services/activities and developmental
      progress
    – Attendance and progression in school and educational mastery
    – Identification and response to specialized needs (child protection, Part
      C and B, child mental health) and correction/ameliorization of conditions
    – Family/community social connections, economic stability, and
      participation in family support activities and parents as first teachers,
      nurses, and safety officers of their kids
• Interoperable (unique identifier, cross-system information sharing)
• Longitudinal/real-time (cradle to career, accessible for case
  planning)
• Geographic (neighborhood/census tract level)
One Approach: Visioning and Developing an
   Ideal 0-8 Child Information System
• Comprehensive (all systems serving children)
    – Health coverage, utilization, and health outcomes
    – Participation in early childhood services/activities and developmental
      progress
    – Attendance and progression in school and educational mastery
    – Identification and response to specialized needs (child protection, Part
      C and B, child mental health) and correction/ameliorization of conditions
    – Family/community social connections, economic stability, and
      participation in family support activities and parents as first teachers,
      nurses, and safety officers of their kids
• Interoperable (unique identifier, cross-system information sharing
• Longitudinal/real-time (cradle to career, accessible for case
  planning)
• Geographic (neighborhood/census tract level)
  My Approach/Opportunity to Share:
 Selectively Analyzing Existing Available
        (or Easily Collectible) Data

• Census, American Community Survey Data
• Getting Ready data identified in School Readiness
  Indicators Initiative
• Public funding data
• Other administrative data
• National and state survey data
• School data (from statewide longitudinal data base)
       Questions You Sent In

• What are best/relatively simple indicators to use for
  identifying progress/problems before the 3rd grade?
          Paul Shinn, Public Policy Analyst, Community Action Project of Tulsa
            County, Oklahoma


• How do we begin to build a platform for a
  “developmental status registry?”
          Anne Stone, Executive Director, OR Pediatric Society
               …from data to information

• ACS – diversity of child population
• Public funding data – investments by child age
• ACS – vulnerable child raising neighborhood data
• School data – preschool participation at kindergarten
  entry & preschool participation and early elementary
  development
• ACS – preschool data overall
• School data – early elementary attendance data
               Diversity in America:
          Young Children Leading the Way

                                  22.3%
             0-4                                                     44.9%
                             18.6%
            5-17
    Age




                                                               40.8%
                        14.0%
          18-64                                        32.4%
                     6.4%
            65+                         18.9%                        Hispanic
                                                                     population
                    6.5%
Teachers (1-8)                         17.9%

Source: United States Census Bureau, 2005 American Community Survey (age)
Current Populations Services, Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2006 (teachers)
  Per Child Composite Investments in
Education and Development by Child Age
               50 States & District of Columbia
                   Composite Assessment
$12,000
                                                                                 $9,531
$10,000           For every dollar invested in a school-
                  aged child, only 6 cents is invested in
 $8,000
                  an infant and toddler and 25 cents in
 $6,000           a preschool child

 $4,000                                               $2,409

 $2,000             $609

    $0
          Infants and Toddlers (0-2)           Pre-schoolers (3-5)   School-age Children (6-18)

                                                                                 State and Local
                                                                                 Federal

             Source: Early Learning Left Out 3rd Edition
             See also http://www.financeproject.org/publications/GLR_Guide.pdf
              Composition of Census Tracts by
              Child-Raising Vulnerability Status
                                                                 All                      No               6-10 Risk Factors
                                                               Tracts                Risk Factors
Total Population                                            281,421,906                164,392,149             18,859,833

Percent of Population                                                                        58.41%                 6.70%
RiskFactors/Vulnerability Indicators
Percent Single Parent                                                27.13                      20.46                53.10

Percent Poor Families with Children                                  13.57                          7.18             41.43

Percent 25+ no HS                                                    19.60                      13.53                48.00

Percent 25+ BA or Higher                                             24.00                      28.67                 7.14

Percent 16-19 no School/Work                                          6.00                          3.05             15.00

Percent HoH on Public Assistance                                      7.81                          4.87             25.48

Percent HoH with Wage Income                                         77.72                      80.60                69.10

Percent HoH – Int/Div/Rent/Home                                      35.87                      42.31                11.05

Percent 18+ Limited English                                           4.62                          1.87             17.52

Percent Owner-Occupied Housing                                       60.24                      71.00                29.62
                          SOURCE: Geolytics Census 2000 Data from Urban Institute, Washington, DC
         Calhoun County, Michigan
     Moderate Risk Tracts and EDI Scores
                                             Calhoun       Moderate
                                             County        Risk Tracts
EDI Vulnerability Scores
Physical Health                                   20%             31%
Social Competence                                 15%             22%
Emotional Maturity                                16%             19%
Language/Cognitive Development                    14%             21%
Communications/General Knowledge                   9%             16%
Vulnerable at Least 1 Domain                      36%             52%
Vulnerable 2 or More Domains                      19%             30%
Note: The moderate risk census tracts are those with 3 or more risk
factors. EDI = Early Development Index used in the TECCS Initiative.
             U.S. 4-Year-Old Preschool
             Participation by Ethnicity
100%
90%
80%
70%        61.1%
                            57.8%                           57.0%
60%
                                            46.7%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
 0%
         White Non-        African         Hispanic          Total
          Hispanic        American

       Source: US Census Bureau, 2009 American Community Survey,
       Public Use Microdata Sample
U.S. 4-Year-Old Preschool Participation, Less
than 200% and Greater than 400% Poverty
100%
 90%
 80%          75.9%             73.6%                         74.1%
 70%                                           64.5%
 60%                    54.6%
        48.2%                                            47.8%
 50%                                      43.3%
 40%
 30%
 20%
 10%
 0%
        White Non-        African          Hispanic         Total
         Hispanic        American
LIGHT BLUE Under 200% of Poverty        DARK BLUE Over 400% of Poverty

       Source: US Census Bureau, 2009 American Community Survey,
       Public Use Microdata Sample
 Preschool Involvement and Subsequent
Student Achievement: Council Bluffs, Iowa

    First Grade Math Scores by SES and District
               Preschool Involvement
       Council Bluffs School District 2005-06
    22
                                                                  +1.15
    22
                                                                  + .48
    21
    21                                                            + .73
    20                                                            + .98
    20
    19
                                                                  + .25
    19
    18
          Beginning Year                  End-Year                Gain

         District Preschool Not Low SES              No Preschool Not Low SES
         ALL STUDENTS                                District Preschool Low SES
         No Preschool Low SES
   Preschool Participation Rates in Iowa
    Statewide Longitudinal Data Base:
          Who’s Being Reached
• Data was consistent with Council Bluffs on kindergarten
  entry assessments by FRM/preschool participation.
• Participation (particularly of FRM students) in statewide
  universal preschool varied widely by school district.
• English language learners were least likely to participate,
  relative to their presence in the kindergarten population.
• Most of the participation of low-income children was the
  result of enhancing preschool for children already in
  Head Start and not expanded outreach and enrollment;
  most increased preschool participation rates in 200-
  400% of poverty child population.
                                  Attendance Counts Data

                                   Rate of Chronic Absenteeism
                                   and Average Daily Attendance
                                                                         y = -4.0283x + 3.9508
                           Select Metropolitan School District, 2008-2009 R2 = 0.8258
                  30%
                                              93% ADA = 21%
                  25%
                                              Chronic Absence
                  20%
Rate of chronic
 absenteeism




                  15%

                  10%                                                           97% ADA = 4%
                                                                                Chronic Absence
                  5%

                   0%
                     91%    92%    93%       94%       95%        96%     97%   98%     99%       100%
                  -5%
                                         Average Daily Attendance (ADA)
  Sharing Experiences in Analyzing Data
   as well as Developing New and More
      Comprehensive Data Systems
• BUILD Data Related Reports (www.buildinitiative.org)
   – Building Public Early Childhood Data Systems for a Multi-Ethnic
     Society
   – Opportunities to Incorporate Young Child Data into Statewide
     Longitudinal Data Systems
   – The Early Learning Network in Pennsylvania
   – Federal Funding and Young Children Part One: Directions,
     Opportunities, and Challenges to States in Building Early
     Childhood Systems
   – Federal Funding and Young Children Part Two: Securing
     Funding Flexibility to Improve Children’s Healthy Development
       Questions You Sent In

• Can you address the importance of real engagement of
  families to promote emergent literacy in very young
  children by providing strategies to intentionally guide
  families on how to promote literacy in the home? It is my
  belief that the culture of education and literacy in the
  home sets the tone for children.
      Sherry Linton, Project Director, CT Early Childhood Education Cabinet
                    Contact Information

Charles Bruner
Director of Research and Evaluation, Build Initiative
Director of Child and Family Policy Center
cbruner@cfpciowa.org

                         www.buildinitiative.org
                         www.finebynine.org
                         www.cfpciowa.org

LEARNING TO READ: Developing 0-8 Information Systems to Improve
Third Grade Reading Proficiency
http://www.cfpciowa.org/uploaded/AEC%20Resource%20Guide%20Learning%
20to%20Read1_1.pdf
                Ralph Smith
• Executive Vice-President, Annie E. Casey Foundation

				
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