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					                    2012 Electric T&D Benchmarking



              Data Collection guide




Updated versions of the Guidelines and recordings from the webinars are
available at are website.

www.1qconsulting.com :: Community Links :: Data Entry Gateway



                                     1
Introduction



Purpose of this document
  The purpose of this Data Collection Guide is to provide guidance and
    direction in how to complete the detailed questionnaire for the T&D
    benchmark study. It gives instructions regarding the types of answers
    expected, as well as errors to avoid. This Guide has been described as
    the “rules” for providing data.
  It provides the underlying process models around which the various
    sections of the questionnaire are organized, to help in understanding the
    purpose of some of the questions.
  The appropriate costs to include, and those to exclude, are highlighted,
    so that each member utility can provide accurate, comparable data for
    comparisons.
  A few key definitions are provided throughout the document. A
    comprehensive set of definitions is provided in a separate Glossary.




                                                              2
  Data Collection Guide Outline


The purpose of this Data Collection Guide is to describe the “rules” for
providing data. The organization follows the questionnaire outline:
  ST. Statistics
  SA. System Activity
  DF. Distribution Financial
  TF. Transmission Financial
  CP. Capital Project & Portfolio Management
  SF. Safety
  SO. Staffing/Outsourcing
  SU. Support
  EV. Environmental
  DR. Distribution Reliability
  SR. Substation Reliability
  TR. Transmission Line Reliability
  DP. Distribution Practices
  SP. Substation Practices
  TP. Transmission Line Practices


                                                            3
        Core Areas to Survey Annually

   Each year, the core subjects are investigated through the survey:

                                                  Dist   Subs   Trans    T&D
         Planning, Engineering, Design             X      X      X
         Field Operations & Maintenance            X      X      X
         New Business Capital                      X      X      X
         Field Construction                        X      X      X
         Distribution Dispatch                     X
         Vegetation Management                     X             X
         Staffing & Outsourcing                    X      X      X
         Energy Control Center                                   X
         Support                                                          X
         (inc: Inventory, Fleet)




                                                                     4
See Guidelines for detailed definition of terms
Example Results



Statistical Report and Analysis




                                  5
Example Metrics Comparisons – Distribution cost


                                          This page is one of
                                          many in the
                                          statistical report.

                                          The basic format
                                          includes the graph,
                                          showing relative
                                          position of each
                                          company, a listing
                                          of the mean and
                                          quartile values, any
                                          comments needed
                                          to clarify the graph,
                                          and the calculation
                                          used for the graph.




                                      6
Example Functional Area Cost Comparison


                                        For each major
                                        subject area, there
                                        are cost and
                                        service level
                                        metrics. Costs are
                                        provided per
                                        customer and per
                                        unit. Service
                                        levels depend on
                                        the specific
                                        subject area.




                                    7
Example Demographic Comparison


                                     A variety of
                                     demographic
                                     variables are
                                     tracked, to enable
                                     analysis of
                                     performance
                                     based on company
                                     demographics




                                 8
Organization/Operational Practice Example


                                         Operational and
                                         organizational
                                         practices were
                                         tracked and
                                         summarized in a
                                         variety of different
                                         ways, helping
                                         companies to
                                         understand their
                                         practices in
                                         relation to other
                                         companies in the
                                         community.




                                     9
Example Open-Ended Question Responses


                                             Many areas of
                                             the
                                             questionnaire
                                             focus on
                                             practices and
                                             initiatives, with
                                             the goal of
                                             getting
                                             concise but
                                             descriptive
                                             responses.




                                        10
Example Summary from Insights Conference


                                     Various findings
                                     from the survey
                                     program are
                                     assembled for
                                     discussion during
                                     the Insights
                                     conference.
                                     These typically
                                     focus on practices
                                     and demographics
                                     among the
                                     companies in the
                                     community




                                    11
Statistics and System Activity




              12
Purpose of the Section


 The purpose of this section of the questionnaireire is twofold: to gather
  statistical information about the existing electric system, and then to gather
  further information about activities during the year that affect the system
  and the company.
 The statistical section gathers a variety of demographic information that
  describes each company's system in terms of size, voltage, customer
  density, etc. This information is used in doing analysis of the results,
  understanding the inherent advantages and limitations of the circumstances
  facing each utility.
 The system activity portion of the questionnaire is designed to identify work
  load drivers associated with activity. There are a variety of questions
  designed to understand the amount of capital activity as well as things that
  are done for O&M.




                                                               13
  Transmission versus Distribution


For purposes of this survey, we define distribution to be a voltage level of 45kV
and below. The distinction is somewhat arbitrary, but picks a point between 69kv
which is generally considered a transmission (or at least sub-transmission) level
and 21kV which would generally be considered distribution.
It is unrealistic to ask utilities to redefine their cost or reliability reporting on the
basis of these definitions. However, a utility that has very different definitions
may want to restate these statistics to better compare their performance.

Distribution Voltage Classes                Transmission classes >=45kV
  5kV class (>1kV, <=9kV)                     <69kV class (>=45kV <69kV)
  15kV class (>9kV, <=15kV)                   69kV class (>=69kV <100kV)
  25kV class (>15kV to <=26kV)                100kV class (>=100kV <200kV)
  35kV class (>26kV to <=36kV)                200kV Class (>=200kV <300kV)
  44kV class (>36kV to <=44kV)                300kV Class (>=300 kV <400 kV)
                                               400kV and above



                                                                      14
       Substation Definitions


   FERC provides definitions on what constitutes a Transmission vs. Distribution
   substation based upon use.
      For multipurpose substations, FERC allows either segregating costs, or assigning
        based upon predominant use.
   For purposes of this survey, we generally will recommend a low side definition
   based upon a 45kV or below as a distribution substation.
      We understand that a typical Canadian practice would be to define a substation
        based upon high side voltage (e.g. 115kv to 12kv stations are defined as
        transmission). Based upon predominant use, these still can be classified as
        transmission substations.
      It is unrealistic to ask utilities to redefine their cost or reliability reporting on the basis
        of these definitions. We will rely on each utility’s self-assigned definitions. However,
        a utility that has very different definitions may want to restate these statistics to better
        compare their performance.
                     Transmission Voltage Classes:                         Distribution Voltage Classes:
                           <69kV                                                  5kV (>1kV, <=9kV)
                           69kV class (>=69kV <100kV)                             15kV (>9kV, <=15kV)
                           100kV class (>=100kV <200kV)                           25kV (>15kV, <=26kV)
                           200kV Class (>=200kV <300kV)                           35kV (>26kV, <=36kV)
                           300kV Class (>=300kV <400kV)                           44kV )>36kV, <=48kV)
                           400kV and above
Note: We will have transmission-only and distribution-only entities participating in this survey.
Undoubtedly their voltage levels will not necessarily line-up with the above definitions.            15
Substation Definitions (cont.)


 Because our benchmarking is done at a relatively high level, we want to
  include transmission substations that have auto-transformers, but not
  AC/DC converter stations.
   ● While these components aren’t all directly measurable, nor are the MVA
     calculations comparable, we want to recognize the existence of these units of
     property to make the benchmarking as comparable as possible.
 Customer-owned or dedicated substations are an issue in making
  comparisons.
   ● If customers own and maintain their own stations, the reporting option for this
     questionnaire is clear – please exclude both the O&M costs and the capacity for
     those stations..
   ● In the event that you maintain one or more customer-owned stations, the answer
     may be different. The preferred approach to responding to this portion of the
     questionnaire is to exclude the costs of the customer-owned stations, and
     exclude the capacity as well. However, if you cannot practically exclude them,
     then be sure that both the O&M costs and the capacity are included in all your
     answers.
 Small, pole-mounted mini-substations (e.g. transformers, protective devices
  and a switch) should not be counted as substations.
                                                                   16
Substation Transformer Nameplate rating


 Generally speaking, we want to measure transformers by MVA rating at
  normal operating conditions.
 Since utilities have different operating conditions and different
  manufacturers have different ratings, we will rely on each utility to report
  their own conditions. Use the number you report in FERC Form 1.
 We recognize that autotransformers may have a different set of conditions
  and that the comparison is imprecise, however, we think this is a better
  solution than leaving them out entirely.




                                                               17
  System Activity Questions


 The purpose of this section is to identify work load drivers associated with
  activity. We ask for capital unit additions and selected O&M activities for the
  year. The goal is to understand the major drivers of work, not to capture all
  of the individual work activities.
 The questions are separated into Distribution Lines, Substations, and
  Transmission Lines




                                                                 18
        Financial –
Overview of the Cost Model


    Working with an adjusted FERC model
                   and the
         Activity-Based Cost Model




                                          19
Financial Section Overview


 The Financial sections of the questionnaire (Sections DF and TF) ask for
  the costs of running the business, separated into Capital and O&M costs.
  We also further ask companies to allocate costs to Substations. There are
  two alternative cost reporting systems:
   ● FERC: The overall cost model is based on the FERC system of accounts, with a
     number of adjustments designed to make the cost reporting more consistent
     between the companies. Specific questions within the questionnaire ask for the
     data reported in individual FERC accounts, and then subsequent questions ask
     for the information required to make the desired adjustments.
   ● ACTIVITY-BASED: The guiding principle of the activity cost model is to capture
     the expenditures associated with the year in which they were made, regardless of
     when they were actually reported to FERC. The activities also are more aligned
     with typical budgetary categories, such as New Business (capital) and Vegetation
     Management (O&M). While budget categories differ among utilities, we have
     developed a generic budget categories that most companies have been able to
     use.
 The Financial Section also covers assets reported to FERC, separated by
  Distribution and Transmission. We also ask companies to allocate assets
  between lines and substations. Construction Work In Progress (CWIP) is
  also covered in this section.
                                                                  20
    FERC: Specific Adjustments

 The following page is a schematic of how basic FERC cost data will be adjusted for this
  benchmarking study.
   ● A&G costs will be excluded – Utilities are asked to adjust their costs to exclude costs typically
      reported as A&G (e.g. pensions and benefits) from their O&M data.
   ● General plant costs will be excluded – Utilities are asked to adjust their costs to exclude costs
      typically reported as General Plant (e.g. IT/Communications infrastructure) from their T&D
      Capital data.
   ● Other T&D Capital exclusions:
         Transmission: Land acquisitions and extraordinary items
         Distribution: Land acquisitions, street lighting and extraordinary items
   ● Other O&M exclusions:
         Transmission: Wheeling, Rents/Leases, IT costs, extraordinary items. If you charge IT
           support to account 569, you should exclude it. Regional Market Expenses (Accts 575, 576).
         Distribution: Streetlight Maintenance, Rents/Leases, IT costs, extraordinary items. If you
           charge IT support to Distribution O&M accounts, you should exclude it.
         If you normally charge R&D, such as EPRI dues, to O&M, include it, unless it is an unusually
           large amount for this year
   ● Substation costs will be allocated from Transmission and Distribution accounts, and similar
      adjustments made.
 The goal of the exclusions is to provide a fairer comparison of T&D operational performance, by
  excluding certain costs that relate to demographic differences not under the control of T&D
  management.

                                                                                 21
     FERC: The ADJUSTED FERC COST MODEL

   FERC provides a general framework
     Certain costs must be excluded to provide fair comparisons that focus on operations
     Substation costs must be separated out, including certain allocations


                 General Plant                 FERC Costs                        A&G


                          Transmission                                Distribution


                Capital                  O&M                Capital                       O&M



                  Trans Lines            Trans Lines          Dist Lines                   Dist Lines


                  Exclusions             Exclusions           Exclusions                  Exclusions


                    Trans                   Trans                Dist                        Dist
Substations      Substations             Substations          Substations                 Substations


                                                                                     22
FERC: Rationale for Exclusions - Distribution



 Do not include land acquisition costs or rents/leases. Although less
  common for distribution, land acquisition costs vary greatly by region and
  also can occur at very different points in time, based upon land policies.
  Similarly, rents/leases are an alternative to ownership and have some of the
  same shortcomings from a benchmarking perspective.
 Do not include street lighting capital or expense costs. There is a large
  variation of what street lighting exists in a service territory and what percent
  is owned and operated by the incumbent utility.
 Do not include extraordinary items. These can run the gamut and should be
  identified individually.
 Storm costs should be excluded if they are outside your “normal”
  experience. This is to account for the fact that some utilities utilize an
  “insurance reserve”, so that extraordinary storm expenses are charged to
  the “reserve” account, and are not “O&M” expenses. If your utility uses an
  “insurance reserve” account, you do not need to make any adjustment.


                                                                23
FERC: Rationale for Exclusions - Transmission


 If you have O&M expenses for which you are reimbursed, such as maintenance done
    for customers, do not include them.
   Do not include land acquisition costs or rents/leases. Land acquisition costs vary
    greatly by region and also can occur at very different points in time, based upon land
    policies. Similarly, rents/leases are an alternative to ownership and have some of the
    same shortcomings from a benchmarking perspective.
   Do not include wheeling expenses. Generally, the transmission metrics are geared to
    operational performance of the infrastructure. So while an argument could be made
    that wheeling is a substitute for system ownership, it may also be simply an economic
    arrangement to purchase incremental or low-cost power.
   Do not include extraordinary items. These can run the gamut and should be identified
    individually.
   Storm costs should be excluded if they are outside your “normal” experience. This is
    to account for the fact that some utilities utilize an “insurance reserve”, so that
    extraordinary storm expenses are charged to the “reserve” account, and are not
    “O&M” expenses. If your utility uses an “insurance reserve” account, you do not
    need to make any adjustment.




                                                                       24
FERC: Rationale for Exclusions - Substation


 Do not include land acquisition costs or rents/leases. Land acquisition costs
  vary greatly by region and also can occur at very different points in time,
  based upon land policies. Similarly, rents/leases are an alternative to
  ownership and have some of the same shortcomings from a benchmarking
  perspective.
 Do not include extraordinary items. These can run the gamut and should be
  identified individually.
 Storm costs should be excluded if they are outside your “normal”
  experience. This is to account for the fact that some utilities utilize an
  “insurance reserve”, so that extraordinary storm expenses are charged to
  the “reserve” account, and are not “O&M” expenses. If your utility uses an
  “insurance reserve” account, you do not need to make any adjustment.




                                                              25
   FERC: CIAC

2. Electric Plant To Be Recorded at Cost.
A. All amounts included in the accounts for electric plant acquired as an operating unit or system, except as otherwise
provided in the texts of the intangible plant accounts, shall be stated at the cost incurred by the person who first devoted
the property to utility service. All other electric plant shall be included in the accounts at the cost incurred by the utility,
except for property acquired by lease which qualifies as capital lease property under General Instruction 19. Criteria for
Classifying Leases, and is recorded in Account 101.1, Property under Capital Leases, or Account 120.6, Nuclear Fuel
under Capital Leases. Where the term cost is used in the detailed plant accounts, it shall have the meaning stated in this
paragraph.
B. When the consideration given for property is other than cash, the value of such consideration shall be determined on a
cash basis (see, however, definition 9). In the entry recording such transition, the actual consideration shall be described
with sufficient particularity to identify it. The utility shall be prepared to furnish the Commission the particulars of its
determination of the cash value of the consideration if other than cash.
C. When property is purchased under a plan involving deferred payments, no charge shall be made to the electric plant
accounts for interest, insurance, or other expenditures occasioned solely by such form of payment.
D. The electric plant accounts shall not include the cost or other value of electric plant contributed to the company.
Contributions in the form of money or its equivalent toward the construction of electric plant shall be credited to accounts
charged with the cost of such construction. Plant constructed from contributions of cash or its equivalent shall be shown
as a reduction to gross plant constructed when assembling cost data in work orders for posting to plant ledgers of
accounts. The accumulated gross costs of plant accumulated in the work order shall be recorded as a debit in the plant
ledger of accounts along with the related amount of contributions concurrently be recorded as a credit.
The actual expenditures, on the other hand, may or may not be net, depending on how the company accounting
works. When the company issues an invoice for the contribution, it should credit to the plant accounts when the invoice
is issued, whether or not the invoice is ever collected, so the actual expenditures should also be net, unless they don’t
issue the invoice timely. I believe that the way most companies do it, and the prudent business practice, would be to
issue the invoice, and maybe collect it, before construction begins.



                                                                                                      26
  FERC: Distribution Capital Adjustments


Each portion of the financial section asks for the key FERC accounts, and then
asks for the information necessary to make the adjustments. In the figure below
(taken directly from the questionnaire), the blue arrow highlights the value to
insert for the exclusion, if it isn't already clear. As noted on the preceding page,
FERC costs are net of CIAC.




                                                                   27
  FERC: Distribution O&M Adjustments


For Distribution Line O&M expenses, the Substations expenses need to be
removed from the overall Distribution expenses (shown with the blue
arrow). Then individual exclusions are identified as well.




                                                            28
  FERC: Transmission Capital Adjustments


Each portion of the financial section asks for the key FERC accounts, and then
asks for the information necessary to make the adjustments. In the figure below
(taken directly from the questionnaire), the blue arrow highlights the value to
insert for the exclusion, if it isn't already clear. As noted on page 25, the FERC
costs are net of CIAC.




                                                                 29
  FERC: Transmission O&M Adjustments


For Transmission Line O&M expenses, the Substations expenses need to be
removed from the overall Transmission expenses (shown with the blue arrow).
Then individual exclusions are identified as well.




                                                             30
  ACTIVITY-BASED Cost Model

While FERC has the benefit of being a uniform system of accounts, there are
several important shortcomings:
•FERC capital spending lags behind actual spending; costs for large projects go
into a Construction Work in Progress (CWIP) account and are not transferred
until the assets are placed into service, sometimes a several year lag.
•FERC capital accounts generally follow plant accounts and units of property
(e.g. poles, towers, and fixtures) – not the typical reasons why utilities spend
(e.g. new business)
•FERC O&M accounts tend to be more activity-oriented, but do not necessarily
track important categories (e.g. vegetation management)

For those reasons, a simplified Activity- Based Costing system was developed to
get current year spending by activity. The following diagram depicts the Activity-
Based approach




                                                                 31
    Activity-Based Cost Model




Transmission Line Capital                   T&D Substation Capital              Distribution Line Capital
• Serve New: Extension to new customers     • Serve New: New Substations        • Serve New: Extension to new customers
• Expand: Capacity Additions                • Expand: Capacity Additions        • Expand: Capacity Additions
• Sustain: Replace/Repair in kind           • Sustain: Repair/replace-in-kind   • Sustain: Replace/Repair in kind
• Sustain: Service Restoration              • Sustain: Service Restoration      • Sustain: Service Restoration
• Sustain: Line Relocations                 • Other                             • Sustain: Line Relocations
• Sustain: Transmission Operations Center   • CIAC                              • Sustain: Distribution Operations Center
• Other                                                                         • Other
• CIAC                                                                          • CIAC

                                            T&D Substation O&M
Transmission Line O&M                       • Maintenance                       Distribution Line O&M
• Maintenance                               • Service Restoration               • Maintenance
• Vegetation Management                     • Distribution Operations Center    • Vegetation Management
• Service Restoration                       • Other                             • Service Restoration
• Transmission Operations Center                                                • Distribution Operations Center
• Other                                                                         • Other




                                                                                               32
Activity-Based: Distribution Capital Activities

 In order to better understand your capital spending, we ask that the capital
  figures be allocated in accordance with a specified list of activities.
 The total capital activity is intended to be the amount actually spent during
  the year, not necessarily what was reported to FERC (and not necessarily
  the “adjusted FERC capital” reported in this survey); we believe that this
  eliminates some of the perturbations caused by changes in CWIP accounts.




                                                              33
Activity-Based: Distribution O&M


 As is done with Capital, we ask that the O&M figures be allocated in
  accordance with a specified list of activities.
 Unlike Capital, we expect the O&M Expense should equal the amount
  reported as “Adjusted FERC”




                                                             34
Activity-Based: Transmission Capital

 In order to better understand your capital spending, we ask that the capital
  figures be allocated in accordance with a specified list of activities.
 The total capital activity is intended to be the amount actually spent during
  the year, not necessarily what was reported to FERC (and not necessarily
  the “adjusted FERC capital” reported in this survey); we believe that this
  eliminates some of the perturbations caused by changes in CWIP accounts.




                                                              35
Activity-Based: Transmission O&M


 As is done with Capital, we ask that the O&M figures be allocated in
  accordance with a specified list of activities.
 Unlike Capital, we expect the O&M Expense should equal the amount
  reported as “Adjusted FERC”




                                                             36
  Distribution Assets


The last series of questions in the Distribution Financial section asks about the
FERC account values for the existing assets. These values are needed in order
to determine asset replacement rates




                                                                37
  Transmission Assets


The last series of questions in the Transmission Financial section asks about the
FERC account values for the existing assets. These values are needed in order
to determine asset replacement rates




                                                                38
Safety, Staffing & Support




            39
  Safety Reporting


Most of the statistics come directly from OSHA definitions (see www.
OSHA.gov)

There are, however, some safety reporting issues:
  Vehicular accidents – Most utilities report all reportable accidents, whether
    preventable or not and regardless of fault. In general, we want utilities to
    include personal vehicles when used on company business.
  There are some differences in how utilities treat limited duty work, which will
    not be resolved as part of this benchmarking.
  The “DART” (Days Away, Restricted or Transferred) rate is a standard
    OSHA statistic. The OSHA definition is included in the Glossary.




                                                                 40
  Safety Question


We’re asking for raw data directly
off your OSHA form for the safety
stats. Within the question we
calculate the safety rates we’ll be
using on the performance profiles
and in the report. We will also
calculate these as part of the
report. When on-line you may
want to enter the calculated data
in the appropriate fields so that
both the on-line version and excel
version match.




                                      41
  Staffing


Staffing summary figures to report
  Employees assigned full time to a function. Include full-time supervisors and
    managers, or full-time employees who spend part time in different functions.
    Include part time supervisors and managers.
     ● Also include employees who spend less than 40 hours per week.
     ● When calculating FTE value use 2080 as the denominator.
  50% rule: Include a person in an activity if they spend at least 50% of their
   time on that activity. You can indicate they are 0.5 FTEs. If a person
   divides their time so that they don’t spend at least 50% of their time on an
   activity they probably should be in the “Support” Group.
  Direct Labor rule: a person directly involved with field work or engineering
   design is considered direct labor. Use the 50% rule if they divide their time.




                                                                  42
  Support

Inventory:
   Provide the portion of the value reported in FERC Account 154, "Plant
    Materials and Operating Supplies", FERC Form 1, Page 110, line 48,
    column C, allocated by function as below
   We ask for Normal Inventory (Omitting storm stock, spares, power
    transformers, regulators, reclosers from inventory value) and Storm Stock
    and Major Construction Stock. Normal inventory is the key measure we are
    looking for.
   For our purposes, a “storeroom” is a facility where inventory materials are
    normally kept for charge-out and use by construction and maintenance
    forces.
Fleet
   We have just selected a few key measures for Fleet. This section is not
    intended to cover the entire fleet operations area
   Vehicle counts should include both company owned and leased vehicles
We also have sections on Shops and Streetlights


                                                              43
Environmental


 The purpose of the Environmental section is to gather data and raise
  awareness on T&D environmental issues. There are four topic areas; we
  would expect you to engage your company subject matter expert and
  follow EPA guidelines in the areas below:
  ●   General Environmental Information
  ●   Greenhouse Gas Emissions from T&D Operations (SF6 & CO2)
       CO2 from line losses if you generate or buy power for resale
       SF6 from equipment leaks
       Some leak information may not be available; initial report to EPA per 40CFR
          98 subpart DD not due until Sept, 2012 for 2011 year.
  ●   PCB Equipment Inventory Information
  ●   Oil Spill Response And Leaking Equipment Information
Reliability




    45
  Distribution Reliability


Statistics
  IEEE Standard 1366 has become the major guide for definitions on
    distribution reliability. Though not every utility follows it exactly, some of the
    key issues identified by this standard include:
      ● Outage duration to be considered an interruption
      ● Definition of a major event (2.5 Beta Method)
      ● IEEE 1366-2003 can be purchased for download at:
           http://webstore.ansi.org/RecordDetail.aspx?sku=IEEE+Std+1366-
            2003&source=google&adgroup=ieee&keyword=ieee%201366-
            2003&gclid=CLDpu7zCzJYCFQJvswodTEJCyw
  There are still some reporting differences among utilities in terms of the
    following:
      ● Step restoration reporting
      ● Level of reporting (are single services included)
      ● Accuracy of estimates
  We will also calculate “mileage adjusted” SAIDI and SAIFI values, as well
    as CEMIx values (adjusted for each integer level)

                                                                     46
  Distribution Reliability (cont)


Worst Circuit Performance
  Many jurisdictions have introduced “worst circuit performance” measures.
    We have asked questions around typical measures (e.g.“bottom 10%”), but
    do not cover all the possible variations.
  We also ask a few questions to highlight some of the adjustments to these
    measures (in particular low customer counts might skew the measures).
Outage Management System
  We ask about OMS systems and features, along with enhancements
    utilities are investing in to improve the restoration processes
Reliability Improvement Initiatives
  Please take the time to provide brief but complete answers to recent
    improvement initiatives that you have undertaken
Estimated Restoration Times
  Customer research shows ERT’s are very important and that most utilities
    are providing them under normal circumstances; please provide information
    on your experience with ERTs, both under normal conditions and in storm
    situations.
                                                             47
  Substation Reliability

Statistics
   The impact of substation components on distribution reliability (customer interruption)
     statistics is of interest. These include SAIDI and SAIFI. The Substation SAIDI and
     SAIFI here are from causes that originate “within the substation fence”. An example
     of this follows:
      ● A cable failure outside the substation occurs, the protecting feeder breaker fails to
          trip due to a relay mis-operation, and the back-up device trips out the substation
          transformer, causing an interruption to the original feeder with the cable fault, as
          well as 3 additional feeders on the same transformer. The outage of the feeder
          with the cable failure is not counted in “substation” (its cause is “distribution
          equipment failure”), but the outage of the other 3 feeders is counted in
          “substation”.
   We also ask about the availability of substation transformers.
   We are asking for the “Percent Misoperation Rate” for relays as defined in a
     document from IEEE/PSRC Working Group 13. The definition is included in the
     Glossary.
   The impacts of substation components on transmission line reliability measures are
     all included in the Transmission Reliability section.




                                                                          48
  Substation Reliability (Cont)


Reliability Improvement Initiatives
  Please take the time to provide concise, complete answers to recent
    improvement initiatives that you have undertaken
  Note that the substation practice area questions ask about substation
    automation initiatives; so you can reference them here, but do not duplicate.
  We recognize that Transmission-only organizations may not have detailed
    customer interruption data — so leave questions related to SAIDI and SAIFI
    blank.
  In general, we follow the TADS instructions. For most companies, the
    “element” is at the “transmission line” level, since most of our companies
    do not have 200kV low-side equipment.




                                                                49
     Transmission Line Reliability

Statistics
  In general, for transmission lines, we are interested in availability, as
    impacted by sustained outages that may or may not have an impact on an
    end-use customer.
  We ask for raw data on outages by voltage class. We have aligned the
    definitions with TADS for all voltages (even though TADS only applies to
    200kV and above)
     ● Cause codes for all voltages based upon TADS
     ● “Automatic” operation replaces the terminology “unplanned” (with minor impact
       on the values)
  Those codes that are “substation related” will be reported in transmission
   lines, but also in the substation section of the final report
  For Transmission reliability the term “outage” refers to a ‘component’ or
   line outage (most of which may not have any customer impact). For
   instance, you might have had 10 transmission component outages last year
   but only 3 of them resulted in an outage to a customer.
  Scheduled outages should be counted as non-automatic. Forced or
   unplanned outages should be counted as “automatic”.
                                                                      50
  Transmission Line Reliability


TADS Measures
  The TADS framework (first used in 2008) introduced some slightly new and
   different terminology, and has evolved some over the past couple of years.
     ● Elements are defined to be transmission circuits of 200kV and above, and include
       AC/DC lines.
     ● For purposes of this survey, we are only interested in AC lines.
     ● Automatic outages replace the more common unplanned outages, and have a
       few distinctions.
     ● Mileage adjusted measures are introduced
     ● TADS metric definitions can be found
       athttp://www.nerc.com/docs/pc/tadstf/TADS_Phase_II_Final_Report_091108.pdf
Reliability Improvement Initiatives
  Please take the time to provide concise, complete answers to recent
    improvement initiatives that you have undertaken
  Note that there may be some overlap with the Transmission and Substation
    practices sections, which ask questions about the intelligent grid.


                                                                    51
Practice sections




       52
  Initiatives vs. Practices

In many areas of the questionnaire, there are open-ended questions, in which we
are looking for insights about how you operate. Answers should be:
  Brief and succinct – so that the reader doesn't need to read through an extensive
    volume of material to understand the message; because the responses will be
    printed verbatim, don't mention your company name or individual names in your
    replies
  Complete enough to be understood in terms of the practice you are describing
  Practically speaking, this translates to 2-3 sentence answers to most of the text
    questions
For our purposes:
  Practices are current activities, programs or processes that have been around for a
    while. For these, sufficient time has passed in which to assess their success or
    failure. We mostly ask about practices that have proven successful in accomplishing
    a specific goal.
  Initiatives are new activities, programs or processes that have been enacted recently
    with the goal of improvement. These are so recent (1 to 2 years) that insufficient time
    has passed in which to assess their success.



                                                                        53
          Distribution Practices

       This section is organized around the following topics:
          Asset Management – Role of asset management, problematic equipment, replacement programs,
             inspection and maintenance programs.
          Planning/Engineering/Design – Standards, estimating, and IT technology
          Quality Management – Approaches to measurement and improvement of quality
          New Business - Customer contributions and scheduling practices
          Field productivity – Improvement initiatives and productivity measurement
          Distribution Operations Center – Challenges and improvement initiatives
          Vegetation Management – Trim cycles and improvement initiatives.
          Intelligent Grid – Technologies, initiatives, and pilot programs
          Customer Satisfaction –JD Power Surveys and Customer Experience




Note: Please keep your answers to open-end questions concise but complete. We would like one
or two sentences, not extended explanations                                                    54
      Substation Practices

   This section is organized around the following topics:
      Asset Management – RCM and Life cycle costing approaches; replacement programs, and
         problematic equipment
      Planning/Engineering/Design –Changes to standards
      Substation Automation – Technology and initiatives underway
      Job Estimating – Software tools and role of construction
      Mobiles/Spares – Deployment of mobiles and spare, and optimization techniques
      Field Maintenance Activities – Initiatives underway, degree of crew specialization, and work
         management systems
      NERC Maintenance Standards – Impact of NERC standards on substation maintenance
      Maintenance – Inspections, impact of deferred maintenance, initiatives to reduce outages




Note: Please keep your answers to open-end questions concise but complete. We would like one
or two sentences, not extended explanations                                                    55
          Transmission Line Practices


       This section is organized around the following topics:
          Asset Management Role of Asset Management, replacement programs, and problematic
             equipment
          Planning/Engineering/Design –Improvement initiatives and changes to standards
          T-line Field Activities – Initiatives underway and maintenance approaches
          Work management systems – WMS Vendor and efforts to improve usefulness
          Contractor Productivity – Challenges, measures and initiatives
          Transmission Operations Center (TOC) – Changes and challenges.
          Right of Way –Growth inhibitors, ROW uses, challenges and practices.
          Maintenance – Inspections, impact of deferred maintenance, initiatives to reduce outages
          Transmission Automation – Technology initiatives underway
          NERC Standards – Impact of NERC standards on transmission organizations, especially Critical
             Infrastructure Protection (CIP), Protection and Control (PRC), and Facilities Design (FAC).




Note: Please keep your answers to open-end questions concise but complete. We would like one
or two sentences, not extended explanations                                                    56
We appreciate your Participation in our Community!


   Contact Information

   Ken Buckstaff                                   Debi McLain
     Ken.Buckstaff@1QConsulting.com                   Debi.McLain@1QConsulting.com
     310-922-0783                                     760-272-7277
   Dave Canon                                      Tim Szybalski
     Dave.Canon@1QConsulting.com                      Tim.Szybalski@1QConsulting.com
     817-980-7909                                     925-878-5066
   Gene Dimitrov
     Gene.Dimitrov@1QConsulting.com
     301-535-0590




   Corporate offices
      California                        Maryland
      400 Continental Blvd. Suite 600   3 Bethesda Metro Center Suite 700
      El Segundo, CA 90245              Bethesda, MD 20814
      (310) 426-2790                    (301) 961-1505

                                                                   57

				
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