Student Teaching - Clemson University

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					See highlighted text in table of contents for all ADEPT
incorporation and ADEPT evaluation forms.

   EUGENE T. MOORE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
       EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
       STUDENT TEACHER HANDBOOK
                Spring 2012




  “PROVIDING CARING, CAPABLE, AND CONNECTED
 PROFESSIONALS FOR THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY”


 Spring Semester Student Teaching Begins: January 17, 2012
    Spring Semester Student Teaching Ends: May 4, 2012



                                                             1
 Eugene T. Moore School of Education Conceptual Framework
1. CARING: What do our candidates value?

        a. Beliefs: Our candidates are committed to ethical and democratic dispositions
        including respecting the rights and responsibilities of all and recognizing diverse
        points of view.
        (ADEPT Performance Standards 1, 2, 4, 7, 8, 9 and 10)

        b. Actions: Our candidates act in accord with the rights and responsibilities of
        all, are sensitive to developmental, social, and cultural differences, and encourage
        a democratic culture.
        (ADEPT Performance Standards 1, 2, 4, 7, 8, 9 and 10)

2. CAPABLE: What do our candidates know and what can they do?

        a. Knowledge: Our candidates are knowledgeable about the foundations of
        education and about their specialty area(s), including appropriate practices.
        (ADEPT Performance Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9)

        b. Practice: Our candidates apply their knowledge through best practices that
        include the effective use of educational and information technology and
        appropriate assessments.
        (ADEPT Performance Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9)

3. CONNECTED: How well do our students communicate, and can they synthesize and
contextualize the content?

        a. Communication: Our candidates communicate effectively through a variety
        of representations (spoken, written and digital).
        (ADEPT Performance Standards 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10)

        b. Integration: Our candidates synthesize their knowledge and practices to
        integrate interdisciplinary perspectives and applications by making connections to
        real life and by making global issues locally relevant.
        (ADEPT Performance Standards 3, 5, 6, and 10)

The South Carolina System for Assisting, Developing, and Evaluating Professional
Teaching (ADEPT) Performance Standards (APS’s):
APS 1: Long-Range Planning
APS 2: Short-Range Planning of Instruction
APS 3: Planning Assessments and Using Data
APS 4: Establishing and Maintaining High Expectations for Learners
APS 5: Using Instructional Strategies to Facilitate Learning
APS 6: Providing Content for Learners
APS 7: Monitoring, Assessing, and Enhancing Learning
APS 8: Maintaining an Environment that Promotes Learning
APS 9: Managing the Classroom
APS 10: Fulfilling Professional Responsibilities

                                                                                              2
                Student Teaching Handbook 2011-2012
                          Table of Contents
1.    Code for Conduct                                                                 4
2.    Student Teacher Syllabus                                                         5-12

3.    ADEPT Performance Standards and Key Elements                                     13 - 24

4.    Student Teacher Assignments                                                      25 - 27

5.    Schedule Planning Form                          Fall 28 - 31            Spring 32 - 35

6.    Long-Range Plan Evaluation Form (APS 1)                                          36

7.    Short-Range Plan and Planning Assessments Evaluation Form (APS’s 2 & 3)          37

8.    Unit Plan Requirements (APS’s 2 & 3)                                             38 - 39

9.    Guidelines for reviewing materials                                               40

10.   Lesson Plan Format                                                               41 - 42

11.   Lesson Observation Form (APS’s 2 - 9)                                            43

12.   Video-tape Student Self-Evaluation Form                                          44 - 46

13.   Video-tape Release Form                                                          47

14.   Electronic Portfolio Evaluation Form & Guidelines                                48 - 51

15.   Fulfilling Professional Responsibilities Evaluation Form (APS 10)                52

16.   Fulfilling Professional Responsibilities Student Teacher Self-Report Questions   53 - 54

17.   Mid-Term and Final Summary Evaluation Forms                                      55 - 60

18.   Conceptual Framework Cooperating Teacher Final Evaluation Questionnaire          61 - 62

19.   Conceptual Framework Final Evaluation Form                                       63 - 64

20.   Conceptual Framework (CF) Level 4 Evaluation Rubric                              65 - 70
21.   Standards of Conduct for South Carolina Educators                                71 - 72
22.   Educational Career Services Reference Sheet                                      73

23.   South Carolina Education and Economic Development Act (EEDA)                     74
      Performance Standards 5, 6, and 7

24.   NAEYC Rubric by standard for the Unit of Instruction                             75 - 79


                                                                                              3
                          CODE FOR CONDUCT
                Clemson University School of Education Students
Students are ambassadors for Clemson University and are guests in the schools.
Remember, you have only one chance to make a good first impression.

1.    Students will sign in at the main office upon arrival.

2.    All Clemson University students must follow the rules and conduct required
      of the faculty of the participating school.

3.    Clemson University students will abide by the dress code and conduct of the
      participating school. Professional dress will be required.

             In most schools, the following would be inappropriate: bare midriffs,
              tank tops, jeans, T-shirts, short skirts, shorts, tennis shoes, flip-flops,
              and sandals.
             No obvious body piercing, other than ear lobes.
             No visible tattoos.

      EXCEPTION: PE classes – students would dress appropriately to
      participate.

4.    Absolutely no smoking or use of any type tobacco is allowed on school
      grounds or at school events.

5.    Clemson University students will arrive at the school at least ten minutes
      before their assigned time.

6.    If a Clemson University student must be late or absent, that student must call
      the school and inform the secretary 24 hours in advance, or as soon as
      possible in an emergency.

7.    Failure to follow the above rules may jeopardize your participation in the
      practicum experience and student teaching program.




                                                                                            4
Directed Teaching – Student Teaching Syllabus
ED EC 484, Directed Teaching in Early Childhood Education

Spring 2012 Semester

Class Meetings/Days/Times/Locations:
August 24, 2007 – December 14, 2007 - Fall Semester
January 11 – May 4, 2012 - Spring Semester
Monday – Friday 7:30 AM – 3:30 PM (adapted to each individual school schedule)
Locations: Assigned Public Schools
Seminars: Attendance is also required at seminars scheduled by Dr Seal Wilson and
the Office of Field Experiences.

Mission Statement. The mission of the Eugene T. Moore School of Education is to
prepare caring and capable professionals through intellectually engaging
experiences in theory, method, and research that connect them to the communities
in which they live and serve.

Commitment to Diversity: The Eugene T. Moore School of Education is committed
to providing all candidates with purposeful, challenging, and diverse experiences. It is
through a range of diverse, carefully constructed, and challenging classroom-based
instruction and field-based experiences that candidates will recognize the inherent
dignity and value of all individuals, promote equity in education, and advocate on
behalf of children, families, and communities.

Academic Integrity Policy. “As members of the Clemson University community, we
have inherited Thomas Green Clemson’s vision of this institution as a ‘high seminary
of learning.’ Fundamental to this vision is a mutual commitment to truthfulness, honor,
and responsibility, without which we can not earn the trust and respect of others.
Furthermore, we recognize that academic dishonesty detracts from the value of a
Clemson degree. Therefore, we shall not tolerate lying, cheating, or stealing in any
form.” Please refer to the “Academic Integrity Policy” on the ETM School of
Education Website (http://www.clemson.edu/ugs/academic_integrity/index.html)

Accommodations to Students with Disabilities. It is the University policy to
provide, on a flexible and individualized basis, reasonable accommodations to students
who have disabilities. Students are encouraged to contact Student Disability Services
to discuss their individual needs for accommodations. If you have a documented
disability that requires accommodations, you must notify the Office of Field
Experiences in writing when submitting your request for Student Teacher placement.

Professor:     Mr. Bill Millar, Coordinator, Office of Field Experiences
               And assigned University Supervisor

Location: 100 Tillman Hall        Office Hours: Monday – Friday
Phone: (864) 656-5095                           8:00 AM – 4:30 PM
Email:    hmillar@clemson.edu     Website URL: http://www.hehd.clemson.edu/fieldexperiences/
                                                                                           5
Course prerequisites: 1. Admission to the professional level of your education program
                      2. Completion of at least 95 semester hours
                      3. A minimum cumulative grade-point ratio of 2.5

Required Text/Materials:     Student Teacher CD purchased from the University Bookstore.
                             Other materials as required by your mentor teacher.

Technology Required:         As required by your mentor teacher in your individual school.

Course Description: This course provides students with an opportunity to learn to teach
under the direction and guidance of certified, experienced Classroom Teachers and
University Supervisors. This experience provides opportunities to incorporate theory
with practice, coupled with real world training, for learning in a diverse global
environment.

Standards Addressed: All standards in the Clemson University School of Education
Conceptual Framework and all ADEPT Performance Standards are addressed during the
student teaching experience.

Instructional strategies employed: Student Teachers will utilize the accumulation of
their undergraduate coursework under the direction of their mentor teacher to instruct
their students within ADEPT guidelines and state standards.

Field Experience:     A field placement in a public school classroom is required for this course.

Attendance Policy: Students are to adhere to the calendar of the individual school and
                   school district. No more than 3 absences are allowed. Absences
                   are reserved for illness or approved professional activities. UPREP
                   attendance is highly encouraged and will not be counted as one of
                   your excused absences. Therefore, you will have three excused
                   absences plus a day to attend UPREP.

Exit Survey: All student teachers are required to complete the Eugene T. Moore
Teacher Certification Program Exit Survey. The critical data from this survey will be
used to evaluate and improve our teacher certification programs. Student teachers must
complete this survey to receive a grade for student teaching. Student teachers can not
graduate if they do not receive a grade for student teaching.




                                                                                          6
Objectives:
A.       ADEPT Performance Standards (APS’s 1 – 10)

    1.   develop and maintain appropriate long-range plans for the semester
    2.   develop and maintain appropriate short range plans of instruction
    3.   exhibit skill in planning assessments and using the data gathered
    4.   establish and maintain high expectations for learners
    5.   use a wide variety of instructional strategies to facilitate learning
    6.   provide appropriate content for the learner
    7.   monitor, assess, and enhance learning
    8.   maintain an environment that promotes learning
    9.   manage the instructional environment (classroom) for a full school day over an
         extended period of time (minimum of two (2) weeks)
10.      fulfill professional responsibilities

B.       CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK Teaching Dispositions and Competencies

11.      Caring: Beliefs – demonstrate commitment to ethical and democratic dispositions
         including respecting the rights and responsibilities of all and recognizing diverse points of
         view.
12.      Caring: Actions – demonstrate actions in accord with the rights and responsibilities of all,
         sensitivity to developmental, social, and cultural differences, and encourages a democratic
         culture.
13.      Capable: Knowledge - demonstrate knowledge about the foundations of education,
         and about his/her specialty area(s), including appropriate practices.
14.      Capable: Practice - demonstrate that he/she can apply his/her knowledge through
         best practices that include the effective use of educational and information
         technology and appropriate assessments.
15.      Connected: Communication - demonstrate effective communication through a
         variety of representations (spoke, written and digital).
16.      Connected: Integration - demonstrate the ability to synthesize his/her knowledge
         and practices to integrate interdisciplinary perspectives and applications by making
         connections to real life and by making global issues locally relevant.

.




                                                                                              7
Assessment Strategies Employed: Student Teachers will be evaluated in accordance with
ADEPT Performance Standards (APS) and Conceptual Framework (CF) standards and the
evaluation and grading rubric shown below for the following Documented Evaluations
(US=University Supervisor/CT=Classroom Teacher). The Consensus Mid-term Evaluations
are used only to provide the student with feedback on his/her performance to date. It will not
be factored into the final grade:
       A.     Long-Range Plan (APS 1) - by US
       B.     Unit Plan (APS’s 2-3) - by US
       C.     8 Formal Lesson Observations (APS’s 2-9) - 4 by US, 4 by CT
       D.     Fulfilling Professional Responsibilities (APS 10) - by CT
       E.     Consensus mid-term evaluation - by US & CT
       F.     Consensus final evaluation - by US & CT
       G.     Portfolio Evaluation - by US


Evaluation and Grading Rubrics:
A.     ADEPT Performance Standards 1-3 (See Page 7)
       3      Proficient: Contains all key components indicated in the handbook, is on time,
              and each area meets expectations and shows competent research and
              preparation. Documentation is free of errors and is professional in appearance.
              Overall, objectives and assessments are clear as to the value to the learner and
              the criteria for assessing learning.
       2      Developing: Component parts may be represented, but may not be complete or
              on time. There is evidence of research and preparation. Documentation contains
              errors. Objectives and assessments are represented, but may require clarification
              as to the value to the learner and the criteria for assessing learning.
       1      Unsatisfactory: Work is incomplete or non-existent, late, full of errors, is
              unprofessional in appearance, and does not meet requirements.
B.     ADEPT Performance Standards 4-10 (See Page 7)
       3      Proficient: Competencies are demonstrated appropriately in all areas and
              enhance the teaching/learning process.
       2      Developing: Competencies are demonstrated at a satisfactory level in some
              areas. Improvement is needed to enhance the teaching/learning process.
       1      Unsatisfactory: Competencies reflect poor instruction, classroom environment,
              and professionalism and deter the teaching/learning process.

C.     Conceptual Framework Teaching Dispositions and Competencies (See Page 7)
       The following student teacher products will be evaluated to provide input for scores for
       the six components of the Conceptual Framework Teaching Dispositions and
       Competencies – long range plan, unit plan, eight formal teaching evaluations,
       portfolio/presentation, and student teacher Fulfilling Professional Responsibilities
       plan/activities (APS10). (see level 4 evaluation rubric on pages 65 - 70 )
                                                                                         8
Final Grade Scoring Rubric:
Final Grade Calculations for Student Teaching (see form on pages 58 - 60):
Scores from the Final Summary Evaluation and the portfolio/ presentation will be
combined to compute the student’s final grade. The following scale will be used to
assign student grades:

Letter Grade          Total Points Earned
A                     108 - 120
B                     96 - 107
C                     84 - 95
D                     72 - 83
F                     71 and below


A      The “A” Student Teacher is one who demonstrates capabilities for excellent teaching to
       such a degree that those who supervised his/her work are willing to predict his/her
       outstanding success in teaching the subject or grade in which he/she did his/her student
       teaching, and to recommend him/her without reservation to a prospective employer.
       This student will be recommended for certification.

B      The “B” Student Teacher is one who demonstrates capabilities for above average
       teaching to such a degree that those who supervised his/her work are willing to predict
       his/her above average success in teaching the subject or grade in which he/she did
       student teaching and to recommend him/her to a prospective employer. This student
       will be recommended for certification.


C      The “C” Student Teacher is one who demonstrates capabilities for average teaching to
       such a degree that those who supervised his/her work are willing to predict his/her
       average success in teaching the subject or grade in which he/she did student teaching
       and to recommend him/her to a prospective employer. This student will be
       recommended for certification.
                                      OR
C      The “C” student may also be one who demonstrates some but not all of the capabilities
       for teaching. This student, after consultation with the Classroom Teacher, the
       University Supervisor, and the Coordinator of Field Experiences has elected to pursue a
       non-certification track. This student will not be recommended for certification. If this
       student decides to pursue certification at a future date he/she understands that further
       remediation and experience would be required for re-entrance into student teaching.


D      The “D” Student Teacher is one who demonstrates very few or below average
       capabilities for teaching. This student did not elect to pursue a non-certification track.
       This Student Teacher will not be recommended for state certification. If this student
       decides to pursue certification at a future date he/she understands that further
       remediation and experience would be required for re-entrance into student teaching.
                                                                                           9
F      The “F” Student Teacher is one who, in the judgment of those who supervised his/her
       work demonstrates so few or so many unacceptable capabilities as to be completely
       ineffective as a teacher. This student will not be awarded any graduate or
       undergraduate credit for his/her student teaching and will not be recommended to a
       prospective employer or for state certification. If this student decides to pursue
       certification at a future date he/she understands that further remediation and experience
       would be required for re-entrance into student teaching.

Special Note: ALL Student Teachers must have taken the Specialty Area Exam(s)
(Praxis II) and the Principals of Learning and Teaching (PLT) exam for their major
(administered by Educational Testing Services) and have scores on file in the Office of
Field Experiences in order to receive a grade for student teaching. Any student who fails
to take the required tests and fails to have scores on record in the Office of Field
Experiences prior to the end of student teaching will receive a grade of incomplete (I).
The incomplete grade can only be changed to a letter grade (A, B, C, D, F) when the
required test scores are received. No student can graduate with a grade of incomplete (I)
for student teaching.




                                                                                         10
Grounds for Dismissal from Student Teaching: It is expected that Student Teachers will
show steady progress toward satisfactory levels in all objectives during the student teaching
experience. Cause for removal from student teaching will be based on consistent
deficiencies in any of the following areas:

               Effective teaching (instruction and planning);
               Classroom management;
               Content knowledge;
               Ethical and professional behavior.

Student Teachers can be removed at the request of the University Supervisor, the
Classroom Teacher, the Cooperating School and/or the Coordinator for Field Experiences.

Professional Expectations of the Student Teacher: The Student Teacher is placed in a
rather demanding role. He/she is a student on the one hand and a teacher-adult on the
other. Understanding this precarious status, we expect the Student Teacher to assume the
adult role; however, we also recognize that the Student Teacher may need encouragement
and guidance in this direction at times. If at any point, the Student Teacher shows lack of
growth or willingness to learn with regard to the expectations set forth below, serious
consideration will be given to his/her dismissal from student teaching.

Students should be aware that different supervisors may place different emphasis on
various aspects of teaching. Student Teachers are responsible for the assignments,
requirements, and instructions given by their supervisor though they may differ to some
degree from what students at another school are doing.

1.     The Student Teacher is to call the Classroom Teacher if he/she cannot attend class.
       It is highly recommended that the call be made the night prior to the absence. The
       University Supervisor should also be called. If the Classroom Teacher cannot be
       reached, the Principal should be contacted. Excessive absences may be cause for
       dismissal.

2.     The Student Teacher is expected to place school duties ahead of personal
       concerns and accept responsibilities that are a necessary part of the profession.

3.     The Student Teacher should strive to exemplify the attitudes and actions of a
       teacher rather than those of a student.

4.     The Student Teacher must conform to school rules and policies and local standards
       of behavior. There will be absolutely no personal involvement, romantic or
       otherwise, with any student in their assigned school or in any school connected with
       Clemson University.

5.     The Student Teacher must plan work weekly in advance of the date the actual
       lesson is to occur, and secure approval from the Classroom Teacher.

6.     The Student Teacher must safeguard all personal and confidential information and
       use it for professional purposes only.
                                                                                           11
7.    The Student Teacher is expected to avoid unfavorable criticism of the
      participating school, the Classroom Teacher, and the community.

8.    The Student Teacher is expected to be cooperative at all times with pupils, teachers,
      and administrators.

9.    The Student Teacher is expected to dress appropriately and in keeping with
      faculty standards.

10.   The Student Teacher is expected to attend professional meetings such as faculty
      meetings, PTO meetings, and County or District Teachers meetings when
      feasible.

11.   The Student Teacher is expected to take an active part in extracurricular activities.

12.   The length of the Student Teacher’s day is expected to correspond with that of the
      Classroom Teacher. The Student Teacher is not expected to participate in “extra”
      activities for which the Classroom Teacher is paid a stipend.

13.   The Student Teacher is expected to attend seminars with the University
      Supervisor or at Clemson University.

14.   The Student Teacher is to turn in reports and do all paperwork assigned to the
      Classroom Teacher. This work must be completed with the same proficiency and
      efficiency as demonstrated by the Classroom Teacher.

15.   The Student Teacher cannot receive compensation for any services rendered
      during student teaching.

16.   The Student Teacher is expected to complete the university requirement of hours
      for a full semester. The Classroom Teacher should notify the University
      Supervisor should a student violate any of these standards.




                                                                                         12
          Clemson University Teacher Education Program
              ADEPT Performance Standards and Key Elements

                                       APS 1
                                 Long-Range Planning

An effective teacher facilitates student achievement by establishing appropriate long-
range learning goals and by identifying the instructional, assessment, and management
strategies necessary to help all students progress toward meeting these goals.

Long-range planning requires the teacher to combine knowledge of content, standards,
and curriculum with knowledge of specific learning-teaching contexts and student
characteristics. Although long-range planning is an essential process for all teachers,
long-range plans (LRPs) will differ according to variables such as content (i.e., subject
matter, concepts, principles, process, and related skills) and context (e.g., setting, learning
needs of the students). In developing LRPs, the teacher should work both independently
and collaboratively. LRPs are dynamic documents that should be reviewed continuously
and revised, as necessary, throughout the school year.


                                    KEY ELEMENTS

This standard requires the teacher to demonstrate the following abilities and dispositions:

1.A The teacher obtains student information, analyzes this information to determine
the learning needs of all students, and uses this information to guide instructional
planning.
 The teacher begins the long-range planning process by gaining a thorough understanding
of students’ prior achievement levels, learning styles and needs, cultural and
socioeconomic backgrounds, and individual interests. The teacher gathers this
information from a variety of sources, including student records (e.g., permanent records,
individualized education programs) and individuals such as other teachers, special-area
professionals, administrators, service providers, parents, and the students themselves.
From this information, the teacher identifies the factors that are likely to impact student
learning. The teacher then uses this information to develop appropriate plans for meeting
the diverse needs of his or her students.

1.B The teacher establishes appropriate standards-based long-range learning and
developmental goals for all students.
The teacher’s goals are aligned with relevant federal, state, and local requirements and
reflect the applicable grade-level academic standards. For preschool children and students
with severe disabilities, the teacher’s goals align with appropriate developmental and/or
functional expectations.



                                                                                            13
1.C The teacher identifies and sequences instructional units in a manner that
facilitates the accomplishment of the long-range goals.
In this context, an instructional unit is a set of integrated lessons that is designed to
accomplish learning objectives related to a curricular theme, an area of knowledge, or a
general skill or process. Consistent with relevant federal, state, and local curriculum
and/or academic standards, the teacher’s instructional units provide for appropriate
coverage of the key themes, concepts, skills, and standards related to the subject area(s)
and are designed to expose students to a variety of intellectual, social, and cultural
perspectives. The sequence of the teacher’s units (as presented through timelines,
curriculum maps, planning and pacing guides, and so forth) follows a logical progression,
with an appropriate amount of time allocated to each instructional unit.

1.D The teacher develops appropriate processes for evaluating and recording
students’ progress and achievement.
The teacher’s evaluation process includes the major formal and informal assessments to
be used (e.g., observations, exams, research papers, performance, projects, portfolios) and
the evaluation criteria for each. The teacher’s evaluation methods are appropriate for the
learning goals and the content. The evaluation criteria match state, local, and/or
individually determined expectations for student progress and achievement. The teacher’s
record-keeping system provides a confidential and well-organized system for storing,
retrieving, and analyzing all necessary student data.

1.E The teacher plans appropriate procedures for managing the classroom.
The teacher’s rules and procedures for managing student behavior, whether developed
independently by the teacher or collaboratively with the students, are clearly stated,
appropriate for the students, and consistent with school and district policies. The rules are
stated in positive terms, when possible, and focus on behaviors rather than on students.
The teacher’s procedures for managing essential non-instructional routines (e.g.,
transitioning between activities and/or subjects, taking roll, collecting student work,
preparing learning centers or labs, retrieving instructional materials or resources) promote
efficiency and minimize the loss of instructional time.

                                     APS 2
                        Short-Range Planning of Instruction
An effective teacher facilitates student achievement by planning appropriate learning
objectives; selecting appropriate content, strategies, and materials for each instructional
unit; and systematically using student performance data to guide instructional decision
making.

In this context, the term instructional unit is defined as a set of integrated lessons that is
designed to accomplish learning objectives related to a curricular theme, an area of
knowledge, or a general skill or process. The length of instructional units—that is, the
number of days or lessons they cover—will vary in accordance with such factors as the
number of objectives to be accomplished; the complexity of the content to be covered;
and the ability levels of the particular students.
                                                                                                 14
                                    KEY ELEMENTS

This standard requires the teacher to demonstrate the following abilities and dispositions:

 2.A The teacher develops unit objectives that facilitate student achievement of
appropriate academic standards and long-range learning and developmental goals.

The teacher’s objectives define what the students should know (i.e., the factual,
conceptual, procedural, and/or meta-cognitive knowledge) and be able to do (e.g., the
cognitive processes—remembering, understanding, applying, analyzing, evaluating,
and/or creating) upon completing the unit. The teacher’s objectives are student-oriented,
explicit, and assessable statements of intended learning outcomes. There is a clear
connection between the unit objectives and grade-level academic standards (or, for
preschool children or students with severe disabilities, between the unit objectives and
appropriate developmental and/or functional expectations). The unit objectives are
consistent with the long-range goals, assessment results from previous instructional units,
state and local curriculum guidelines, individualized education programs (IEPs), and the
needs and interests of the students. The unit objectives are logically linked to previous
and future learning objectives.

2.B The teacher develops instructional plans that include content, strategies,
materials, and resources that are appropriate for the particular students.

The content of the teacher’s instructional plans is drawn from multiple sources that are
accurate and current and is applicable to the students’ grade-level academic standards,
instructional needs, ability and developmental levels, and interests. The sources of the
content expose students to a variety of intellectual, social, and cultural perspectives as
appropriate. The teacher selects a variety of instructional strategies and materials in order
to present content in formats that accommodate learning differences and that translate
into real-life contexts for the students. Instructional technology is included as appropriate.
The instructional strategies are logically sequenced and include sufficient opportunities
for initial learning, application and practice, and review. The strategies lead the students
to increasingly higher levels of thinking and problem solving. They promote active
student engagement during both independent and collaborative learning tasks, and they
provide opportunities for the teacher and students to vary their roles in the instructional
process (e.g., instructor, facilitator, coach, audience).

2.C The teacher routinely uses student performance data to guide short-range
planning of instruction.

The teacher develops lesson and unit plans on the basis of accurate conclusions that he or
she has drawn from analyses of the particular students’ prior performance (i.e., their
behavior, progress, and achievement).




                                                                                           15
                                     APS 3
                      Planning Assessments and Using Data

An effective teacher facilitates student achievement by assessing and analyzing student
performance and using this information to measure student progress and guide
instructional planning.

In this context, the term assessment refers to any formal or informal measurement tool,
activity, assignment, or procedure used by a classroom teacher to evaluate student
performance. Assessments may be commercially produced or developed by the teacher,
but all should be valid, reliable, and maximally free from bias.

                                   KEY ELEMENTS

This standard requires the teacher to demonstrate the following abilities and dispositions:

 3.A The teacher develops/selects and administers a variety of appropriate
assessments.

The assessments used by the teacher are technically sound indicators of students’
progress and achievement in terms of the unit objectives, the grade-level (or individually
determined) academic standards, and the student achievement goals. The assessments
align with the learning objectives and the instruction in terms of the type(s) of knowledge
(i.e., factual, conceptual, procedural, and/or meta-cognitive) and the cognitive processes
(i.e., remembering, understanding, applying, analyzing, evaluating, and/or creating). The
teacher is not overly reliant on commercially produced assessments, but when he or she
uses them, the teacher is careful to ensure that any necessary modifications are made.
Assessment materials are free of content errors, and all assessments include verbal and/or
written directions, models, and/or prompts that clearly define what the students are
expected to do. The assessments are appropriate for the ability and developmental levels
of the students in the class. The teacher provides appropriate accommodations for
individual students who require them in order to participate in assessments.

3.B At appropriate intervals, the teacher gathers and accurately analyzes student
performance data and uses this information to guide instructional planning.

The teacher routinely obtains student baseline data, analyzes the data to determine
student learning needs, and uses this information to develop appropriate instructional
plans. At appropriate intervals throughout instruction, the teacher analyzes student
performance on informal assessments (e.g., individual and group performance tasks,
quizzes, assignments) and formal assessments (e.g., tests, projects, portfolios, research
papers, performances) to determine the extent to which both individual students and
groups of students are progressing toward accomplishing the learning objectives. On the
basis of these analyses, the teacher determines the impact of instruction on student
learning and makes appropriate decisions about the need to modify his or her
instructional plans.

3.C The teacher uses assessment data to assign grades (or other indicators) that
accurately reflect student progress and achievement.

The teacher makes decisions about student performance, progress, and achievement on
the basis of explicit expectations that clearly align with the learning objectives and

                                            16
achievement goals, the assessments, and the students’ level of ability. The teacher may
present his or her evaluation criteria in the form of scoring rubrics, vignettes, grading
standards, answer keys, rating scales, and the like. Assessments are appropriately
weighted on the basis of the relative importance of each in determining overall progress
and achievement. The teacher maintains accurate, current, well-organized, and
confidential records of assessment results. The teacher uses available information
technology to store and assist with the analysis of student data.

                                 APS 4
      Establishing and Maintaining High Expectations for Learners

An effective teacher establishes, clearly communicates, and maintains appropriate
expectations for student learning, participation, and responsibility.

In this context, the term participation refers to student effort.

                                     KEY ELEMENTS

This standard requires the teacher to demonstrate the following abilities and dispositions:

4.A The teacher establishes, communicates, and maintains high expectations for
student achievement.

The teacher’s expectations are appropriately challenging for the grade and/or ability
levels of the particular students. The teacher communicates the learning objectives so that
students clearly understand what they are expected to know and be able to do. The
teacher reviews and/or clarifies the objectives as necessary.

4.B The teacher establishes, communicates, and maintains high expectations for
student participation.

The teacher’s expectations are appropriate for the grade and/or ability levels of the
particular students and for the subject area. The teacher effectively communicates these
expectations so that his or her students will readily apply them to instructional activities
and events during the lessons and to assignments and tasks both in and out of the
classroom.

4.C The teacher helps students assume responsibility for their own participation
and learning.

The teacher clearly communicates the importance and relevance of the academic
standards and learning objectives as well as the way the standards and objectives relate to
the students’ previous and/or future learning. The teacher encourages the students to
become the active agents of their own learning and to take the initiative to follow through
with their work. The teacher provides appropriate opportunities for the students to engage
in self- assessment and reflection on their learning and to develop a meta-cognitive
awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses. The teacher assists the students in
developing strategies to compensate for their weaknesses when it is necessary.




                                              17
                                    APS 5
             Using Instructional Strategies to Facilitate Learning

An effective teacher promotes student learning through the effective use of appropriate
instructional strategies.

The term instructional strategies refers to the methods, techniques, technologies,
activities, or assignments that the teacher uses to help his or her students achieve the
learning objectives.

                                     KEY ELEMENTS

This standard requires the teacher to demonstrate the following abilities and dispositions:

5.A The teacher uses appropriate instructional strategies.

The teacher’s strategies are appropriate for the particular objectives and content and the
particular students’ grade, developmental, and ability levels. The strategies build on the
students’ interests and prior learning and are appropriate for the students’ stage of
learning (e.g., initial, application, practice, review) with regard to the particular material.
The teacher’s strategies promote higher levels of thinking and/or performance.

 5.B The teacher uses a variety of instructional strategies. The teacher draws from a
substantial repertoire of instructional strategies, varying his or her strategies both within
and among lessons according to the particular objectives and content and the students’
ability levels, learning styles, rates of learning, and special needs. The teacher conveys
information in a variety of formats (e.g., lectures, videotapes, texts, DVDs) and
approaches (e.g., demonstrations, guided practice, guided discovery, simulations). As
appropriate to the learners and the learning, the teacher’s instructional strategies include
sharing instructional responsibilities with other teachers, guest speakers, and/or parents;
varying and/or exchanging roles (e.g., instructor, facilitator, coach, observer) with
students; and creating opportunities for both independent and collaborative learning
experiences.

 5.C The teacher uses instructional strategies effectively. The teacher uses
instructional strategies that actively engage his or her students and that ultimately result
in meaningful learning for them. All students receive opportunities to experience success.

                                      APS 6
                          Providing Content for Learners
An effective teacher possesses a thorough knowledge and understanding of the discipline
so that he or she is able to provide the appropriate content for the learners.

In this context, the term content refers to the particular aspects of the discipline that are
being taught, including subject matter, concepts, principles, processes, and related skills.
Central to this standard is the content competence of the teacher. From this in-depth
knowledge of the discipline, the teacher must select the content that is appropriate for his
or her students and then organize the content in ways that best facilitate student learning.




                                               18
                                   KEY ELEMENTS

This standard requires the teacher to demonstrate the following abilities and dispositions:

6.A The teacher demonstrates a thorough command of the discipline that he or she
teaches.

The teacher provides content that is accurate and current. The teacher’s presentations,
demonstrations, discussions, responses to students’ questions, and methods of engaging
the students indicate a thorough knowledge and understanding of the content. The teacher
identifies and explains/demonstrates conceptual relationships and/or procedural steps.
The teacher identifies and corrects students’ content errors.

6.B The teacher provides appropriate content.

The content of the teacher’s lessons is aligned with the applicable curriculum
requirements, grade-level academic standards, and/or student learning objectives.
Whenever possible, the teacher draws lesson content from multiple sources and presents
it in ways that expose students to a variety of intellectual, social, and/or cultural
perspectives.

6.C The teacher structures the content to promote meaningful learning.

The teacher’s instruction goes beyond the simple presentation of factual knowledge. The
teacher aligns the content with the learning objectives and ensures that students are
provided with opportunities to acquire the knowledge and to use the cognitive processes
that are necessary for successful problem solving. The teacher is able to identify and to
explain and/or demonstrate key concepts and skills as well as their broader relationships
and applications. The teacher guides student learning by presenting concepts and/or
procedures in a logical sequence and in clear and sufficient detail. The teacher uses
appropriate examples to help make the content relevant, meaningful, and applicable to the
students. When students experience difficulties in mastering the content, the teacher is
able to identify and address the sources of the problems. 14

                                             APS 7
               Monitoring, Assessing, and Enhancing Learning
An effective teacher maintains a constant awareness of student performance throughout
the lesson in order to guide instruction and provide appropriate feedback to students.

In this context, the term monitoring refers to any methods the teacher uses during the
lesson to collect information about his or her students’ understanding of the content.
Assessing includes any formal or informal measurement tools, activities, assignments, or
procedures a teacher uses during the lesson to evaluate the students’ performance and
their progress toward meeting the learning objectives. Enhancing learning refers to
actions a teacher takes during the lesson as a direct result of monitoring and assessing in
order to improve or extend student learning.

Both APS 3 (Planning Assessments and Using Data) and APS 7 involve teacher decision
making on the basis of the results of student assessments. However, APS 3 deals with
decision making that occurs prior to and after instruction. In contrast, APS 7 deals with
the decision making that occurs during the actual lesson. In other words, the key elements
of APS 7 occur “in flight.”
                                            19
                                   KEY ELEMENTS

This standard requires the teacher to demonstrate the following abilities and dispositions:

7.A The teacher continually monitors student learning during instruction by using a
variety of informal and formal assessment strategies.
The teacher maintains a constant awareness of student learning by engaging the students
in classroom activities such as discussions, projects, performances, assignments, and
quizzes. During these activities, the teacher uses effective questioning techniques to
sample a representative cross section of students. The teacher’s questions are appropriate
to the content, the activities, and the students. The teacher determines the students’ level
of understanding of key concepts and skills by carefully observing/listening to and
analyzing students’ verbal and nonverbal responses and reactions, inquiries, approaches
to the task, performance, and final products.

7.B The teacher enhances student learning by using information from informal and
formal assessments to guide instruction.
The teacher systematically collects, analyzes, and summarizes assessment data to monitor
students’ progress. On the basis of formal and informal assessment information, the
teacher makes appropriate decisions regarding instruction. When his or her students have
difficulty answering questions, the teacher provides appropriate response time, rephrases
the question, and/or provides prompts or other such assistance. The teacher provides
additional explanations, demonstrations, or assistance, and modifies the content and/or
the instructional strategies when necessary. The teacher adjusts the pace of the lessons to
conform to the needs of the students. The teacher promotes student retention of the
content by actively engaging the students in reviews of the key elements, steps, or
procedures as necessary. The teacher extends students’ learning and development through
appropriate enrichment activities.

7.C The teacher enhances student learning by providing appropriate instructional
feedback to all students.
The teacher provides feedback to the students throughout the lesson. The teacher also
provides feedback on all significant student work. The teacher’s feedback—whether oral,
written, or nonverbal—is equitable (i.e., provided to all students) and individualized. The
feedback is accurate, constructive, substantive, specific, and timely. The feedback is
effective in helping correct students’ misunderstandings or errors, reinforcing their
knowledge and skills, and/or extending their learning.




                                            20
                                          APS 8
           Maintaining an Environment That Promotes Learning

An effective teacher creates and maintains a classroom environment that encourages and
supports student learning.
In this context, the term environment refers to both the physical surroundings and the
affective climate of the classroom. This standard focuses on environmental factors that a
teacher can reasonably be expected to control.

                                    KEY ELEMENTS

This standard requires the teacher to demonstrate the following abilities and dispositions:

8.A The teacher creates and maintains the physical environment of his or her
classroom as a safe place that is conducive to learning.
The teacher’s classroom arrangement allows all students to see, hear, and participate
during instruction. The classroom is free from clutter and distractions that impede
learning. The teacher ensures that all materials are safely and properly stored and that all
applicable safety regulations and precautions are followed. Classroom displays feature
items of educational relevance and interest, including current samples of student work as
appropriate.

8.B The teacher creates and maintains a positive affective climate in his or her
      classroom.
The teacher conveys confidence in his or her ability to teach the lesson content and to
work with diverse groups of students. The teacher exhibits the enthusiasm necessary to
generate interest in the subject matter and the patience and sensitivity necessary to assist
and support all students, regardless of their social and cultural backgrounds or intellectual
abilities. The teacher shows respect for the feelings, ideas, and contributions of all
students and encourages the students to do likewise.

8.C The teacher creates and maintains a culture of learning in his or her classroom.
The teacher exemplifies and emphasizes initiative, industriousness, inquisitiveness, and
excellence and, by doing so, encourages the students to do likewise. The teacher
facilitates cooperation and teamwork among students and provides them with appropriate
incentives and rewards for learning. The teacher works to ensure that every student feels
a sense of belonging in the classroom. To the extent appropriate, the teacher invites
student input and suggestions when designing instructional activities and events.




                                             21
                                          APS 9
                              Managing the Classroom
An effective teacher maximizes instructional time by efficiently managing student
behavior, instructional routines and materials, and essential non-instructional tasks.

                                    KEY ELEMENTS

This standard requires the teacher to demonstrate the following abilities and dispositions:

9.A The teacher manages student behavior appropriately.
The teacher’s behavioral rules and consequences are appropriate for the students and are
consistent with district and school policies. These rules and consequences are clearly
conveyed to the students and are enforced in a fair and consistent manner. The teacher
maintains a constant awareness of classroom events and activities. The teacher uses
effective preventive discipline techniques (e.g., eye contact, facial expressions,
proximity) and handles any disruptions in an appropriate and timely manner. Disciplinary
actions focus on the inappropriate behaviors and not on the students themselves. The
teacher encourages students to monitor and assume responsibility for their own behavior.

9.B The teacher makes maximal use of instructional time.
The teacher ensures that his or her students are engaged in meaningful academic learning
throughout the instructional period. Instructional materials, resources, and technologies
are useable, well organized, and accessible. In general, instruction is characterized by a
smooth flow of activity.

9.C The teacher manages essential non-instructional routines in an efficient manner.
It is evident that the teacher has clearly communicated to his or her students the rules and
procedures for safety routines (e.g., fire drills, tornado drills, emergency preparedness)
and classroom operations (e.g., roll call, collecting or turning in assignments, obtaining
and distributing instructional materials, keeping work stations or lab areas in order).
Transitions between activities or classes are handled in an efficient and orderly manner,
with supervision provided as is necessary and appropriate.




                                             22
                                          APS 10
                      Fulfilling Professional Responsibilities
An effective teacher is an ethical, responsible, contributing, and ever-learning member of
the profession.

                                    KEY ELEMENTS

This standard requires the teacher to demonstrate the following abilities and dispositions:

10.A The teacher is an advocate for the students.
The teacher collaborates with colleagues, administrators, and other student-oriented
professionals (e.g., curriculum specialists, counselors, library media specialists, speech-
language therapists, nurses) to determine the needs of his or her students and to plan and
provide them with the appropriate learning experiences and assessments. The teacher
establishes appropriate professional relationships with agencies, businesses, and
community groups that support the well-being of students.

10.B The teacher works to achieve organizational goals in order to make the entire
school a positive and productive learning environment for the students.
The teacher regularly attends and contributes to departmental meetings, faculty meetings,
strategic planning sessions, and the like. The teacher actively supports the efforts of
school organizations such as parent-teacher groups and school improvement councils. To
the extent that is possible and appropriate, the teacher supports extracurricular activities
that contribute to the overall learning and development of students (e.g., academic clubs,
student council, athletics, cultural/artistic events).

10.C The teacher is an effective communicator.
Both inside and outside the classroom, the teacher’s spoken and written language is clear,
correct, and appropriate for each target audience (e.g., students, parents, colleagues,
related professionals). The teacher communicates with parents/guardians on a regular
basis about goals and expectations for student learning, behavioral rules and
consequences, assignments, suggestions for supporting student learning at home,
assessment results, and student progress and performance. The teacher responds
appropriately to parental concerns. The teacher uses a variety of formats (e.g., telephone
contacts, meetings, conferences, letters/newsletters, Web sites, report cards, notes, e-
mails, interactive journals) to maintain effective and ongoing communication with others.

10.D The teacher exhibits professional demeanor and behavior.
The teacher maintains a valid teaching certificate; complies with all professional, school,
and district rules, policies, and procedures; and is cognizant of the policies set forth in the
SDE publication Standards of Conduct for South Carolina Educators. The teacher’s
performance is characteristic of a professional in terms of self-management (e.g.,
responsibility, initiative, time management, appearance), ethical standards, and quality of
work (e.g., completing required tasks in an accurate, timely, and effective manner).

                                              23
10.E The teacher is an active learner.
The teacher is a reflective practitioner who systematically collects, synthesizes, and
evaluates student-achievement data in order to accurately identify his or her own
professional strengths and weaknesses and to gain professional insight and vision
regarding ways to enhance student learning. As a result of this self-assessment, the
teacher collaborates with his or her supervisor(s) to develop an appropriate individualized
professional growth plan. Additionally, the teacher regularly seeks out, participates in,
and contributes to activities that promote collaboration and that support his or her
continued professional growth (e.g., participation in professional associations, courses,
conferences, workshops, seminars).




                                            24
                  SCHOOL OF EDUCATION - Clemson University
                           Student Teacher Assignments
      Student Teacher (ST) Classroom Teacher (CT) University Supervisor (US)
 1.    ADEPT/Conceptual Framework (CF) Electronic Portfolio materials
 2.    Class daily/weekly schedule
 3.    16 week schedule plan, fall & spring
 4.    Long-range plan
 5.    Unit plan
 6.    Detailed and abbreviated daily lesson plans
 7.    Video-taped lesson - student self evaluation
 8.    Electronic Portfolio and portfolio presentation
 9.    Fulfilling Professional Responsibilities plan
10.    Manipulatives, visuals, videos, etc.

1.      ADEPT/CF Electronic Portfolio Materials: The format for organizing your
electronic portfolio is provided in the folder (on this CD) labeled Student Teaching
Electronic Portfolio Format. Additional instructions for compiling your portfolio are on
pages 48 - 51 of this handbook. Your university supervisor may require you to have paper
copies of your artifacts and reflections for review during the semester. Have your electronic
portfolio and paper files (if required) available for your US to see at every visit.
2.      Class Schedule: Provide the US with a copy of your daily/weekly schedule as soon
as possible. Include information about when the school day begins and ends; when your
major instructional blocks occur and for what subjects/themes; when your planning period
and lunch period occur; and when and where your students will be during the week for
various activities such as music and PE. With this information the US can plan to visit you
during appropriate times. You can make changes with the supervisor throughout the
semester as needed.
3.     Sixteen Week Schedule: With your CT, complete as soon as possible the 16 week
schedule planning form. On this form, indicate the order in which you will assume
responsibilities from the CT. See the form for more specific directions. The ST must teach
a minimum of two full weeks during which he/she has made or contributed to all the
plans with the CT’s approval, and has complete control of all classroom activities.
4.      Long-range Plan: During the first month of student teaching, prepare a long-range
plan for the entire student teaching experience. Complete this assignment as soon as
possible. For this formal plan, you will be required to write instructional goals and identify
sequential units to meet these goals for only one subject area or preparation area. Early
Childhood student teachers should not use spelling or handwriting as the subject area they
choose.
Construct the plan with reference to the key elements described on the form, “Evaluation of
APS 1 - Long Range Planning” which is located on page 36 of the handbook. Also, review
the key elements for ADEPT Performance Standard 1 on pages 13 and 14 of the Student
Teaching handbook. Your plan should logically flow from and contribute to the CT’s plan.
Note that these plans are very comprehensive and cover more than just instructional
elements.
You are expected to work with and ask for help and ideas from your CT. It is essential that
you understand where to find source information such as curriculum guides, student records,
etc., so you will be able to do this exercise on your own when you begin teaching. Submit
this plan to your CT in rough draft form for his/her input. Provide a finished copy of the plan
to your CT and one to your US.
                                            25
This plan can be in any format that you choose. A sample plan is provided on your student
teaching CD. Your CT or US may have other samples for you to review.
5.     One Written Unit Plan: Prepare one unit plan in a subject area you select with
the approval of your CT & US. You will find specific instructions for this unit plan on
pages 38 - 39 of the handbook. Please also review the key elements for ADEPT
Performance Standards 2 & 3 on pages 14 - 17 to guide you in the writing of your unit plan
and associated assessments.
It will be necessary for you to continue to plan units with your CT as you progress through
the semester, but only one written plan is required for formal evaluation by your US. You
should seek guidance from your CT as you plan and prepare the unit. Submit a rough draft
copy for the CT’s approval. Be sure to seek his/her input and approval on the detailed
lesson plans that are a part of the unit assignment. Provide the CT and US with a final draft
copy.
Turn the written unit in to your US for evaluation as soon as you complete it. Teach this
unit as early in the semester as you can.
6.      Daily Lesson Plans: Write daily lesson plans for every lesson that you teach. Be
sure you have your CT’s approval for these plans. Plan ahead so the CT can go over your
plans a week in advance. Present these plans on Thursday for your CT to approve and
return on Friday (unless your CT has another schedule that he/she wishes you to follow).
        Detailed plans: A sample guide for detailed plans is included in this handbook on
pages 41 and 42. Other formats are acceptable with permission from your US. A wide
variety of lesson plan types are acceptable as long as you include all of the material
required. Write at least five (5) detailed lesson plans to accompany your written unit.
Provide detailed plans for the US for four (4) scheduled lesson observations. Provide
detailed plans for your CT for four (4) scheduled lesson observations. Altogether you will
write no fewer than thirteen (13) detailed lesson plans.
        Abbreviated Plans: With permission from your CT and US, all other lesson plans
may be kept in a weekly planning book like the one your teacher uses. These plans should
be as detailed as space allows. Include an objective, outline procedures, and name the
assessment if applicable. Never resort to simply stating page numbers.
8.      Video Taped Lesson - Student Self-Evaluation: Video tape one lesson. Use the
form provided on pages 44 – 46 in the handbook to evaluate the lesson. You may put the
video on the same tape used in 400/401. Give the tape and your completed self-evaluation
to the US when you have finished. The evaluation will be returned to you for your records.
9.      Electronic Portfolio and Presentation: Complete a portfolio and schedule a
portfolio presentation with your US & CT during the last weeks of student teaching. (A
detailed guide for this assignment is on page 49 of the handbook).
10.      Fulfilling Professional Responsibilities: Submit the professional development
activities you completed based on key elements for APS 10 and the Student Teacher Self
Report Questions on pages 53 - 54. Obtain the APS 10 form from your CT. You are to
fill out the top portion of the form and give it to your CT who will substantiate your
activities where possible. When completed by both parties, provide a copy of the form to
the US.
11.    Manipulatives, visuals, videos, etc. ADEPT challenges teachers to meet the
individual needs of students and to provide a classroom environment that promotes and

                                            26
facilitates learning. In order to meet these varying needs, a good teacher will have to
employ a wide variety of learning activities for students. To meet this challenge, you will
have to have a room rich in colorful visuals (i.e. bulletin boards, posters, etc.), a room
with provisions for “hands on” activities, and a variety of materials designed to meet
specific needs.
Be prepared to tell or demonstrate to your CT or US how you plan to meet the needs of
students who finish early, who are not reading on grade level, who are tactile/kinesthetic
learners, etc.
Do not be overly dependent on commercially made materials. Demonstrate that you are
capable of meeting student needs with tests, activities, games, experiments, etc. that you
have designed or selected because they are right for your individual students.




                                            27
                   TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM - CLEMSON UNIVERSITY
                               SCHEDULE PLANNING FORM - FALL

This form should be completed by the end of the 3rd week by the Classroom Teacher and the Student
Teacher with the help of the University Supervisor if requested. Non-instructional duties (lunch money, class
roll, playground supervision, etc.) are to be included in this schedule. Detail the schedule in the Daily
Lesson Plan Book as feasible.

The Student Teacher will function as a member of a team with the Classroom Teacher as the team leader
and primary planner. Gradually the Student Teacher should assume leadership and planning
responsibilities until the roles are reversed for at least a two week period.

Assume responsibility for: (List group of students, time slot, or lesson or activity for which the Student
Teacher is to be responsible and day responsibility is to be assumed.) Assume new responsibilities each
week as you continue responsibilities from the week before.

                    Aug 21 –Tillman 315- 8:00-4:00 - Mandatory
                August 24 - Full-time Student Teaching Begins – 7:45

First Week                          Aug 24 - Aug 28
                                             •                 Assume responsibility for:
                                             •
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Second Week                         Aug 31 - Sept 4
Continue responsibility for:                 •                  Assume responsibility for:
                                             •
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Third Week                          Sept 8 - 11
Continue responsibility for:                 •                 Assume responsibility for: Holiday (7th)
                                             •                                            Anderson 1, 4, 5
                                             •                                            Greenville
                                             •                                            Oconee
                                                      •                                            Pickens
                                                               •
                                             •
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NOTES:




                                                     28
Fourth Week                    Sept 14 - 18
Continue responsibility for:          •            Assume responsibility for:
                                      •
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Fifth Week                     Sept 21 - 25
Continue responsibility for:          •            Assume responsibility for:
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Sixth Week                     Sept 28 - Oct 2
Continue responsibility for:          •            Assume responsibility for:
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Seventh Week                    Oct 5 - 9
Continue responsibility for:          •            Assume responsibility for:
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Eighth Week                    Oct 12 - 16
Continue responsibility for:          •            Assume responsibility for:
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NOTES:




                                              29
Ninth Week                     Oct 19 - 23
Continue responsibility for:          •           Assume responsibility for:
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Tenth Week                     Oct 26 - 30
Continue responsibility for:          •           Assume responsibility for:
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Eleventh Week:                 Nov 2 - 6
Continue responsibility for:          •           Assume responsibility for: Holiday (2nd)
                                      •                                      Anderson 1, 4, 5

                                      •
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Twelfth Week:                  Nov 9 - 13
Continue responsibility for:          •           Assume responsibility for:
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Thirteenth Week:               Nov 16 - 20        Assume responsibility for:
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NOTES:




                                             30
Fourteenth Week:                  Nov 23 - Nov 27
Continue responsibility for:              •                   Assume responsibility for: (Holidays 25,
26, 27)
                                          •                                               Anderson 1, 4,
5
                                          •                                               Greenville
                                          •                                               Oconee
                                          •                                              *Pickens1/2 Day
Wed 11/25
                                          •
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Fifteenth Week:                   Nov 30 - Dec 4
Continue responsibility for:              •                 Assume responsibility for:
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                                                               th
Sixteenth Week:                   Dec 7 - 11                (11 -Last day student teaching)
Continue responsibility for:              •                 Assume responsibility for:
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NOTES:




Making the Transition: The Student Teacher and the cooperating Classroom Teacher should
carefully plan making the transition of responsibilities a smooth one for teachers and students.
The Student Teacher may plan with the cooperating teacher and Principal to spend some time
during the last week of student teaching visiting other classes and grade levels, and possibly
other schools. Any plans to visit in other classrooms or other schools must be approved by the
Classroom Teacher, the University Supervisor and the Principal.

Electronic Portfolio Presentation: Students should work closely with their University
Supervisors during the last three weeks of student teaching to identify a date to turn in their digital
portfolio and to schedule a date and time for their oral portfolio presentation. Please note that
some University Supervisors may schedule these presentations during exam week - it is your
responsibility to schedule this through your supervisor.

    Certification: Any questions regarding certification should be directed to the Office of Field
                         Experiences, Room 100 Tillman Hall, 656-5095.



                                                  31
                   TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM - CLEMSON UNIVERSITY
                           SCHEDULE PLANNING FORM - SPRING
This form should be completed by the end of the 3rd week by the Classroom Teacher and the Student
Teacher with the help of the University Supervisor if requested. Non-instructional duties (lunch money, class
roll, playground supervision, etc.) are to be included in this schedule. Detail the schedule in the Daily
Lesson Plan Book as feasible.

The Student Teacher will function as a member of a team with the Classroom Teacher as the team leader
and primary planner. Gradually the Student Teacher should assume leadership and planning
responsibilities until the roles are reversed for at least a two week period.

Assume responsibility for: (List group of students, time slot, or lesson or activity for which the Student
Teacher is to be responsible and day responsibility is to be assumed.) Assume new responsibilities each
week as you continue responsibilities from the week before.

     Jan 13– Student Teaching Seminar –Tillman Auditorium - 8:00-4:00 - Mandatory
                 January 17 - Full-time Student Teaching Begins – 7:45

First Week                          Jan 17 – 20                            th
                                                               (Holiday 16 ) All Districts
                                             •                 Assume responsibility for:
                                             •
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Second Week                         Jan 23 – 27
Continue responsibility for:                 •                 Assume responsibility for:
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Third Week                           Jan 30 – Feb 3
Continue responsibility for:                 •                 Assume responsibility for:
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NOTES:




                                                     32
Fourth Week                     Feb 6 -10
Continue responsibility for:          •                   Assume responsibility for:
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                                      •
                                                     th
Fifth Week                     Feb 13 -17         (17 ) Professional Dev. Anderson 1, 4, 5
Continue responsibility for:          •                   Assume responsibility for:
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •
                                                                      th
Sixth Week                     Feb 20 – 24            (Holiday 20 ) Greenville, And 1, 4, & 5
                                                             th
Professional Development Pickens School District (Feb 20 ) Professional Development Oconee
                           th
School District(Feb 24 )
Continue responsibility for:          •                Assume responsibility for:
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •
                                                                       th
Seventh Week                   Feb 27 – March 2           (Holiday 27 ) Oconee School District
Continue responsibility for:          •                   Assume responsibility for:
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •

Eighth Week                     Mar 5 - 9
Continue responsibility for:          •                   Assume responsibility for:
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •
                                      •

NOTES:




                                             33
Ninth Week                          Mar 12 – 16          Professional Development Oconee
                               th
School District(March 16 )
Continue responsibility for:               •             Assume responsibility for:
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •

Tenth Week                          Mar 19 – 23
Continue responsibility for:               •             Assume responsibility for:
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •


Eleventh Week:                      Mar 26 – March 30
Continue responsibility for:               •             Assume responsibility for:
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •

Twelfth Week:                       Apr 2 - Apr 6        (Spring Break) Anderson 1, 4 & 5;
Greenville, Pickens and Oconee School District



                                                              th
Thirteenth Week:             Apr 9 - 13               (April 9 ) Holiday Anderson 1, 4, 5,
Oconee Professional Development Pickens School District
Continue responsibility for:               •             Assume responsibility for:
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
NOTES:                                     •




                                                    34
Fourteenth Week:                  Apr 16 – 20
Continue responsibility for:               •                Assume responsibility for:
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •

Fifteenth Week:                   Apr 23 - 27
Continue responsibility for:               •                Assume responsibility for:
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                                              th
Sixteenth Week:                   April 30 – May 4          (4 - Last day of student teaching)
Continue responsibility for:               •                Assume responsibility for:
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •
                                           •

NOTES:




Making the Transition: The Student Teacher and the Cooperating Classroom Teacher should
carefully plan making the transition of responsibilities a smooth one for teachers and students.
The Student Teacher may plan with the cooperating teacher and Principal to spend some time
during the last week of student teaching visiting other classes and grade levels, and possibly
other schools. Any plans to visit in other classrooms or other schools must be approved by the
Classroom Teacher, the University Supervisor and the Principal.

Electronic Portfolio Presentation: Students should work closely with their University
Supervisors during the last three weeks of student teaching to identify a date to turn in their digital
portfolio and to schedule a date and time for their oral portfolio presentation. Please note that
some University Supervisors may schedule these presentations during exam week - it is your
responsibility to schedule this through your supervisor.

   Certification: Any questions regarding certification should be directed to The Office of Field
                        Experience, Room 100 Tillman Hall, 656-5095.




                                                  35
               Teacher Education Program - Clemson University
Student Teacher                                               Date_________________
Cooperating Teacher                                           School________________
University Supervisor                                         Semester _______________

        EVALUATION OF APS 1 - LONG-RANGE PLANNING (Domain 1)
                                                                  1            2         3
                                                           Unsatisfactory   Developing Proficient

Key elements of APS 1 followed by Rationale

Obtains student information, analyzes this information            1            2          3
to determine learning needs of all students, uses this
information to guide instructional planning.




Establishes appropriate standards-based long-range                1            2          3
learning and developmental goals for all students.




Identifies and sequences appropriate instructional units          1            2          3
in a manner that facilitates the accomplishment of
long-range goals.




Develops appropriate processes for evaluating and                 1            2          3
recording students’ progress and achievement.




Plans appropriate procedures for managing the classroom.          1            2          3




STRENGTHS AND RECOMMENDATIONS




Observer Signature ________________________________________



                                                36
             Teacher Education Program - Clemson University
Student Teacher                                                       Date_________________
Cooperating Teacher                                                   School________________
University Supervisor                                                 Semester _______________

    Evaluation of APS 2: Short-Range Planning of Instruction (Domain 1)
                                                                          1            2         3
                                                                   Unsatisfactory   Developing Proficient

Key elements of APS 2 followed by Rationale

Develops unit objectives that facilitate student achievement              1            2          3
of appropriate academic standards and long-range learning
and developmental goals.



Develops instructional plans that include content, strategies,            1            2          3
materials, and resources that are appropriate for the particular
students.



Routinely uses student performance data to guide short-range              1            2          3
planning of instruction.



STRENGTHS AND RECOMMENDATIONS




  Evaluation of APS 3: Planning Assessments and Using Data (Domain 1)
                                                                          1            2         3
                                                                   Unsatisfactory   Developing Proficient

Key elements of APS 3 followed by Rationale
Develops/selects and administers a variety of appropriate                 1            2          3
assessments.



Gathers and accurately analyzes student performance data                  1            2          3
and uses the information to guide instructional planning.



Uses assessment data to assign grades (or other indicators)               1            2          3
that accurately reflect student progress and achievement.



STRENGTHS AND RECOMMENDATIONS




Observer Signature ________________________________________




                                                      37
        TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM - CLEMSON UNIVERSITY
                      UNIT REQUIREMENTS


Use any format you choose, but be sure to address the following component parts. Review
the key elements for ADEPT Performance Standards 2 & 3 on pages 14 - 17 to guide you in
writing your unit plan and associated assessments.

 I.     UNIT TOPIC:


 II.    GRADE LEVEL:


III.    RATIONALE FOR UNIT AND CONTEXTUAL FACTORS: How does the
        unit relate to instructional goals, needs of students, prior units? Explain your
        answers. Be specific. Also describe the contextual factors (including the
        relevant student characteristics from key element 1.a of your long range plan as
        well as any other factors related to the community, district, school, classroom or
        students) that are likely to impact instruction and/or student learning with regard
        to the selected unit. Include a description of the ways in which each of these
        factors will be taken into consideration during unit planning and instruction

 IV.    OBJECTIVES: Describe the unit objectives and their correlated standards or
        expectations.

 V.     CONTENT: In addition to the content taught in your unit, describe the key
        instructional activities and strategies you will use to teach this unit.

VI.     REFERENCE/RESOURCE MATERIALS: Describe the materials and
        resources (including instructional technology) you will use to teach this unit.
        Attach or have available copies of supplemental materials, poems, songs, activity
        sheets, etc.; list suggested book titles. You may want to categorize materials to
        show how they address student needs--interests, abilities, culture.

VII.    DAILY LESSON PLANS: Attach extended lesson plans for a minimum of five
        daily lessons. Use the Sample Lesson Plan Format as a guide. Remember to
        write reflections after each lesson.

VIII.   PRIMARY ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES: Describe and/or attach the
        assessments for each unit objective. Include descriptions of any necessary
        accommodations.

 IX.    EVALUATION CRITERIA: For each assessment, include the evaluation
        criteria (i.e., describe and/or attach appropriate scoring rubrics, observation
        checklists, rating scales, item weights, and the like).

 X.     INTERPRETATIONS AND DECISIONS: Pre-assessment data are necessary
        to implement the unit plan and to analyze student performance relative to unit
        objectives. Attach one or more clearly labeled tables, graphs or charts that depict
        the results of the pre-assessment(s) in a format that allows you to find patterns of
        student performance relative to each objective. Summarize the results of the pre-
        assessment(s) and describe the implications of these results on instruction. Once
                                             38
      you have completed the unit, analyze all of your assessments and determine your
      students’ progress relative to unit objectives. Attach clearly labeled tables, graphs
      or charts that depict student performance for the entire class and for at least two
      individual students. For each visual representation, provide a descriptive
      narrative that summarizes your analysis of student progress and achievement.
      Finally, explain the ways in which you have assigned student grades (or other
      indicators of student performance), and include a description of the ways in
      which these results have been recorded as well as how and to whom they have
      been reported.

XI.   REFLECTION AND SELF-ASSESSMENT: Reflect on and describe the
      relationship between your students’ progress and achievement and your teaching
      performance. If you were to teach this unit again to the same group of students,
      what, if anything, would you do differently, and why?




                                           39
                  Guidelines for Reviewing Instructional Materials

In reviewing instructional materials the evaluator should check to determine if:

1. clear directions have been provided for completing or using the materials;

2. the format and quality of the written materials are such that they may be easily read or
   interpreted;

3. the written materials are free of grammatical or content errors;

4. the materials are appropriate for the planned objectives and methods of instruction;
   and

5. the materials are appropriate for the age and ability levels of the students.




                    Guidelines for Reviewing Assessment Materials

In reviewing assessment materials the evaluator should check to determine if:

1. clear directions have been provided for completing the assessment;

2. the format and quality of the materials are such that the information may be easily
   read or interpreted;

3. the materials are free of grammatical and content errors;

4. the materials contain questions, problems, and/or tasks which are appropriate for the
   planned objectives and methods of instruction;

5. the materials contain questions, problems, and/or tasks which are appropriate for the
   age and ability levels of the students; and

6. the materials contain a sufficient number and type of questions, problems, and/or
   tasks to adequately cover the content planned for instruction.




                                             40
                               Short Range Lesson Plan (APS 2 & 3)

Title of Lesson:
Subject:
Grade level:
Teacher:

Objective(s): (APS 4)
   o The purpose of a behavioral objective is to COMMUNICATE.
   o The objective clarifies the intent of the instruction for the teacher, and for all who have
                interest in the outcome of instruction
   o Ideally, all behavioral objectives should contain 3 elements:
               Conditions (a statement that describes the conditions under which the behavior is to
                        be performed)

               Behavioral Verb (an action word that connotes an observable student behavior)

               Criteria (a statement that specifies how well the student must perform the
                         behavior)
SCSDE Curriculum Standard(s) Addressed: (APS 4, 6)

Prerequisites: Indicate what the student must know or be able to do in order to achieve the stated
objective.
    o This section is necessary in considering the readiness state of your students.
    o Students cannot master the objective and teachers cannot duplicate your lesson without
                 prerequisites
    o List one or two specific behaviors necessary to begin the lesson

Materials/Preparation: (APS 6)
   o List all materials/equipment to be used by the teacher and students
   o Include preparation considerations of the materials to ready them for the lesson.

Procedures: (APS 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9)
    o Describe what you will do when teaching the lesson. Include how you plan to introduce the
        lesson to the students, the instructional techniques you will use (to include the use of
        instructional technology), and how you will summarize the lesson and provide closure.
    o Consider the following elements:
         Introductory Activity: Provides FOCUS for the lesson, activates prior knowledge, and
             interests students in content.
         Main Activity: Includes specific techniques used (e.g., input, demonstration, explanation,
             discussion, guided practice, check for understanding, independent practice)
         Closure: Pull the information together at the end of the lesson. Provide feedback to
             students as needed to reinforce the lesson.

Assessment: (APS 3)
    o Determine to what extent the students have attained the objective.
    o Specific behaviors and actions must be demonstrated by students to support the mastery of
               the objective

Adaptations: (APS 6, 7)
   o This is a statement or two telling how you will include all levels of ability and pace in the
                lesson
   o Include modifications that will allow students of all cultures to participate and feel successful



Follow-up Lessons/Activities: (APS7)
                                                 41
    o   Include suggested activities for enrichment or reinforcement of the lesson.
    o   Include possible lessons that might follow.

Reflection:
Complete separately after lesson is taught. Consider your decisions in planning the lesson (materials,
procedures, strategies); Consider the impact the lesson had on the students (Did they achieve the
objective(s)?, Did your procedures seem effective?); Finally, consider areas for improvement if lesson
were taught again, and what areas were most successful.




                                                  42
             Teacher Education Program - Clemson University
Student Teacher
      Date___________________
Cooperating Teacher                                                          School
________________
University Supervisor                                                        Semester _______________
Lesson Observation/Evaluation – APS’s 2 – 9
       (Written plan must be examined to evaluate APS’s 2 & 3)                     1                  2             3
                                                                              Unsatisfactory      Developing   Proficient

APS 2 – Short Range Planning of Instruction (Domain 1: Planning)

2A     Develops instructional objectives that facilitate student achievement                                   1    2   3
2B     Develops instructional plans appropriate for all students                                               1    2   3
2C     Uses student performance data to guide planning of instruction                                          1    2   3

APS 3 – Planning Assessments and Using Data (Domain 1: Planning)

3A     Develops/selects/administers a variety of appropriate assessments                                       1    2   3
3B     Gathers/analyzes/uses assessment data to guide instructional planning                                   1    2   3
3C     Uses assessment data to accurately reflect student progress and achievement                             1    2   3

APS 4 - Establish & Maintain High Expectations for Learners (Domain 2: Instruction)

4A     Establishes/communicates/maintains high expectations for student achievement                            1    2   3
4B     Establishes/communicates/maintains high expectations for student participation                          1    2   3
4C     Helps students assume responsibility for their own participation and learning                           1    2   3

APS 5 – Using Instructional Strategies to Facilitate Learning (Domain 2: Instruction)

5A     Uses appropriate instructional strategies                                                               1    2   3
5B     Uses a variety of instructional strategies                                                              1    2   3
5C     Uses instructional strategies effectively                                                               1    2   3
EEDA Standard 7: Implements strategies to accommodate the needs of diverse learners (score 1 2 3 or N/A)

EEDA Standard 6: Implements learning strategies that promote cooperation (score 1 2 3 or N/A)

APS 6 - Providing Content for Learners (Domain 2: Instruction)
6A     Demonstrates a thorough command of the discipline he/she teaches                                        1    2   3
6B     Provides appropriate content                                                                            1    2   3
6C     Structures content to promote meaningful learning                                                       1    2   3
EEDA Standard 5: Uses concrete, hands-on instruction and content presentation
with an emphasis on real-world application and problem solving. (score 1 2 3 or N/A)

APS 7 – Monitoring, Assessing, and Enhancing Learning (Domain 2: Instruction)

7A     Monitors student learning during instruction by using informal/formal assessments                       1    2   3
7B     Enhances student learning during instruction by using information from informal/formal assessments      1    2   3
7C     Provides appropriate instructional feedback to all students                                             1    2   3

APS 8 – Maintaining an Environment that Promotes Learning (Domain 3: Environment)
8A     Creates/maintains a safe physical environment for learning                                              1    2   3
8B     Creates/maintains a positive affective classroom climate                                                1    2   3
8C     Creates/maintains a classroom culture of learning                                                       1    2   3

APS 9 - Managing the Classroom (Domain 3: Environment)
9A     Manages student behavior appropriately                                                                  1    2   3
9B     Makes maximum use of instructional time                                                                 1    2   3
9C     Manages non instructional routines efficiently                                                          1    2   3

STRENGTHS AND RECOMMENDATIONS (for both written plan and lesson implementation):


Observer Signature ______________________________________

                                                        43
                 TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM - CLEMSON UNIVERSITY
                                  VIDEO-TAPED LESSON
                                    Student Self-Evaluation
                (Please use this evaluation form. Give examples and be specific.)



NAME                                                               GRADE __________

AREA (subject)                                                     DATE ____________

Objectives and Expectations:
What were your objectives and how did you communicate your expectations to the class?




Materials:
What types of materials/resources were used? How did you plan ahead? Were all necessary
materials accessible and adequate?




Strategies and Content:
How did you focus the students’ attention (introduction)? What was your motivator?




How was new information presented?




How did you model or demonstrate knowledge or skills?




List the variety of instructional strategies used? Did you use concrete hands-on instruction?



How did the strategies actively engage all students and accommodate the needs of diverse
learners? What opportunities were included for guided practice and independent application?




How did strategies promote varied levels of thinking and problem-solving skills?




                                                44
Was content current, accurate, and logically sequenced? Explain.




Was content appropriate for all learners? Was the content relevant to real life problem solving
situations? What provisions were made for rates? for enrichment? for remediation?




Identify the levels of questions used in the lesson to monitor student understanding.




How did you bring closure to the lesson?




Class Management:
How did you establish clear and appropriate rules for student behavior?




Were you fair and impartial in enforcing rules for student behavior?




How did you maximize student involvement in productive learning? How was the pace
appropriate?




How transitions, classroom routines,       and instructional materials were effectively managed?




                                                 45
Classroom Environment:
How was the learning environment engaging and interesting to students?




How did you promote positive and productive interactions among students; cooperative learning,
teamwork, respect?




Reflection:
What were the strengths of the lesson?




What were the weaknesses of the lesson?




What changes would you make if you taught the lesson again?




                                              46
Many schools or districts have their own release form. Please check to see if they prefer that you use their
form rather than the one provided here. Parents may have been required to complete a release form at the
beginning of the school year, in which case, the form would already be on file within the school. It may not
be necessary for you to have parents complete a second form. In either case, please work through the
Classroom Teacher to establish the proper procedure to be followed in securing permission for individual
students to be recorded or photographed.


Release Form
Photograph / Audio, Video, Digital Recording / and/or Interview Release
Form
Student’s Name:
School:                                               Grade:

Photograph / Audio, Video, Digital Recording
I.        My child may be photographed and/or recorded as part of the class setting:

          By whom:      Clemson University students and/or their education instructors.
          For what:     To demonstrate and/or evaluate the Clemson University student’s teaching skills.
          Comment / Additional Information:




                    Yes              No

Interview
II.        My child may be interviewed by Clemson University students as part of educational assignments
      for their university education classes.

          Comment / Additional Information:




                   Yes               No




Signed:                                                        Date:
                   Signature of Parent or Guardian

Signed:                                                        Date:
                   Signature of child 18 or older


Home Address:




Phone Numbers: Home:                                                    Work:



                                                     47
                           TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM – CLEMSON UNIVERSITY
                                   ELECTRONIC PORTFOLIO EVALUATION


Student Teacher                                       Total Points (18 Possible) ___________________

School                                            Date_____________________________________

                                           1                   2                  3
                                     Unsatisfactory         Developing         Proficient

Artifact Representation of ADEPT Standards (all items weighted X 1, maximum score 3 points)
1. ___Items not included for all standards or items chosen to support standards were inappropriate, or were one
       dimensional; with little or no evidence of creativity
2. ___Items chosen to support standards were adequate, Most items selected were appropriate with evidence of creativity
3. ___Items chosen to support standards were appropriate and reflected uniqueness and creativity

Portfolio Organization and Writing Quality (all items weighted X 1, maximum score 3 points)
1. ___Overall portfolio material poorly organized, numerous errors in grammar and spelling
2. ___Portfolio showed continuity and organization. Errors, if present, are few and do not detract from the reader’s
      overall impression of the portfolio or the content of writing and reflective thought.
3. ___Portfolio showed excellent continuity and organization, exactness, and clarity of thought with evidence of
      originality and creativity. No errors were present.

Evidence of Reflection and Self- Evaluation: Written Portfolio (all items weighted X 2, maximum score 6 points)
1. ___Very little or no evidence of reflection and self-evaluation was present on the standards and/or revealed little or no
      awareness of integration among standards, awareness of present development as a caring, capable, connected
      professional was limited, and no awareness of needs for future personal growth.
2. ___Evidence of reflection and self-evaluation was adequate on all or most standards and revealed adequate awareness
      of integration among standards, awareness of present development as a caring, capable, connected professional,
      and awareness of needs for future personal growth
3. ___Evidence of reflection and self-evaluation was present on all standards and revealed an excellent awareness of
      integration among standards, awareness of present development as a caring, capable, connected professional, and
      awareness of needs for future personal growth

Evidence of Reflection and Self- Evaluation: Oral/Electronic Presentation and Panel Questions (all items weighted X 2,
maximum score 6 points)
1. ___Very little or no evidence of reflection and self-evaluation was present on the standards and/or revealed little or no
      awareness of integration among standards, awareness of present development as a caring, capable, connected
      professional was limited, and no awareness of need for future personal growth.
2. ___Evidence of reflection and self-evaluation was adequate on all or most standards and revealed adequate awareness
      of integration among standards, awareness of present development as a caring, capable, connected professional,
      and awareness of needs for future personal growth
3. ___Evidence of reflection and self-evaluation was present on all standards and revealed an excellent awareness of
      integration among standards, awareness of present development as a caring, capable, connected professional, and
      awareness of needs for future personal growth

RECOMMENDATIONS:




EVALUATOR’S SIGNATURE_________________________________ DATE_________________




                                                              48
        TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM - CLEMSON UNIVERSITY
       GUIDELINE FOR DEVELOPING AN ELECTRONIC PORTFOLIO
Your electronic teaching portfolio provides a way to present yourself as a thoughtful,
competent professional and documents your growth in teaching. It should include
carefully selected evidence of your performance as a Student Teacher and of your ability
to analyze your teaching.

The size of the portfolio is not as important as the content. A portfolio is not just a
collection of products. Although you may choose certain products as examples, it is the
way you analyze and present yourself that is critical. The portfolio should be a clear,
concise, understandable, and an effective portrayal of yourself as a beginning teacher. The
rating scale that will be used to evaluate your electronic portfolio and oral/electronic
presentation is provided on page 48.

Your portfolio and presentation will count 18 points toward your final grade.
Therefore, the quality of your portfolio/presentation can have a significant impact on
your final grade for student teaching. Turn your portfolio in to your University
Supervisor on the assigned date.
1) Begin with an introductory section that includes your philosophy of education (1-3
   pages) and a copy of your resume. Your philosophy of education must include how
   you will incorporate multicultural education and diversity into your curriculum and
   how you will promote cultural sensitivity, inclusiveness and appreciation in your
   classroom activities.

2) Provide a narrative summary with reflection for each ADEPT Performance
   Standard justifying how you have met the standard and give evidence of reflection and
   self-evaluation (1 or 2 pages for each standard). This narrative summary must include
   a reflection statement for each artifact. The statement should cover an evaluation of
   the artifact and the experience that it documents. Consider what you learned from the
   experience and how you might do things differently in the future. Address how the
   experience contributed to your development as a Caring, Capable and Connected
   professional educator, consider what steps you might need to take for future growth,
   and consider ways that the standards of ADEPT interconnect. (See reflection prompts
   for portfolio on pages 50 & 51)

3) Select one artifact for each standard that best represents your growth and competency
   in that area. Deciding what items of evidence to use and how to present them
   throughout the various sections of your portfolio will be a challenge. Many
   possibilities exist! In fact, throughout the semester, an important activity for you will
   be to refine your techniques of describing, portraying, and presenting what you are
   doing successfully and analytically as an aspiring professional teacher. As you work
   with your classroom teacher and University Supervisor, you should seek feedback on
   your presentation of evidence of your success as a Student Teacher. Your unit plan
   and associated assessments/analysis are required artifacts for APS’s 2 & 3.

4) The format for organizing your electronic portfolio is provided in the folder (on this
   CD) labeled Student Teaching Electronic Portfolio Format. Turn your electronic
   portfolio into your university supervisor on a CD on the date the portfolio is due.
   Your university supervisor may require you to have paper copies of your artifacts and
   reflections for review during the semester.


                                             49
5) Prepare a 30 minute oral/electronic presentation of yourself as a developing
   professional teacher. Schedule a presentation during the last weeks of student teaching
   with your University Supervisor. The presentation may be made to a panel of
   professionals which may include your Classroom Teacher, your University Supervisor,
   teachers at your school, a fellow Student Teacher, etc. This presentation is not just an
   exercise in presenting PowerPoint slides for each ADEPT APS. It should be an
   analytical journey through your semester of becoming a teacher.

                   Clemson University Teacher Education Program
        REFLECTION PROMPTS FOR PORTFOLIO
In your reflections for your portfolio, make sure that you address all of the questions that address our
Conceptual Framework (marked with CF) and all or nearly all of the remaining questions. The evidence
you provide must support your responses.

Performance Standard 1: Long-Range Planning
    (CF – Actions) To what extent have you planned for acting in accord with the
      rights and responsibilities of all students?
    (CF – Actions) To what extent have you honored the contributions of diverse
      learners?
    How well does your long-range plan capture the big ideas of the course?
    Have you included meaningful affective goals for the course?
    To what degree have you developed a plan for managing behavior?
    How well have you planned for non-instructional routines?

Performance Standard 2: Short-Range Planning of Instruction
    To what extent have your plans been designed to improve students’ process standards?
    To what extent have your plans used the process standards to help students
      understand important ideas?
    To what extent have your plans incorporated technology as a learning tool?
    How successful have you been at planning lessons that capture students’ interest?

Performance Standard 3: Planning Assessments and Using Data
    (CF – Practice) How well have you used best practices, including the effective
      use of technology, to assess student learning?
    To what degree have your assessments been aligned with your instruction and
      your goals?
    How have you used strategies other than quizzes and tests to provide authentic
      assessment of student achievement?
    How successful have you been at providing meaningful feedback to students?
    How successful have you been at maintaining accurate records?

Performance Standard 4: Establishing and Maintaining High Expectations for
             Learners
    (CF – Actions) To what extent have you shown sensitivity to the developmental
      needs of diverse learners?
    Did you set and maintain high expectations for everyone?
    Did students understand what they were supposed to learn?
    Did you have high expectations for everyone, both cognitively and affectively?

Performance Standard 5: Using Instructional Strategies to Facilitate Learning
    Did you use instructional strategies that were appropriate for the objectives?
    Did you build toward, rather than from, abstract ideas?

                                                    50
    Did you use strategies that actively engaged students?
    Did you use strategies that promoted the process standards?
    Did you use a variety of strategies?

Performance Standard 6: Providing Content for Learners
    (CF – Knowledge) Did you demonstrate a solid understanding of content and a
      variety of teaching methods to help students gain a deep understanding?
    (CF – Integration) To what degree did you synthesize the content you taught and
      integrate interdisciplinary perspectives and applications by making connections to
      real life and by making global issues locally relevant?
    How accurate were you in teaching content?
    How well did you pace the course? Did you emphasize breadth over depth or
      depth over breadth?
    Did you emphasize big ideas?
    Were skills taught with understanding?
    Did students see the purpose for the skills they were learning?

Performance Standard 7: Monitoring, Assessing, and Enhancing Student Learning
    (CF – Beliefs) To what extent were you committed to ethical and democratic
      dispositions, including respecting the rights and responsibilities of all students,
      valuing diverse points of views?
    (CF – Practice) To what extent did you enhance student learning through best
      practices, including the effective use of technology?
    How effective was the feedback you provided to students in helping them learn?
    Did you summarize frequently and emphasize big ideas?
    Did you extend or enrich the learning for every student?

Performance Standard 8: Maintaining an Environment that Promotes Learning
    How engaging and interesting was the environment in your classroom?
    Did students feel free to take risks and make mistakes?
    Did the environment promote cooperation and respect?
    Did students accept responsibility for their own learning?

Performance Standard 9: Managing the Classroom
    (CF – Communications) Did you communicate effectively through a variety of
      representations (spoken, written, and digital) when you interacted with students,
      parents, professional colleagues and community leaders?
    (CF – Beliefs) Did you demonstrate an ethical and democratic disposition that
      respected the rights and responsibilities of all students?
    Did you have an effective management plan?
    Did you enforce your rules fairly and consistently?
    Did you manage time effectively, including transitions between activities?

Performance Standard 10: Fulfilling Professional Responsibilities
    Have you joined professional organizations?
    Have you attended professional conferences?
    To what extent have you been involved with meetings and organizations outside
      the classroom?
    Comment on your interactions with parents and other members of the community.




                                           51
            Teacher Education Program - Clemson University
Student Teacher                                       Date___________________
Cooperating Teacher                                   School ________________
University Supervisor                                 Semester _______________

    Fulfilling Professional Responsibilities – APS 10 (Domain 4)
STUDENT PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES (by Student Teacher)




EVALUATION OF PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES (by Classroom Teacher)

                                                              1               2          3
                                                         Unsatisfactory   Developing   Proficient


Advocate for the students                                     1              2          3


Works to achieve organizational goals in order
to make the entire school a positive and productive           1             2           3
learning environment for the students


Effective communicator                                        1             2           3


Exhibits professional demeanor and behavior                   1             2           3


Active, lifelong learner                                      1             2           3



STRENGTHS AND RECOMMENDATIONS




Observer Signature ________________________________________




                                               52
                         Student Teacher Self-Report Questions

APS 10: Fulfilling Professional Responsibilities
     Domain 4: Professionalism
Directions:


The Self-Report provides Student Teachers with a method of documenting activities and
relations related to fulfilling professional responsibilities beyond the classroom. It is not
expected that Student Teachers will necessarily be involved in all of the professional
activities or relationships listed below. To complete your report, use the form provided.
Fill in the top half and give to your Classroom Teacher to complete.


I.     Please describe your involvement in activities or relationships which promote the
       general well-being of students such as working with:

       a.      colleagues, administrators, and other student-oriented professionals;
       b.      community organizations (i.e., scouting programs, recreational programs,
               Guardian Ad Litem, and Big Brother/Sister programs);
       c.      State or local agencies; and
       d.      businesses.


II.    Please describe your involvement in any collaborative activities or relationships
       which promote accomplishing school or district goals such as:

       a.      activities or relationships with other teachers (i.e., planning instruction and
               student services);
       b.      activities or relationships with other student-oriented professionals in the
               school or district (i.e., librarians, media-specialists, counselors, social
               workers, and nurses);
       c.      collegial activities designed to make the entire school a productive
               learning environment (i.e., department/faculty meetings and team
               planning);
       d.      working with teams or committees of educators and other citizens (i.e.,
               PTO, School Improvement Councils, and strategic planning); and
       e.      extracurricular activities that contribute to the overall learning and
               development of students (i.e., clubs, student councils, athletics, and
               cultural/artistic events.)


III.   Please describe your involvement with activities that exhibit your effective,
       correct, and appropriate spoken and written communication skills such as:

       a.      communicating with students, parents or guardians;
       b.      communicating with colleagues and related professionals
       c.      communicating with a variety of formats (e.g. phone, meetings,
               newsletters, etc.)



                                              53
     IV.   Please describe your involvement with activities that exhibit professional
     demeanor and behavior such as:

     a.     maintaining a valid teaching certificate;
     b.     complying with all policies and procedures required by profession, state,
            district, and school;
     c.     displaying professionalism, ethical standards, and quality work.


V.   Please describe your involvement with activities which promote continued active
     learning such as:

     a.     participating in school-based staff development or training.
     b.     participating in district-wide staff development or training;
     c.     taking college courses; and/or pursuing advanced degrees.
     d.     membership in professional organizations; attendance and/or
            presentations at professional conferences.
     e.     self evaluating by collecting and evaluating student achievement data to
            identify strengths and weaknesses to gain professional insight into ways to
            enhance student learning;
     f.     creating an individualized professional growth plan.




                                         54
                        Teacher Education Program - Clemson University
     Student Teacher:                                                    Date:
     School:                                               Classroom Teacher:
     University Supervisor:                                              Semester:

                               MID-TERM SUMMARY EVALUATION
                                                     1                      2             3
                                             Unsatisfactory            Developing   Proficient
Domain 1: Planning

APS1:             Long-Range Planning                                  Score                     Rationale

1A      Obtains/analyzes student information and uses
        this information to determine student learning             1      2    3
        needs and to guide instructional planning
1B      Establishes appropriate standards-based
        long-range learning and developmental goals                1      2    3
        for all students
1C      Identifies and sequences appropriate
        instructional units in a manner that facilitates           1      2    3
        the accomplishment of long-range goals
1D      Develops appropriate processes for evaluating
        and recording students’ progress and                       1      2    3
        achievement
1E      Plans appropriate procedures for managing the
        classroom                                                  1      2    3




APS2:    Short-Range Planning of Instruction                           Score                     Rationale

2A      Develops unit & lesson objectives that
        facilitate student achievement of academic                 1      2    3
        standards and long range learning goals
2B      Develops unit & lesson plans (content,
        strategies, materials, resources) that are                 1      2    3
        appropriate for all students
2C      Uses student performance data to guide
        planning of instruction                                    1      2    3




APS3:   Planning Assessments and Using Data                            Score                     Rationale

3A      Develops/selects and administers
        a variety of appropriate assessments                       1      2    3

3B      Gathers, accurately analyzes, and uses
        assessment data to guide instructional                     1      2    3
        planning
3C      Uses assessment data to assign grades
        that accurately reflect student progress and               1      2    3
        achievement




                                                              55
             MID-TERM SUMMARY EVALUATION                                       (cont. pg 2)

Domain 2: Instruction
APS4:   Establishing and Maintaining High                         Score       Rationale
        Expectations for Learners
4A      Establishes, communicates, and maintains
        high expectations for student achievement             1     2     3

4B      Establishes, communicates, and maintains
        high expectations for student participation           1     2     3

4C      Helps students assume responsibility for their
        own participation and learning                        1     2     3




APS5:   Using Instructional Strategies to                         Score       Rationale
        Facilitate Learning
5A      Uses appropriate instructional strategies
                                                              1     2     3

5B      Uses a variety of instructional strategies
                                                              1     2     3

5C      Uses instructional strategies effectively
                                                              1     2     3




APS6:   Providing Content for Learners                            Score       Rationale

6A      Demonstrates a thorough command
        of the discipline he/she teaches                      1     2     3

6B      Provides appropriate content
                                                              1     2     3

6C      Structures content to promote meaningful
        learning                                              1     2     3



APS7:   Monitoring, Assessing, and Enhancing                      Score       Rationale
        Learning
7A      Monitors student learning during instruction
        by using informal/formal assessments                  1     2     3

7B      Enhances student learning during instruction
        by using information from informal/formal             1     2     3
        assessments
7C      Provides appropriate instructional feedback to
        all students                                          1     2     3




                                                         56
             MID-TERM SUMMARY EVALUATION                                         (cont. pg 3)
Domain 3: Environment

APS8:   Maintaining an Environment that                             Score       Rationale
        Promotes Learning
8A      Creates and maintains a safe physical
        environment that is conducive to learning               1     2     3

8B      Creates and maintains a positive affective
        classroom climate                                       1     2     3

8C      Creates and maintains a classroom
        culture of learning                                     1     2     3




APS9:   Managing the Classroom                                      Score       Rationale

9A      Manages student behavior appropriately
                                                                1     2     3

9B      Makes maximum use of instructional time
                                                                1     2     3

9C      Manages non instructional routines efficiently
                                                                1     2     3



Domain 4: Professionalism

APS10: Fulfilling Professional Responsibilities                     Score       Rationale

10A     Advocate for the students
                                                                1     2     3

10B     Works to achieve organizational goals in order
        to make the entire school a positive and                1     2     3
        productive learning environment for the students
10C     Effective communicator
                                                                1     2     3

10D     Exhibits professional demeanor and
        behavior                                                1     2     3

10E     Active, lifelong learner
                                                                1     2     3


                                          EVALUATOR SIGNATURE




                                                           57
                        Teacher Education Program - Clemson University
     Student Teacher:                                                    Date:
     School:                                               Classroom Teacher:
     University Supervisor:                                              Semester:

                                   FINAL SUMMARY EVALUATION
                                                                         1                 2               3
                                                                  Unsatisfactory       Developing      Proficient
Domain 1: Planning

APS1:             Long-Range Planning                                 Score                      Rationale

1A      Obtains/analyzes student information and uses
        this information to determine student learning            1     2     3
        needs and to guide instructional planning
1B      Establishes appropriate standards-based
        long-range learning and developmental goals               1     2     3
        for all students
1C      Identifies and sequences appropriate
        instructional units in a manner that facilitates          1     2     3
        the accomplishment of long-range goals
1D      Develops appropriate processes for evaluating
        and recording students’ progress and                      1     2     3
        achievement
1E      Plans appropriate procedures for managing the
        classroom                                                 1     2     3




APS2:    Short-Range Planning of Instruction                          Score                      Rationale

2A      Develops unit & lesson objectives that
        facilitate student achievement of academic                1     2     3
        standards and long range learning goals
2B      Develops unit & lesson plans (content,
        strategies, materials, resources) that are                1     2     3
        appropriate for all students
2C      Uses student performance data to guide
        planning of instruction                                   1     2     3



APS3:   Planning Assessments and Using Data                           Score                      Rationale

3A      Develops/selects and administers
        a variety of appropriate assessments                      1     2     3

3B      Gathers, accurately analyzes, and uses
        assessment data to guide instructional                    1     2     3
        planning
3C      Uses assessment data to assign grades
        that accurately reflect student progress and              1     2     3
        achievement

                                                                      Domain 1: Planning Subtotal -




                                                             58
               FINAL SUMMARY EVALUATION                                                 (cont. pg 2)
Domain 2: Instruction

APS4:   Establishing and Maintaining High                         Score                       Rationale
        Expectations for Learners
4A      Establishes, communicates, and maintains
        high expectations for student achievement             1     2     3

4B      Establishes, communicates, and maintains
        high expectations for student participation           1     2     3

4C      Helps students assume responsibility for their
        own participation and learning                        1     2     3




APS5:   Using Instructional Strategies to                         Score                       Rationale
        Facilitate Learning
5A      Uses appropriate instructional strategies
                                                              1     2     3

5B      Uses a variety of instructional strategies
                                                              1     2     3

5C      Uses instructional strategies effectively
                                                              1     2     3




APS6:   Providing Content for Learners                            Score                       Rationale

6A      Demonstrates a thorough command
        of the discipline he/she teaches                      1     2     3

6B      Provides appropriate content
                                                              1     2     3

6C      Structures content to promote meaningful
        learning                                              1     2     3



APS7:   Monitoring, Assessing, and Enhancing                      Score                       Rationale
        Learning
7A      Monitors student learning during instruction
        by using informal/formal assessments                  1     2     3
7B      Enhances student learning during instruction
        by using info from informal/formal assessments        1     2     3
7C      Provides appropriate instructional feedback to
        all students                                          1     2     3


                                                                  Domain 2: Instruction Subtotal -




                                                         59
                      FINAL SUMMARY EVALUATION                                                (cont. pg 3)
Domain 3: Environment

 APS8:        Maintaining an Environment that                             Score                   Rationale
              Promotes Learning
 8A           Creates and maintains a safe physical
              environment that is conducive to learning               1     2     3

 8B           Creates and maintains a positive affective
              classroom climate                                       1     2     3

 8C           Creates and maintains a classroom
              culture of learning                                     1     2     3




 APS9:        Managing the Classroom                                      Score                   Rationale

 9A           Manages student behavior appropriately
                                                                      1     2     3

 9B           Makes maximum use of instructional time
                                                                      1     2     3

 9C           Manages non instructional routines efficiently
                                                                      1     2     3


                                                           Domain 3: Environment Subtotal -
Domain 4: Professionalism

 APS10: Fulfilling Professional Responsibilities                          Score                   Rationale

 10A          Advocate for the students
                                                                      1     2     3
 10B          Works to achieve organizational goals in order
              to make the entire school a positive and                1     2     3
              productive learning environment for the students
 10C          Effective communicator
                                                                      1     2     3
 10D          Exhibits professional demeanor and
              behavior                                                1     2     3
 10E          Active, lifelong learner
                                                                      1     2     3

                                                           Domain 4: Professionalism Subtotal -

Electronic Portfolio Total Points


Final Score                                               EVALUATOR SIGNATURE




                                                                 60
                             Teacher Education Program - Clemson University
                    Student Teacher                                                       Date____________________
                    Cooperating Teacher                                                   School _________________
                    University Supervisor                                                 Semester________________
                              Eugene T. Moore School of Education Conceptual Framework:
                                  Cooperating Teacher Final Evaluation Questionnaire
                                  1                     2              3                                           4
                           Unsatisfactory         Developing       Proficient                               Distinguished
    A rating of 1 (unsatisfactory) or 4 (distinguished) must be accompanied by an explanation. Feel free to comment on any rating.

Caring: Beliefs - Candidate is committed to ethical and democratic dispositions including respecting the rights and
responsibilities of all and recognizing diverse points of view. (ADEPT Performance Standards 1, 2, 4, 7, 8, 9, and 10)

The proficient candidate:
       takes responsibility for own actions and work and applies legal and ethical standards to decision making.
       communicates an awareness of and value for individual differences and the effects of this diversity on learning.   (1 2 3   4)
       communicates a plan that insures the rights and safety of all.

Score: 1       2      3                      4

Comments must be provided for any ratings of 1 or 4:




Caring: Actions - Candidate acts in accord with the rights and responsibilities of all, is sensitive to developmental,
social, and cultural differences, and encourages a democratic culture.
(ADEPT Performance Standards 1, 2, 4, 7, 8, 9, and 10)

The proficient candidate:
       treats others (colleagues and students) fairly
       successfully engages students in activities.
       maintains friendly candidate-student and student-student interactions and demonstrates mutual warmth, caring, and respect, with
        sensitivity to culture and developmental levels. Standards of conduct are clear and learning goals establish high expectations. ( 1 2 3
        4)
       maintains daily routines and classroom environment to promote physical and emotional safety and is alert to student behavior, while
        monitoring is subtle and preventative.
       responds to misbehavior appropriately and successfully, with sensitivity to students’ dignity.
       plans lessons that reflect sensitivity to developmental needs and diversity of students and during implementation, the candidate is
        reactive to individual differences. These interactions are sensitive to cultural norms. ( 1 2 3 4 )
       motivates students and conveys genuine enthusiasm for the content and for learning.

Score: 1       2      3                      4

Comments must be provided for any ratings of 1 or 4:


Capable: Knowledge - This candidate is knowledgeable about the foundations of education and about his/her
specialty area(s), including appropriate practices. (ADEPT Performance Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9)

The proficient candidate:
       displays knowledge of developmental characteristics and individual differences and recognizes the extent to which students follow the
        patterns.
       demonstrates solid knowledge of subject matter and pedagogy in lesson planning, preparation, and implementation and assessment.
        Lesson plans demonstrate knowledge of resources.
       makes Appropriate connections and plans and practices reflect understanding of prerequisite relationships of topics and concepts.
       effectively incorporates appropriate instructional strategies to meet the lesson objectives and student needs.
       conveys high, reachable expectations for student achievement.
       maintains GPR necessary to register for student teaching.

Score: 1       2      3                      4

Comments must be provided for any ratings of 1 or 4:                                                                (continued on back)



                                                                          61
Capable: Practice - This candidate can apply his/her knowledge through best practices that include the effective use
of educational and information technology and appropriate assessments.
(ADEPT Performance Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9)

The proficient candidate:
       reflects on teaching experiences and provides evidence that the experiences have altered pre-conceptions and will improve future
        practice.
       clearly articulates how goals are tied to curriculum standards.
       plans and implements learning activities which produce a clear, unified whole that allow for different pathways according to student
        needs, and reflect current best practices.
       ensures that most students are challenged at high cognitive levels, are productively engaged, and reflect upon important concepts.
       fully aligns assessment with instruction, gives meaningful feedback to students, and effectively informs instructional decisions.
       designs and implements lessons that incorporate technology in ways that maximize student learning. ( 1 2 3 4 )

Score: 1       2      3                      4

Comments must be provided for any ratings of 1 or 4:



Connected: Communication - This candidate communicates effectively through a variety of representations (spoken,
written and digital). (ADEPT Performance Standards 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10)

The proficient candidate:
       gives directions and procedures are clear to students and contain an appropriate level of detail.
       communicates clearly and correctly through spoken and written language. Vocabulary is appropriate to students’ age and interests
       asks high quality questions most of the time. Adequate time is available for students to respond.
       successfully accommodates students’ questions or interests.
       communicates with parents/guardians about students’ progress and instructional program on a regular basis.
       uses appropriate technology to effectively communicate to the diverse needs of a variety of audiences.

Score: 1       2      3                      4

Comments must be provided for any ratings of 1 or 4:




Connected: Integration - This candidate synthesizes his/her knowledge and practices to integrate interdisciplinary
perspectives and applications by making connections to real life and by making global issues locally relevant.
(ADEPT Performance Standards 3, 5, 6, and 10)

The proficient candidate:
       plans lesson content, including authentic assessments, which encourages the integration and application of knowledge and skills within
        and across disciplines.
       consistently connects lesson content to relevant, real-world issues. Relevance of content is clearly communicated.

Score: 1       2      3                      4

Comments must be provided for any ratings of 1 or 4:




Observer’s Signature ________________________________________




                                                                         62
                             Teacher Education Program - Clemson University
                    Student Teacher                                                       Date____________________
                    Cooperating Teacher                                                   School _________________
                    University Supervisor                                                 Semester________________
                              Eugene T. Moore School of Education Conceptual Framework:
                                                  Final Evaluation
                                  1                     2             3                                            4
                           Unsatisfactory         Developing       Proficient                               Distinguished
    A rating of 1 (unsatisfactory) or 4 (distinguished) must be accompanied by an explanation. Feel free to comment on any rating.

Caring: Beliefs - Candidate is committed to ethical and democratic dispositions including respecting the rights and
responsibilities of all and recognizing diverse points of view. (ADEPT Performance Standards 1, 2, 4, 7, 8, 9, and 10)

The proficient candidate:
       takes responsibility for own actions and work and applies legal and ethical standards to decision making.
       communicates an awareness of and value for individual differences and the effects of this diversity on learning.   (1 2 3   4)
       communicates a plan that insures the rights and safety of all.

Score: 1       2      3                      4

Comments must be provided for any ratings of 1 or 4:




Caring: Actions - Candidate acts in accord with the rights and responsibilities of all, is sensitive to developmental,
social, and cultural differences, and encourages a democratic culture.
(ADEPT Performance Standards 1, 2, 4, 7, 8, 9, and 10)

The proficient candidate:
       treats others (colleagues and students) fairly
       successfully engages students in activities.
       maintains friendly candidate-student and student-student interactions and demonstrates mutual warmth, caring, and respect, with
        sensitivity to culture and developmental levels. Standards of conduct are clear and learning goals establish high expectations. ( 1 2 3
        4)
       maintains daily routines and classroom environment to promote physical and emotional safety and is alert to student behavior, while
        monitoring is subtle and preventative.
       responds to misbehavior appropriately and successfully, with sensitivity to students’ dignity.
       plans lessons that reflect sensitivity to developmental needs and diversity of students and during implementation, the candidate is
        reactive to individual differences. These interactions are sensitive to cultural norms. ( 1 2 3 4 )
       motivates students and conveys genuine enthusiasm for the content and for learning.

Score: 1       2      3                      4

Comments must be provided for any ratings of 1 or 4:


Capable: Knowledge - This candidate is knowledgeable about the foundations of education and about his/her
specialty area(s), including appropriate practices. (ADEPT Performance Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9)

The proficient candidate:
       displays knowledge of developmental characteristics and individual differences and recognizes the extent to which students follow the
        patterns.
       demonstrates solid knowledge of subject matter and pedagogy in lesson planning, preparation, and implementation and assessment.
        Lesson plans demonstrate knowledge of resources.
       makes Appropriate connections and plans and practices reflect understanding of prerequisite relationships of topics and concepts.
       effectively incorporates appropriate instructional strategies to meet the lesson objectives and student needs.
       conveys high, reachable expectations for student achievement.
       maintains GPR necessary to register for student teaching.

Score: 1       2      3                      4

Comments must be provided for any ratings of 1 or 4:                                                                (continued on back)



                                                                          63
Capable: Practice - This candidate can apply his/her knowledge through best practices that include the effective use
of educational and information technology and appropriate assessments.
(ADEPT Performance Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9)

The proficient candidate:
       reflects on teaching experiences and provides evidence that the experiences have altered pre-conceptions and will improve future
        practice.
       clearly articulates how goals are tied to curriculum standards.
       plans and implements learning activities which produce a clear, unified whole that allow for different pathways according to student
        needs, and reflect current best practices.
       ensures that most students are challenged at high cognitive levels, are productively engaged, and reflect upon important concepts.
       fully aligns assessment with instruction, gives meaningful feedback to students, and effectively informs instructional decisions.
       designs and implements lessons that incorporate technology in ways that maximize student learning. ( 1 2 3 4 )

Score: 1       2      3                      4

Comments must be provided for any ratings of 1 or 4:



Connected: Communication - This candidate communicates effectively through a variety of representations (spoken,
written and digital). (ADEPT Performance Standards 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10)

The proficient candidate:
       gives directions and procedures are clear to students and contain an appropriate level of detail.
       communicates clearly and correctly through spoken and written language. Vocabulary is appropriate to students’ age and interests
       asks high quality questions most of the time. Adequate time is available for students to respond.
       successfully accommodates students’ questions or interests.
       communicates with parents/guardians about students’ progress and instructional program on a regular basis.
       uses appropriate technology to effectively communicate to the diverse needs of a variety of audiences.

Score: 1       2      3                      4

Comments must be provided for any ratings of 1 or 4:




Connected: Integration - This candidate synthesizes his/her knowledge and practices to integrate interdisciplinary
perspectives and applications by making connections to real life and by making global issues locally relevant.
(ADEPT Performance Standards 3, 5, 6, and 10)

The proficient candidate:
       plans lesson content, including authentic assessments, which encourages the integration and application of knowledge and skills within
        and across disciplines.
       consistently connects lesson content to relevant, real-world issues. Relevance of content is clearly communicated.

Score: 1       2      3                      4

Comments must be provided for any ratings of 1 or 4:




Observer’s Signature ___________________________________________________




                                                                         64
Conceptual Framework (CF) Level 4 Evaluation Rubric
Score: the quality of the candidate evidence for each element. Only 1 score per element, whole number
only.

                          1 = Unsatisfactory (does not meet Developing level)
                          2 = Developing (passing but lacking)
                          3 = Proficient (passing and competent)
                          4 = Distinguished (going beyond Proficient)




Caring: Beliefs                    Level 4
Our candidates are committed to ethical and democratic dispositions including respecting the rights and
responsibilities of all and recognizing diverse points of view.


    CRITERIA                   DEVELOPING                                          PROFICIENT

Ethical and respects   Candidate admits own               Candidate takes responsibility for own actions and work, and
rights of all          substandard work or                applies legal and ethical standards to decision making.
                       inappropriate behavior, but does   Communicates a plan that insures the rights and safety of all.
                       not recognize the ramifications
                       of his/her actions or makes an
                       excuse. Candidate
                       communicates a concern for the
                       rights and safety of all.
Diversity and          Candidate’s plans and behavior     Candidate communicates an awareness of and value for
individual             are in line with a caring          individual differences and the effects of this diversity on
differences            disposition, but do not            learning.
                       communicate a basis for this
                       behavior. Some aspects of
                       individual differences are
                       sometimes ignored in plans or
                       procedures.




                                                   65
Conceptual Framework (CF) Level 4 Evaluation Rubric
Caring: Actions                     Level 4
Our candidates act in accord with the rights and responsibilities of all, are sensitive to developmental,
social and cultural differences, and encourage a democratic culture.

   CRITERIA                           DEVELOPING                                           PROFICIENT
Fairness             Some students are not consistently engaged in     Candidate treats others (colleagues and students)
                     activities. Instructional groups are sometimes    fairly. Successfully engages students in
                     inappropriate or unsuccessful.                    activities.
Respect              Candidate-student interactions occasionally       Candidate-student and student-student interactions
                     reflect inconsistencies, favoritism, or           are friendly and demonstrate mutual warmth,
                     disregard for students’ cultures. Most            caring, and respect, with sensitivity to culture and
                     students exhibit respect for other students and   developmental levels. Standards of conduct are
                     the candidate.                                    clear. Learning goals establish high expectations.

Environment and      Responses to student misbehavior are              Daily routines and classroom environment promote
classroom            occasionally absent, ineffective or               physical and emotional safety. Candidate is alert to
management           inappropriate.                                    student behavior, while monitoring is subtle and
                                                                       preventative. Candidate responds to misbehavior
                                                                       appropriately and successfully, with sensitivity to
                                                                       students’ dignity.
Diversity            Lesson plans and/or classroom interactions do     Lesson plans reflect sensitivity to developmental
                     not consistently consider developmental needs     needs and diversity of students. During
                     and diversity of students.                        implementation the candidate is reactive to
                                                                       individual differences. Interactions are sensitive to
                                                                       cultural norms.
Motivation           Motivational techniques occasionally              Candidate motivates students and conveys genuine
                     ineffective.                                      enthusiasm for the content and for learning.




                                                     66
Conceptual Framework (CF) Level 4 Evaluation Rubric
Capable: Knowledge Level 4
Our candidates are knowledgeable about the foundations of education and about their specialty area(s),
including appropriate practices.

       CRITERIA                             DEVELOPING                                        PROFICIENT
Developmental Needs        Candidate displays generally accurate                Candidate displays knowledge of
                           knowledge of developmental characteristics and       developmental characteristics and
                           individual differences. Some prominent               individual differences and recognizes the
                           characteristics or differences are not considered    extent to which students follow the
                           as evidenced by the content and procedures           patterns.
                           displayed in lesson planning, delivery, or
                           evaluation results.

Specialty area             Candidate displays basic pedagogical and             Demonstrates solid knowledge of subject
knowledge                  content knowledge but does not consistently 1)       matter and pedagogy in lesson planning,
                           articulate connections with other parts of           preparation, and implementation and
                           discipline or other disciplines; or 2) demonstrate   assessment. Lesson plans demonstrate
                           awareness of prerequisite learning; or 3)            knowledge of resources. Appropriate
                           anticipate student misconceptions. Awareness of      connections are made, and plans and
                           resources for teaching or learning is not clearly    practices reflect understanding of
                           demonstrated.                                        prerequisite relationships of topics and
                                                                                concepts.
Instructional strategies   Inconsistently incorporates appropriate              Effectively incorporates appropriate
                           instructional strategies to meet the lesson          instructional strategies to meet the lesson
                           objectives and student needs.                        objectives and student needs.

Instructional Goals        Candidate occasionally sets low or unreachable       Candidate conveys high, reachable
                           expectations for some students.                      expectations for student achievement.




                                                    67
Conceptual Framework (CF) Level 4 Evaluation Rubric
Capable: Practice                  Level 4
Our candidates can apply their knowledge through best practices that include the effective use of
educational and information technology and appropriate assessments.

     CRITERIA                          DEVELOPING                                         PROFICIENT
                        Candidate reflects on teaching experiences      Candidate reflects on teaching experiences and
                        and provides evidence that future instruction   provides evidence that the experiences have
Reflective              will be positively influenced by these          altered pre-conceptions and will improve future
Practitioner            experiences. Little or no evidence is           practice.
                        provided as to how the experiences have
                        altered pre-conceptions.
                        Learning goals are indirectly related to the    Candidate clearly articulates how goals are tied to
Learning goals
                        standards.                                      curriculum standards.
related to standards
                        Planning for and implementation of learning     Planning and implementation of learning activities
                        activities do not produce a unified whole.      produce a clear, unified whole that allow for
Coherent progression    There is lost time during transitions. Some     different pathways according to student needs, and
of material with        teaching is conducted skillfully, with good     reflect current best practices.
appropriate pacing      examples, but some teaching is difficult to
and transitions         follow. Only some of the activities reflect
                        best practice
                        .
                        Some students are challenged by candidate’s     Most students are challenged at high cognitive
Students engaged,       instruction. Candidate has some difficulty      levels, are productively engaged, and reflect upon
challenged, and         engaging and challenging students. Students     important concepts.
reflective              often do not reflect upon important
                        concepts.

Assessment aligned      Assessment is aligned with instruction, but     Assessment is fully aligned with instruction, gives
with instruction,       is not used for improving learning and/or       meaningful feedback to students, and effectively
serving summative       teaching.                                       informs instructional decisions.
and formative needs
Educational and         Candidate designs and implements lessons        Candidate designs and implements lessons that
information             that incorporate technology, but technology     incorporate technology in ways that maximize
technology enhances     is not used to maximize student learning.       student learning.
learning




                                                    68
Conceptual Framework (CF) Level 4 Evaluation Rubric
Connected: Communication                             Level 4
Our candidates communicate effectively through a variety of representations (spoken, written, and digital).

             CRITERIA                              DEVELOPING                                   PROFICIENT
Directions and Procedures              Candidate directions and procedures     Candidate directions and procedures are
                                       are clarified after initial student     clear to students and contain an appropriate
                                       confusion or are excessively            level of detail.
                                       detailed.
Oral and Written Language              Candidate’s spoken language is          Candidate’s spoken and written language is
                                       audible, and written language is        clear and correct. Vocabulary is
                                       legible. Both are used correctly.       appropriate to students’ age and interests.
                                       Vocabulary is correct but limited or
                                       is not appropriate to students’ ages
                                       or backgrounds.
Quality of Questions                   Candidate’s questions are a             Most of candidate’s questions are of high
                                       combination of low and high quality.    quality. Adequate time is available for
                                       Only some invite a response.            students to respond.
Response to Students                   Candidate attempts to accommodate       Candidate successfully accommodates
                                       students’ questions or interests. The   students’ questions or interests.
                                       effects on the coherence of a lesson
                                       are uneven.
Communication with                     Candidate adheres to the school’s       Candidate communicates with
Parents/Guardians                      required procedures for                 parents/guardians about students’ progress
                                       communicating to parents/guardians.     and instructional program on a regular
                                       Communication is based on required      basis.
                                       contacts only.
Use of technology for                  Attempts to communicate with a          Uses appropriate technology to effectively
communication                          variety of audiences but does not       communicate to the diverse needs of a
                                       consistently use appropriate media to   variety of audiences.
                                       reach all members of those
                                       audiences.




                                                    69
Conceptual Framework (CF) Level 4 Evaluation Rubric
Connected: Integration                       Level 4
Our candidates synthesize their knowledge and practices to integrate interdisciplinary perspectives and
applications by making connections to real life and by making global issues locally relevant.


                 CRITERIA                               DEVELOPING                                PROFICIENT
Plans, implements, and evaluates effective   Often lessons are ineffective or          Lesson content, including authentic
interdisciplinary learning experiences       incomplete in making connections          assessments, encourages the
                                             across content areas.                     integration and application of
                                                                                       knowledge and skills within and
                                                                                       across disciplines.
Lesson content is connected to relevant      Instruction has not been consistently     Lesson content is consistently
issues                                       designed with reference to contextual     connected to relevant, real-world
                                             factors or candidate is inconsistent at   issues. Relevance of content is
                                             connecting lesson content to relevant     clearly communicated.
                                             issues.




                                                    70
Standards of Conduct for South Carolina Educators
“Just Cause”
       South Carolina Code Ann. ξ 59-25-160 (1990) lists reasons that the State Board of
       Education may consider in determining “just cause” to suspend or revoke a teaching
       certificate:
            Incompetence
            Willful neglect of duty
            Willful violation of the rules and regulations of the State Board of Education
            Unprofessional conduct
            Drunkenness
            Cruelty
            Crimes against the laws of this state or the United States of America
            Immorality
            Any conduct involving moral turpitude
            Dishonesty
            Evident unfitness for the position for which the individual is employed, and
            Sale of/or possession of narcotics

        In addition, a teacher’s certificate can be suspended or revoked for failure to pay child
        support (S.C. Code Ann. ξ 20-7-945 (Supp. 1998)) or for breaching a teaching contract
        (S.C. Code Ann. ξ 59-25-530 (1990)).

        Sanctions that the State Board of education can impose upon an educator:
            Public reprimand
            Suspension (up to three years), which may be accompanied by certain conditions
                such as drug and alcohol testing, psychiatric counseling, specialized coursework,
                or other appropriate conditions
            Revocation where the teacher can reapply for a certificate after three years, and
            Permanent revocation

The process for suspension or revocation of a teaching certificate:

        1. State Board of Education Regulation 43-58.1 requires that school districts to report
           the name of any certified educator who is dismissed, resigns or is otherwise separated
           from employment with the district based on allegations of misconduct. Once the
           Department of Education has been notified of conduct that could constitute just cause
           for sanctions against a teacher’s certificate, the Department will send the teacher a
           letter by registered mail indicating that a hearing will be held. The teacher has fifteen
           days from the receipt of this letter to make a written request to appear at the hearing
           and to indicate whether the teacher wishes the hearing to be public or private. If the
           teacher fails to do so within this time frame, he or she will waive the right to appear
           at the hearing and the State Board may make a determination based on evidence
           presented by the Department.
        2. If the educator requests a hearing, he or she will have a due process hearing before
           the Board or a hearing officer.
        3. After a final decision is made, an order is assigned by the Board chair, and a copy is
           sent to all interested parties.
        4. Notice of suspension or revocation of a teacher’s certificate is sent to all districts in
           South Carolina and to the National Association of State Directors of Teacher
           Education and Certification (NASDTEC) Clearinghouse. Notices of public
           reprimand are sent only to the school districts.

Of note: The majority of teachers in South Carolina who have their certificates suspended or
revoked do so because of inappropriate relationships or actions towards a student. South
Carolina teachers have lost their teaching certificates for

                                                71
         Pursuing a personal, inappropriate relationship with a student
         Touching a student in any way that is deemed inappropriate
         Engaging in a physical altercation with a student
         Supplying alcohol or drugs to a student
         Using a school computer to view or download pornography
         Sending or receiving prurient emails, including child pornography
         Violating test security
         Violating state or federal laws involving drugs or alcohol or other illegal behavior
         Embezzling public funds
         Committing breach of trust , and
         Breaching a teaching contract


The educator recognizes the magnitude of the responsibility inherent in the
teaching process. The desire for the respect and confidence of one’s
colleagues, of students, of parents, and of the members of the community
provides incentive to attain and maintain the highest possible degree of
ethical conduct.
       -Code of Ethics of the Education Profession




                                              72
                         Educational Career Services
  Michelin Career Center Suite 316 Hendrix Student Center Phone 864.656.2497 Fax 864.656.0439




General Information:

                                     Our Services:
                                Placement File Services
                      Resume writing and interviewing assistance
                                  Job search resources
                                   Career Counseling
                                    Vacancy listings
                 Addresses of public school systems throughout America




Who May Participate?

1. Senior undergraduate students enrolled for their student teaching experience.
2. Post graduate/Post baccalaureate students enrolled in a Student Teacher certification
program
3. Graduate students enrolled in a masters or doctoral Education Program.
4. Clemson University alumni within the Education program.


Placement File Requests:

Any individual who has an established file with Educational Career Services MUST
formally request in writing (via fax or mail) that a placement file be distributed to a
potential employer. NO PHONE CALL REQUESTS WILL BE ACCEPTED. No file
will be sent until it is complete. A completed file is one that includes all required
documents as noted and is signed by the student upon beginning the placement file.




                                              73
South Carolina Education and Economic Development Act
(EEDA) Performance Standards 5, 6, and 7

Teacher candidate performance on EEDA Performance Standards 5, 6, and 7 will be
evaluated during the formal teaching observations/evaluations conducted by the
cooperating teacher and the university supervisor (see evaluation form on page 43). The
rubrics used to evaluate the ADEPT Performance Standards will also be used to evaluate
EEDA Performance Standards 5, 6, and 7. The highest score achieved by the student (on
the teaching evaluations) for each EEDA Standard will be used as the final score for each
EEDA standard. The definitions and standards for EEDA standards 5, 6, and 7 are
provided below.

5. DEFINITION: Contextual teaching is a concept that refers to methodologies used by
teachers that focus on concrete, hands-on instruction and content presentation with an
emphasis on real-world application and problem solving.

Performance Standard: Teacher candidates will use concrete, hands-on instruction and
content presentation with an emphasis on real-world application and problem solving.

6. DEFINITION: Cooperative learning is an instructional technique where students
interact collaboratively to complete a task.

Performance Standard: Teacher candidates will implement learning strategies that
promote cooperation.

7. DEFINITION: Learning styles is a concept that refers to methodologies intended to
accommodate diversity in student learning.

Performance Standard: Teacher candidates will implement strategies to accommodate
the needs of diverse learners.




                                           74
Student Name                             Date

Cooperating Teacher                      School
University Supervisor                    Semester

Evaluator




  EDEC 484 NAEYC Artifacts – Unit of Instruction and Portfolio


Tips for completion:

Read over the scoring rubrics before reading through student work.
This will help focus your review of each artifact.

It may be helpful to score the Unit of Instruction (pgs 2 & 3) first
followed by the entire Portfolio (pgs 4 & 5).

The highest score (2: exceeds expectations) should be reserved for
student work that goes above and beyond the stated expectations in
each standard.

If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to email the
Early Childhood representative for the artifact collection – Angela
Eckhoff (eckhoff@clemson.edu or 864-656-2042)

    Unit of Instruction Rubric: pages 2 & 3
      Portfolio Rubric: pages 4 & 5


PLEASE CONTINUE TO THE NEXT PAGE




                                    75
          NAEYC Rubric by standard for the Unit of Instruction




                              Does not meet                                                               Candidate
                                                   Meets expectations           Exceeds expectations
   STANDARD 1                  expectations                                                                 Score
                                      0                       1                            2
Candidate is able use     Candidate’s             Candidate work reflects       In addition, candidate
her/his understanding     knowledge seems         knowledge of the              work is grounded in
of young children’s       weak or nonexistent.    child’s specific needs        developmental theory
                                                  and provides examples
characteristics and       Candidate does not                                    and provides rich
                                                  of interrelationships
needs, and of             provide evidence that                                 examples to describe
                                                  among developmental
multiple interacting      the environment will    areas. They describe          child’s characteristics
influences on             support the child’s     the nature of influences      and needs. There is
children’s development    health,culture, and     on the child; cite relevant   evidence of thorough
and learning, to create   individuality, and      intervention programs and     knowledge of possible
environments that are     challenge child to      research. They describe       interactions among
healthy, respectful,      gain new                the essentials of research    these influences; and
supportive, and           competencies.           and developmental             cites relevant theory
                                                  principles used to create
challenging for all                                                             and research.
                                                  an effective learning
children.
                                                  environment for the child;
                                                  provide evidence that the
                                                  environment to be created
                                                  will support the child’s
                                                  health, culture, and
                                                  individuality, and
                                                  challenge child to gain
                                                  new competencies.


                              Does not meet
                                                   Meets expectations           Exceeds expectations      Candidate
   STANDARD 3                  expectations
                                      0                        1                          2                 Score
Candidate knows           Candidate’s             Candidate shows               In addition, candidate
about and                 understanding and       knowledge of                  shows how assessments
understands the           use of assessment is    important goals of            selected align with
goals, benefits, and                              assessment, and explain       goals, curriculum, and
                          weak, inappropriate,
uses of assessment.                               benefits and potential        teaching strategies of
                          or non-existent.
Candidate knows                                   harm of assessments           the classroom.
about and uses            There is little or no   considered and                Evidence goes beyond
systematic                evidence of             selected. They show           to show in-depth
observations,             knowledge of and        basic competence in           knowledge and a high
documentation, and        ability to contribute   implementing tools and        level of skill in using
other effective           to partnerships.        approaches selected;          the approaches selected
assessment strategies                             work reflects skill in        with the child, given
in a responsible way,                             interpreting and using        unique special needs.
in partnership with                               results. They articulate      Candidate discusses
families and other                                a research base that          legal issues that might
professionals, to                                 supports partnerships;        apply.
support children’s                                demonstrate core skills
development and                                   in communicating with
learning.                                         families and cooperating
                                                  teacher




                                                        76
                                 Does not meet
                                                        Meets expectations        Exceeds expectations     Candidate
   STANDARD 4                     expectations
                                         0                        1                         2                Score
Candidates integrate         Candidate’s knowledge     Candidate shows            In addition, candidate
their understanding of       and skills related to     knowledge of               shows an extensive
and relationships with       developmental effective   developmentally            understanding of
children and families;       approaches are weak       effective approaches       appropriate
their understanding of       and candidate does not    when                       developmental
developmentally              demonstrate knowledge     teaching/assessing         approaches and
effective approaches to      of academic disciplines   young children and         employs quality
teaching and learning;                                 candidate’s work shows     professional resources
and their knowledge of                                 ability to                 to supplement
academic disciplines, to                               integrate multiple areas   and inform their own
design, implement, and                                 of knowledge in            teaching and learning
evaluate experiences                                   curriculum                 practices.
that promote positive                                  design,.
development and
learning for all children.




           PLEASE CONTINUE TO THE NEXT PAGE




                                                            77
            NAEYC Rubric by standard for the Portfolio

                              Does not meet                                                               Candidate
                                                   Meets expectations           Exceeds expectations
   STANDARD 1                  expectations                                                                 Score
                                   0                           1                           2
Candidate is able use     Candidate’s             Candidate work reflects       In addition, candidate
her/his understanding     knowledge seems         knowledge of the              work is grounded in
of young children’s       weak or nonexistent.    child’s specific needs        developmental theory
                                                  and provides examples
characteristics and       Candidate does not                                    and provides rich
                                                  of interrelationships
needs, and of             provide evidence that                                 examples to describe
                                                  among developmental
multiple interacting      the environment will    areas. They describe          child’s characteristics
influences on             support the child’s     the nature of influences      and needs. There is
children’s development    health,culture, and     on the child; cite relevant   evidence of thorough
and learning, to create   individuality, and      intervention programs and     knowledge of possible
environments that are     challenge child to      research. They describe       interactions among
healthy, respectful,      gain new                the essentials of research    these influences; and
supportive, and           competencies.           and developmental             cites relevant theory
                                                  principles used to create
challenging for all                                                             and research.
                                                  an effective learning
children.
                                                  environment for the child;
                                                  provide evidence that the
                                                  environment to be created
                                                  will support the child’s
                                                  health, culture, and
                                                  individuality, and
                                                  challenge child to gain
                                                  new competencies.


                              Does not meet
                                                   Meets expectations           Exceeds expectations      Candidate
   STANDARD 3                  expectations
                                   0                           1                           2                Score
Candidate knows           Candidate’s             Candidate shows               In addition, candidate
about and                 understanding and       knowledge of                  shows how assessments
understands the           use of assessment is    important goals of            selected align with
goals, benefits, and                              assessment, and explain       goals, curriculum, and
                          weak, inappropriate,
uses of assessment.                               benefits and potential        teaching strategies of
                          or non-existent.
Candidate knows                                   harm of assessments           the classroom.
about and uses            There is little or no   considered and                Evidence goes beyond
systematic                evidence of             selected. They show           to show in-depth
observations,             knowledge of and        basic competence in           knowledge and a high
documentation, and        ability to contribute   implementing tools and        level of skill in using
other effective           to partnerships.        approaches selected;          the approaches selected
assessment strategies                             work reflects skill in        with the child, given
in a responsible way,                             interpreting and using        unique special needs.
in partnership with                               results. They articulate      Candidate discusses
families and other                                a research base that          legal issues that might
professionals, to                                 supports partnerships;        apply.
support children’s                                demonstrate core skills
development and                                   in communicating with
learning.                                         families and cooperating
                                                  teacher


            PLEASE CONTINUE TO THE NEXT PAGE




                                                          78
                                 Does not meet
                                                        Meets expectations        Exceeds expectations     Candidate
   STANDARD 4                     expectations
                                         0                        1                         2                Score
Candidates integrate         Candidate’s knowledge     Candidate shows            In addition, candidate
their understanding of       and skills related to     knowledge of               shows an extensive
and relationships with       developmental effective   developmentally            understanding of
children and families;       approaches are weak       effective approaches       appropriate
their understanding of       and candidate does not    when                       developmental
developmentally              demonstrate knowledge     teaching/assessing         approaches and
effective approaches to      of academic disciplines   young children and         employs quality
teaching and learning;                                 candidate’s work shows     professional resources
and their knowledge of                                 ability to                 to supplement
academic disciplines, to                               integrate multiple areas   and inform their own
design, implement, and                                 of knowledge in            teaching and learning
evaluate experiences                                   curriculum                 practices.
that promote positive                                  design,.
development and
learning for all children.




  Evaluator:




                                                                                                                   79

				
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