WEB 20 and BEYOND

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WEB 20 and BEYOND Powered By Docstoc
					Melissa Pace Montgomery College Rockville Maryland Contributors: Vani Murthy Metta Lash Kim Emery Scott Youngblood Kani Holt Paula Carrasquillo

Social Media & Beyond Not ―If‖ but ―When & How?‖

More turning to Web to watch TV, movies
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More Web sites like Hulu and Joost are offering free movies and TV shows Some consumers are taking advantage of this to eliminate cable or satellite TV Internet users in the U.S. viewed a record 14.3 billion videos in December, 2008 The IPTV players are in a great position to wage an all-out war for eyeballs over the next 6 to 10 years. The future of TV is definitely IP, but it will take some time to get there.
http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/02/06/internet.tv/index.html

20% watch some TV online
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Users watched over 24 million videos on Hulu in December. Joost users viewed 818,000 hours of video in January, up +25% from the previous month A survey of 3,000 prime-time TV watchers by Integrated Media Measurements Inc. found 20% watched some TV online Cable companies have taken notice. Comcast launched Fancast, its online TV player, last year to show hits CSI: Miami and 30 Rock "We embrace the online world as much as the offline world," said Mary Nell Westbrook, senior director of consumer communications for Comcast
http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/02/06/internet.tv/index.html

Path to Technology Adoption

Youtube.com/montgomerycollege

Youtube stats ~ Montgomery College
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Youtube.edu sites available for higher education organizations allow longer maximum file lengths Over 100,000+ video views since 2007 Without significant marketing effort Most popular – women‘s volleyball Largest demographic segment – adults 45-64 Situation: Iran, a 30 minute studio interview program, received 300 video views within first 24 hours posted

Montgomery College

PEG Network

City of Rockville

Setting Up
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You will need a personal Facebook account. Determine if you need a fan page or if you need a Facebook group. A Facebook fan page is publically visible and

searchable and requires heavy interaction while a Facebook group can be made public or private
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Once your personal page has been created go to: facebook.com/pages/create.php to set up your fan page
for your department. College uses ―Education‖ from the drop down menu in the ―Category‖ box

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Decide on a name for your page. Include your department
name: an example would be Montgomery College Math Department

Customize your page. Click on the ―Edit Page‖ link from the
upper right corner of your page. This will take you to a page with a number of customizable options. Add photos and video!

Setting Up
Add second or third administrator from your department to help manage your site. Facebook is an interactive site and it is practical to have a back up person who knows the information on your department. To do this:  Add your colleague as a friend on your personal FB account.  Click on the link from your page that says, ―Edit Page‖  Click on the link on the ―Admins‖ box that says ―Add‖  Choose the colleague you want to have admin rights from the list of your friends.
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Growing presence on
Build your fan base
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Invite your personal friends on FB to join your page. Invite your colleagues to join your page. Post a link to your department‘s page on the main organization Facebook page. Put your Facebook page URL on any printed materials you may send out – and attach it to your email signature!

Best Practices
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Facebook should be treated like any other communication vehicle. If troubling behavior or makes remarks make you uncomfortable, bring the behavior to the attention of the Dean of Student Life or the Behavioral Intervention Team, just as you would for a disturbing phone call or email message. If the remarks are threatening or vulgar, notify Facebook and campus security before deleting the post. Try to post 1x to 3x per day. Post anything of interest – news items, photos, events and factoids. Try to post information that will get your audience involved. The more people ―like‖ your links, comment on your photographs, the more people will pay attention to what‘s going on.

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Best Practices
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Pay attention to your Facebook‘s Insights tool which is available to page admins and gives you statistics about your members, their activity, and the kind of content they like and respond to. The link to the Insights tool is along the left side of the page. Insights can tell you a lot about your audience and your page quality. Be authentic! This means answering questions, and interacting with your fans. If there is erroneous information on your page, find the correct information and post it. Be willing to spend some time on your page and online community

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Council Member Blogs, & twitter

White House Blogs & Videos

Internal Uses ~ Planning & Behavior Intervention

Access Montgomery TV~HB1182

Plain Language Writing for the Web
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PlainLanguage.gov guidelines and NIH

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resource model create guidelines on using plain language when writing for Web. It‘s more important in writing for web than for paper documents. Why? Because people scan when they read documents online. People need structure to help find the content. Web users want information that helps complete tasks, to synthesize content, make decisions, and act.

Plain Language Basic Recommendations
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Plain Language is:
Grammatically correct language that includes complete sentence structure and accurate word usage Clear writing that tells the reader exactly what the reader needs to know without unnecessary words or expressions, more lists, more headings, shorter paragraphs Easy-to-read and understand design features, such as bullets and tables

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Writing for the Web
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Plain Language is NOT:

Unprofessional writing

A method of "dumbing down" or "talking down" to the reader

Web Time Line

http://swissmiss.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/2007/05/24/webtimeline.jpg

First Generation Web (1.0)
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Focus on building the web, & making it accessible Development of protocols Emergence of open standard mark up languages Internet access via ISPs First web browsers Web development platforms and tools Web centric software languages Creation of websites – passive interaction Commercialization and web business models Growth of key portals
KurzweilAI.net December 17, 2006

Web 1.0 vs. Web 2.0

Examples of Web 2.0 Tools

http://socialmediamama.files.wordpress.com/2008/12/gliffy-web-20-tools-1-copy.jpg

Second Generation Web (2.0)
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Web as a platform to deliver services Software as a service (SaaS) not a product Harnessing collective intelligence Data is set free Emergence of mashups Web 2.0 sites often feature a rich and dynamic experience Empowerment of user through interaction & participation…Sharing and contribution of information Software is device independent

Web 2.0 Tools Categorized
Web 2.0 Technologies
Wikis, commenting and shared workspaces Blogs. Podcasts, videocasts, and peer to peer Prediction markets, information markets, polling, and surveys Tagging, social bookmarking/filtering, user tracking, ratings, and RSS

Description
Facilitates co-creation of content/applications across large distributed set of participants Offers individuals a way to communicate/share information with a broad set of other individuals Harnesses the collective power of the community and generates a collectively derived answer Adds additional information to primary content to prioritize information or make it more valuable

Category of Technology
Broad collaboration

Broad collaboration

Collective estimation

Metadata creation

Social networking/ network mapping

Leverages connections between people to offer new applications

Social graphing

The McKinsey Quarterly, February 2009

Web 2.0 Representation

APIs ~

Application Programming Interface

Social media services like Twitter, Facebook, and Google have been fundamental pillars for building social graphs, promoting the sharing of information, and fostering innovation. While these companies have created some incredible tools, their greatest innovation may actually be opening up their products to outside developers through the use of the API. The API is a way for outside parties to build a product or app off of an existing service.
TweetDeck for Twitter MySpace applications and Facebook Connect are a few examples of the use of social APIs today
Mashable.com The Evolution of the Social Media API May 21st, 2009 | by Ben Parr

APIs ~
eBay:

Application Programming Interface

Some of the first Web APIs, which helped lead towards the rich social media APIs developers enjoy today:
one of the oldest social APIs, dating back to the turn of the millennium, understood that an API could help it expand its services and promote innovation. web API in 2002, which allowed developers to pull information like product reviews and wish lists into 3rd party applications other services. The company first started testing an API for its search engine in April 2002, which allowed for 1,000 automated search queries. Now Google has dozens of available APIs that have resulted in thousands of applications Launched in August 2006, the Facebook Developer‘s API was one of the first APIs specific to a social network. It allowed for the utilization of certain aspects of the social graph to create mashups and other unique tools. Although its API originally only allowed for apps centered around friends, profiles, photos, and events, it has dramatically evolved and opened up, most recently with its Open Stream API.

Amazon: One of the oldest stewards of web technology and innovation, released its first

Google: is well known for its many open APIs for search, Google Maps, and its many

Facebook:

Mashable.com The Evolution of the Social Media API May 21st, 2009 | by Ben Parr

APIs and Mashups: Examples
APIs
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Mashups with APIs
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Amazon ecommerce API http://developers.facebook.com/ http://code.flickr.com/ http://code.google.com/apis/maps/in dex.html

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combines the content into one service—to avoid browsing different web sites everyday http://doggdot.us/  Digg  Slashdot  Delicious http://www.geckogo.com/  Facebook  Flickr  Googlemaps

Mashable.com
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the Social Media Guide

twitter lists:

Motivational Tweets: 25 of the Most Inspiring Users on Twitter 47 Comments and 1594 Reactions HOW TO: Leverage Twitter for Hiring 15 Comments and 217 Reactions HOW TO: Start a Petition on Twitter 10 Comments and 1061 Reactions Twitter for Beginners: 5 Steps for Better Tweeting 47 Comments and 2195 Reactions

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How To:

HOW TO: Gather Feedback With Social Media 17 Comments and 1322 Reactions HOW TO: Make Facebook Your Company Newsroom 48 Comments and 996 Reactions HOW TO: Use Twitter Hashtags for Business Hashtags are essentially a simple way to catalog and connect tweets about a specific topic. They make it easier for users to find additional tweets on a particular subject, while filtering out the incidental tweets that may coincidentally contain the same keyword.

Mashable.com
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the Social Media Guide

www.blippr.com - syncs your Netflix,

goodreads, Xbox 360 etc. and broadcasts to your Friendfeed, twitter account(s)
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WordPress Resource Lists, Resources

Top 10 WordPress Plugins to Promote Your Social Media Profiles 55 Comments and 478 Reactions WORDPRESS GOD: 300+ Tools for Running Your WordPress Blog 132 Comments and 118 Reactions HOW TO: Connect With the FriendFeed Community 27 Comments and 160 Reactions

Widgets in Blogs
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Customize blogs by using widgets. By adding snippets of code to sidebars, users can talk to blogger via Instant Messaging IM, see what your most popular posts are, or read news from other sites, etc. 5 Great Blogger Communications Widgets: Google Talk – Give visitors the ability to talk to you directly from your blog sidebar Jaxtr – allows people to call you on the phone without revealing the phone number to them Meebo Me – allows you to create a chat box that you can install on your Blogger page, giving you the chance to converse with visitors to your site Skype – allows you to create various buttons that can show your current status and also allows people to just click it and give you a call Tag-Board – Allows you to add a real-time chat board to your blog that your visitors and you can use to converse

Mashable.com The Evolution of the Social Media APIMay 21st, 2009 | by Ben Parr

Data Portability
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One of social media‘s key tenants is openness. Information from the social graph brought onto 3rd party websites helps create more robust social tools. The result has been the release of data-porting tools like: MySpaceID, Facebook
Connect, and OpenID

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Allows users to log into websites via their social media profiles and interact with friends and post their activity to news feeds from just about anywhere. Tools like Polar Rose (facial recognition on Flickr) help connect friends YouTube recently expanded its API in order to allow users to import their activities on other social media websites and to allow developers to use favorites, uploading, and commenting in their YouTube mashups.

APIs: Web sites as Web Services
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Advantages:
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Absolute minimum barrier to use – no encryption or special authentication needed Easily distributed code Less to worry about – no need to manage user accounts or development keys Allows creation of Mashups

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APIs: Web Sites as Web Services
Disadvantages:
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No control - Anyone, anywhere, can use the API
No encryption - All requests and responses are visible to anyone Can't contact developers – changes can be made by anyone to the API that will affect their application Abuse

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What comes next?

Third Generation Web (3.0)
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Web 3.0 might be defined as a third-generation of the Web enabled by the convergence of several key emerging technology trends: Ubiquitous connectivity
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Broadband adoption – devices like iPhone Mobile internet access – connections with speed exceeding 200 Kb/s Mobile devices

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Network computing
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Software as a service business models Web services interoperability Distributed computing

KurzweilAI.net December 17, 2006

Third Generation Web (3.0)
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Open technologies  Open APIs and protocols  Open data formats - allow separating the data from the application, which would provide several benefits including portability and flexibility  Open source software platforms Open Identity  Open reputation  Portable identity and personal data Cloud Computing  Providing user services remotely on demand
KurzweilAI.net December 17, 2006

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Third Generation Web (3.0)
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Third generation of Internet-based services that collectively comprise what might be called 'the intelligent Web‗ Microformats - small patterns of HTML to represent commonly published things like people, events, blog posts, reviews and tags in web pages. Simple conventions for embedding semantics in HTML to enable decentralized development. Semantic web, natural language search, data-mining, machine learning, recommendation agents, and artificial intelligence technologies Machine-facilitated understanding of information in order to provide a more productive and intuitive user experience
KurzweilAI.net December 17, 2006

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Semantic Technologies
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eXtensive Markup Language (XML) – allows creation of tags/hidden labels for annotation Resource description framework (RDF) – assigns meaning to tags with properties and values in sets of triples; links data and identifiers. Web Ontology Language (OWL) - program discovers common meanings and associative databases thru statement based datastores  Taxonomy  Inference rules
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Third Generation Web (3.0)
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The Intelligent Web
 Semantic
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web technologies

Resource Description Framework, OWL, SPARQL. Semantic application platforms statement based datastores such as triplestores, tuplestores, and associative databases

 Distributed

databases where interoperability is enabled by semantic web technologies

 Intelligent

Applications http://www.kurzweilai.net/meme/frame.html?m=9
KurzweilAI.net December 17, 2006

Difference Between Web 2.0 and 3.0
Web 2.0
HTML/XML Metadata

Web 3.0
RDF Metadata

Mostly unstructured data
Data Silos Making the web interactive and dynamic User created content

Structured data
Data mining Making the web smarter and intelligent Software created content

Telling the machines what we Teaching the machines to think is important figure out what we think is important

Semantic Web
Pragmatics is the study of how the arrangement of words and phrases can alter the meaning of a sentence.

Semantic Web Characteristics
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Not a single web Not separate from existing web  Adds metadata to existing web Use of structured data Semantic web is about information, data and applications not just web pages Semantic web does not require AI code RDF makes content more manageable and frees developers and content providers from having to look at relational data models. RDF gives end-users better ways to collect and manage content they find.
ZD Net, November 12th, 2006 Web 2.0 isn’t dead, but Web 3.0 is bubbling up

Web 1.0 – Web 3.0

http://fredericmartin.typepad.com/myblog/WindowsLiveWriter/image_114.png

Cloud Computing Characteristics
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Infrastructure, platform and applications are available on demand as services Utility computing vs. cloud computing Distributed computing vs. cloud computing Cloud computing refers to services provided Computing location is irrelevant to end user Easy access to computing Scalability – grow or slow to meet demand Instantaneous

Web 1.0 to 3.0

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_U9YMKUF9sOg/Ru1smnFymAI/AAAAAAAAAGw/ECO1M0bg1Gg/s400/web-evolution.png

What will Web 3.0 Look Like?
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Personalization
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interprets, analyses and retrieves information based on individual preferences
Single search – a multi-media report vs. thousands of results/hits Machines can read pages, understand and process data Keyword search vs. interpreting the context of the search

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Implications of Web 3.0
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Changing how we view authorship - What will copyright mean if content is no longer strictly created by people? Knowledge Construction – Search results will be compared, contrasted, and collated in a basic way, presenting points of agreement/disagreement, and perhaps associating these with political positions or contrasting research. Because the web knows something about you, it alerts you to local lectures on related topics, books you might want to read, TV programs available through your cable service, blogs you might find relevant, and even local groups you can contact that are also focused on this issue.

Implications of Web 3.0
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Your cell phone will beep when a significant development occurs. After all, the semantic web will be highly inclusive, providing a common language for many kinds of media and technologies, including cell phones. The net result, ideally, is that you spend less time searching and sifting and more time absorbing, thinking, and participating. Personal learning network (PLN) that connects us to our interests Rethinking of identity, privacy and personal data

10 Semantic Apps to Watch

from ReadWriteWeb - Blog http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/10_semantic_apps_to_watch.php

Presented by:

Melissa Pace, Manager, Montgomery College Television

Montgomery College Contributors & Subject Area Experts: Vani Murthy, Technical Services Manager, Montgomery College Libraries Metta Lash, Reference Librarian, Montgomery College Libraries Kimberly Emery, Analyst / Programmer, Office of Information Technology Scott Youngblood, Producer / Director, Montgomery College Television

Kani Holt, Marketing Specialist, Office of Communications
Paula Carrasquillo, Web Content Specialist, Office of Institutional Advancement


				
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