4.3. Surf Smelt Resource Management - Fisheries and Oceans by shitingting

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									   PACIFIC REGION
INTEGRATED FISHERIES
  MANAGEMENT PLAN

                               SURF SMELT

               APRIL 1, 2011 TO
              DECEMBER 31, 2011




This Integrated Fisheries Management Plan is intended for general purposes only. Where there is a discrepancy between the
Plan and the regulations, the regulations are the final authority. A description of Areas and Subareas referenced in this Plan
can be found in the Pacific Fishery Management Area Regulations.
                                                                                                Formatted: Appendix 1, Tab stops: Not at
CONTACTS                                                                                        2.74"

Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Website: www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Commercial Information                                                         (604) 666-2828
Toll Free Commercial Information                                              1-800-431-3474
Observe, Record, and Report                                                   1-800-465-4336

Fisheries Management Branch
Website: www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/fm-gp/commercial/pelagic-pelagique/smelt-eperlan/index-
eng.htm

Regional Headquarters
Regional Pelagics Coordinator                            Lisa Mijacika        (604) 666-3637

Area Contacts
Resource Management, Areas 1 to 10                       Mark Potyrala        (250) 627-3457    Formatted: Not Highlight
Resource Management, Areas 11 to 27                      Brenda Spence        (250) 756-7329
Resource Management, Areas 28 and 29                     Bridget Ennevor      (604) 666-6390

Recreational Fisheries

South Coast Area
Recreational Fisheries Coordinator                       Brad Beaith          (250) 756-7190

North Coast Area
Recreational Fisheries Coordinator                       Mark Reagan          (250) 627-3409

Fraser River
Recreational Fisheries Coordinator                      Brian Matts           (604) 666-2096

Conservation and Protection

South Coast Area
Area Chief                                              John Lewis            (250) 756-7159

North Coast Area
Regional Chief                                          Denis Burnip          (250) 627-3402

To report violations
Observe, Record, and Report                                            1-800-465-4DFO (4336)

First Nations Fisheries
South Coast Area
AFS Implementation Officer                              Sonora Butterfield    (250) 756-7196    Formatted Table


2011 Surf Smelt Fisheries Management Plan                                                -i-
Lower Fraser River
Resource Manager, Aboriginal Fisheries                  Jason Morgan    (604) 666-8426

Central Coast Area, Bella Coola
Resource Manager                                        Kristen Smith   (250) 902-0482    Formatted: Not Highlight


Central Coast Area, Campbell River
Resource Manager                                        Kent Spencer    (250) 850-5705    Formatted: Not Highlight


North Coast Area
Section Head – Salmon and Herring                       Steven Groves   (250) 627-3455

Science
Website: www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/science/index-eng.htm

Biologist                                             Tom Therriault    (250) 756-7394

Pacific Fisheries Licencing Units
Website: www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/ops/fm/Licensing/Default_e.html

Regional Headquarters
Pacific Fishery Licence Unit                                            (604) 666-0566
200 – 401 Burrard Street
Vancouver BC
V6C 3S4

South Coast Area
Pacific Fishery Licence Unit                                            (250) 754-0400
60 Front Street
Nanaimo BC
V9R 5H7

North Coast Area
Pacific Fishery Licence Unit                                            (250) 627-3413
417 2nd Avenue West
Prince Rupert, BC
V8J 1G8

Treaty and Aboriginal Policy Development
Website: www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/tapd/default_e.htm

Regional Director                                      Sarah Murdoch    (604) 666-7478
Transport Canada
Marine Safety
Website: www.tc.gc.ca/marinesafety/menu.htm

2011 Surf Smelt Fisheries Management Plan                                        - ii -
Regional Headquarters
620 – 800 Burrard Street                                                   (604) 666-5300
Vancouver BC
V6Z 2J8

South Coast Area
Room L4 60 Front Street                                                    (250) 754-0244
Nanaimo BC
V9R 5H7

501 – 1230 Government Street                                               (250) 363-0394
Victoria BC
V8W 3M4

North Coast Area
400 – 309 2nd Avenue West                                                  (250) 627-3045
Prince Rupert BC
V8J 3T1
Environment Canada
COSEWIC
Website: http://www.cosewic.gc.ca/eng/sct5/index_e.cfm

COSEWIC Secretariat                                                   Tel.: (819) 953-3215
c/o Canadian Wildlife Service                                         Fax: (819) 994-3684
Environment Canada                                               cosewic/cosepac@ec.gc.ca
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0H3

FishSafe BC
Website: http://www.fishsafebc.com

Safety Coordinator                                       Gina Johansen     (604) 261-9700
2-11771 Horseshoe Way
Richmond, BC
V7A 4V4
Vancouver Aquarium
Whale and Sea Turtle Sightings
Website: http://wildwhales.org/

BC Cetacean Sighting Network and                                   Tel: 1-866-I-SAW-ONE
Sea Turtle Sighting Network                                               (1-866-472-9663)
                                                                       Fax: (604) 659-3599
                                                                    sightings@vanaqua.org

2011 Surf Smelt Fisheries Management Plan                                           - iii -
                                                   TABLE OF CONTENTS

CONTACTS .................................................................................................................................... I

FOREWARD ......................................................................................................................... VIIIVI

1       OVERVIEW.........................................................................................................................97
         1.1 Introduction .............................................................................................................97
         1.2 History .....................................................................................................................97
         1.3 Type of Fishery and Participants .............................................................................97
              1.3.1 First Nations ...............................................................................................97
              1.3.2 Recreational .............................................................................................108
              1.3.3 Commercial ..............................................................................................108
         1.4 Location of Fishery ...............................................................................................108
              1.4.1 First Nations .............................................................................................108
              1.4.2 Recreational .............................................................................................108
              1.4.3 Commercial ..............................................................................................108
         1.5 Fishery Characteristics ........................................................................................1198
              1.5.1 First Nations ...........................................................................................1198
              1.5.2 Recreational Fishery ................................................................................119
              1.5.3 Commercial ..............................................................................................119
         1.6 Governance ............................................................................................................119
         1.7 Consultation.........................................................................................................1210
         1.8 Approval Process .................................................................................................1210

2       STOCK ASSESSMENT, SCIENCE AND TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE ...............1210
          2.1 Biological Synopsis .............................................................................................1210
          2.2 Ecosystem Interactions ........................................................................................1311
          2.3 Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge/Traditional Ecological Knowledge .............1311
               2.3.1 Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge ........................................................1311
               2.3.2 Traditional Ecological Knowledge ........................................................1311
          2.4 Stock Assessment ................................................................................................1311
               2.4.1 Stock Assessment Overview ..................................................................1311
          2.5 Precautionary Approach ......................................................................................1412
          2.6 Research ..............................................................................................................1412

3       MANAGEMENT ISSUES ...............................................................................................1513
         3.1 Lack of Stock Status Information and Possible Resource Depletion ..................1513
         3.2 Inconsistency with Precautionary Approach .......................................................1513
         3.3 Reporting and Data Collection ............................................................................1513
         3.4 Oceans and Habitat Considerations .....................................................................1513
              3.4.1 Oceans Act .............................................................................................1513
              3.4.2 Sustainable Fisheries Framework ..........................................................1714
              3.4.3 Pacific North Coast Integrated Management Area ................................1714
              3.4.4 Marine Protected Areas..........................................................................1815
              3.4.5 National Marine Conservation Areas.....................................................1815
              3.4.6 Species at Risk Act ................................................................................1815
2011 Surf Smelt Fisheries Management Plan                                                                                                - iv -
            3.5 Gear Impacts........................................................................................................1916

4       OBJECTIVES ..............................................................................................................201616
         4.1 National ...........................................................................................................201616
         4.2 Pacific Region .....................................................................................................2017
         4.3 Surf Smelt Resource Management ......................................................................2017
         4.4 Compliance ..........................................................................................................2118

5       ACCESS AND ALLOCATION ......................................................................................2118
         5.1 First Nations ........................................................................................................2118
         5.2 Recreational .........................................................................................................2118
         5.3 Commercial .........................................................................................................2118

6       SHARED STEWARDSHIP ARRANGEMENTS .......................................................221918
          6.1 Commercial .....................................................................................................221918
          6.2 Fisheries and Oceans Canada ..............................................................................2219

7       COMPLIANCE PLAN ....................................................................................................2219

8       PERFORMANCE REVIEW ............................................................................................2320
          8.1 Management Plan Evaluation Criteria ................................................................2320
              8.1.1 National ..................................................................................................2320
              8.1.2 Pacific Region ........................................................................................2320
              8.1.3 Surf Smelt Resource Management.........................................................2320

9       REFERENCES .................................................................................................................2421

10      GLOSSARY .....................................................................................................................2522

APPENDIX 1. POST-SEASON REVIEW................................................................................2926

APPENDIX 2. MAP OF FISHING AREA ...............................................................................3027

APPENDIX 3. ABORIGINAL FISHING PLAN......................................................................3128

APPENDIX 4. RECREATIONAL FISHING PLAN ................................................................3229

APPENDIX 5. COMMERCIAL FISHING PLAN ...................................................................3330

APPENDIX 6. COMMERCIAL CATCH REPORTING FORM .............................................4037

APPENDIX 7. SAFETY AT SEA .............................................................................................4138

CONTACTS .................................................................................................................................... I

FOREWARD ................................................................................................................................ VI

1       OVERVIEW...........................................................................................................................7
         1.1 Introduction ...............................................................................................................7
2011 Surf Smelt Fisheries Management Plan                                                                                                -v-
         1.2 History .......................................................................................................................7
         1.3 Type of Fishery and Participants ...............................................................................7
              1.3.1 First Nations .................................................................................................7
              1.3.2 Recreational .................................................................................................8
              1.3.3 Commercial ..................................................................................................8
         1.4 Location of Fishery ...................................................................................................8
              1.4.1 First Nations .................................................................................................8
              1.4.2 Recreational .................................................................................................8
              1.4.3 Commercial ..................................................................................................8
         1.5 Fishery Characteristics ..............................................................................................8
              1.5.1 First Nations .................................................................................................8
              1.5.2 Recreational Fishery ....................................................................................9
              1.5.3 Commercial ..................................................................................................9
         1.6 Governance ................................................................................................................9
         1.7 Consultation.............................................................................................................10
         1.8 Approval Process .....................................................................................................10

2     STOCK ASSESSMENT, SCIENCE AND TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE ...................10
        2.1 Biological Synopsis .................................................................................................10
        2.2 Ecosystem Interactions ............................................................................................11
        2.3 Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge/Traditional Ecological Knowledge .................11
             2.3.1 Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge ............................................................11
             2.3.2 Traditional Ecological Knowledge ............................................................11
        2.4 Stock Assessment ....................................................................................................11
             2.4.1 Stock Assessment Overview ......................................................................11
        2.5 Precautionary Approach ..........................................................................................11
        2.6 Research ..................................................................................................................12

3     MANAGEMENT ISSUES ...................................................................................................12
       3.1 Lack of Stock Status Information and Possible Resource Depletion ......................13
       3.2 Inconsistency with Precautionary Approach ...........................................................13
       3.3 Reporting and Data Collection ................................................................................13
       3.4 Oceans and Habitat Considerations .........................................................................13
            3.4.1 Oceans Act .................................................................................................13
            3.4.2 Sustainable Fisheries Framework ..............................................................13
            3.4.3 Pacific North Coast Integrated Management Area ....................................14
            3.4.4 Marine Protected Areas..............................................................................14
            3.4.5 National Marine Conservation Areas.........................................................14
            3.4.6 Species at Risk Act ....................................................................................15
       3.5 Gear Impacts............................................................................................................16

4     OBJECTIVES ......................................................................................................................16
       4.1 National ...................................................................................................................16
       4.2 Pacific Region .........................................................................................................16
       4.3 Surf Smelt Resource Management ..........................................................................16
       4.4 Compliance ..............................................................................................................17

2011 Surf Smelt Fisheries Management Plan                                                                                              - vi -
5      ACCESS AND ALLOCATION ..........................................................................................17
        5.1 First Nations ............................................................................................................17
        5.2 Recreational .............................................................................................................17
        5.3 Commercial .............................................................................................................18

6      SHARED STEWARDSHIP ARRANGEMENTS ...............................................................18
         6.1 Commercial .............................................................................................................18
         6.2 Fisheries and Oceans Canada ..................................................................................18

7      COMPLIANCE PLAN ........................................................................................................18

8      PERFORMANCE REVIEW ................................................................................................19
         8.1 Management Plan Evaluation Criteria ....................................................................19
             8.1.1 National ......................................................................................................19
             8.1.2 Pacific Region ............................................................................................19
             8.1.3 Surf Smelt Resource Management.............................................................19

9      REFERENCES .....................................................................................................................20

10     GLOSSARY .........................................................................................................................21

APPENDIX 1. POST-SEASON REVIEW....................................................................................25

APPENDIX 2. MAP OF FISHING AREA ...................................................................................26

APPENDIX 3. ABORIGINAL FISHING PLAN..........................................................................27

APPENDIX 4. RECREATIONAL FISHING PLAN ....................................................................28

APPENDIX 5. COMMERCIAL FISHING PLAN .......................................................................29

APPENDIX 6. COMMERCIAL CATCH REPORTING FORM .................................................36

APPENDIX 7. SAFETY AT SEA .................................................................................................37




2011 Surf Smelt Fisheries Management Plan                                                                                           - vii -
FOREWARD
The purpose of this Integrated Fisheries Management Plan (IFMP) is to identify the main
objectives and requirements for the surf smelt fishery in the Pacific Region, as well as the
management measures that will be used to achieve these objectives. This document also serves
to communicate the basic information on the fishery and its management to DFO staff, legislated
co-management boards and other stakeholders. This IFMP provides a common understanding of
the basic “rules” for the sustainable management of the fisheries resource.

This IFMP is not a legally binding instrument which can form the basis of a legal challenge. The
IFMP can be modified at any time and does not fetter the Minister's discretionary powers set out
in the Fisheries Act. The Minister can, for reasons of conservation or for any other valid reasons,
modify any provision of the IFMP in accordance with the powers granted pursuant to the
Fisheries Act.

Where DFO is responsible for implementing obligations under land claims agreements, the
IFMP will be implemented in a manner consistent with these obligations. In the event that an
IFMP is inconsistent with obligations under land claims agreements, the provisions of the land
claims agreements will prevail to the extent of the inconsistency.


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2011 Surf Smelt Fisheries Management Plan                                                    - viii -
1.      OVERVIEW

1.1.    Introduction
        This Integrated Fisheries Management Plan (IFMP) for surf smelt covers the period from
        April 1, 2011 to December 31, 2011.

        This IFMP provides a broad context to the management and interrelationships of all
        fishing sectors of the surf smelt fishery. Section 2 considers present stock status, while
        sections 3 and 4 consider the social, cultural, and economic performance of the fishery
        and its broader management issues, respectively. Section 5 describes the objectives to
        address the issues identified in section 4. Sections 6 and 7 describe the management
        procedures that will be employed during the year.

        Appendices 3 and 4 detail the Aboriginal and recreational harvest plans, respectively.
        The commercial harvest plan is detailed in Appendix 5.
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1.2.    History
        Although no sales or catch records exist until 1886, there is evidence of the popularity of
        surf smelt as a local delicacy in the Pacific Region. Commercial fisheries for surf smelt
        have existed since the mid-1800s (Anderson 1880). There was a lack of export demand
        for smaller fish species, such as smelt, so catches were used primarily for personal
        consumption or local demand (Motherell 1923). The British Columbia smelt fishery was
        not as commercially important as the Atlantic coast smelt fisheries, especially those in
        New Brunswick (Kendall 1926).

        Commercial smelt fisheries peaked in 1904 with more than 230 tons harvested from BC.
        Since the early 1960s, commercial landings of surf smelt have not exceeded 10 tons.
        This reduction in commercial landings highlights the shift in this fishery from
        commercial harvest to recreational harvest. Early commercial fisheries existed along the
        coast of British Columbia but following World War I, commercial fisheries became
        concentrated around Vancouver and on the lower mainland of British Columbia (DFO
        2002).

        Recreational fisheries are also centered in the lower mainland region. The recreational
        fishery does not require reporting of catch so there is considerable uncertainty regarding
        the actual recreational harvest of surf smelt. However, interest in this recreational fishery
        continues to grow and poses question of sustainability for this stock (DFO 2002).
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1.3.    Type of Fishery and Participants
                                                                                                        Formatted: Keep with next
        1.3.1. First Nations
               There is a long history of First Nations’ usage of surf smelt throughout the Pacific     Formatted: Indent: Left: 1"
               Coast. Aboriginal harvest for food, social, and ceremonial purposes is authorized
               by a communal licence and may also occur coastwide in sheltered waters where
               surf smelt are found. There are an unknown number of Aboriginal harvesters for
               surf smelt in the Pacific Region;



2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                             -9-
                fishing effort by Aboriginal harvesters is thought to be minimal. The Department
                is not aware of any current First Nation surf smelt fishing activities in the lower
                mainland region or the coastwide fishing area.
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        1.3.2. Recreational
               Recreational fishing for surf smelt has increased significantly since the early
               1990s, especially on beaches of the Lower Mainland, rivers of Alberni Inlet, and
               docks in the Prince Rupert area.

                A British Columbia Tidal Waters Sport Fishing Licence is required for the
                recreational harvest of all species of fish including surf smelt. Tidal Waters Sport
                Fishing Licences can be purchased at many tackle stores and marinas or online by
                using the DFO website:

                http://www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/fm-gp/rec/licence-permis/index-eng.htm

                The Tidal Waters Sport Fishing Licence includes access to numerous species, so
                the number of recreational harvesters taking advantage of the bag limit for surf
                smelt is unknown. However, the numbers may be significant, as easy access and
                ample fishing opportunities make gillnetting for surf smelt a popular recreational
                activity.

                The fishing effort by recreational harvesters is thought to be small, but locally
                focused based on human population concentrations.
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        1.3.3. Commercial
               Any vessel with a vessel based commercial licence (i.e. salmon, schedule II,                  Formatted: Indent: Left: 1"
               geoduck, sablefish, halibut, crab, shrimp by trawl, and shrimp and prawn by trap)
               may fish commercially for surf smelt. A party-based Z8 licence is also available
               and is available to any individual with a Fisher Registration Card (FRC).
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1.4.    Location of Fishery
                                                                                                             Formatted: Keep with next
        1.4.1. First Nations
               Aboriginal harvest may occur in the coastal areas of the lower mainland region                Formatted: Indent: Left: 1"
               including the Burrard Inlet area and coastwide, subject to appropriate licencing.
                                                                                                             Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
        1.4.2. Recreational
               Recreational harvest generally occurs in the Burrard Inlet area of the lower                  Formatted: Indent: Left: 1"
               mainland region but may occur coastwide, subject to appropriate licencing and
               temporal closures, temporary area-based closures, and other permanent closures
               for various purposes listed in this management plan (see Appendix 4).
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        1.4.3. Commercial
               With the exception of temporal closures, temporary area-based closures, and other             Formatted: Indent: Left: 1"
               permanent closures for various purposes (see Appendix 5), the current
               commercial fishery occurs throughout the BC coast, but is centralized in the lower
               mainland region, and especially in Burrard Inlet area.
                                                                                                             Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.5"




2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                                - 10 -
                                                                                                          Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
1.5.    Fishery Characteristics
                                                                                                          Formatted: Keep with next
        1.5.1. First Nations
               The Department is not aware of any current First Nation surf smelt fishing                 Formatted: Indent: Left: 1"
               activities in the lower mainland region or elsewhere in the coastwide fishing area.

                The Fishery is closed from June 15 to August 15 in Management Areas 28 and 29.            Formatted: Indent: Left: 1"
                                                                                                          Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
        1.5.2. Recreational Fishery
               Surf smelt may be fished for recreational purposes year-round, subject to
               temporary and permanent area-based and temporal closures. The recreational
               fishery is managed geographically by Statistical Management Areas and temporal
               restrictions by month and by day.

                The Fishery is closed from June 15 to August 15 in Management Areas 28 and 29.

                Because any individual with a BC Tidal Waters Sport Fishing Licence may fish
                for surf smelt, this fishery is considered an open access fishery. The daily
                maximum sport limit for surf smelt is 20 kg, with a two-day possession limit of 40
                kg. Recreational harvesting may occur by means of dip net or gillnet, with the
                preferred method being a specialized gillnet referred to as a ‘smelt net’.
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        1.5.3. Commercial
               Similar to the recreational fishery, the commercial fishery is managed
               geographically by Statistical Management Areas and temporal restrictions by
               month and by day.

                The Fishery is closed from June 15 to August 15 in Management Areas 28 and 29.

                Any vessel with a vessel-based licence may fish for surf smelt, and an open-
                access party-based Z8 licence is also available to any individual with a valid
                Fisher Registration Card (FRC).

                Fishing for smelt with vessel-based licences is performed using gillnets. Party-
                based licences are permitted to harvest without a vessel using either seine nets or
                gill nets.
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1.6.    Governance
        The Fisheries Act and the regulations made thereunder.                                            Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.5"
          Areas and Subareas, as described in the Pacific Fishery Management Area
             Regulations, are referenced in describing surf smelt Management Areas.
          Fishery (General) Regulations (i.e. Conditions of Licence) and the Pacific Fishery
             Regulations, 1993 (i.e. open times).
          The British Columbia Sport Fishing Regulations (1996) and the Aboriginal
             Communal Fishing Licences Regulations.
          The Oceans Act.
          The Species at Risk Act.



2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                             - 11 -
        These documents are available on the Internet at:                                              Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.5"


        http://www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/ops/fm/toppages/actreg_e.htm

        In addition, the new national Sustainable Fisheries Framework contains policies for            Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.5"
        adopting an ecosystem based approach to fisheries management including:
           A Fishery Decision-Making Framework Incorporating the Precautionary Approach;
           Managing Impacts of Fishing on Benthic Habitat, Communities and Species;
           Policy on New Fisheries for Forage Species.

        Along with existing economic and shared stewardship policies, these will help the              Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.5"
        department meet objectives for long-term sustainability, economic prosperity, and
        improved governance.

        For more information on these departmental objectives, please visit the following site:

        http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/fm-gp/peches-fisheries/fish-ren-peche/sff-cpd/overview-
        cadre-eng.htm
                                                                                                       Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
1.7.    Consultation
        Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) has a broad mandate, with the authority to regulate
        and enforce activities, develop policy, provide services and manage programs. To help
        ensure that the department's policies and programs are aligned with its vision and
        effectively address the interests and preferences of Canadians, DFO supports
        consultations that are transparent, accessible and accountable.

        Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Region, undertakes consultations in order to
        improve departmental decision-making processes, promote understanding of fisheries,
        oceans and marine transport issues, and strengthen relationships.

        For more information on the consultative process for surf smelt, please visit the following
        site:

        http://www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/consultation/fisheries-peche/pelag/index-eng.htm
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1.8.    Approval Process
        The Regional Director General for the Pacific Region approves this plan.                       Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.5"


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2.      STOCK ASSESSMENT, SCIENCE AND TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE

2.1.    Biological Synopsis
        Surf smelt (Hypomesus pretiosus) are a coastal marine species distributed from Prince          Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.5"
        William Sound, Alaska, to Long Beach, California. Adults are nearshore pelagic fishes
        and it is hypothesized that juveniles remain nearshore as well. Data on the distribution of
        surf smelt in British Columbia are sparse. Historical records suggest surf smelt were
        abundant and could easily be caught year-round in the southern part of their range, which


2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                          - 12 -
        includes the Strait of Georgia and Whiterock, with additional reports from Rivers and
        Smith Inlets and near the mouth of the Skeena River (Hart and McHugh 1944). The
        initiation of systematic surveys in British Columbia might reveal previously unknown
        surf smelt spawning beaches. It is probable that more than one genetic population of surf
        smelt is found in British Columbia given the large geographical range of this species.

        In the Lower Mainland, surf smelt spawn only during summer, but specific spawning               Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.5"
        times are not available. Evidence from Fishery Officers and commercial fishermen
        indicate the Prince Rupert population spawns during the spring, between mid-February
        and April. Surf smelt are beach spawning fish, seeking out beaches with fine to coarse
        gravel. Eggs adhere to the beach substrate and are subsequently buried 2-15 cm by wave
        action in the upper tidal zone. Larval hatch and development occurs over the summer
        months of June through August.
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2.2.    Ecosystem Interactions
        Surf smelt feed on a variety of zoobenthos and zooplankton (i.e. amphipods, copepods,
        crab larvae, shrim, aquatic insects, worms, fish eggs and larvae, and jellyfish). Surf smelt
        are important prey for larger predatory fish (e.g. salmon), marine mammals (e.g. harbour
        seals) and birds (e.g. mallards, blue herons, and bald eagles (Penttila 1995).

        At this time there is no information available on the appropriate conservation limits for
        surf smelt based on ecosystem considerations. Research is ongoing to better understand
        these ecosystem processes and the role surf smelt play in maintaining the integrity and
        functioning of the ecosystem.
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2.3.    Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge/Traditional Ecological Knowledge
        2.3.1. Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge
               There is no available information on Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge at this            Formatted: Indent: Left: 1"
               time in a format accessible for fisheries management.
                                                                                                        Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
        2.3.2. Traditional Ecological Knowledge
               Traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) in the form of observations and                   Formatted: Indent: Left: 1"
               comments collected from commercial fishery participants, fisheries officers, and
               resource managers over many years contributes to decisions on scientific survey
               locations and is considered in management decisions.
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2.4.    Stock Assessment
        2.4.1. Stock Assessment Overview
               No formal stock assessments for surf smelt have been conducted in British                Formatted: Indent: Left: 1"
               Columbia. It is assumed there is only a single surf smelt stock, but the likely
               possibility exists that there are different stocks distributed along the coast.
               Furthermore, since surf smelt spawning beaches tend to be associated with the
               mouth of large river systems, stocks might home to these beaches. Anecdotal
               information suggests the Prince Rupert population spawns earlier than the Burrard
               Inlet population, possibly indicating reproductive isolation. Additional studies are
               needed to verify the number of stocks in British Columbia.



2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                           - 13 -
                There is anecdotal evidence to suggest that surf smelt populations, notably              Formatted: Indent: Left: 1"
                Burrard Inlet, are declining. However, additional studies are needed to verify this
                suggestion. Also, since the fishery operates as unlimited entry, there is a potential
                for expansion and resource over-utilization.
                                                                                                         Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
2.5.    Precautionary Approach
        The Department has recently begun implementation of the Sustainable Fisheries
        Framework (SFF), which is a toolbox of existing and new policies for Fisheries and
        Oceans Canada (DFO) and other interests to sustainably manage Canadian fisheries in
        order to conserve fish stocks and support prosperous fisheries.

        Fisheries worldwide are under increasing pressure, creating challenges for policy makers,
        resource managers and industry leaders to make informed decisions regarding the
        conservation, recovery and wise management of these precious resources. DFO held
        consultations throughout Canada in 2007 and 2008 to develop strategies to ease
        ecosystem pressures and enhance the capacity of the resource to sustain growing industry
        needs. New conservation policies have been developed to implement the ecosystem and
        precautionary approaches to fisheries management. These new policies, incorporated
        into development of new Integrated Fisheries Management Plan (IFMP) templates, will
        join existing policies in a new framework to promote sustainable fisheries.

        The new fishery decision-making framework incorporating the precautionary approach
        policy applies to key harvested fish stocks managed by Fisheries and Oceans Canada,
        including commercial, recreational, or subsistence fisheries.

        The framework requires that a harvest strategy be incorporated into respective fisheries
        management plans to keep the removal rate moderate when the stock status is healthy, to
        promote rebuilding when stock status is low, and to ensure a low risk of serious or
        irreversible harm to the stock. It also requires a rebuilding plan when a stock reaches low
        levels.

        For more information on DFO’s new decision-making framework, please visit the
        following site:

        http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/fm-gp/peches-fisheries/fish-ren-peche/sff-cpd/precaution-
        eng.htm
                                                                                                         Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
2.6.    Research
        Scientific information on the biology, distribution and fishery data of surf smelt
        (Hypomesus pretiosus) was compiled in a paper reviewed November 2002 by the Pacific
        Scientific Advice Review Committee (PSARC) Pelagics Subcommittee.
        Recommendations from the subcommittee focused on the need to collect biological and
        catch data from both recreational and commercial fisheries.

        To view the PSARC paper, please visit the following site:

        http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/csas/Csas/DocREC/2002_115e.pdf


2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                            - 14 -
        A limited catch monitoring survey was conducted in 2003 where both commercial and
        recreational users were surveyed in order to document, assess and generate an estimate of
        fishing activity for this area. The survey area included identified popular surf smelt
        fishing beaches along the north and south shores of Burrard Inlet. Data collected in this
        survey included information on biological attributes such as length, weight, age, sex ratio,
        by-catch and other related information. There has been no further work on addressing
        this and other research needs for surf smelt since that time.

                                                                                                        Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
3.      MANAGEMENT ISSUES
The following sections highlight the on-going, or longer-term management issues that are being
addressed in this fishery. Specific management objectives designed to mitigate these issues are
detailed in Section 5. There are few immediate, or annual management issues that need to be
addressed, however, when short-term issues arise they will be detailed in this section.
                                                                                                        Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
3.1.    Lack of Stock Status Information and Possible Resource Depletion
        There is no stock assessment program for surf smelt and therefore a lack of stock
        assessment information for these stocks. Fundamental information such as the number of
        surf smelt stocks in B.C. is not available to managers. There is negligible biological and
        fisheries information available for surf smelt in all Statistical Management Areas in
        British Columbia.
                                                                                                        Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
3.2.    Inconsistency with Precautionary Approach
        The current management plan is inconsistent with the precautionary approach to fisheries
        management. In accordance with the guidelines for new and developing fisheries, there
        are insufficient data to reasonably manage the resource. Currently there is no biological
        basis to support an unlimited entry, unlimited quota fishery where biological data are
        sparse or non-existent and formal assessments are not possible.
                                                                                                        Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
3.3.    Reporting and Data Collection
        There is a harvest log submission requirement for commercial surf smelt fisheries. There
        is no method in place to measure the recreational harvest (e.g. creel survey), which is
        potentially a significant portion of the total harvest.
                                                                                                        Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
3.4.    Oceans and Habitat Considerations
        3.4.1. Oceans Act
               In 1997, the Government of Canada enacted the Oceans Act. This legislation               Formatted: Indent: Left: 1"
               provides a foundation for an integrated and balanced national oceans policy
               framework supported by regional management and implementation strategies. In
               2002, Canada’s Oceans Strategy was released to provide the policy framework
               and strategic approach for modern oceans management in estuarine, coastal, and
               marine ecosystems. As set out in the Oceans Act, the strategy is based on the
               three principles of sustainable development, integrated management, and the
               precautionary approach.

                For more information on the Oceans Act, please visit the following site:                Formatted: Indent: Left: 1"



2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                           - 15 -
                http://www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/oceans/default_e.htm
                                                                             Formatted: Bullets and Numbering




2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                - 16 -
        3.4.2. Sustainable Fisheries Framework
               Fisheries worldwide are under increasing pressure, creating challenges for policy
               makers, resource managers and industry leaders to make informed decisions
               regarding the conservation, recovery and wise management of these resources.
               The Sustainable Fisheries Framework (SFF) is a toolbox of existing and new
               policies for Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) to sustainably manage Canadian
               fisheries by conserving fish stocks while supporting the industries that rely on
               healthy fish populations. The SFF provides planning and operational tools that
               allow these goals to be achieved in a clear, predictable, transparent, and inclusive
               manner.

                The SFF was created through a Canada-wide consultative process led by DFO in
                2007-08, to find ways of easing ecosystem pressures while meeting growing
                industry needs. From this process, new conservation policies were completed in
                early 2009 to implement the ecosystem and precautionary approaches to fisheries
                management. These new policies include;
                   Mmanaging the impacts of fishing on sensitive benthic areas;
                   Nnew fisheries for forage species; and,                                             Formatted: Indent: Left: 1.13", Tab stops:
                                                                                                        1.38", List tab + Not at 1"
                   Aa fishery decision-making framework incorporating the precautionary
                      approach.

                Starting in 2009, these new policies, in addition to revised Integrated Fisheries
                Management Plan (IFMP) templates, will be phased-in through the normal IFMP
                processes based on regional priorities and in consultation with First Nations and
                stakeholders. In this way they will join existing policies and tools in a new
                framework to promote sustainable fisheries.

                For more information, please contact your Area’s Resource Manager (see
                Contacts).
                                                                                                        Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
        3.4.3. Pacific North Coast Integrated Management Area
               As part of Canada's Oceans Strategy, Fisheries and Oceans Canada is initiating an        Formatted: Indent: Left: 1"
               integrated management planning process for the Pacific North Coast Integrated
               Management Area (PNCIMA). The PNCIMA is bounded by the BC-Alaska
               border, the base of the shelf slope and the mainland, stretching south as far as
               Campbell River and the Brooks Peninsula. The PNCIMA initiative marks a shift
               toward a broader ecosystem approach to ocean management. This is consistent
               with the Government of Canada’s overall direction and with Fisheries and Oceans
               Canada’s new Wild Salmon Policy. The PNCIMA initiative will bring the area’s
               stakeholders together to develop an integrated management plan for the region
               that achieves conservation, sustainable resource use, and economic development
               goals for oceans and coastal areas. The PNCIMA initiative will also function as
               an umbrella for various ocean management processes, complementing and linking
               existing processes and tools, including IFMPs.

                For more information on PNCIMA, please visit:



2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                           - 17 -
                http://www.pncima.org/
                                                                                                             Formatted: Indent: Left: 0"
                                                                                                             Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
        3.4.4. Marine Protected Areas
               Fisheries and Oceans Canada is also responsible for designating Marine Protected              Formatted: Indent: Left: 1"
               Areas (MPAs) under Canada’s Oceans Act. Under this authority, DFO has
               designated two MPAs in the Pacific Region. The Endeavour Hydrothermal
               Vents, designated in 2003, lie in waters 2,250m deep 250 km southeast of
               Vancouver Island. The Bowie Seamount, designated in 2008, is 180 km west of
               Queen Charlotte Islands (Haida Gwaii) rising from a depth of over 3,000 m to
               within 25 m of the sea surface. Work is ongoing to consider MPA designations
               for other areas along the Pacific Coast, including the Race Rocks area off Rocky
               Point south of Victoria (currently designated as a Provincial Ecological Reserve)
               and the Hecate Strait / Queen Charlotte Sound Glass Sponge Reefs.
                                                                                                             Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
        3.4.5. National Marine Conservation Areas
               The Canada National Marine Conservation Areas Act provides for the
               establishment of National Marine Conservation Areas (NMCAs). Parks Canada,
               Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the Council of the Haida Nation are currently
               working together to establish the Gwaii Haanas NMCA through the exchange of
               information on marine resources, fisheries and cultural data and coordinated
               consultations. Following establishment, measures respecting the management of
               the Gwaii Haanas NMCA will be articulated in future IFMPs.

                Fisheries and Oceans Canada is also working with other federal and provincial
                agencies to coordinate efforts towards establishing a national system of Marine
                Protected Areas to fulfill Canada’s commitments to the UN Convention on
                Biological Diversity.

                For more information on NMCAs, please visit:

                www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/oceans/default_e.htm
                                                                                                             Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
        3.4.6. Species at Risk Act
               The Species at Risk Act (SARA) came into force in 2003. The purposes of the
               Act are “to prevent wildlife species from being extirpated or becoming extinct,
               and to provide for the recovery of a wildlife species that are extirpated,
               endangered or threatened as a result of human activity and to manage species of
               special concern to prevent them from becoming endangered or threatened.”

                To view the list of Endangered, Threatened, and Special Concern species
                currently listed under Schedule 1 of SARA, please visit:
                                                                                                             Formatted: Indent: Left: 1"
                http://www.sararegistry.gc.ca/species/schedules_e.cfm?id=1

                In addition to the existing prohibitions under the Fisheries Act, it is illegal to kill,
                harm, harass, capture, take, possess, collect, buy, sell or trade any listed


2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                                - 18 -
                endangered or threatened animal or any part or derivative of an individual. These
                prohibitions apply unless a person is authorized, by a permit, licence or other
                similar document issued in accordance with SARA, to engage in an activity
                affecting the listed species or the residences of its individuals. Species listed as
                special concern are not included in these prohibitions.

                The formal SARA legal listing process begins when the Minister of Environment
                issues a response statement, detailing how he intends to proceed with the
                COSEWIC species designations. Response statements can be found at:
                                                                                                           Formatted: Indent: Left: 1"
                http://www.sararegistry.gc.ca/search/advSearchResults_e.cfm?stype=doc&docID
                =19

                Future Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife Species Assessments

                COSEWIC was formed in 1977 to provide Canadians with a single, scientifically
                sound classification of wildlife species at risk of extinction. COSEWIC began its
                assessments in 1978 and has met each year since then to assess wildlife species.

                With the implementation of SARA, COSEWIC has been established as an
                independent body of experts responsible for identifying and assessing wildlife
                species considered to be at risk. This is the first step towards protecting wildlife
                species at risk. Subsequent steps include COSEWIC reporting its results to the
                Canadian government and the public, and the Minister of the Environment's
                official response to the assessment results. Wildlife species that have been
                designated by COSEWIC may then qualify for legal protection and recovery
                under SARA.

                For a full list of species identified and assessed by COSEWIC, please visit:

                http://www.cosewic.gc.ca/rpts/Detailed_Species_Assessments_e.html

                Whale and Leatherback Turtle Sightings
                The Department welcomes assistance in the reporting of any whale or leatherback
                turtle sightings or entanglement. Sightings for leatherback turtles and many
                whale species are infrequent in Pacific Canadian waters, and the collection of
                sightings data is very useful to scientists in determining population size and
                distribution. Establishing this information can in turn help in the recovery
                planning under SARA.

                To report a whale or a sea turtle sighting, contact the BC Cetacean Sighting
                Network and Sea Turtle Sighting Network respectively (see Contacts)
                                                                                                           Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
3.5.    Gear Impacts
        Under normal operating circumstances, there is minimal to no environmental impact from
        gear types used in the surf smelt fishery.



2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                              - 19 -
                                                                                                         Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
4.      OBJECTIVES

4.1.    National
        Fisheries and Oceans Canada aims to:
         Meet conservation objectives and ensure healthy and productive fisheries and
            ecosystems;
         Manage fisheries to provide opportunities for economic prosperity;
         Provide stability, transparency, and predictability in fisheries management and
            improved governance.
                                                                                                         Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
4.2.    Pacific Region
        In 1994, the Biological Objective Working Group of the Pacific Scientific Advice
        Review Committee (PSARC) identified three biological objectives for management of
        Pacific Region fish and invertebrate stocks (Rice et al, 1995):
         Ensure that subpopulations over as broad a geographical and ecological range as
            possible do not become biologically threatened (in the Committee on the Status of
            Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) sense of “threatened”).
         Operationally, Objective 1 requires at least that management allow enough spawners
            to survive, after accounting for all sources of mortality (including all fisheries and
            natural mortality), to ensure production of enough progeny that they will, themselves,
            be able to replace themselves when mature.
         Fisheries may have collateral effects on other species, mediated by the ecological
            relationships of the target species. Fisheries should be managed in ways that do not
            violate the above objectives for ecologically related species, as well as target species.

        The objectives remain relevant today, particularly in light of development of the national       Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.5"
        objectives around sustainable fisheries.
                                                                                                         Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
4.3.    Surf Smelt Resource Management
        The overall objective of the current surf smelt fishery is to obtain a product that is
        economically viable and ecologically sustainable. Specific objectives are detailed below,
        and respective performance measures are further described in the commercial
        management measures for the fishery (Appendices 7):

        Environmental and Ecological Conservation
        To ensure conservation and protection of surf smelt stocks and their habitat, and manage
        for ecosystem impacts through the application of scientific management principles
        applied in a risk averse and precautionary manner based on the best scientific advice
        available.

        Consultation Process
        Conduct an open and transparent consultation process for discussions of harvest
        management issues for the surf smelt fishery, including the annual development of an
        IFMP, long-term direction of the fishery, and to increase information posted on the DFO
        consultation website to allow for wide review of all relevant material.




2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                            - 20 -
        First Nations
        To ensure that, subject to conservation needs, first priority is accorded to First Nations for
        opportunities to harvest surf smelt for food, social and ceremonial purposes. Feedback
        from consultations sessions is relied on to measure the performance of providing priority
        to First Nations for opportunities to catch fish for food, social and ceremonial purposes.

       Commercial
        To provide opportunities for the commercial harvest of surf smelt in a sustainable
        manner, and ensure that adequate catch monitoring is in place to meet stock assessment
        and management requirements through the commercial catch reporting plan (Appendices
        5 and 6)

        Recreational
        To provide opportunities for the recreational harvest of surf smelt in a sustainable
        manner.
                                                                                                          Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
4.4.    Compliance
        C&P staff monitors and enforces issues and problems related to all surf smelt fisheries in
        conjunction with the monitoring and enforcement activities dedicated to the identified
        priority fisheries in the Pacific Region.

        For more information, see Section 8.

                                                                                                          Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
5.      ACCESS AND ALLOCATION
The Minister can, for reasons of conservation or for any other valid reasons, modify access,
allocations, and sharing arrangements as outlined in this IFMP in accordance with the powers
granted pursuant to the Fisheries Act.
                                                                                                          Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
5.1.    First Nations
        Aboriginal harvest of surf smelt for FSC purposes may occur coast wide where
        authorized by a communal licence. The Department will provide First Nations with
        priority access to the resource for FSC purposes, and FSC quotas may be determined
        through bilateral discussions.
                                                                                                          Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
5.2.    Recreational
        Recreational harvest of surf smelt may occur coast wide, and requires a British Columbia          Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.5"
        Tidal Waters Sport Fishing licence. Surf smelt may be fished for recreational purposes
        year-round, subject to area-based and temporal closures. The daily maximum sport limit
        for surf smelt is 20 kg, with a two-day possession limit of 40 kg.
                                                                                                          Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
5.3.    Commercial
        Any vessel with a vessel based commercial licence (i.e. salmon, schedule II, geoduck,             Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.5"
        sablefish, halibut, crab, shrimp by trawl, and shrimp and prawn by trap) may fish
        commercially for surf smelt. A party-based Z8 licence is also available and is available
        to any individual with a Fisher Registration Card (FRC). There is an unlimited quota for
        this fishery.


2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                             - 21 -
                                                                                                         Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
6.      SHARED STEWARDSHIP ARRANGEMENTS

6.1.    Commercial
        There are no shared stewardship arrangements with industry in the surf smelt fishery.            Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.5"
                                                                                                         Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
6.2.    Fisheries and Oceans Canada
        Numerous Science, Resource Management, and Conservation and Protection personnel                 Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.5"
        are directly involved in the surf smelt fishery, to varying degrees. Contributions to the
        IFMP are provided by Fisheries Management in Areas, Regional Headquarters, and
        National Headquarters; the Science Branch; Conservation and Protection; the Pacific
        Fishery Licence Unit; the Treaty and Aboriginal Policy Directorate, and numerous
        administrative personnel.

                                                                                                         Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
7.     COMPLIANCE PLAN
Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) has the responsibility to enforce the Fisheries Act and
associated regulations, to address conservation, health and safety issues and to maintain proper
management and control of the various fisheries.

DFO’s Conservation and Protection (C&P) program promotes and maintains compliance with
legislation, regulations and management measures implemented to achieve the conservation and
sustainable use of Canada’s aquatic resources. The program also works closely with its partners
to ensure peaceful and orderly fisheries; makes a significant contribution to the protection of
Canadian sovereignty and the identification of potential marine security threats through
extensive marine surveillance activities; and plays a key role in the administration of the
Canadian Shellfish Sanitation Program to ensure that the public is protected from consumption
of contaminated fisheries products.

There are approximately 173 fishery officers stationed in the Pacific Region (which encompasses
British Columbia and Yukon Territory). They are designated as “fishery officers” under Section
5 of the Fisheries Act. Their powers and responsibilities are outlined in the Fisheries Act, the
Criminal Code of Canada and the Constitution Act. The Fisheries Act and the Criminal Code of
Canada are the primary pieces of legislation outlining the powers and responsibilities of Fishery
Officers. Officers are designated under other Acts as well such as the Coastal Fisheries
Protection Act and Species at Risk Act.

Another component supporting compliance management is contract monitors and validators.
They have limited enforcement training and may contribute to enforcement efforts through
observe, record and report activities.

The third component supporting compliance management is native fishery guardians and
monitors. They may wear the uniform of their Band or Tribal Group. Their main
responsibilities are monitoring and catch validations. Some First Nations carry a “fishery
guardian” designation, depending on training and the agreement between the Band and the



2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                            - 22 -
Department, C&P staff, along with CCG staff, contract monitors and First Nations guardians and
monitors, participate in all surf smelt fisheries coast-wide.

C&P staff promote compliance through education and shared stewardship activities, monitor
fisheries, enforce the regulatory regime, and support the safe conduct of the fleet related to all
surf smelt fisheries in British Columbia. Regional and area-based compliance strategies are
formulated to apply the most effective tools to address identified compliance issues, and annual
operational priorities are established to align program resources in a way that best manages risks
and any threats to sustainability.

Fisheries require C&P presence to support peaceful and orderly fisheries. Regional priorities
also determine the degree of effort which C&P allocate to the various fisheries.

Users of the resource have a responsibility to report violations. Any suspected or actual
fisheries, wildlife or pollution violations can be quickly and discretely reported to the appropriate
enforcement officer by using the toll free observe, record and report hotline. This toll free
number is available 24 hours a day. Confidentiality is assured.

OBSERVE, RECORD AND REPORT 1-800-465-4DFO (1-800-465-4336)
Enforcement enquiries can also be directed to the local field offices during regular office hours.

                                                                                                         Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
8.      PERFORMANCE REVIEW

8.1.    Management Plan Evaluation Criteria
        8.1.1. National
                 Surf smelt conservation objectives are met.                                            Formatted: Indent: Left: 1.13", Tab stops:
                                                                                                         1.38", List tab + Not at 0.25"
                 Reasonable effort has been made to provide opportunities for economic
                    prosperity and still maintain conservation objectives.
                 Consultation and management processes are stable, transparent, and
                    predictable.
                                                                                                         Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
        8.1.2. Pacific Region
                 Surf smelt stocks are not biologically threatened as management decisions
                    and processes are informed by advice from DFO Science and are managed
                    in accordance with the Precautionary Approach.
                 There are sufficient spawners to provide replacement progeny and provide
                    for a sustainable fishery.
                 There are no observable collateral ecological effects due to effective stock           Formatted: Indent: Left: 1.13", Tab stops:
                                                                                                         1.38", List tab + Not at 0.25"
                    management.
                                                                                                         Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
        8.1.3. Surf Smelt Resource Management
               Environmental and Ecological Conservation                                                 Formatted: Indent: Left: 1"
                 Conservation and protection of surf smelt stocks will be carried out by                Formatted: Indent: Left: 1.13", Tab stops:
                                                                                                         1.38", List tab + Not at 0.88"
                    applying a conservative management regime in the absence of stock
                    assessment information.
                 Collect relevant information by geographic location and time period.


2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                            - 23 -
                Consultation                                                                          Formatted: Indent: Left: 1"
                  Seek stakeholder and First Nations advice on development of the IFMP
                    allowing 30 days for review and feedback on IFMP draft content.
                  Where possible, facilitate consensus building among stakeholders on issues
                    related to the management of the fishery.
                  Where possible, hold post-season meetings to review issues encountered and
                    to develop options for addressing and resolving them.
                  Post meeting notes and meeting presentations as soon as is possible
                    following consultation meetings.

                First Nations                                                                         Formatted: Indent: Left: 1"
                   Fisheries and Oceans Canada will consult with First Nations in order to           Formatted: Indent: Left: 1.13", Tab stops:
                                                                                                      1.38", List tab + Not at 0.88"
                      determine their FSC requirements. First Nations will be authorized to fish
                      for FSC purposes on a priority basis through use of a communal licence.


                Commercial                                                                            Formatted: Indent: Left: 1"
                  Through post-season reviews and data analysis, assess catch monitoring,
                   management measures, timing of fishing season, and fishing areas.
                  Ensure compliance with catch reporting requirements for the commercial
                   sector.
                  Continue to have commercial fishery openings from Monday to Thursday
                   and the recreational openings from Friday to Sunday in order to minimize
                   potential conflict between commercial and sport fishers.

                                                                                                      Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
9.      REFERENCES

Anderson, A. C. 1880. Report of the Inspector of Fisheries for British Columbia, for the year
1879. In Annual report of the Department of Fisheries, Dominion of Canada, for the year 1879.
Queen’s Printer, Ottawa ON.

DFO. 2002. Surf Smelt. DFO Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat Stock Status Report B6-
09 (2002).

Hart, J. L. and J. L. McHugh. 1944. The smelts (Osmeridae) of British Columbia. Bulletin of
the Fisheries Research Board of Canada No. 64.

Kendall, E. C. 1926. The Smelts. Fisheries Bulletin of the United States. 42:217-375.

Motherwell, M. J. A. 1923. Report of the Chief Inspector, Major J. A. Motherwell, Western
Fisheries Division (British Columbia) for 1922. In Fifty-sixth annual report of the Fisheries
Branch, Department of Marine and Fisheries for the year 1922. King’s Printer, Ottawa ON. Pp
44-60.



2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                         - 24 -
Penttila, D. E. 1995. Baitfish Resources and Habitats of Fidalgo Bay, Skagit County, WA.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Management Report.

Rice, J., R. D. Humphreys, L. Richards, R. Kadowaki, D. Welch, M. Stocker, B. Turris, G. A.
McFarlane, F. Dickson, and D. Ware. 1995. Pacific Stock Assessment Review Committee
(PSARC) Annual Report for 1994. Canadian Manuscript Report of Fisheries and Aquatic
Sciences 2318.


10.     GLOSSARY
                                                                                                           Formatted: Normal
Aboriginal Traditional       Knowledge that is held by, and unique to Aboriginal peoples. It is a
Knowledge (ATK)              living body of knowledge that is cumulative and dynamic and adapted
                             over time to reflect changes in the social, economic, environmental,
                             spiritual, and political spheres of the Aboriginal knowledge holders. It
                             often includes knowledge about the land and its resources, spiritual
                             beliefs, language, mythology, culture, laws, customs and medicines.

Abundance                    Number of individuals in a stock or a population.

AFS                          Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy

Area and Subarea             Defined in Section 2 of the Pacific Fishery Management Area
                             Regulations. A map of Pacific Fishery Management Areas is available
                             on the Department’s Internet site at:
                             www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/ops/fm/Areas/areamap_e.htm

Biomass                      Total weight of all individuals in a stock or a population.

By-catch                     The unintentional catch of one species when the target is another.

Committee on the             Committee of experts that assess and designate which wild species are
Status of Endangered         in some danger of disappearing from Canada.
Wildlife in Canada
(COSEWIC)

Communal Licence             A licence issued to First Nations organizations under Section 4 of the
                             Aboriginal Communal Fishing Licences Regulations, pursuant to the
                             Fisheries Act, to carry on fishing and related activities.

COSEWIC                      Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada                      Formatted Table




2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                              - 25 -
Ecosystem-Based              Taking into account of species interactions and the interdependencies
Management                   between species and their habitats when making resource management
                             decisions.

Fishing Effort               Quantity of effort using a given fishing gear over a given period of
                             time.

Fishing Mortality            Death caused by fishing, often symbolized by the mathematical
                             symbol F.

Food, Social and             A fishery conducted by Aboriginal groups for food, social and
Ceremonial (FSC)             ceremonial purposes.

Intertidal                   The area of the ocean shoreline located between the highest high water
                             and lowest low water tidal levels.

Landing                      Quantity of a species caught and landed. Harvested animals
                             transferred from a vessel to land.

LOMA (Large Ocean            Integrated management planning in Canada is focused in five high
Management Area)             priority LOMAs, these are: Placentia Bay and the Grand Banks, the
                             Gulf of St. Lawrence, the Scotian Shelf, the Beaufort Sea and the
                             Pacific North Coast.

Natural Mortality            Mortality due to natural causes, symbolized by the mathematical
                             symbol M.

Osmerid, Osmeridae           Osmerid refers to a member of the smelt family,
                             Osmeridae.

Pelagic                      Living in the surface or middle depths of the sea.

PFLU                         Pacific Fishery Licencing Unit

Population                   Group of individuals of the same species, forming a breeding unit, and
                             sharing a habitat.

Precautionary                Set of agreed cost-effective measures and actions, including future
Approach                     courses of action, which ensures prudent foresight, reduces or avoids
                             risk to the resource, the environment, and the people, to the extent
                             possible, taking explicitly into account existing uncertainties and the
                             potential consequences of being wrong.




2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                             - 26 -
PSARC                        Pacific Scientific Advice Review Committee, chaired by DFO and
                             including other federal and provincial government agency
                             representatives and external participants.

Quota                        Portion of the total allowable catch that a unit such as vessel class,
                             country, etc. is permitted to take from a stock in a given period of
                             time.

Research Survey              Survey at sea, on a research vessel, allowing scientists to obtain
                             information on the abundance and distribution of various species
                             and/or collect oceanographic data. E.g.: bottom trawl survey, plankton
                             survey, hydroacoustic survey, etc.

Spawner                      Sexually mature individual.

Spawning Stock               Sexually mature individuals in a stock.

Species at Risk Act          The Act is a federal government commitment to prevent wildlife
(SARA)                       species from becoming extinct and secure the necessary actions for
                             their recovery. It provides the legal protection of wildlife species and
                             the conservation of their biological diversity.

Stakeholders                 Individuals or groups with an interest in a particular fishery or activity.

Stock                        Describes a population of individuals of one species found in a
                             particular area, and is used as a unit for fisheries management.

Stock Assessment             Scientific evaluation of the status of a species belonging to a same
                             stock within a particular area in a given time period. Results of
                             analyses of fisheries and research data used to evaluate the effects of
                             fishing on a stock or population and to predict the reactions of
                             populations to alternative management choices.

Substrate                    The ground (often the ocean bottom) and its composition, in or on
                             which animals live.

Subtidal                     A portion of the bottom of the ocean that is not exposed at low tide
                             stages. The ocean bottom at elevations below low water or chart
                             datum.

Ton                          Short ton, 2000 lbs., traditionally used as a unit of measure by fish
                             harvesters in British Columbia.




2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                                  - 27 -
Tonne                        Metric tonne, which is 1000kg or 2204.6 lb.

Total Allowable Catch        Total allowable catch: the amount of catch that may be taken from a
(TAC)                        stock, determined by analytical procedures, to achieve management
                             objectives.

Traditional Ecological       A cumulative body of knowledge and beliefs, handed down through
Knowledge (TEK)              generations by cultural transmission, about the relationship of living
                             beings (including humans) with one another and with their
                             environment.

Vessel Size                  Length overall.




2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                             - 28 -
APPENDIX 1. POST-SEASON REVIEW

First Nation Fisheries: The Department is not aware of any First Nation surf smelt fishing
activities in the lower mainland region or the coastwide fishing area in 2010.

Recreational Fisheries: The Department does not have reporting and catch monitoring programs
to track recreational harvest of this species in 2010.

Commercial Fisheries: Pacific Fishery Licence Unit (PFLU) records indicate that 3 commercial
‘Z8’ Party Based licence were issued in 2010. This reflects a continuation of the low effort and
downward trend in licences issued in recent years. For example, the number in previous years
was as follows: 2009 = 1 licence issued; 2008= 5 licences issued; 2007= 8 licences issued;
2006= 24 licences issued.




2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                         - 29 -
APPENDIX 2. MAP OF FISHING AREA




2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan   - 30 -
APPENDIX 3. ABORIGINAL FISHING PLAN
The Department is committed to improving its relationship with Aboriginal people. Aboriginal
fisheries play an important role in this relationship and, therefore, are an integral part of fisheries
resource management in the Pacific Region. Through consultation, cooperative management and
stewardship activities, DFO and Aboriginal groups are working together to build strong, healthy
relationships and a sustainable fishery.

Through the Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy, the Department seeks to negotiate with Aboriginal
organizations access for Food, Social, and Ceremonial (FSC) purposes. Subject to conservation,
this access has priority over access for commercial and recreational harvest. FSC fisheries are
managed through communal licences that are issued to First Nations organizations. The
Department will consult with First Nations organizations to determine appropriate levels of
access. In some cases, a portion of a PFMA may be closed to fishing except for fishing by a
First Nation organization. These closures may be for the season or for specified times.
Whenever possible, the appropriate annual fishing plan will identify such closures. It is possible
that situations may arise in the implementation of the plan where in season closure adjustments
will be required to ensure access to the fishery by First Nations organizations for FSC purposes.

For additional information on DFO’s Treaty and Aboriginal Fisheries programs, please visit:

www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/tapd/default_e.htm




2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                              - 31 -
APPENDIX 4. RECREATIONAL FISHING PLAN
The recreational harvest of various fish and invertebrate species in BC is regulated via the British
Columbia Sport Fishing Regulations, 1996 made under the Fisheries Act. A Fisheries and
Oceans Canada Tidal Waters Sport Fishing licence is required for the recreational harvest of all
species of fish.

The regulations for recreational fishing of finfish are summarized in the British Columbia Tidal
Waters Sport Fishing Guide which lists closed times, bag limits, size limits (where applicable)
and closed areas. When required, Fishery Notices are issued to advise of changes to this guide.
For more information on the recreational fishery refer to the following web link:

http://www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/recfish/default_e.htm

The primary consultative body for the recreational fishing community is the Sport Fishing
Advisory Board (SFAB). The SFAB has representatives from all parts of the community
including the British Columbia Wildlife Federation and the Sport Fishing Institute of British
Columbia. If you have any questions or need further information, please contact a recreational
fisheries co-coordinator or a local Fisheries and Oceans Canada office (see Contacts).

The daily maximum sport limit for surf smelt is 20 kg, with a two-day possession limit of 40 kg.
Recreational harvesting may occur by means of dip net (unspecified mesh or hoop size) or gill
net (maximum 7.5 m length and mesh size between 25 mm and 50 mm).

In Areas 28 and 29, the fishery is open from 08:00 Thursday to 08:00 Monday during the open
season. The fishery is closed from June 15 to August 15 in Management Areas 28 and 29.

If necessary, fishery notices are posted to document closures or changes from the British
Columbia Tidal Waters Sport Fishing Guide. Closures may be implemented in order to conserve
vulnerable stocks, or to protect the public from consumption of contaminated shellfish or to meet
First Nations, social and ceremonial needs.




2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                           - 32 -
APPENDIX 5. COMMERCIAL FISHING PLAN

                                                TABLE OF CONTENTS

1     PURPOSE ....................................................................................................................343130

2     COMMERCIAL FISHERY OVERVIEW ...................................................................343130
       2.1 Events Calendar...............................................................................................343130

3     MANAGEMENT MEASURES FOR THE DURATION OF THIS PLAN ................343130
       3.1 Changes from Previous Season .......................................................................343130
       3.2 Allocation and Harvest Levels ........................................................................343130
       3.3 Open Times .....................................................................................................343130
       3.4 Open Areas ......................................................................................................343130
       3.5 Closures ...........................................................................................................353230
       3.6 Participation Requirements .............................................................................373432
       3.7 Quota Allocations ............................................................................................373433
       3.8 Compliance with other Federal and Provincial Legislation and Regulations .373433

4     GEAR ...........................................................................................................................373433
       4.1 Gill Net ............................................................................................................373433
       4.2 Seine ................................................................................................................373433

5     REPORTING PROGRAM ...........................................................................................373433

6     LICENCING ................................................................................................................383533
        6.1 Fisher Identification Number ..........................................................................383533
        6.2 Licence Categories ..........................................................................................383534
        6.3 Licence Fees ....................................................................................................383534
        6.4 Licence Application ........................................................................................383534
        6.5 Licence Requirements .....................................................................................383534
        6.6 Licence Documents .........................................................................................393634
             6.6.1 Valid Period .......................................................................................393634
             6.6.2 Replacements .....................................................................................393635

                                                                                                                                               Formatted: Heading 1, Outline numbered +
                                                                                                                                               Level: 1 + Numbering Style: 1, 2, 3, … + Start
                                                                                                                                               at: 1 + Alignment: Left + Aligned at: 0" +
                                                                                                                                               Indent at: 0.5"
                                                                                                                                               Formatted: Bullets and Numbering




2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                                                                 - 33 -
10.1. PURPOSE
The purpose of this fishery is to provide opportunities for the commercial harvest of surf smelt.

                                                                                                       Formatted: Heading 1
2.      COMMERCIAL FISHERY OVERVIEW                                                                    Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
Surf smelt populations support a modest, traditionally shore-based commercial fishing industry,
primarily in Burrard Inlet. Management of surf smelt involves both protection and conservation
of the spawning stock, as well as regulating the fishery.
                                                                                                       Formatted: Heading 2
2.1.    Events Calendar- 2011 Fishing Season                                                           Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
          Month      Date                               Event                                          Formatted: Font: Times New Roman
        January                                                                                        Formatted: Font: Times New Roman
        February                                                                                       Formatted: Font: Times New Roman
        March
                                                                                                       Formatted: Font: Times New Roman
        April          1    Fishing season starts
                                                                                                       Formatted: Font: Times New Roman
                            Commercial harvest open 0800h Tuesday to 0800h Friday
        May                                                                                            Formatted: Font: Times New Roman
        June          15    Conservation closure starts                                                Formatted: Font: Times New Roman
        July                                                                                           Formatted: Font: Times New Roman
        August        15    Conservation closure ends                                                  Formatted: Font: Times New Roman
        September                                                                                      Formatted: Font: Times New Roman
        October                                                                                        Formatted: Font: Times New Roman
        November                                                                                       Formatted: Font: Times New Roman
        December      31    Fishing season ends                                                        Formatted: Font: Times New Roman
                                                                                                       Formatted: Heading 1
3.      MANAGEMENT MEASURES FOR THE DURATION OF THIS PLAN
                                                                                                       Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
3.1.    Changes from Previous Season
        There are no changes to the commercial fishing plan from the 2010 season.
                                                                                                       Formatted: Heading 2
3.2.    Allocation and Harvest Levels                                                                  Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
        Due to lack of stock assessment information, there is no Total Allowable Catch (TAC)
        calculated for surf smelt. There is unlimited commercial allocation.
                                                                                                       Formatted: Heading 2
3.3.    Open Times                                                                                     Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
        Fishing for surf smelt is permitted from 00:00 hours April 1, 2011 until 23:59 hours           Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.5"
        December 31, 2011, with the exception of a conservation closure from June 15 to August
        15 to protect surf smelt during the peak spawning period when they are most vulnerable
        to fishing activities.
                                                                                                       Formatted: Heading 2
3.4.    Open Areas                                                                                     Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
        The surf smelt fishery is permitted in Pacific Fishery Management Area 28 and 29 with          Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.5"
        the exception closed times and areas identified in Section 3.5 below.




2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                          - 34 -
                                                                                                         Formatted: Heading 2
3.5.      Closures                                                                                       Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
          Note that there may be additional closures in-season by Variation Order and Fishery            Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.5"
          Notice. Consult with the local fisheries office for further information.
Table 1: Sub-Area closures for surf smelt.
                                           Temporal Closures                                             Formatted: Font: Times New Roman

Areas           Closed January 1 to December 31, 2011.                                                  Formatted: Font: Times New Roman
1 to 10
Areas           Closed January 1 to December 31, 2011.                                                  Formatted: Font: Times New Roman
11 to 27
Areas           Open 08:00 hours Monday to 08:00 hours Thursday of each week from April 1 to            Formatted: Font: Times New Roman
28 & 29          June 14 and August 16 to December 31, 2011.
                Closed June 15 to August 15, 2011.


                                          Permanent Closures                                             Formatted: Font: Times New Roman

Area 13         Discovery Passage: Subareas 13-3, 13-4, 13-5 and a portion of 13-6.                     Formatted: Font: Times New Roman

                Those waters of Discovery Passage bounded on the north by a straight line drawn
                 true west from North Bluff on Quadra Island, across Seymour Narrows to a
                 fishing boundary sign on Vancouver Island, and on the south by a line from the
                 Cape Mudge light true west to Vancouver Island. (Marine Reserve and Research
                 Closure)
                Deep Water Bay: A portion of Subarea 13-7 inside a line from a fishing boundary
                 sign at Separation Head to a fishing boundary sign at the north-westerly entrance
                 to Deepwater Bay. (Salmon Holding Area) Kelsey Bay: Subarea 13-34.
                 (Navigational Closure)
Area 14         Subareas 14-11 (Upper Baynes Sound) and 14-14 (Comox Harbour).                          Formatted: Font: Times New Roman
                 (Navigational Closure)
Area 16         Those waters of Skookumchuck Narrows and Sechelt Rapids in Subarea 16-9                 Formatted: Font: Times New Roman
                 bounded on the west by a line from a point on the foreshore at the westerly limit
                 of Secret Bay on Sechelt Peninsula thence 50 degrees
                 foreshore on the mainland; and the east by a line from Raland Point on Sechelt

                 (Park)
                Subareas 16-1 (Halfmoon Bay, Secret Cove, Thormanby Islands), 16-3 and 16-4
                 (Pender Harbour, Bargain Bay), 16-5 (Head of Sechelt Inlet) and 16-19 (NE shore
                 of Lasqueti Island).


Area 17         Subareas 17-7 (Ladysmith Harbour) and 17-14 (Nanaimo Harbour).                          Formatted: Font: Times New Roman
                 (Navigational Closure)
Area 18         Subareas 18-7 (Sansum Narrows, Burgoyne Bay and Maple Bay), 18-8                        Formatted: Font: Times New Roman
                 (Cowichan Bay) and 18-10 (Fulford Harbour). (Navigational Closure)



2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                            - 35 -
Area 19         Subareas 19-1 (Victoria Harbour, navigational closure), 19-2 (Esquimalt Harbour,        Formatted: Font: Times New Roman
                 navigational closure), 19-6 (Sidney Spit Marine Park, park reserve), and 19-7 to
                 19-12 (Saanich Inlet, conservation).
                Subarea 19-3 inside a line from the navigation light at the western end of the
                 Ogden Point Causeway thence to Brotchie Ledge Light, thence to Holland Point
                 on Vancouver Island. (Marine Reserve)
                Subareas 19-4 and 19-5 within 0.4 (10 Mile Point) nautical miles of Cadboro Pt.
                 navigation light. (Marine Reserve)
                Subareas 19-3 and 20-5 within 0.5 nautical miles of Great Race Rocks. (Marine
                 Reserve)
Area 20         Subareas 19-3 and 20-5 within 0.5 nautical miles of Great Race Rocks. (Marine           Formatted: Font: Times New Roman
                 Reserve)
                Subarea 20-3 between the lowest low water on record and the highest high water
                 on record from San Juan Point thence following the Vancouver Island shoreline
                 easterly to the mouth of Tom Baird Creek. (Marine Reserve)
                Subarea 20-1 between the lowest low water on record and the highest high water
                 on record from Bonilla Light thence following the shoreline of Vancouver Island
                 easterly to Owen Point. (Park)
Area 24         Subarea 24-9 and Grice Bay west and south of Indian Island in Subarea 24-11 in          Formatted: Font: Times New Roman
                 the waters of Tofino Inlet within Pacific Rim National Park including McBey
                 Islets and Dinner Island in Tsapee Narrows, Browning Passage. (Park)
Area 28         Subarea 28-4, east of a line drawn from a white fishing boundary sign located on        Formatted: Font: Times New Roman
                 the south shore of Porteau Cove to a white fishing boundary sign located on the
                 north shore of Porteau Cove. (Marine Reserve)
                Subarea 28-2 bounded by a line commencing from the most southerly point of
                 Whytecliff Park; thence in a straight line to a point located 100 m east of the most
                 south-easterly point of Whyte Inlet.; thence following the southern shoreline of
                 Whyte Inlet at a distance of 100 m to a point lying 100 m from the most south-
                 westerly point of Whyte Inlet; thence in a straight line to a point lying 100 m west
                 of White Cliff Point; thence following the shoreline at a distance of 100 m in a
                 northerly direction to a point 100 m north of Lookout Point; thence following the
                 shoreline at a distance of 100 m in an easterly direction to a point 100 m
                 perpendicular to the most northerly point of Whytecliff Park; thence to the most
                 northerly point of Whytecliff Park on the mainland. (Marine Reserve)
                Subarea 28-6 bounded by a line commencing at the southwest entrance to
                 Starboat Cove thence seaward in a southwest direction for 85 m, thence westerly
                 following the shoreline for 100 m, thence in a northeast direction to a point on
                 land. (Conservation Closure)
                Subarea 28-8, False Creek. (Navigational Closure)
                Subarea 28-10, Burrard Inlet. (Navigational Closure)




2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                            - 36 -
                                                                                                         Formatted: Heading 2
3.6.    Participation Requirements                                                                       Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
        The surf smelt fishery is an open-access fishery, open to any interested party provided          Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.5"
        that the specific licence requirements and eligibility criteria described in Section 6.5 of
        the Commercial Plan have been met. The fishery is also accessible by any vessel with a
        vessel based commercial licence.
                                                                                                         Formatted: Heading 2
3.7.    Quota Allocations                                                                                Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
        There is an unlimited quota for the commercial surf smelt fishery.                               Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.5"
                                                                                                         Formatted: Heading 2
3.8.    Compliance with other Federal and Provincial Legislation and Regulations
                                                                                                         Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
        Fish harvesters are responsible for compliance with all federal and provincial laws and
        regulations pertaining to fishing operations. This includes compliance with the Navigable        Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.5"

        Waters Protection Act for any structures related to fishing operations.

                                                                                                         Formatted: Heading 1
4.      GEAR                                                                                             Formatted: Bullets and Numbering

4.1.    Gill Net
         For party-based licences: Maximum length of 275 m and mesh size no less than 25                Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.63", Tab stops:
                                                                                                         0.88", Left + Not at 0.5"
              mm and no greater than 50 mm. Gill nets are permitted in Areas 28 and 29 only.
                                                                                                        Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.63", Bulleted +
                                                                                                         Level: 1 + Aligned at: 0.25" + Tab after: 0.5"
          For vessel-based licences: unspecified gill net is permitted.                                 + Indent at: 0.5", Tab stops: 0.88", Left +
                                                                                                         Not at 0.5"
4.2.    Seine                                                                                            Formatted: Heading 2
          Maximum length of 90 m and minimum mesh size of 19 mm.                                        Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
                                                                                                         Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.63", Tab stops:
                                                                                                         0.88", List tab + Not at 0.5"
5.      REPORTING PROGRAM                                                                                Formatted: English (Canada)
Timely and accurate information on harvest and harvesting practices is essential to assess the           Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.25"
status of fish stocks and to ensure the conservation and the long-term sustainability of fish
                                                                                                         Formatted: Heading 1
resources. Accurate catch reporting in the surf smelt fishery is integral to the effective
                                                                                                         Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
management of the fishery and surf smelt resource.

The licence holder is responsible for the provision and maintenance of an accurate record, a
“log”, of daily harvest operations (see Appendix 6). This log must be completed and a copy
submitted in in an approved format as defined by DFO Stock Assessment Division’s Pelagics
Data Unit. Please refer to Conditions of 2011 Surf Smelt Licence for further detail.

DFO wishes to remind fishers that harvest logs must be completed accurately during
fishing operations and submitted to DFO in accordance with the timing set out in
conditions of licence. Delay of completion or submission of logs is a violation of the
Conditions of Licence.




2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                            - 37 -
                                                                                                        Formatted: Heading 1
6.      LICENCING                                                                                       Formatted: Bullets and Numbering

6.1.    Fisher Identification Number
        The FIN allows for fast, easy, and reliable on-grounds identification of fish harvesters for
        data collection, fisheries management and enforcement purposes. Once a FIN is assigned
        to a fish harvester, that individual will reference the FIN when identifying him or herself
        in subsequent business dealings with both the Department and service contractors. As the
        FIN is now used during normal business interactions with DFO and contractors, fish
        harvesters will no longer need to provide detailed personal information identifying such
        items as gender or date of birth.

        Once the FIN is issued to a fish harvester, it will not change from year to year. More
        information on FIN may be obtained from your DFO fisheries manager, or the Pacific
        Fishery Licensing Unit (PFLU).
                                                                                                        Formatted: Heading 2
6.2.    Licence Categories                                                                              Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
        A category Z8, any vessel based commercial licence (i.e. salmon, schedule II, geoduck,
        sablefish, halibut, crab, shrimp by trawl, groundfish trawl and shrimp and prawn by trap)
        or any communal commercial licence for the same species or a valid category N salmon
        licence authorizes the harvest of surf smelt commercially. Category Z8 surf smelt
        licences are unlimited entry and party based.
                                                                                                        Formatted: Heading 2
6.3.    Licence Fees                                                                                    Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
        The application fee is $30.00 per licence.                                                      Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.5"
                                                                                                        Formatted: Heading 2
6.4.    Licence Application
                                                                                                        Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
        Surf smelt licence application forms are available at any of the three Pacific Fishery
        Licence Units (PFLU). Eligible applicants must submit a completed Application for surf          Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.5"

        smelt licence along with the required fee of $30.00 to a PFLU. Applications may be
        submitted together with the required fee in person or by mail to any PFLU.

        The applicant must sign the application. If the applicant is a company, the PFLU must
        have on record a copy of either a Confirmation of Signing Authorities or an Amendment
        to Confirmation of Signing Authorities form listing the signing authorities.

        No party may hold more than one surf smelt licence at a time.

        No fishing may commence until the licence is received.
                                                                                                        Formatted: Heading 2
6.5.    Licence Requirements                                                                            Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
        The following requirements must be met prior to the issue of a party-based (Z8) surf            Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.5"
        smelt licence:
         The applicant must sign the application form. Where the applicant is a company, a
           signing authority must be identified through a Confirmation of Signing Authorities or
           an Amendment to Confirmation of Signing Authorities, which must be kept on record
           at the PFLU.
         The applicant must possess a valid Fisher Registration Card (FRC).


2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                           - 38 -
           Ensure any conditions of a previous year’s surf smelt licence are met, i.e. completion,
            submission, and approval of any fish slips and harvest logs. Harvest logs must be
            submitted even where no harvesting occurred (i.e. for nil catch).
                                                                                                         Formatted: Heading 2
6.6.    Licence Documents                                                                                Formatted: Bullets and Numbering

        6.6.1. Valid Period
               Surf smelt, category Z8, licence documents are valid from the date of issue to            Formatted: Indent: Left: 1"
               December 31 of each calendar year.
                                                                                                         Formatted: Heading 3
        6.6.2. Replacements
                                                                                                         Formatted: Bullets and Numbering
               Replacements for lost or destroyed licence documents may be obtained by
               completing a Declaration Concerning Licence Documents form. Please contact a              Formatted: Indent: Left: 1"

               PFLU for further details.




2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                            - 39 -
APPENDIX 6. COMMERCIAL CATCH REPORTING FORM

                                      Fishers Identification Number (FIN): __________

                        2011 LANDING REPORT                       SURF SMELT FISHERY
                       Please record information for each set you make and send it to the address below at the end of your smelt fishing season.


   TYPE OF SALE (Please check appropriate one):            Dock Sales: _____ Processor Sale: ____    Personal Bait: _____


   SMELT LICENCE NUMBER: Z8 _______________________________ Party ID: __________________________
   FISHER NAME:____________________________ Address_________________________________________________
   Phone #____________________              _________________________________________________

         DATE              (Mgmt). AREA / :        Time start    Time end      TOTAL CATCH        BY-CATCH (list        Unit Price           Value
     (d / m/ year)        Location of Catch         (00:00 h)    (00:00h)    (lbs./kgs./or tons) species & quantity)    (if applicable)   (if applicable)

       /    /2010                                      :            :
       /    /2010                                      :            :
       /    /2010                                      :            :
       /    /2010                                      :            :
       /    /2010                                      :            :
       /    /2010                                      :            :
       /    /2010                                      :            :
       /    /2010                                      :            :
       /    /2010                                      :            :
       /    /2010                                      :            :
       /    /2010                                      :            :
       /    /2010                                      :            :
       /    /2010                                      :            :
       /    /2010                                      :            :
       /    /2010                                      :            :
       /    /2010                                      :            :
       /    /2010                                      :            :
   NOTE: If you did not fish, send in this report marked 'NIL' in the "Total Catch" Section


   This form is to be completed by the LICENCE HOLDER and submitted by December 31, 2011 to:
   FISHERIES AND OCEANS CANADA Attn: Bridget Ennevor #3-100 Annacis Parkway, Delta B.C. V3M 6A2                           Fax: 604.666.7112
   For inquiries regarding this form please call (604) 666-6390

                                                              PLEASE RETAIN A COPY FOR YOUR RECORDS




2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                                                                         - 40 -
APPENDIX 7. SAFETY AT SEA
This information may change without notice. Please check with agencies and departments
referenced below for the most up-to-date information.

Vessel owners and masters have a duty to ensure the safety of their crew and vessel. Adherence
to safety regulations and good practices by owners, masters and crew of fishing vessels will help
save lives, prevent vessel damage and protect the environment. All fishing vessels must be in a
seaworthy condition and maintained as required by Transport Canada (TC), WorkSafeBC, and
other applicable agencies. Vessels subject to inspection should ensure that the certificate of
inspection is valid for the area of intended operation.

In the federal government, responsibility for shipping, navigation, and vessel safety regulations
and inspections lies with Transport Canada (TC); emergency response with the Canadian Coast
Guard (CCG) and DFO has responsibility for management of the fisheries resources. In B.C.,
WorkSafeBC also regulates health and safety issues in commercial fishing. This includes
requirements to ensure the health and safety of the crew and safe operation of the vessel. DFO
(Fisheries and Aquaculture Management (FAM) and CCG) and TC through an MOU have
formalized cooperation to establish, maintain and promote a safety culture within the fishing
industry.

Before leaving on a voyage the owner, master or operator must ensure that the fishing vessel is
capable of safely making the passage. Critical factors for a safe voyage include the
seaworthiness of the vessel, vessel stability, having the required safety equipment in good
working order, crew training, and knowledge of current and forecasted weather conditions. As
safety requirements and guidelines may change, the vessel owner, crew, and other workers must
be aware of the latest legislation, policies and guidelines prior to each trip.

There are many useful tools available for ensuring a safe voyage. These include:
 Education and Training Programs
 Marine Emergency Duties
 Fish Safe Stability Education
 First Aid
 Radio Operators Course
 Fishing Masters Certificates
 Small Vessel Operators Certificate
 Publications:
       a) Transport Canada Publication TP 10038 ‘Small Fishing Vessel Safety Manual’(can be
           obtained at Transport Canada Offices from their website at
           www.tc.gc.ca/MarineSafety/Tp/Tp10038/tp10038e.htm),
       b) Gearing Up for Safety – WorkSafeBC
       c) Safe At Sea DVD Series – Fish Safe
       d) Stability Handbook – Fish Safe and Measuring Stability –DVD

For further information see: http://www.tc.gc.ca/marine/menu.htm



2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                          - 41 -
Important Priorities for Vessel Safety
There are three areas of fishing vessel safety that should be considered a priority. These are:
vessel stability, emergency drills, and cold water immersion.
Fishing Vessel Stability
Vessel stability is paramount for safety. Care must be given to the stowage and securing of all
cargo, skiffs, equipment, fuel containers and supplies, and also to correct ballasting. Fish
harvesters must be familiar with their vessel’s centre of gravity, the effect of liquid free surfaces
on stability, loose water or fish on deck, loading and unloading operations and the vessel’s
freeboard. Know the limitations of your vessel; if you are unsure contact a reputable naval
architect, marine surveyor or the local Transport Canada Marine Safety Office.

Fishing vessel owners are required to develop detailed instructions addressing the limits of
stability for each of their vessels. The instructions need to be based on a formal assessment of
the vessel by a qualified naval architect and include detailed safe operation documentation kept
on board the vessel. Examples of detailed documentation include engine room procedures,
maintenance schedules to ensure watertight integrity, and instructions for regular practice of
emergency drills.
Emergency Drill Requirements
The master must establish procedures and assign responsibilities to each crew member for
emergencies such as crew member overboard, fire, flooding, abandoning ship and calling for
help.

The Crewing Regulation under the Canada Shipping Act (CSA) states that as of July 30th 2002
all seafarers, including fish harvesters, must have a Basic Safety Certificate (MED A1 or A3
depending upon vessel and operating waters) within 6 months of becoming a crewmember,
regardless of time at sea. The MED A1 is a three day course, and must be taken by all crew
regardless of duty station.

MED provides a basic understanding of the hazards associated with the marine environment; the
prevention of shipboard incidents; raising and reacting to alarms; fire and abandonment
situations; and the skills necessary for survival and rescue.
Cold Water Immersion
Drowning is the number one cause of death in B.C.’s fishing industry. Cold water is defined as
water below 25 degrees Celsius, but the greatest effects occur below 15 degrees. BC waters are
usually below 15 degrees. The effects of cold water on the body occur in four stages: cold
shock, swimming failure, hypothermia and post-rescue collapse. Know what to do to prevent
you or your crew from falling into the water and what to do if that occurs. More information is
available in the WorkSafe Bulletin Cold Water Immersion (available from the WorkSafe BC
website).
Other Issues
Weather
Vessel owners and masters are reminded of the importance of paying close attention to current
weather treads and forecasts during the voyage. Marine weather information and forecasts can



2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                              - 42 -
be obtained on VHF channels 21B, Wx1, Wx2, Wx3, or Wx4. Weather information is also
available from Environment Canada website at:

http://www.weatheroffice.gc.ca/marine/index_e.html
Emergency Radio Procedures
Vessel owners and masters should ensure that all crew are able to activate the Search and Rescue
(SAR) system early rather than later by contacting the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG). It is
strongly recommended that all fish harvesters carry a registered 406 MHz Emergency Position
Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB). These beacons should be registered with the National Search
and Rescue secretariat. When activated, an EPIRB transmits a distress call that is picked up or
relayed by satellites and transmitted via land earth stations to the Joint Rescue Co-ordination
Centre (JRCC), which will task and co-ordinate rescue resources.

Fish harvesters should monitor VHF channel 16 or MF 2182 Khz and make themselves and their
crews familiar with other radio frequencies. All crew should know how to make a distress call
and should obtain their restricted operator certificate from Industry Canada. However, whenever
possible, masters should contact the nearest Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) Marine
Communications and Traffic Services (MCTS) station (on VHF channel 16 or MF 2182 kHz)
prior to a distress situation developing. Correct radio procedures are important for
communications in an emergency. Incorrect or misunderstood communications may hinder a
rescue response.

Since August 1, 2003 all commercial vessels greater than 20 metres in length are required to
carry a Class D VHF Digital Selective Calling (DSC) radio. A registered DSC VHF radio has
the capability to alert other DSC equipped vessels in your immediate area and MCTS that your
vessel is in distress. Masters should be aware that they should register their DSC radios with
Industry Canada to obtain a Marine Mobile Services Identity (MMSI) number or the automatic
distress calling feature of the radio may not work. For further information see the Industry
Canada site at:

http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/ic1.nsf/eng/h_00014.html

A DSC radio that is connected to a GPS unit will also automatically include your vessel’s current
position in the distress message. More detailed information on MCTS and DSC can be obtained
by contacting a local Coast Guard MCTS centre (located in Vancouver, Victoria, Prince Rupert,
Comox and Tofino) or from the Coast Guard website:

www.pacific.ccg-gcc.gc.ca
Collision Regulations
Fish harvesters must be knowledgeable of the Collision Regulations and the responsibilities
between vessels where risk of collision exists. Navigation lights must be kept in good working
order and must be displayed from sunset to sunrise and during all times of restricted visibility.
To help reduce the potential for collision or close quarters situations which may also result in the
loss of fishing gear, fish harvesters are encouraged to monitor the appropriate local Vessel
Traffic Services (VTS) VHF channel, when travelling or fishing near shipping lanes or other
areas frequented by large commercial vessels. Vessels required to participate in VTS include:


2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                           - 43 -
        a) every ship twenty metres or more in length,
        b) every ship engaged in towing or pushing any vessel or object, other than fishing gear,
        c) where the combined length of the ship and any vessel or object towed or pushed by
           the ship is forty five metres or more in length; or
        d) where the length of the vessel or object being towed or pushed by the ship is twenty
           metres or more in length.

Exceptions include:
       a) a ship towing or pushing inside a log booming ground,
       b) a pleasure yacht less than 30 metres in length, and
       c) a fishing vessel that is less than 24 metres in length and not more than 150 tons gross.

More detailed information on VTS can be obtained by calling (604) 775-8862 or from Coast
Guard website:

http://www.ccg-gcc.gc.ca/e0003901
Buddy System
Fish harvesters are encouraged to use the buddy system when transiting, and fishing as this
allows for the ability to provide mutual aid. An important trip consideration is the use of a sail
plan which includes the particulars of the vessel, crew and voyage. The sail plan should be left
with a responsible person on shore or filed with the local MCTS. After leaving port the fish
harvester should contact the holder of the sail plan daily or as per another schedule. The sail
plan should ensure notification to JRCC when communication is not maintained which might
indicate your vessel is in distress. Be sure to cancel the sail plan upon completion of the voyage.
WorkSafe BC
Commercial fishing is legislated by the requirements for diving, fishing and other marine
operations found in Part 24 of the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation (OHSR). Many
general hazard sections of the OHSR also apply. For example, Part 8: Personal Protective
Clothing and Equipment addresses issues related to safety headgear, safety foot wear and
personal floatation devices. Part 15 addresses issues on rigging, Part 5 addresses issues of
exposure to chemical and biological substances, and Part 3 addresses training of young and new
workers, first aid, and accident investigation issues. Part 3 of the Workers Compensation Act
(WCA) defines the roles and responsibilities of owners, employers, supervisors and workers.
The OHSR and the WCA are available from the Provincial Crown Printers or by visiting the
WorkSafeBC website:

www.worksafebc.com

For further information, contact an Occupational Safety Officer or the Focus Sector Manager for
Fishing.

Occupational Safety Officers
Shane Neifer                                                 Terrace                 (250) 615-6640
Bruce Logan                                                  Lower                   (604) 244-6477
                                                             Mainland


2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                          - 44 -
David Clarabut                                              Victoria                (250) 881-7563
Pat Olsen                                                   Courtney                (250) 334-8777
Mark Lunny                                                  Courtney                (250) 334-8732

Focus Sector Manager for Fishing
Mark Peebles                                                                        (604) 279-7563

For information on projects related to commercial fishing contact:
Ellen Hanson                                                                        (604) 233-4008
                                                                           1-888 621-7233 ext. 4008
                                                                     Ellen.Hanson@worksafebc.com
Fish Safe
Fish Safe is coordinated by Gina Johansen and directed by the Fish Safe Advisory Committee
(membership is open to all interested in improving safety on board). The advisory committee
meets quarterly to discuss safety issues and give direction to Fish Safe in the development of
education and tools for fish harvesters.
Vessel masters and crew are encouraged to become more knowledgeable regarding vessel
stability. FishSafe BC developed the Fish Safe Stability Education Course, which is available to
all fish harvesters who want to improve their understanding of stability and find practical
application to their vessel’s operation.
Fish Safe also works closely with WorkSafeBC to improve the fishing claims process. For
further information, contact:

Gina Johansen                                                                      (604) 261-9700
Safety Coordinator                                                              fishsafe@telus.net
2-11771 Horseshoe Way                                                          www.fishsafebc.com
Richmond, BC
V7A 4V4




2011 Surf Smelt Integrated Fisheries Management Plan                                         - 45 -

								
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