Examples of Objectives by IO87wH

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									English Language Arts
Grade 8
Standard (3.5) Identify and analyze recurring themes (e.g., good versus evil) across
traditional and contemporary works.
Text: “The Giver” by Lois Lowry

Knowledge
Students will be able to define and recognize the term “theme” after a given
lesson.
Comprehension
Having read “The Giver,” students will be able to identify and describe one
theme in the story.
Application
Having read “The Giver” and identifying a particular theme, students will be
able to describe orally how that theme might change their own lives in school.
Analysis
Having read “The Giver” and identified a particular theme, students will be able
to compare the reactions of most of the people to music with the reaction that
Jonas has.
Synthesis
Having read “The Giver” and identified a particular theme, students will be able
to write about the reactions of a visitor from the Giver’s world to our own and
whether that reaction would be painful or joyous or both.
Evaluation
Having read “The Giver” and identified a particular theme, students will be able
to judge whether or not a utopian or dystopian society is better and explain their
reasoning of why or why not.
English Language Arts
Grade 8
Standard (3.6) Identify significant literary devices (e.g., metaphor, symbolism, dialect,
irony) that define a writer’s style and use those elements to interpret the work.
Text: A Dream Deferred by Langston Hughes
Knowledge
Students will be able to recognize and define key terms “tone” and “diction”
after a given lesson.
Comprehension
Given students read, A Dream Deferred by Langston Hughes, students will be
able to identify the tone of the poem.
Application
Given students have read A Dream Deferred and identified one symbol in the
poem, students will be able to show diction choice illustrates that particular
symbol.
Analysis
Given students have read A Dream Deferred and identified the author’s tone in
the poem, students will be able to explain the author’s strengths in using that
particular word choice and analyze why.
Synthesis
Given students have read A Dream Deferred and identified the author’s tone in
the poem, students will be able to use the example given by Langston Hughes
and write their own poem while paying particular attention their use of diction.
Evaluation
Given students have read A Dream Deferred and identified the author’s tone in
the poem, students will be able to judge whether or not their peers were
successful in conveying a particular tone through diction in their own poems.
Adrián Sánchez
August 24, 2009
Learning Objectives – (FL) Spanish

Proficiency - Stage 1
1.) Knowledge: Given a review and discussion on Spanish greetings, students
will be able to give the Spanish equivalent of English greeting words.

2.) Comprehension: Given a model of how to introduce oneself and respond to
introductions in Spanish, students will be able to introduce themselves and
respond to other introductions during a small group activity.

3.) Application: Given a review of the different seasons and weather, students
will be able to describe the current weather and/or season in Spanish by having
a discussion with other classmates on the topic.

4.) Analysis: Given a basic review of the Spanish sentence structure terminology,
students will be able to identify different parts of the sentence by going up to the
board and naming different components of the sentences written on the board.

5.) Synthesis: Given an introduction of South American geography, students will
be able to explain the geography by creating a map of their own and presenting
it in small groups and teaching other classmates about the location of different
countries.

6.) Evaluation: Given various scenarios on how to make requests, students will
be able to evaluate the appropriateness and effectivness of the scenarios
presented by their peers.


Proficiency – Stage 4
1.) Knowledge: Given a discussion of the different uses for se, students will be
able to identify and use the correct se form by completing their workbook activity
on usage of se and discussing in small groups the different forms uses.

2.)Comprehension: Given an introduction of colloquial variants of the present
subjective tense, students will be able to use the standardize form but also learn
about the diverse colloquial variants of the present subjective by identifying the
standard and colloquial forms in the provided sample sentences on the board.

3.) Application: Given various examples of cognates, students will be able to
start generating an understanding of how it is easy for people learning a foreign
language to mistakenly use incorrect words by explaining what is a cognate and
by coming up with commonly used cognates in Spanish and English.

4.) Analysis: Given a very general review of Guatemala’s history, students will
be able to analyze the topic by writing a short summary of the history and by
explaining some of the major components of Guatemala’s history to other
classmates.

5.) Synthesis: Given a discussion on problems drugs and alcohol cause, students
will be able to use the topic as a starting point to advance their communication
skills by creating small groups and debating about drug addiction.

6.) Evaluation: Given a lecture on formal or informal speech in Latin culture, the
students will determine the appropriateness of the speech uttered by Latino
adolescent in a classroom.
                                                                   Michelle Hillberry
                                                                           ED 395BF
                                                                     August 28, 2009

                            Writing Learning Objectives

Content Area: Mathematics

Standard One (From Algebra I – standard 6.0): Students graph a linear equation
and compute the x- and y-intercepts (e.g., graph 2x + 6y = 4). They are also able to
sketch the region defined by linear inequality (e.g., they sketch the region defined by
2x + 6y < 4).

Objective 1: Given a line drawn on graph paper with a natural number for the x- and
y-intercept, students will be able to (SWBAT) correctly label the rise and run, and
calculate the resultant slope of each line in 95% of 15 problems.

Objective 2: Given a preliminary understanding of slope and equations of lines in
various forms, SWBAT manipulate equations into slope-intercept form (y = mx+b),
identify the slope and y-intercept, and correctly explain verbally and in writing what
they are doing.

Objective 3: Given the equation of a line in standard form (ax + by = c), SWBAT
solve for the x- and y-intercepts by setting the opposing variable equal to 0 and
solving the remaining equation.

Objective 4: Given an introductory understanding of intercepts and slope and a
linear equation in either standard, slope-intercept, or point-slope form; SWBAT
graph the line on graph paper and identify the x- and y-intercept correctly 95% of
the time.

Objective 5: Given a lesson and examples of linear equations in standard, point-
slope, and slope-intercept form, SWBAT correctly classify equations and create two
examples of each type.

Objective 6: Given prior knowledge of inequalities and a linear inequality, SWBAT
express the given equation in a form conducive to graphing and test the line for
appropriate shading by testing a point in either region.

Standard Two (From Algebra I – standard 11.0): Students apply basic factoring
techniques to second- and simple third-degree polynomials. These techniques
include finding a common factor for all terms in a polynomial, recognizing the
difference of two squares, and recognizing perfect squares of binomials.
Objective 1: Given a group of perfect and non-perfect squares involving variables
and numbers, SWBAT categorize perfect squares from other numbers and
explain their significance mathematically with 90% accuracy.

Objective 2: Given an introduction to the diamond method of factoring second-
degree polynomials, SWBAT factor simple second-degree equations during an
interactive factoring relay game with no more than two errors per student.

Objective 3: Given a presentation on the difference of two squares, SWBAT
recognize second-order equations of this type and correctly factor ten problems
with no more than two errors.

Objective 4: Given prior instruction on perfect squares and a demonstration on
factoring rules, SWBAT identify second order equations of this type and factor
them with 90% accuracy.

Objective 5: Given instruction on identifying common terms and equations of
this type, SWBAT identify common terms and factor ten second- and third-order
equations in an appropriate manner with no more than two errors.

Objective 6: Given prior instruction in methods of factoring and various second-
and third-order equations, SWBAT correctly classify each equation and factor
using an appropriate method 95% of the time.
       Mike Bauer
                             Social Science Objectives

8.10 Students analyze the multiple causes, key events, and complex consequences of the
Civil War.

1. Knowledge – Students will be able to name three generals who fought for the
Union and three generals who fought for the confederacy.

2. Comprehension – Students will be able to correctly name who and explain
why Abraham Lincoln said this quote in defense of the Civil War. "The
probability that we may fall in the struggle ought not to deter us from the
support of a cause we believe to be just; it shall not deter me.”

3. Application – Students will draw a six panel comic strip with events in
chronological order leading up to the Civil War.

4. Analysis – Students will be able to name the differences and similarities of the
Union and the Confederacy and why this caused the Civil War.

5. Synthesis – Students will be able to extrapolate the consequences of what
would have happened if in 1863 England had joined the Confederate side in the
Civil War.

6. Evaluation – At the start of the Civil War, Lincoln argued that in spite of
horrendous numbers of casualties, the war was still worth fighting in order to
preserve the union. Ignoring for the moment the issue of abolishing slavery
(which came later), students will formulate an argument for or against Lincoln’s
position. That is, was the death of tens of thousands of young men worth the effort to
ensure that the South remain part of the U.S.A?
                                                  Objectives

8.10.4 Students analyze the multiple causes, key events, and complex consequences of the Civil War.
Discuss Abraham Lincoln's presidency and his significant writings and speeches and their
relationship to the Declaration of Independence, such as his "House Divided" speech (1858),
Gettysburg Address (1863), Emancipation Proclamation (1863), and inaugural addresses (1861 and
1865).

Gettysburg Address
Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in
Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.
Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so
dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a
portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It
is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.
But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate -- we can not consecrate -- we can not hallow -- this ground. The
brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or
detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they
did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought
here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining
before us -- that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the
last full measure of devotion -- that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain -- that
this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom -- and that government of the people, by the
people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.



Knowledge
Students will be able to recite the Gettysburg Address from memory.

Comprehension
Given a copy of the Gettysburg Address, students will be able to explain why Lincoln says that
“we can not consecrate” or “we can not hallow” “this ground?”

Application
Given a copy of the Gettysburg Address, students will be able to rewrite the Address using
modern language.

Analysis
Given a copy of the Gettysburg Address students will identify all the descriptions used by
Lincoln for why the United States was so unique.

Synthesis
Given written descriptions of the events at Gettysburg on Nov. 19, 1863, students will imagine
that they are attending Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address as a reporter for a New York Newspaper
and write a brief article on what had happened and what Lincoln said.

Evaluation
Given the Gettysburg address and given the statistic that 640,000 soldiers died, more than any
war in U.S. history, students will write a 4 paragraph essay either supporting the civil war or
opposing it.
                           Science Objectives
Standard: Structue of Matter: 3d. Students know the states of matter (solid, liquid,
gas) depend on molecular motion.

Knowledge
        Given a short lecture (on the three states of matter: solid, liquid, gas) with
visual, physical examples of each SWBAT describe each.

Comprehension
       Given a short lecture SWBAT compare each state of matter with each
other and describe the differences in molecular motion using the sentence frame
___ has ____ molecular motion, whereas ____ has _____molecular motion.

Application
         Given a pre lab SWBAT classify the examples presented to them as a
solid, liquid, or gas and state whether the molecular motion is fast, medium, or
slow.

Analysis
     Given a lab where the students start with a liquid and create ice cream
SWBAT explain the process of the phase changes that took place in the lab

Synthesis
       Given the knowledge gathered from the lecture and the lab SWBAT
design an experiment where a phase change occurs to change the state of
matter.

Evaluation:
      Given the completion of this unit SWBAT determine other ways of
speeding up molecular motion or slowing it down to go through phase changes.




Standard: Chemistry of Living Systems 6a: a. Students know that carbon, because
of its ability to combine in many ways with itself and other elements, has a
central role in the chemistry of living organisms.
Knowledge
       Given a lecture on carbon structure SWBAT draw the molecular structure
of carbon.

Comprehension
       Given the information from the lecture SWBAT interpret why the structure
they drew makes carbon play a central role in the chemistry of living organisms.

Application
      Given a demonstration of problems on the board SWBAT construct
drawings of carbon bonding to other elements.

Analysis
      Given a lecture an activity in the computer lab SWBAT investigate
molecular formula of everyday things and see if they contain carbon.

Synthesis
       Given a demonstration SWBAT draw the structure of carbon then pick
other elements on the periodic table and use the information there to construct
other structures

Evaluation:
      Given the information presented throughout the lesson SWBAT justify
why we leave a “carbon footprint” because carbon is a large part of our
environment.
Pustizzi, Julia
Science

Content Standard “Students know the characteristics that distinguish plant cells
from animal cels, including chloroplasts and cell walls.”

Knowledge:
Given a list of cell organelles, SWBAT label the organelles as P (plant), A (animal)
or B (both) with 90 % accuracy.

Comprehension:
Given a list of cell organelles and a Venn Diagram, SWBAT place the organelles
in the appropriate section, P, A, or B, with 90% accuracy.

Application:
Given an unlabeled model of a plant and animal cell, SWBAT identify, with
100% accuracy, which cell is which and justify their claims based on at least one
distinguishing organelle.

Analysis:
After the lesson, SWBAT describe one characteristic of a plant on the school
lawn, and explain why that trait occurs, based on distinguishing characteristics.

Synthesis:
Given pipe cleaners and play dough, students will construct their own cell for
their own super-plant, invent and label one new organelle, explain its function,
and include a distinguishing characteristic of a plant/animal cell.

Evaluation:
Given other students’ models of a super-cell and brief peer-explanation, students
will list the cell, the distinguishing organelle, explain its function, and identify
the given cell as plant or animal.
Content Standard: “Students know how to construct a simple branching diagram
to classify living groups of organisms by shared derived characteristics and how
to expand the diagram to include fossil organisms.”

Knowledge:
Given a tree diagram, students will be able to identify the last common ancestor
of two species to 80% accuracy.

Comprehension:
Given a tree diagram with one inaccuracy, SWBAT (with 90% accuracy) identify
the inaccuracy and give one characteristic that explains why it is inaccurate.

Application:
Given a complete tree diagram, SWBAT pick a random organism and add it on at
a logical place, justifying their reasoning in two sentences or less.

Analysis:
Given a complete tree diagram, students will focus in on one branch, and
identify one possible reason for one new characteristic that develops along that
branch.

Synthesis:
Given 20 related organisms, students will construct their own tree diagram, and
orally justify their classifications.

Evaluation:
Given a two different tree diagrams with two different arrangements, SWBAT
list two reasons why each tree diagram is logical.

								
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