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									  BALTIMORE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS
FAMILY- SCHOOL COLLABORATION MODEL:
 WORKING WITH VULNERABLE HOMELESS
              STUDENTS




           VICTORIA COFIELD-ABER, LCSW-C
              JOANNA DURHAM, LCSW-C
              TANEKA HAMOND,LCSW-C
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE EDUCATION OF HOMELESS
                CHILDREN AND YOUTH
                  NOVEMBER 7, 2011
              OBJECTIVES
By the end of this session participants will
 be able to:
 Identify student engagement for youth
  experiencing homelessness.
 Compare and contrast levels of student-
  parent engagement in the educational
  program.
 Apply techniques to build and sustain
  engagement strategies.
        AWARENESS ACTIVITY

 Awareness of diversity among
  individuals experiencing homelessness.

 Answer questions independently.

 Share answers with your group.
     MYTH OR FACT ACTIVITY
 Families of color are over represented in the
  homeless population nationally.

 42% of children experiencing homelessness are under
  age six.

 Homelessness is a largely urban phenomenon.

 As the recession continues to grow, working and
  middle-class Americans have been forced into
  shelters, motel rooms, and tents.
         BALTIMORE COUNTY PUBLIC
                SCHOOLS
• 23rd largest school system in the U.S.

• 3rd largest district in Maryland

• 108,600 Students

• 17,000 Employees

• 8,200 Teachers
                         Baltimore County Public Schools
                               Homeless Enrollment
2000                                                                       1914


                                                                    1738



                                                             1442
1500
                                                      1388

                                           1230



                               971
1000
                         805                                                      Homeless Enrollment


             659   685



500

       314




  0




                                 Year of Enrollment
   SOME THINGS TO PONDER

 What differences do you see in
  communicating with families experiencing
  homelessness and those who are not?

 What are the reasons for the differences?

 What are the challenges?
                 UNDERSTANDING

 McKinney Vento Act

 Free lunch

 Free school supplies

 Continue at same school if transportation feasible

 Attend special programs and after school activities

 Receive needed services as all other students
ASSESSMENT
      NEEDS ASSESSMENT


Answers Questions
 Who are the stakeholders?
 What are the expectations?
 Why are the findings important?
EXAMPLES OF NEEDS ASSESSMENT


 Focus Groups
 Key Informant Interviews
 Mailed Surveys
 Phone Surveys
 In-Person Surveys
STRENGTHS RATHER THAN DEFICITS
STRENGTHS-BASED ASSESSMENT

  This bank of questions can be especially useful
  when families feel pressured or embarrassed
  by their life challenges.


  Choose questions carefully and keep the
  wording simple.
ECOLOGICAL MODEL




      Students
 COMPARE AND CONTRAST
     ENGAGEMENT

Parent does not attend     Child participates in the
meetings. Has access to    after school program.
after school program and   Parent utilizes
transportation but does    transportation. The
not utilize them.          shelter staff complains
                           the parent is not available
                           to pick the student up
                           from the bus stop.
CARING, COMMUNICATING,
    COLLABORATING
HOME-SCHOOL COLLABORATION GROUP
 PARENT EDUCATION IN HOMELESS
           SHELTERS

Group sessions provide information in four areas:
     Academic
     Social
     Behavioral
     Emotional

Goal for parent sessions:
   To improve relationships between parents and school to
    support students learning
HOME-SCHOOL COLLABORATION
         GROUP
    PARENT EDUCATION

       SESSION ONE:
     FAMILY ORIENTATION
HOME-SCHOOL COLLABORATION
         GROUP
    PARENT EDUCATION

       SESSION TWO:
   MAINTAINING A POSITIVE
         ATTITUDE
HOME-SCHOOL COLLABORATION
         GROUP
    PARENT EDUCATION

      SESSION THREE:
   DEVELOPING RELATIONSHIPS
HOME-SCHOOL COLLABORATION
         GROUP
    PARENT EDUCATION


     SESSION FOUR:
  COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUES
HOME-SCHOOL COLLABORATION
         GROUP
    PARENT EDUCATION

      SESSION FIVE:
    TIME MANAGEMENT
Home-School Collaboration Group
   Parent Education Survey
               OUTCOMES


 Dictionaries

 Book drive

 Read aloud
     PROCESS FOR STUDENTS IN
           TRANSITION


• Establish a contact person for students in
  transition.

• Coordinate services needed for families.

• Contact appropriate staff and agencies as
  needed.
  SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS


 Meet monthly with school administrators for
  consultation.

 Give recommendations, implement and
  review plans.
            SCHOOL STAFF

 Facilitate yearly staff development

 Continue ongoing communication with
  contact person.

 Provide information on services available to
  highly mobile student population.
           SHELTER STAFF


 Meet bi-monthly for consultation and updates
  on families.

 Plan programs and schedule activities

 Give recommendations, implement and
  review plans.
SHELTER STAFF SPEAKS



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      Homeless Education Interventions
                 2010-2011

              6%
       17%
                   10%
                                Referals 49
                                Individual Sessions 77
                                Group Sessions 272

21%                             Family Sessions 88
                                Home Visits 160
                     35%
                                Case Management Services 132

        11%
READ ALOUD
      LITERACY DRIVE IN HOMELESS
               SHELTERS


Thematic topics
     Living your dreams
     Love and resilience
     Achievement
     Go green

 270 parents and children participated.

 Survey showed parents and children were
  motivated to read more often.
                      Read Aloud Survey
Read Aloud Evaluation Tool

•   1. The book was easy to understand.
            Strongly Agree Agree Somewhat Agree Disagree            Strongly Disagree

•   2. I would like to do this again.
           Strongly Agree Agree         Somewhat Agree     Disagree Strongly Disagree

•   3. I would like more time for this activity.
           Strongly Agree Agree         Somewhat Agree     Disagree Strongly Disagree

•   4. I would like less time to complete this activity.
           Strongly Agree Agree        Somewhat Agree      Disagree Strongly Disagree

•   5. I enjoyed the reading activity.
            Strongly Agree Agree       Somewhat Agree      Disagree Strongly Disagree

•   6. The activity makes me want to read more.
           Strongly Agree Agree      Somewhat Agree        Disagree Strongly Disagree
      WHAT THE RESEARCH SAYS
 Read Alouds can increase receptive vocabulary
  (Senechal & Camell, 1993).

 Read Alouds and discussion of the text assist with discovery of
  word meaning .

 Discussions with peers and teachers are found to enhance
  knowledge.

 Read Alouds improve students vocabulary and comprehension
  (Adams, 1990).

 Read Alouds help to improve abstract thinking, story structure,
  organization, and predictions.
      THINKING AND LEARNING


 Highly dependent on mood and emotional state
  (Jensen, 2008).

 Interaction of cognition and emotion important for
  educators to understand.

 Educators must engage students mind, body, and
  emotions (Jensen, 2008).
EMOTIONS, THINKING, LEARNING


 Foster positive emotional climate

 Cognitive beliefs shape self-concept

 Positive emotions enhance higher order thinking

 Soft music shown to create relaxation and mental
  alertness (Hardiman, 2003).
     READING COMPREHENSION

 Peer led literature discussion groups contribute to
  reading engagement and motivation

 Construct meaning through discussion during reading

 Ability to think metacognitively about comprehension
  processes (Bearn and Clark, 2008)
          HOW CAN YOU USE THIS
             INFORMATION?



 What will you take with you?

 Faces of homelessness change each year.

 Caring, Communication, and Collaboration
    DISCUSSION

QUESTIONS & ANSWERS
                  REFERENCES

 America’s youngest outcast: state report card on child
  homelessness. Newton, MA: Author National center
  of Family Homelessness, 2009.

 Bearne, J. & Clark, K. (2008). Focusing literature
  discussion groups on comprehension strategies. The
  Reading Teacher, 62(1), 74-79.

 Constable, R. (2006). School Social Work: Practice,
  Policy, and Research.
               REFERENCES

 Hardiman, M. (2003). Connecting brain research
  with effective teaching: The brain based teaching
  model.

 Jensen, E. (2008). Brain-based learning: The new
  paradigm of teaching.

 Jozefowicz-Simbeni, D and Israel, Nathaniel (2006)
  Services to Homeless Students and Families.
  Children and Schools,28,35-43.
             REFERENCES


 Music For Relaxation, VOL. 4 (1992). Decca
  Record Company Limited, London.

 National Association for the Education of
  Homeless Children and Youth, website, The
  Economic Crisis Hits
  www.familyhomelessness.org

								
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