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Oct. 3_ 2011 - Missouri State Senate

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Oct. 3_ 2011 - Missouri State Senate Powered By Docstoc
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A SWEET DEAL GONE SOUR
The failure of the Mamtek project not only has triggered investigations, it also has put strain on a small
community that had been excited at the prospect of an economic boost.
By Rudi Keller
Columbia Daily Tribune Saturday, October 1, 2011
MOBERLY — The failure of Mamtek has hurt more than Moberly’s credit rating.
A landlord is out $6,000 for four apartments leased by Mamtek. City Bank is suing Mamtek and the Moberly
Industrial Development Authority over $28,000 owed on two vehicles. Construction contractors are owed in
excess of $1 million, sources said, the bulk being owed to Septagon Construction Co., which ran the job from its
Columbia office.
And 15 people — some who moved hundreds of miles to work for an exciting startup — are left without
paychecks and health insurance. The health insurance coverage expired last night, and with no company to pay
the premium, the workers can’t even keep their COBRA coverage.
As official Moberly keeps its fingers crossed in hopes that former Mamtek CEO Bruce Cole can make good on his
latest promise to deliver $250,000 on Monday, there is little hope that any of those owed money will be paid.
Debts to those creditors were not included in the city’s agreement with Cole’s new business, American Sucralose
Manufacturing Inc.
And with the company gone, it would make little sense to sue Mamtek, said landlord Larry Schnell of Centralia,
who builds and renovates homes in Moberly and elsewhere. “They called me a week before Labor Day and said
they were out of money,” he said.
Olivia Lindsey was Mamtek’s human resources director. She received a call Sept. 2 that she was being laid off as
Mamtek cut staff. Lindsey was living in St. Charles and working for Covidien when she took the job at Mamtek.
Now, instead of returning to St. Charles, she is opening a restaurant in Moberly.
Attempts to contact other former employees, ranging from top managers to engineers to others working under
Lindsey, were not successful. Many have returned to where they came from, including New Haven, Conn.; Austin,
Texas, and Columbus, Ohio.
“All of us left great careers to come to Mamtek,” Lindsey said. “And all of us were just left with nothing.”
                                                         ■
Mamtek arrived in Missouri with great promise in July 2010. Gov. Jay Nixon, former Gov. Bob Holden and Cole
announced the company’s arrival to a packed room at Moberly Area Community College. The company would
bring 600 or more jobs in a few years, they said, and provide a major boost to a community struggling with
unemployment above 10 percent.
“At a time when too many American companies are shuttering their plants and moving jobs overseas, we are
thrilled to have a global company creating hundreds of good manufacturing jobs right here in Missouri,” Gov.
Nixon said in a news release at the time.
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Nixon announced $17.6 million in state tax credits and other incentives for the project. Moberly borrowed $39
million to build and equip the factory. Cole promised he had $8 million in private capital.
Now that promise is shattered, and at least three investigations — one by the Securities and Exchange
Commission, one by the Missouri Attorney General and one by the Missouri Senate — are underway. Few
questions were asked regarding Cole’s financing schemes or ability to make the project work.
One person who did ask questions — journalist Janet Morales, publisher of the weekly Moberly Mirror — quickly
found out that giving the deal too much scrutiny would get her in trouble.
From simple questions — such as why the company didn’t convert an existing large building instead of
constructing a new factory — to more complex ones — such as how the company’s ownership was structured —
Morales received the message unofficially that her inquiries were unwelcome.
The Mirror was operating on a shoestring, trying to establish itself against the daily Moberly Monitor Index.
Morales intended to concentrate on local news — proms, council meetings and club news — that is the staple of
local journalism in smaller communities.
And after initially raising questions, she turned away from the story.
Morales comes from hometown stock. Her mother was from Moberly and her father was from South Dakota. The
family moved to Moberly when she was 14 and her father worked at Montgomery Ward and Moberly Motors
and her mother worked at the Berry Box clothing store.
After a stint at the California Democrat newspaper, Morales took a job at the Monitor-Index. She liked Moberly
and she and her husband, Roy, wanted to make their home there. “We could have gone anywhere,” she said.
“But my family was here.”
                                                         ■
Advertising began to drop off in November, Morales said. Once-pleasant advertisers became hostile. Among the
things said to her, she recalled, were worries that she was “investigating” Mamtek and that could endanger the
project, despite all the commitments and outlay of millions by the end of 2010.
But after advertisers stopped doing business with her amid persistent rumors she was investigating Mamtek, she
decided to give it a closer look. Knowing that the paper couldn’t survive — she had about 300 paid subscribers
and only a handful of advertisers — she printed three pages of everything she had learned and on March 31
printed enough copies to deliver one to every home in Moberly. Her articles still are available at
www.moberlymirror.com.
“I owe on equipment, I owe the printer and I will probably have to declare bankruptcy on the business,” Morales
said last week.
Morales was overwhelmed by stonewalling as she sought to learn more about Mamtek, she said. And she
believes Debbie Miller, executive director of the Moberly Chamber of Commerce, coordinated the effort to
persuade businesses to stop advertising.
Miller denied the accusation and said Morales is rewriting history. Conversations soon after the newspaper
started are being “twisted” by Morales into hostility over her news reporting, Miller said.
“The only time I ever talked to Janet about her business is when she sent out a letter, before all this Mamtek
stuff, she sent out a letter to businesses trying to shame them into advertising with her,” Miller said.
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The letter, Miller said, informed potential advertisers that the Monitor-Index was trying to run her out of
business and she was in danger of losing her investment. “I talked to her because I had heard that some of the
people who had got the letter were very turned off by it.”
Miller is clearly angered by Morales’ charges, which she repeatedly said were not true.
“The problem I have is that she has made it sound like the Mamtek story that she was trying to write or trying to
tell is the reason she went out of business. She went out of business because she is not a good businessperson.”
                                                          ■
The damage to Moberly’s city finances will be ongoing. The industrial development bonds aren’t a legal
obligation of the city, but failure to pay could send the city’s credit rating — already cut five notches on future
borrowing by Standard & Poor’s — into junk status.
The debt amounts to about $3,000 for every man, woman and child in the city of 13,741. Some money might be
recovered if the factory equipment can be sold, but a disclosure filed this week by UMB Bank, the bondholder
trustee, shows there are competing claims to the property.
Banking on promises from Cole could be risky, many city leaders acknowledge. His dealings are being
investigated by the SEC. The Missouri Senate will investigate how Moberly was sold Mamtek by the Department
of Economic Development. And Randolph County Prosecuting Attorney Mike Fusselman, in partnership with
Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster, is investigating all aspects of the deal.
But if the factory project is to be restarted, the promise from Cole is all the city has. City Manager Andy Morris
said yesterday that he would not comment on the value of Cole’s promises until Monday.
Corey Mehaffy, executive director of the Moberly Area Economic Development Corporation, isn’t talking at all.
And Miller, too, was saying little about Cole.
“Everything is just so vulnerable right now,” she said. “I am just going to tell you I have complete faith in Corey
Mehaffy and the economic development office and our city government. These folks work long hours and try to
do good things.”
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WILL REVISED SCHOOL SOCIAL MEDIA BILL GET SIGNED?
Missouri Governor's office says bill will be "reviewed closely." A decision may be as soon as today or Friday.
Eureka-Wildwood Patch - By Ryan Krull
September 29, 2011
MO State Sen. Jane Cunningham marshals a new version of Facebook ban through the statehouse, and up to the
governor's desk. V
Although Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is not indicating whether he'll sign a revised social networking bill this week,
the bill is on his desk awaiting his approval.
As previously reported by Eureka-Wildwood Patch, revisions to the Amy Hestir Student Protection Act had been
making their way through the General Assembly all last week. Friday the revised bill finally made it's way through
the house and senate and is now in Nixon's hands.
Last month, Patch reported on the controversy and confusion surrounding Senate Bill 54, also known as the Amy
Hestir Student Protection Act. It is sponsored by former Ladue school board member and Missouri State
Senator Jane Cunningham, R-Chesterfield, and designed to protect students.
The Missouri State Teachers Association (MSTA) sued the state over ths social network portions of Senate Bill 54,
claiming it was too vague. MSTA was awarded an injunction on Aug. 26, just two days before the new law was to
take effect.
At that time Gov. Jay Nixon called for repeals to parts of SB 54, and Cunningham worked to revise and clarify the
bill.
The revisions to the social media aspects of SB 54 took the form of Senate Bill 1.
As of the start of this week, there is no clear indication as to what Nixon will do with the piece of legislation.
"The bill will be closely reviewed after it reaches the Governor's desk and before he acts on it," Nixon's Press
Secretary Scott Holste tells Patch. However, there is no word on if or when Nixon will sign the revised bill into
law.
Cunningham said that she is “very hopeful” the revised bill will be signed into law.
“I am hopeful that (Gov. Nixon) signs it, since all education and teacher groups helped craft the language,”
Cunningham told Patch.
If signed into law, SB 1 would replace the portions of SB 54 that teachers claimed were confusing.
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AFTER YEARS OF IGNORING PLEAS THAT BENEFITS BE EXTENDED TO
SAME-SEX COUPLES, THE UM SYSTEM IS STARTING TO LISTEN
By Janese Silvey
Columbia Daily Tribune Sunday, October 2, 2011
There’s mounting pressure on the University of Missouri System to adopt benefits for same-sex couples — and
much of the weight is coming from top campus administrators.
MU’s Council of Deans is the latest group to rally for domestic partner benefits, sending a letter to UM interim
President Steve Owens urging the system to extend benefits to domestic partners of faculty and staff.
Chancellor Brady Deaton has sent two letters to University Hall in support of domestic partner benefits. So have
the Missouri Students Association and MU’s Graduate Professional Council.
Even MU Athletic Director Mike Alden weighed in, sending a letter to Board of Curators Chairman Warren
Erdman asking for his support on the issue.
Erdman has no plan to expand health benefits this year, but he will ask the board’s Compensation and Human
Resources Committee to review benefits, including the possibility of adding domestic partner benefits, Owens
said in a statement to the Tribune.
That announcement adds a significant cog in the movement toward providing same-sex partner benefits, a
subject curators have long ignored.
Owens said UM System staff has been carefully — albeit quietly — studying the issue since spring.
“Like other public institutions, the UM System must consider this within our own institution as well as within our
state and national context,” he said. “While other public higher education institutions throughout the country
have made domestic partner benefits available, public universities in Missouri and most of our surrounding
states have not done so.”
Owens also asked faculty groups to make a business case for why domestic partner benefits are needed. Faculty
members are responding with a report outlining reasons the university should extend its benefits.
With large companies and other major research universities now offering retirement and health benefits for
same-sex couples, some say MU is falling behind the competition.
BUDGET BURDENS
It’s no secret university campuses have been tightening the purse strings as state funding dwindles and
restrictions are put on their ability to raise tuition.
And those economic realities force the university to carefully prioritize where administrators spend money,
Owens said.
Providing insurance packages to same-sex families is expected to add 1 percent to 2 percent to the system’s
benefits costs, which amounts to between $1 million and $3 million, Betsy Rodriguez, vice president of human
resources, told the Tribune in April. That might not sound like a lot, she said, but “frankly anything is a lot of
money at this point.”
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Sen. Kurt Schaefer, R-Columbia, also cited fiscal impact as the most significant consideration. “Any change in
policy that requires an increase of expenses of any kind should be looked at very closely,” he said. “That’s my
only concern.”
UM administrators have, at times, indicated they also would be worried about political ramifications if the
university were to adopt benefits for partners of gays and lesbians.
Rep. Mike Thomson, R-Maryville, chairs the House Higher Education Committee. He wasn’t familiar with the
ongoing discussion about domestic partner benefits at UM when the Tribune called him last week.
At first nod, though, Thomson said there might be lawmakers who would be concerned about the state’s land-
grant university providing benefits to same-sex couples, a policy that wouldn’t necessarily represent conservative
leanings in parts of the state.
“I think there would be discussion of it, not necessarily from the higher education committee, but informally,” he
said.
Schaefer, a member of the Senate’s Education Committee, said he’s not sure the General Assembly would take
any sort of retaliatory action if the UM System were to adopt the benefits, though.
“There are people in the General Assembly who, arguably, would be on both sides of that issue,” he said. “It’s a
very polarizing issue.”
But, Schaefer said, the House and Senate each have lots of members who don’t agree on a number of issues.
“Certainly, we have members in the General Assembly with strong opinions on a myriad of issues who might like
to take certain actions,” he said. “The question is: Does the body as a whole take an action?”
The UM System is no stranger to standing up to state lawmakers, Rep. Chris Kelly, D-Columbia, said. He pointed
to the Board of Curators’ decision this year to raise tuition higher than Gov. Jay Nixon wanted. That move cost
the board some funding when Nixon later withheld state money from the university.
“There was plenty of backlash on the tuition” decision, “but they stood up to that,” Kelly said. “Which was, by the
way, very courageous on their part.”
And that’s exactly what the system needs in this case, said Candace Galen, a professor of biological sciences at
MU. “It takes courage. That’s what it comes down to.”
RECRUITMENT REASONS
Galen has been with her partner for 15 years, and they are raising two children. Conservatively, she estimates,
having to pay out-of-pocket for her partner’s health insurance costs the family $5,000 a year, and that’s for a
policy with a high deductible.
“It impacts our bottom line every month,” Galen said. “Anyone who has to pay for his or her own health
insurance knows it’s not trivial.”
And those extra expenses might be keeping other top-notch professors and administrators from applying for
open positions at MU. Although it’s mostly based on anecdotal evidence, campus leaders say the absence of
benefits for gay and lesbian partners is hurting recruitment.
Between 2008 and 2010, at least four potential faculty members and three administrative-level candidates have
passed up jobs on UM System campuses because of the lack of domestic partner benefits. That’s from the
preliminary report the Intercampus Faculty Council is preparing for Owens.
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In one case, a woman who might have been a fit for a chair position did not apply to a UM school and instead
was recruited to be an associate dean at a Big Ten university with domestic partner benefits.
In another testimony, someone who took on a leadership role within the UM System had hoped to recruit a
“strong colleague from my previous institution” to Missouri, but the person declined an interview because his
partner persuaded him not to apply to a “hostile institution.”
“We know that it’s a critical part of being able to recruit, especially at the faculty level,” said Noor Azizan-
Gardner, interim chief diversity officer at MU. “To get the best candidates out there, you must have an inclusive
benefits package.”
IFC, which includes members from all four UM campuses, estimates nearly 400 institutes of higher education
offer same-sex partner benefits, including all Ivy League schools.
In Missouri, a handful of private schools in Kansas City and St. Louis — including Washington University — offer
domestic partner benefits, as well as Drury University in Springfield.
Several local liberal arts colleges also extend benefits to gay and lesbian couples, including Stephens College,
Westminster College and William Woods University.
Although MU typically doesn’t compete with small liberal arts schools for faculty, offering domestic partner
benefits has given Stephens College a competitive edge in its peer market, said Richard Enyard, director of
human resources.
“I do know with a few of the hires we made, they inquired about whether we had domestic partner benefits,” he
said. “It’s a good benefit for those who have significant others who may or may not have health insurance. It’s a
good benefit to offer when competing for top-quality talent.”
Westminster College in Fulton began offering same-sex partner benefits two years ago, spokesman Rob Crouse
said. “We pride ourselves on being a family-friendly workplace and environment with family-friendly benefits,”
he said.
Representatives from all three area schools said their respective institutions have not had problems with anyone
trying to abuse the benefit by adding a same-sex friend who wasn’t actually a partner.
Kathy Groves, director of human resources for William Woods, said it’s fairly obvious when someone is a
significant other. “Generally, that person is their beneficiary on life insurance or on their checking account,” she
said. “We haven’t seen abuse.”
The lack of benefits to same-sex partners also is hurting staff recruitment, the faculty report says. MU competes
for IT workers, administrative assistants and other nonfaculty positions with local companies that do provide
domestic partner benefits, including State Farm Insurance, 3M and major department stores.
MU, the report warns, is soon to be in a “very small minority of employers” that don’t provide domestic partner
benefits.
QUIET DISAPPROVAL
With faculty members, top administrators and an athletics director on board, you’d think support for domestic
partner benefits is unanimous.
It’s not.
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In a survey given to faculty and staff last year, 34 percent of respondents agreed same-sex partner benefits
should be a high priority for the system — but 34 percent also disagreed.
Another 21 percent said they didn’t have strong feelings, and 1,200 of the 7,000 survey respondents skipped the
question.
Those on campus who oppose benefits for same-sex couples aren’t exactly shouting it from the rooftops, though.
Some faculty members contacted by the Tribune weren’t interested in opining. One did provide an alternative
view but only on the condition of anonymity.
“From a Christian point of view, you’re kind of torn because you know that everybody is a sinner, including
yourself, and you don’t want to pick out one group,” the person said. “On the other hand, you feel by allowing
domestic benefits, you’re encouraging people to go into a lifestyle that is against what you believe people should
do.”
Were the issue to go to a faculty vote, it’s anybody’s guess what the outcome would be.
Case in point: Last year, MU Faculty Council members were stunned when the faculty as a whole voted down a
plan to require students to take a diversity-focused course. The requirement seemed to be a sure thing with
support from administrators, vocal professors and student leaders.
Anyone who opposed the plan hadn’t said a peep before the vote, at least publicly, likely for fear of being seen as
anti-diversity.
That failed diversity course requirement, along with two back-to-back racially charged incidents on campus, has
student leaders and administrators rallying for a public perception that MU is “One Mizzou,” an entity that
embraces all.
The catchphrase is well-intentioned, Galen said, but “there’s a difference walking the walk and talking the talk.”
Historically, she said, higher education institutions have taken the lead on advancing social causes. In Missouri,
though, corporations and private businesses are the ones adopting benefits for gay and lesbian couples.
“I’d like to see” the university “take the lead on this and not hide behind industry’s coattails,” Galen said. “There
will come a time when most big businesses and independent companies will have partner benefits, and the
university will look like the odd duck out.”
STUDENTS’ SIDE
Those same industries are going to want future employees to be comfortable in diverse situations, Galen said.
“We’re supposed to be training people those businesses want to employ,” she said. “Instead we’re, by example,
giving our students the idea it’s OK to be intolerant. I don’t think that’s a good employee.”
In the draft report to Owens making a case for domestic partner benefits, IFC members cite several quotes from
CEOs of major employers stressing the importance of diversity.
Hallmark Cards, for instance, has an “ongoing commitment to diversity in our workforce and to creating a
workplace where our employees feel comfortable bringing their full selves to work,” wrote Bob Bloss, senior vice
president of human resources, in a statement after the company was awarded “Best Place to Work” by the
Human Rights Campaign.
IFC’s greatest concern, the report says, is the university will have a reputation as an institution that discriminates,
and that “will reflect negatively on our students and employers.”
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Missouri Students Association members, in their letter to Owens, say students are the primary stakeholders of
the university, making it important that students take pride in all aspects of campus.
“The present situation, which discriminates against individuals on the basis of sexual orientation (a practice
expressly prohibited by the University of Missouri non-discrimination policy), is nothing to be proud of,” they
wrote.
The letter goes on to say not having domestic partner benefits is a “stain on our good name” that has an adverse
effect on the educational experience of students.
George Justice, dean of MU’s Graduate School, also is worried about the impact on his older student population.
“Even if the benefits are not relevant to graduate students who come here with different kinds of offers, the tone
is important to highly recruited students, particularly doctoral students, who are deciding between universities
on cultural as well as academic grounds,” Justice said in an email. “I strongly support same-sex partner benefits
for faculty and staff as a graduate student recruiting thing, even if students themselves wouldn’t benefit.”
CHANGING ATTITUDES
Since Missourians defined marriage in 2004 as only between a man and woman, perceptions and attitudes have
been changing, at least nationwide. More states are allowing gay and lesbian couples to marry or join through
civil unions.
A 2010 study from the Pew Research Center indicates 63 percent of people surveyed consider same-sex couples
with children a “family.”
“Clearly opinions are changing regarding the definition of ‘family’ and most public and private sector businesses
are recognizing the need and advantages of offering benefits without the stipulation of a marriage license,” the
IFC report says.
And UM System administrators — who have mostly been silent on the issue — now say they’re listening.
“We provide generally competitive employee benefits and recognize that the expansion of benefits to domestic
partners is a significant issue for some of our employees,” Owens said in his statement. “As with other topics of
importance, the university welcomes employee input, engagement and diversity of thought.”
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ANALYSIS: MO. SCIENCE INITIATIVE FACES UNCERTAIN OUTCOME
BECAUSE OF CONTINGENCY CLAUSE
The Republish - DAVID A. LIEB, Associated Press
First Posted: October 02, 2011 - 12:31 pm
Last Updated: October 02, 2011 - 12:31 pm
 JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — Though seven years and several hundred million dollars behind Kansas, Missouri may
finally be poised to enact a long-discussed initiative channeling state tax dollars to upstart companies in science-
and technology-based ventures.
Or perhaps not.
Due to an intentional legislative quirk, the Missouri Science and Innovation Reinvestment Act (MOSIRA) that
recently passed the Legislature contains a clause declaring that it cannot take effect unless a separate bill on
state tax incentives also passes during the current special legislative session.
Thus far, that other business incentive bill has not passed. If lawmakers cannot settle their stalemate and send
Gov. Jay Nixon that bill by the session's Nov. 5 automatic adjournment, the contingency clause in the MOSIRA
legislation could be tested in court.
The question for judges to consider: Can lawmakers legally link one piece of legislation to the enactment of
another one?
"From a layman's perspective, there's some really interesting issues there," said Kelly Gillespie, executive director
of the Missouri Biotechnology Association, a leading advocate for the MOSIRA legislation.
For example, does tying one bill to the enactment of another run afoul of requirements in the state constitution
that each bill address only one subject that is clearly expressed in its title? Does it amount to an unconstitutional
delegation of the Legislature's powers to make laws? And if the contingency clause is declared void, can the rest
of the bill still be implemented?
On the surface, the answers to all of these questions might appear to be 'no' — meaning there is no way for
MOSIRA to take effect unless that separate, broader bill on business incentives also passes and becomes law. But
there is enough uncertainty that supporters of MOSIRA are holding out hope.
"There might not be case law that tells you exactly what the outcome will be and would give us a warm and fuzzy
assurance," Gillespie said. But "we know some of these issues that surround this — especially in the case of
logrolling and separation of powers and things like that — someone might find some really interesting
arguments" to be raised in court.
In one potentially relevant case, the state Supreme Court struck down a contingency clause in a 1993 education
bill that would have placed a tax referendum on the ballot only if the Supreme Court ruled in a certain way on
separate lawsuit challenging the state's school funding formula. The Supreme Court ruled that the contingent
referendum was an improper delegation of legislative powers.
If it can be implemented, the MOSIRA legislation would create a special fund overseen by the Missouri
Technology Corp. to offer incentives to "science and innovation" companies. It defines that to cover firms
conducting research or making products related to agricultural biotechnology, veterinary medicine, biochemistry,
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energy or environmental issues, forestry, homeland security, information technology, medical devices,
microbiology and pharmaceuticals, among other things.
The program would be financed by annual transfers from state revenues equal to a percentage of the growth in
the wages paid to employees of existing science-based companies, using 2010 as a base year for the calculations.
In short: Tax revenues from existing biotechnology companies would be used as grants to help similar businesses
get started in Missouri.
A similar 2004 law created the Kansas Bioscience Authority, which so far has directed about $360 million to a
fund that could top out at $581 million over 15 years. That money has been used to fund research, develop
products and entice businesses to expand or locate in Kansas. Other states also have initiatives to finance
research and start-up companies in high-tech fields. Ohio has a $2.3 billion, 14-year project. Massachusetts and
Maryland have each pledged at least $1 billion over 10 years toward life sciences initiatives.
Missouri's science-based initiative was separated by lawmakers from the broader economic development bill
because of concerns that the bigger bill's title of "relating to taxation" might not cover the creation of a program
that grants money to businesses. Yet Senate President Pro Tem Rob Mayer, R-Dexter, linked the bills with the
contingency clause — essentially leveraging the MOSIRA bill to try to spur passage of the other business incentive
bill.
This is not the first time lawmakers have stuck a contingency clause in a bill. A manual entitled "The Essentials of
Bill Drafting in the Missouri General Assembly" — prepared by and for legislative staff — includes a section on
how to draft contingency clauses. One of the models cited is a 1998 education bill, which made changes to the
state's school funding formula contingent upon the attorney general providing notice that school desegregation
lawsuits had been settled.
A year earlier, the governor signed a bill about procedures for administrative rules that included a multi-part
contingency clause referring to an executive order issued by then-Gov. Mel Carnahan. Attorney Brad Ketcher,
who was Carnahan's chief of staff, helped negotiate the wording of that contingency clause with lawmakers.
Ketcher said a general principle for determining whether such clauses are OK is if the state's reviser of statutes —
who literally places bills in the law books — can easily determine if the contingency has been met. Linking one bill
to the enactment of another would seem to meet that test, he said.
In the case of the MOSIRA legislation, "I think it's an appropriate contingency, because it can be readily obtained
if it has occurred or not," Ketcher said. "So the reviser of statutes will have a clear benchmark to tell whether it
has been triggered."
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CONFERENCE CHOICE PUTS CURATORS ON THE SPOT
Board inundated with fan input on Big 12.
By David Briggs Columbia Daily Tribune
Sunday, October 2, 2011
The separation of campus and athletics at Missouri used to be understood.
The chairman of the board contacted University of Missouri President George Russell.
“George, we’d like to have something to say on the new coach,” John Lichtenegger told the president, Hall
recalled.
Russell’s response: “Well, John, sure, we could do that, if that’s what you want to do. Matter of fact, if you want
to call some of the plays, you can do that, too.”
Message received.
“In other words,” Hall said with a laugh, “stay out of it.”
It’s not so simple now.
As a groundswell of support for Missouri to join the Southeastern Conference mounts, the decision whether to
leave the Big 12 — if there is indeed an opportunity to leave — rests with the seven voting members of the UM
System Board of Curators.
The governor-appointed assembly includes a Kansas City businessman sensitive to his city’s economic interests, a
newspaper publisher in St. Joseph and a substance-abuse counselor in Kennett. The board is required to approve
any proposal to change conference affiliation.
The curators, who a source said will meet Tuesday in Columbia to discuss Missouri’s conference affiliation,
traditionally have deferred to Athletic Director Mike Alden and Chancellor Brady Deaton on athletics issues. They
could rubber-stamp Deaton’s recommendation or vote to give the chancellor unilateral authority to act on behalf
of the university.
That’s what the board of regents at Texas and Oklahoma did when those schools were considering switching
conferences.
“People on boards get involved, and when they get involved, collegiality sometimes stops,” Texas Athletic
Director DeLoss Dodds told reporters last week. “We’ve got to empower people on the athletics side to put this
together and keep it together.”
The conference realignment saga is probably the most high-profile issue the board will encounter in their six-year
terms, and they are being lobbied from every direction.
A former curator said the board was “very involved” in examining the possibility of Missouri joining the Big Ten
last summer. This year, as the curators wade through thousands of overwhelmingly pro-SEC fan emails, the
stakes and emotions are raised.
“If I was chairman of the board, I would want to be very involved in that decision,” said a source familiar with the
board dynamics.
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He’s also glad he is not.
“I’m sympathetic to the administration at the University of Missouri,” the source said. “I know that they’re in a
hell of a situation. You can’t win on this deal. You might satisfy some people, but … you wait and see, it’s going to
be a firestorm.”
The seven voting curators all declined comment or did not respond to messages.
The most fervent opposition to Missouri joining the SEC originates from Kansas City. Board Chairman Warren
Erdman, the only curator from Kansas City, is “sympathetic” to the concerns of city leaders over the potential
economic impact of MU’s exit from the Big 12, a source said. Kansas City would no longer be a Big 12 hub and
could lose the lucrative conference basketball tournament, which is under contract with the city through 2014.
Kansas City attorney Paul Blackman, a prominent MU booster, described the area as “evenly split.”
Assuming Missouri is wanted by the SEC, the curators would also weigh the more tangible economic costs of
bolting the Big 12 — exit fees and a potential lawsuit — and the opinion of Deaton, whose stance remains
unclear despite his position as the chairman of the Big 12 Board of Directors. One recent curator said the board
has “a lot of respect” for the chancellor.
Still, as MU student Cory Steinman typed more than 3,000 times in an email to curators, opinion is tilting toward
the “SEC!”
Sources told the Tribune that Missouri athletic officials and Gov. Jay Nixon, who appointed five of the seven
voting curators, are on board with a move to the SEC. So, too, are many fans, some of whom have threatened to
stop donating to MU if the school bypasses the SEC and grants its primary television rights for the next six years
to the Big 12.
“If the University of Missouri does not end up in the SEC, you will never see another dime from me again,” one
fan wrote to the curators.
Through an open-records request, the Tribune obtained hundreds of emails sent to the curators on Sept. 21.
Nearly all contained a plea for MU to leave the Big 12.
“For once in my life,” one fan wrote in a message sent to the curators, Deaton and Alden, “I would love to see
The University of Missouri, the school that I have loved since the day I was born, come out and give everyone
else in the Big 12 the 1 finger salute & do what’s best for this University.”
Columbia attorney Clark Jones pledged to increase his annual donation to the Tiger Scholarship Fund from $3,000
to $12,000 if MU moved to the SEC.
Even Blackman, who said he is as passionate about Kansas City as he is MU, is now behind a move south. He sent
a signed letter to Erdman.
“If there is an opportunity to go to the SEC, to me it would be reckless to gamble that the Big 12 would be viable
in three, five, six years,” he said.
Hall, a curator from 1993-1999, said the board should ignore the outside pressures and defer to Deaton.
“He would have the advice of a very knowledgeable athletic staff and Mike Alden,” Hall said, “and they would
make a far better decision than a group of curators that don’t know everything about it.”
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PRO: FACEBOOK LAW WOULD PROTECT STUDENTS
Law would protect students from inappropriate contact
Victoria Advocate - Camille Doty
Originally published October 2, 2011 at 11:03 p.m., updated October 2, 2011 at 11:10 p.m.
Children need protection from people who push the boundaries on social media, a parents says.
"Sometimes you have to tell people what to do," said
Christopher Paz, a Victoria father of two. Paz said he would support a law prohibiting teachers from friending
students through Facebook and other social networks.
He added it should be common sense for students and teachers not to have inappropriate online
communication.
Paz said he will be vigilant to protect his children when they do reach school age.
Missouri State Sen. Jane Cunningham, a Missouri law maker who sponsored the Facebook law, said legislation
would bring children one step closer to having protection from sexual predators in school.
"After five years of fighting, I'm proud to see this legislation finally sent to the governor's desk," said Cunningham
in a news release.
The bill is named after a teacher who was charged with sexually assaulting a student. The teacher was employed
by several school districts and won a Teacher of the Year award before retiring.
The Republican senator also said the bill would make it possible for school officials to be aware of sexual
misconduct exhibited by potential hires and their employees when making staffing decisions.
Twyla Thomas, an elementary school principal in the Refugio School District, said her district prohibits employees
from communicating with a student on personal social networking sites.
She said there should be laws providing guidelines and restrictions on student/teacher relationships in order to
eliminate inappropriate conduct.
"It is acceptable only when the teacher has set up a professional educational page that is used as a tool to
improve student achievement," she said.
Thomas said her school has online programs for students where the teachers are able to monitor and view their
work.
The school's 394 students and 27 certified teachers are not allowed to communicate directly between 11 p.m.
and 6 a.m.
Diane Boyett, Victoria school district director of communications, said the general rule with social media is,
"Don't do it, unless it's related to an instructional capacity."
Boyett said the school board approved a social networking clause on Sept. 7, 2010.
The school district's Employee Handbook, states:
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"The educator shall refrain from inappropriate communication with a student or minor, including, but not limited
to, electronic communication such as cell phone, text messaging, email, instant-messaging, blogging, or other
social network communication."
Boyett said, "The rule provides another layer of protection for students."
She added the mandate applies to current or former students as long as they are enrolled in the school district.
If an instructor has inappropriate conduct, the district sends the report to the State Board for Educator
Certification.
Suzanne Marchman, with the Texas Education Agency, said certain sanctions are made available to the public.
The various levels range from dismissal to formal reprimand to suspension of certification to loss of certification.
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MCCASKILL BLASTS PLAN FOR MEDICARE
Senator criticizes transforming program into voucher system during visit.
11:00 PM, Sep. 30, 2011
Written by Didi Tang, Springfield News-Leader
U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill told a group of local senior citizens Friday afternoon that a Republican plan to remake
Medicare into a voucher system is unacceptable to her.
"Do we need to make changes to Medicare and bring down the costs? Yes. But we should never shift rising health
costs to the back of seniors, which was what the Republican plan did," the Democratic senator said.
"We cannot dismantle Medicare and make it into a voucher system for seniors," McCaskill said.
She made the remarks at a town hall meeting at South Side Senior Center in Springfield on Friday afternoon.
It was one of two town hall meetings she had planned in Missouri during a four-day congressional recess, said
Anamarie Rebori, a communications assistant for McCaskill.
The other meeting was held in the Kansas City area, Rebori said.
At the town hall meeting in Springfield, McCaskill fielded a range of questions, including the controversial E-
Verify issue in Springfield and the federal deficit in Washington D.C.
She kicked off the meeting with a brief speech that focused on reining in rising costs of Medicare.
The likes of Donald Trump, for example, should pay for their own medicine, she said.
The health care industry can be encouraged to adopt measures to save money, McCaskill said, citing a pilot
program by St. John's Health System that saved Medicare $17.6 million over five years, partly through tracking
patient information and identifying gaps in care.
In return, St. John's will receive a $2.3 million bonus for its performance.
While the government cannot mandate healthy lifestyles, McCaskill said she would like to see Americans stay
healthy through exercise and proper nutrition.
Prevention, she said, helps control and reduce Medicare costs.
At the meeting, she was asked to comment on possible mandated use of E-Verify, a federal system that checks
the legal status of potential employees, at the local level.
McCaskill said employers should be held accountable for their hires and that the federal government needs to go
after those who are knowingly hiring undocumented workers.
The practice, she said, is unfair to competitors and shortchanges the workers.
To control the federal deficit, McCaskill said she supports spending limits but would like to see the very wealthy
pay more taxes.
Higher tax rates in the 1990s did not stop so-called job creators from creating jobs, McCaskill said.
The nation's capital is politically divided, but she would continue to work from the middle to seek compromises
and find solutions, McCaskill said.
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The upcoming 2012 election is skewing priorities in Washington D.C., she said.
"There are too many people that are saying they can't give the president a victory because that will help them,"
she said when asked about the president's jobs plan.
"In other words, too many people are worrying about the election and are not worrying about the American
people."
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THREE GOP PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES WILL ADDRESS A KC
GATHERING TODAY
By DAVE HELLING - The Kansas City Star
Posted on Sat, Oct. 01, 2011 12:05 AM
Three Republican presidential candidates — Herman Cain, Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum — are scheduled to
bring their campaigns to Kansas City today.
Their GOP colleagues, though, have decided to stay away from the morning meeting of the National Federation
of Republican Women, which is holding its every-other-year convention downtown.
Federation president Sue Lynch said she’s pretty frustrated with the no-shows.
“We’ve offered them a venue here to talk to over 1,200 women,” Lynch said Friday. “We are the ones that are
the Republican Party. And for them not to take the time or even send a note of appreciation or asking for our
vote, it really concerns me.”
Today’s speeches are not open to the public.
Convention delegates also will vote in a presidential straw poll today. Unlike other recent straw polls, however,
campaigns do not appear to have heavily invested in the outcome.
“I think that they’re missing a great opportunity here,” said Megan Carpenter, a delegate from Pennsylvania. “We
go home and we’ve got hundreds of thousands of women that we talk to.”
The federation was founded in 1938. Its members work for Republican candidates and campaigns at the state
and local level, as well as help recruit women candidates for office.
The convention also features workshops, idea exchanges, speeches and, on Friday, lots of pin trading among
delegates.
But delegates said they expect a relatively quiet gathering. The federation, they said, does not seem as split
between conservatives and moderates as some other GOP organizations.
“These women are very conservative,” said delegate Nancy Kimble from Pennsylvania. “And anybody but Obama
… we’re all going to be together in the end.”
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DOUBT IN STATE LAWMAKERS MOTIVATED MISSOURI GOP CAUCUS
SWITCH
October 1, 2011
Missouri News Horizon - Posted by: Tim Sampson
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – A lack of faith in state lawmakers to abide by the request of the national parties is
ultimately what prompted the Missouri GOP to make the bombshell decision to shirk the traditional presidential
primary contest in favor of a caucus system, according to a spokesman for the state Republican Party.
“When it became clear that the presidential preference primary was not going to be moved, we began exploring
all our options,” said party spokesman Jonathon Prouty. “This looked like the best one.”
It was the best, according to Prouty, because it will keep the state in line with rules set forth by the Republican
National Committee, insuring that all of Missouri’s delegates will be seated at the national nominating
convention next year.
To spread out the various nominating contests across the country and preserve the influence of traditional first-
in-the-nation states like New Hampshire and Iowa, the RNC had threatened to not seat Missouri’s delegates if
the state did not move its presidential primary from February to March.
But changing the primary date requires action by the state legislature – action that has been unsuccessful so far
in the General Assembly. Proposals to move the primary date have been vetoed by the governor and run into
stiff opposition from state Senators who argue that the national parties are trying to limit Missouri’s influence by
pushing them back later in the nominating process.
The legislature was scheduled to make one more attempt at moving the primary date during the current special
session. But legislative leaders have said they won’t take up the proposal before an agreement is reached on the
jobs bill at the heart of the special session – a doubtful prospect at this time.
Prouty said that rather than waiting for the legislature to take action and risk having no say in who the
Republican presidential nominee will be next year, the state party decided to modify its own rules in a way that
renders the primary election meaningless.
“Very little has changed here,” Prouty said. “The change in the call to convention, in essence, unbound the
delegates from the presidential preference primary.”
Prouty said a caucus system already exists within the party, at the local and state level, to determine the actual
men and women who will serve as delegates at the convention. In the past, the way these delegates voted on the
convention floor was determined by the results of the primary election. That will no longer be the case, after the
GOP’s decision. The way delegates vote will now be determined solely through the caucus process.
“It retains our delegate strength and our influence in the national nominating process and that’s been our goal all
along,” Prouty said.
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ROBIN CARNAHAN CALLING IT QUITS — FOR NOW
By Jo Mannies, Beacon political reporter
Posted 2:56 pm Fri., 9.30.11
Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan chose the last day of this quarter's campaign-finance period to
announce that she's not running for re-election in 2012 — reversing her declaration earlier this year that she was
definitely running for a third term.
In an email to supporters sent Friday afternoon, Carnahan wrote that "the time will be right for me to return to
private life, to gather new ideas and experiences and a fresh perspective."
Carnahan left open the prospect that she may return to politics sometime in the future, citing the example of her
father, the late Gov. Mel Carnahan, who stepped in and out of public life.
Carnahan has been secretary of state since 2005; she lost a bid last fall for the U.S. Senate, losing badly to
Republican Roy Blunt.
Carnahan had raised little additional money this year for her third-term bid, raising suspicions in recent months
that she might be reconsidering. Until Friday, however, she had denied that was the case.
Carnahan gave a rousing speech in June at the state Democratic Party's Jefferson-Jackson dinner held downtown.
Sources close to Carnahan, 50, say that her health is good. She is a cancer survivor and underwent treatment
during her first term in office. Although she raised virtually no money this year, her last campaign-finance report,
filed in July, showed her with a bank balance of $210,781.53
Her decision will likely ignite a flurry of Democratic activity to find a replacement since the 2012 election is just
over 13 months away.
State Rep. Jason Kander, D-Kansas City, immediately sent out a statement announcing his candidacy. Kander also
has hired the campaign consulting firm representing Gov. Jay Nixon, a fellow Democrat.
Other likely prospects may include former state Auditor Susan Montee, who has been chairman of the state
Democratic Party since losing her own re-election bid last fall to Republican Tom Schweich, although by a closer
margin than the Carnahan-Blunt contest.
Carnahan's brother, U.S. Rep. Russ Carnahan, D-St. Louis, swiftly issued a statement lauding his sister's years of
service — and making it clear that he has no intention of seeking her job.
"I encourage Missourians who share Robin’s dedication to working for the people of Missouri to select a
candidate who will take up her fight and run," Russ Carnahan wrote. "I remain focused on representing the St.
Louis region, working to grow the economy and jobs and preparing for reelection in 2012.”
Later, Montee issued a statement on behalf of the Missouri Democratic Party that praised Robin Carnahan as "a
dedicated and tireless public servant to the state of Missouri."
Montee added, “Robin has been an incredible advocate for middle class families, promoting fair elections,
protecting our seniors and making Missouri a better state for us all. We know Robin will continue to serve
Missourians well.”
Montee said the Democratic Party is committed to "fielding a competitive candidate who will be a strong
advocate for Missouri’s families as Secretary of State."
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CARNAHAN POLITICAL LEGACY GOES BACK GENERATIONS
The Carnahan family is Missouri's prominent political family in Democratic politics. Robin Carnahan's decision
raises the prospect that no Carnahan will be on a statewide ballot in 2012; a Carnahan has been on the ballot in
every presidential election year since 1988.
Her grandfather, A.S.J. Carnahan, was a Democratic member of Congress from southern Missouri during the
1940s. Her father, Mel Carnahan (right) served as state treasurer, lieutenant governor and then governor before
dying in a plane crash on Oct. 16, 2000 while campaigning for the U.S. Senate against Republican incumbent John
Ashcroft.
The plane's pilot was Robin Carnahan's older brother, Randy, a lawyer who also ran the family cattle operation.
Robin Carnahan has overseen the farm since the plane crash.
Robin Carnahan had been a behind-the-scenes player in Missouri politics for years and oversaw the successful
1999 statewide campaign against an initiative that would have allowed most Missourians to carry concealed
weapons. (The Missouri General Assembly went on to enact a concealed-carry law in 2003.)
But it was her speech at her father's funeral on Oct. 20, 2000, which featured a eulogy by then-President Bill
Clinton that immediately elevated Robin Carnahan's political and public profile.
She advised her mother, Jean Carnahan (left), who was appointed to a two-year term in the U.S. Senate after Mel
Carnahan posthumously defeated Ashcroft in November 2000. Jean Carnahan lost a bid for a full term in 2002 to
Republican Jim Talent.
In 2004, Robin Carnahan successfully defeated the Republican nominee for secretary of state, then-state House
Speaker Catherine Hanaway of St. Louis County.
In 2008, Carnahan handily won re-election against a little-known Republican, Mitchell Hubbard.
As secretary of state, Carnahan oversees elections and also is the state's chief official overseeing the financial
industry and corporate registrations. During her tenure, she has focused on battling securities fraud and also has
been an outspoken critic of the Republican-led effort to require all Missouri voters to show a government-issued
photo ID before being allowed to cast a ballot.
Excerpted text of Robin Carnahan's email announcing her decision not to seek re-election:
"I’m proud of the success we’ve had in the secretary of state’s office by staying focused on things that matter for
Missourians...
"Without question, serving the state and people that I love has been the honor of my life. Your friendship and
support over the years have given me the strength to stand up to challenges, both political and personal. But
after careful reflection, I’ve decided not to run for a third term as secretary of state.
"Many who step away from public life cite a desire to 'spend more time with family.' I’ve already learned to
cherish every moment spent with family and friends because I know that life is precious and unpredictable.
"But I’ve also learned that service can and does take many forms, and elective office is just one of them.
"I watched as my father moved regularly between elective office and private life … always devoted to his family
and to making a positive difference in the community. He served on church boards, the local school board and
helped the Red Cross and countless other causes — every day committed to helping a neighbor and making the
community better. Dad always thought his experience as a private citizen helped make him a more effective
public servant and a better governor.
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"After eight years as secretary of state, the time will be right for me to return to private life, to gather new ideas
and experiences and a fresh perspective. But my commitment to public service won’t stop, because I know the
challenges facing our country can’t be solved in Washington or Jefferson City alone. It will take ideas, energy and
the daily commitment and determination of all of us. So I plan to stay engaged and involved. And I ask you to do
the same. For me, that could include running for elected office again, but it will certainly mean speaking out and
working hard for the values we share and the candidates who stand up for them ..."
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ROBIN CARNAHAN WON’T SEEK RE-ELECTION AS MISSOURI
SECRETARY OF STATE
By STEVE KRASKE - The Kansas City Star
Posted on Fri, Sep. 30, 2011 10:15 PM
Democrat Robin Carnahan, who kept Missouri in suspense for months about her political plans for next year,
announced Friday that she will not seek a third term as secretary of state.
Carnahan, 50, said she will not seek any office in 2012 and had no job awaiting her in the private sector.
Carnahan’s health — she is a breast cancer survivor — was said not to be a factor in her decision.
In an interview with The Kansas City Star, Carnahan reflected on her late father, who moved several times
between the public and private sectors before becoming governor in 1993.
“He always thought that time spent in the private sector was especially valuable to him,” Carnahan said. “It made
him a better governor and a better public servant. I feel after eight years this is going to be a good time for me to
broaden my experience as well.
“I don’t have any plans to do anything else. I just know I needed to make a decision about this, and that’s what
I’ve done.”
Asked if she wants to become governor someday, Carnahan said: “We’ll see. I think I’d be a good one. As
someone said to me, this isn’t a period when it comes to your public career, it’s a comma. And that’s how I feel
about it. There’ll be another stage.”
For now, Carnahan’s announcement leaves the Missouri Democratic Party without one of its best-known
officeholders on the 2012 ballot.
Although she was beaten badly in the 2010 race for the U.S. Senate by Republican Roy Blunt, members of both
parties thought she would be tough to beat in a re-election bid. In 2008, the 1,749,152 votes Carnahan received
in winning a second term set a Missouri record for a statewide office seeker.
Democratic insiders had speculated for months that Carnahan’s brother, Russ, a four-term St. Louis
congressman, would run statewide if his sister opted out of the race. But he recently said he’ll seek another term
in the House.
Except for 2003 and 2004, a Carnahan has held statewide office in Missouri since 1989.
Carnahan’s announcement set off a scramble within both parties.
Jason Kander, a two-term Democratic state representative from Kansas City, announced plans to run.
In a prepared statement, Kander said: “I am running for secretary of state, and I look forward to talking with
citizens from across Missouri about my vision for the office.”
Another Kansas City area politician said to be considering the race is Jackson County Executive Mike Sanders,
who declined to comment Friday.
Veteran Democratic political consultant Steve Glorioso said it would “be a real plus to have someone from
western Missouri on the ticket.”
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Missouri Sen. Scott Rupp, a Wentzville Republican, already has announced plans to run for secretary of state.
Other Republicans thought to be interested include Missouri Sens. Ron Richard of Joplin, Bill Stouffer of Napton
and Mike Kehoe of Jefferson City, and Missouri Reps. Shane Schoeller of Willard and John Diehl of Town and
Country.
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CARNAHAN WON'T RUN FOR MO. SECRETARY OF STATE
By DAVID A. LIEB,Associated Press
Southeast Missourian - Sep 30, 6:09 PM EDT
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) -- Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan said Friday she will not seek re-election
in 2012, setting off a scramble among Democrats to find a candidate for an office that can serve as a political
stepping stone to even bigger things.
Carnahan, 50, said in an emailed statement addressed to supporters that she plans to return to "private life"
when her term ends in January 2013, but she did not rule out another run for office in the future. The Democrat
won election as secretary of state in 2004 and was re-elected in 2008, but she was soundly defeated in a U.S.
Senate campaign last year by Republican Rep. Roy Blunt.
Although a Carnahan spokesman said in February that she intended to seek re-election, Carnahan had not been
raising money and had shown few signs of building a 2012 campaign team.
"After careful reflection, I've decided not to run for a third term as secretary of state," Carnahan said in her
emailed statement. She later added: "After eight years as secretary of state, the time will be right for me to
return to private life, to gather new ideas and experiences and a fresh perspective."
Carnahan comes from one of Missouri's most prominent political families. She is the daughter of the late Gov.
Mel Carnahan and former U.S. Sen. Jean Carnahan, who was appointed to the fill seat her husband won
posthumously after he was killed in an October 2000 plane crash while campaigning. One of Robin Carnahan's
brothers also died in the crash. Another one of her siblings is U.S. Rep. Russ Carnahan, whose district includes
part of the St. Louis area. Her other brother, Tom Carnahan, is a wind farm investor who is scheduled to host a
fundraiser for President Barack Obama next week.
Minutes after Carnahan bowed out of the secretary of state's race, Democratic state Rep. Jason Kander of Kansas
City issued a statement declaring his candidacy. Kander, 30, is a lawyer who served as a military intelligence
officer in Afghanistan and was first elected to the Missouri House in 2008.
"It is important that the next secretary of state continues moving the office forward in the most efficient and
effective manner," Kander said in his announcement.
Jackson County Executive Mike Sanders, another Kansas City area Democrat, also is "taking really good look" at
running for secretary of state, said his political spokesman, Glenn Campbell.
"This is definitely a game changer. It wasn't something he was going to challenge her for," Campbell said. But "it's
something that's being discussed quite a bit at the moment."
The secretary of state oversees Missouri's elections and also regulates securities, handles business registration,
publishes state regulations and manages the state library and archives. Like Carnahan, many of the Missouri's
other recent secretaries of state have run for higher statewide offices.
Even before Carnahan's announcement, two Republican state senators already had declared their candidacies for
secretary of state in 2012. They are Sens. Scott Rupp of Wentzville and Bill Stouffer of Napton.
Carnahan probably had a good chance of winning re-election, said Peverill Squire, a political science professor at
the University of Missouri-Columbia. Her exit from the race could prompt others from both major political parties
to consider running.
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"It certainly suggests that the Republicans are going to be more competitive than they would have been had she
sought re-election," Squire said. "And Democrats are going to have to scramble to come up with a candidate that
can run on the ticket, largely with the governor."
Before running for office, Carnahan worked for the National Democratic Institute on elections abroad and served
as assistant to the chairman of the Export-Import Bank. While in office, she got married and successfully fought
cancer. Carnahan did not specifically say what she planned to do upon leaving office, but said she planned to stay
"engaged and involved" in public service.
"Many who step away from public life cite a desire to `spend more time with family,'" Carnahan said. "I've
already learned to cherish every moment spent with family and friends, because I know that life is precious and
unpredictable. But I've also learned that service can and does take many forms, and elective office is just one of
them."
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ROBIN CARNAHAN WILL NOT RUN FOR A THIRD TERM AS SECRETARY
OF STATE
St. Louis Post-Dispatch - BY JAKE WAGMAN
Posted: Saturday, October 1, 2011 12:05 am
ST. LOUIS • After Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan lost her bid for U.S. Senate last year by a wide
margin, many wondered whether she would have the desire to run another statewide campaign to keep her
current job in Jefferson City.
Those questions only grew after Carnahan raised hardly a penny in her re-election fund.
On Friday, after months of insisting she was only giving her donors a break, Carnahan confirmed what many
fellow Democrats had already suspected: She will not seek a third term in 2012.
"Without question, serving the state and people that I love has been the honor of my life," Carnahan said in a
statement. "But after careful reflection, I've decided not to run for a 3rd term as secretary of state."
Carnahan did not indicate what her next move will be, only that she will return to private life after her term ends
in 15 months.
Carnahan's decision, in addition to creating a coveted open seat in Jefferson City, also reflects her family's
gradual ebb from the ranks of power in Missouri politics.
Carnahan's brother, U.S. Rep. Russ Carnahan, is weighing his options after his seat was eliminated in redistricting.
Both siblings grew up watching the long career of their father, Mel Carnahan, in elected office, which ended
tragically in 2000 when the former governor was killed in a plane crash while campaigning for a U.S. Senate seat
against John Ashcroft.
On Friday, Russ Carnahan issued a statement saying he was "tremendously proud" of his sister — though he
made clear he is not interested in running to replace her.
"I remain focused on representing the St. Louis region," Carnahan said.
However, the secretary of state's race is expected to attract renewed interest now that the incumbent is not
running.
The timing of Carnahan's announcment — the last day of the fundraising quarter — gives potential successors a
fresh quarter to begin raising money.
State Rep. Jason Kander, D-Kansas City, announced his intention to run for secretary of state about 30 minutes
after Carnahan announced she would not be running.
On the Republican side, Carnahan's departure from the race could persuade state Reps. John Diehl, a former
elections official in St. Louis County, and Shane Schoeller, who once worked in the secretary of state's office, to
enter the race.
Two Republican state senators had already entered the race: Scott Rupp of Wentzville and Bill Stouffer of Saline
County.
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Robin Carnahan's decision does not mean she is out of politics for good. In her statement Friday, she said her
future "could include running for elected office again."
"I watched as my father moved regularly between elective office and private life," Carnahan said. "Dad always
thought his experience as a private citizen helped make him a more effective public servant and a better
governor."
Carnahan's re-election fund still has $210,000 on hand. And on Tuesday, her family will be right back in the
political spotlight: Her brother Tom will host a $25,000-per-person fundraiser at his home near Forest Park for
President Barack Obama.
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NIXON ENDS SEPTEMBER WITH HEFTY SUMS FROM LARGE DONOR
By Jo Mannies, Beacon political reporter
Posted 1:22 am Sat., 10.1.11
While outgoing Secretary of State Robin Carnahan snagged Friday's headlines, Gov. Jay Nixon was busy collecting
campaign cash.
On Friday, the deadline for raising money during this quarter, the governor reported collecting at least $118,000
within the last two days from five donors, several of whom were law firms:
-- $50,000 from Langdon & Emison in Lexington, Mo.
--$25,000 from Simmons, Browder, Gianaris, Angelides & Barnerd, LLC in Alton, Ill.
--$25,000 from Emerson Electric Co. in St. Louis
-- $10,000 from Hanly, Conroy, Bierstein, Sheridan, Fisher & Hayes, a law firm in New York.
-- $8,000 from St. Louis lawyer Andrew O'Brien.
All five donations had to be reported within 48 hours to the Missouri Ethics Commission, because they were
larger than $5,000.
During the entire month of September, Nixon collected $393,000 from such larger donors. The biggest was
$100,000 from the Clayton law firm of Carey & Danis.
Those collections likely reflect only a portion of the governor's money-raising. Contributions of $5,000 or less
don't have to be reported until Oct. 15.
Another Democrat, state Treasurer Clint Zweifel, also had a productive Friday. He reported raising $62,500 from
the Missouri Drive Fund, a labor-aligned PAC, and $10,000 from the Teamsters local in Kansas City.
As for the Republicans, the state Republican Party reported Friday that it received $50,000 from two donors --
Hunter Engineering Co. (Stephen Brauer) and Enterprise Holdings (the Taylor family). The contributions were
likely tied to Monday night's fundraising event at Brauer's Hunter Farms, which featured New Jersey Gov. Chris
Christie.
The state GOP's state Senate arm, the Missouri Senate Campaign Committee, reported on the last day collecting
$56,250 from various donors -- including $10,000 from former Gov. Matt Blunt.
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MO. DEM. CHAIR MONTEE PLANS TO RUN FOR LT. GOV.
Southeast Missourian
Sep 30, 6:19 PM EDT
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) -- Missouri Democratic Party Chairwoman Susan Montee says she plans to run for
lieutenant governor next year.
Montee said Friday she has been trying to recruit strong Democratic candidates for offices and believes she has
the best chance of winning the lieutenant governor's office being vacated by Republican Peter Kinder.
Kinder has said he will not seek re-election and is instead considering a run for governor.
Montee served as state auditor for four years before losing re-election last year to Republican Tom Schweich.
Two other candidates already have entered the lieutenant governor's race. They are Republican House Speaker
Steven Tilley and Democrat Becky Plattner, who is chairwoman of the Missouri Conservation Commission.
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LEGISLATOR LEADS EFFORT TO LAUNCH NEW WEB SITE TARGETING
PROGRESSIVE WOMEN
By Jo Mannies, Beacon political reporter
Posted 11:35 am Fri., 9.30.11
A new politically progressive web site — www.ProgressWomen.com — is launched today, with the aim of
highlighting progressive stands on women's issues, countering perceived conservative attacks.
State Rep. Stacey Newman, D-Richmond Heights, (right) is among the founders, and wrote one of the newest
articles, which deals with efforts in Missouri to curb rights to abortion. But Newman emphasizes that most of the
site's focus is on other issues as well, such whether Missouri is truly family friendly when it comes to health care,
family leave and related issues.
"We definitely feel that it's needed because there's no central place for women to go to be informed,'' said
Newman, who also chairs the state House's Progressive Caucus.
The progressive writers include students in the Columbia, Mo., as well as progressive women in the St. Louis
area. Newman said in an interview that she believes such a web site has been needed for some time.
The site appears to signal an effort by progressives to counter the strong Internet presence that Missouri
conservative groups have created in recent years. The St. Louis Tea Party, among others, has an active web site
and email distribution list.
Said Newman in her announcement: "In a campaign season (which seems to never end) with women’s issues
being talked about on the national, state and local stage, ProgressWomen offers a distinct progressive
viewpoint. Women care about more than just "abortion"!
"The women’s vote will continue to be vital – and women voters (and men too) need the progressive perspective
to be fully informed and engaged as they prepare to cast their votes in 2012."
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SEC PROBES EFFORT TO BUILD SWEETNER PLANT IN MOBERLY
Associated Press | Posted: Saturday, October 1, 2011 12:00 am
A recent disclosure indicates the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is investigating a so-far unsuccessful
effort to build an artificial sweetener plant in Moberly, Mo.
The Columbia Daily Tribune reported Friday that the trustee for bonds issued for the project, UMB Bank,
reported in a filing with the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board that the bank had been told it would receive
a subpoena. Moberly City Manager Andy Morris told the newspaper Friday that the city has given the SEC
documents that were requested.
"We have been cooperating with them," Morris said.
Mamtek U.S. Inc. planned to employ several hundred people at the artificial sweetener plant. The city issued $39
million in industrial development bonds for the project, the state offered more than $17 million in incentives —
though no state funds went to the company — and $8 million was to come from private investors. However, the
plant still is under construction, and Mamtek has laid off its employees.
Mamtek made a payment for more than $1.2 million in interest for bonds on the project this year, but the
company did not make its first $2.2 million payment for principal and missed a second interest payment for more
than $1 million on Aug. 1.
Several investigations already have been launched into the project.
According to the disclosure filing, UMB Bank said a bond reserve had $2.4 million remaining and only $2 million
remained of the original $33 million project fund. The bank also reported that Mamtek assigned its assets to an
Illinois company to be sold and proceeds distributed to creditors.
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MISSOURI HOUSE WILL VOTE NEXT WEEK ON ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT BILL
By STEVE KRASKE - The Kansas City Star
Posted on Fri, Sep. 30, 2011 10:15 PM

Missouri’s stagnant special legislative session has received new life, with Republican leaders announcing that the
House will consider a jobs bill next week.
A vote of the full House on the much discussed economic development bill is to take place Thursday. House
Republicans are to caucus Wednesday.
“I feel very confident we’ll get a bill out of the House,” said House Minority Leader Mike Talboy, a Kansas City
Democrat.
He said members should be able to review the bill Monday.
However, whether legislation that the House approves will pass muster in the Senate remains unclear. The
Senate has passed a jobs bill, but House leaders said it was unacceptable because of the way the measure
addressed the state’s two leading tax credit programs for low-income housing and historic preservation.
Republican leaders have been at loggerheads over the bill since lawmakers returned to the Capitol for the special
session early in September. A month’s worth of on-again, off-again talks have not produced a compromise.
“We still don’t have an agreement,” House Speaker Steve Tilley told The Associated Press.
The centerpiece of the bill is a new international cargo hub at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport. Also
included is a provision aimed at helping Kansas City compete with Kansas to retain businesses.
A separate bill aimed at boosting high-technology jobs in the state, already approved, is contingent on passage of
the economic development bill.
Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat, has urged lawmakers in recent days to either pass a bill or end the session.
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WATER PATROL OFFICERS TRADE IN WATERWAYS FOR HIGHWAYS
STARTING THIS WEEKEND
Sunday, October 2, 2011
By Michelle Friedrich - Daily American Republic
POPLAR BLUFF, Mo. -- The public is expected to see no difference in the services provided by Missouri State
Highway Patrol as the members of its Water Patrol Division begin transitioning into their road duties on Saturday.
"In the past, the Water Patrol (officers) worked their season, then they would, due to all the overtime and leave
days, … take a lot of time off in their off season," explained Capt. George Ridens, Troop E's commanding officer.
"What they are doing this year, since they have been transitioned over to the Highway Patrol, is effective the first
of October, they will become troop personnel."
This change is the result of legislation signed by Gov. Jay Nixon last summer, which led to the Missouri State
Water Patrol being absorbed into the highway patrol on Jan. 1.
When the initial transition took place in March, Ridens said, the Water Patrol Division troopers were sent to the
patrol's academy for four weeks, followed by a 10-day, ride-along orientation with a road officer.
What the troops now will do is "re-indoctrinate" the Water Patrol Division officers to "handling road functions,"
Ridens said. " … We do that for any road officer who has been off the road, usually in excess of six months."
Unlike other road troopers, Ridens said, these officers also will be handling their water patrol functions.
"They are still Water Patrol Division officers," Ridens said. " … Their first response is to the waters.
"They will augment, supplement the road officers whenever they are not doing water patrol functions."
According to Ridens, this process is "new to all of us. This is our plan at this point in time."
From a water aspect, "I don't think the public will see anything change," said Lt. Mike Pulliam.
Clark Parrott, Troop E's public information officer, agreed.
From a water patrol standpoint, "that service isn't going to go away," Parrott said. "We're going to continue to
work the water, while getting three additional bodies in troop to work within the zones."
What citizens are going to see, from a "road aspect and critical incidents, is we'll have the ability to provide more
services easier because they are part of our agency and vice versa," Pulliam said.
During the spring flooding, "we had uniformed road officers in the boats with them, so we certainly aided in their
role in responding a lot easier than before," Pulliam said.
Effective Saturday, Ridens said, the three water patrol officers living within the 13-counties of Troop E "will come
to Troop E."
"Basically, all that we're doing is their scheduling, overseeing their reports (and) overseeing their day-to-day
operation until spring when they go back out to the water patrol side, back to the waterways," Ridens said.
The water patrol officers, according to Ridens, will ride in patrol cars with other officers starting out.
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Once the zone sergeants feel comfortable "with them doing their job, they'll be on the road alone," Ridens said.
"They will be operating out of their pickups."
Even before "the merger, (water patrol officers) had the authority to do car stops," Pulliam said. "Again, it's really
not changing, other than the different uniforms and their vehicles as marked highway patrol as opposed to water
patrol."
Parrott agreed.
"Their uniforms are the same as what we all wear," Parrott said.
The only difference is "you're going to see some pickup trucks out there making enforcement stops now," Parrott
said.
If red and blue lights appearing "behind you (from) a pickup worries you, then pull over at the first safe spot you
can, roll your window down far enough so you can talk to the officer and tell them your concerns and ask him for
his identification," Ridens said. "Make sure he is in a uniform."
With the additional personnel, Ridens said, comes additional responsibilities "we've not had in the past. It's going
to be a learning experience for them; it's going to be a learning experience for us in the troop, but the public
should not see any difference at all."
Ridens said the transition should be "seamless as far as what goes on on the waterways and the roadways."
Pertinent address:
4947 Highway 67 North Poplar Bluff, MO
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SECTION OF HWY 25 RENAMED IN HONOR OF FORMER
REPRESENTATIVE
Friday, September 30, 2011
LECIA FORESTER - Daily Dunklin Democrat
On Thursday afternoon, friends, family and colleagues of State Representative Otto Bean, Jr., gathered at the
local BAILS office to share memories and honor a man who contributed so much to Southeast Missouri.
Bean was a two-term representative for District 163 in Missouri and made history in the year of 2002 when he
was the first republican to represent the district in the Missouri House of Representatives in recorded history.
The purpose of the gathering on Thursday was the dedication ceremony renaming Highway 25 in Dunklin and
Stoddard Counties from US 412 to Routes U and Z the Representative Otto Bean, Jr., Memorial Highway.
This piece of legislature was sponsored by State Representative Kent Hampton, R-Malden, 163rd district and who
was also one of the speakers for the event, introducing those who knew Representative Bean well.
The room in which the meeting was held was adorned in white, orange and yellow tablecloths each holding a fall
arrangement. At the front of the room near the podium was a huge composite of Bean and different colleagues,
many depicting scenes as his role of representative. On the table was a picture showing a much younger Bean.
An estimated 50 to 60 people had gathered together to pay tribute to not only a representative but as a friend
also.
Featured speakers included Caleb Davis, Ark-Mo Delta General Manager, Terry Swinger, State Representative,
District 162, Billy Pat Wright, State Representative, District 159, Dave Haggard, Haggard Farms, Darren Lingle,
director of Projects and Outreach, speaking on behalf of Congresswoman Jo Ann Emerson, District Eight, and Rob
Mayer, Missouri Senate, District 25.
Hampton first took the podium and spoke.
"As we have an opportunity to reflect and an opportunity to honor Representative Otto Bean, Jr., with a
memorial highway from Highway 25 [in Kennett] to Highway U and Z in Bernie," he said.
Hampton then shared a story with the audience concerning Bean.
"As I started out visiting houses and areas in the district itself, I'd always heard that abracadabra was a magic
word that opened doors. I soon realized that Otto Bean in 163 replaced those words. Not only was the reception
greater, there was always a story that went with it. From a visit that he had encountered with the individual to a
time that he helped the individual with an issue. He was a people person. He loved people and people loved him.
He worked hard, he loved his job and he did a good job," he said, adding, "We're all better for it."
Hampton noted how some things that are already in place, Bean actually laid the groundwork for it.
Hampton then added his thanks to the supporters of this project, Marsha Haskell, as well as Tim Shaw and BAILS
for the usage of the meeting room.
"Friendships are priceless. They can't be bought. They last forever. Today is a testimony of that," Hampton noted.
At the conclusion of his remarks, Hampton introduced other people who shared their memories of Bean.
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The next one to speak was Davis.
"Today is a celebration of Ott's life. Ott was truly a man for all seasons. He was a devoted family man, church
man. He was an outstanding farmer. He was a great cotton man and he served the cotton industry in all aspects,"
he said, adding, "He was a wonderful legislator." Davis noted how Bean could unite people and get things done.
In conclusion, through a tear-filled voice, Davis said, "God Speed Ott, we miss you. No body deserves this any
more than he does."
The next to speak about his memories of Bean was Representative Swinger, a personal friend as well as a former
colleague of his in the House.
Swinger spoke of how he got to know Bean in the legislature. He told of a story about the issue of that the two
were working on and that was of Boll weevils.
"He said the problem with boll weevil is when one of them dies, ten thousand comes to his funeral." Swinger also
talked of how Bean had a crop of cotton growing outside his office and spoke of how he got 107 counties to
understand what is done in Southeast Missouri.
"We all got to working together and meet in the senator's office every week. We figured out how to work
together as a team and that's what we do from our area." Another issue Bean tackled while in office was the
issue of genetically modified rice. As a result of his efforts and others as well, it was solved as Swinger said,
"expeditiously."
"Everybody liked Ott. He had this wonderful personality. He was warm. He was comfortable. He was charismatic.
He just loved people and people loved him. I think this is a fitting tribute to Otto Bean, Jr." Swinger said.
Next to speak was Representative Wright, a friend and former colleague. He spoke of the memory of when he
was running for office. Bean had called him up and said he was going to come by and pick him up the day after
election and take him to Jefferson City and Wright told him that they should wait till after the election and see if
he won. To this Bean kept saying, "You're going to win, You're going to win." Wright told him to call him later, a
little closer to election time. Wright noted that Bean then called him every week. The last time he called he told
Wright to get his bags packed and Wright asked him what would he do if he lost. To this Wright related that Bean
said if that happened, he'd go by and pick up the other guy.
There was much laughter in the audience as each remembered the man who was once the state representative
for the 163 district.
"Folks, Otto on the floor was a gentleman. I think of Otto as a real slim Kentucky Fried Chicken man with gray
hair. He was such a gentleman. Representative Gail Kingry always called him "grandpa." I learned to love Otto,"
he said, adding a phrase that Bean once said, "Treat each other like you want to be treated."
Haggard, a family friend, was the next to speak.
He talked of a memory of when his mother took both he and Bean to the train station in Poplar Bluff to the train
station to go to military school. Haggard spoke of what a shock it was for him because he did not want to go.
Bean had actually been assigned to the school and when Haggard's mother saw Bean and his family, she asked
him if he would look after her son, according to Haggard "he said yes and he did it to his dying day." If he made a
promise, that was it. Look at how much time has passed and Ott's friends still cling because he was so unique."
Haggard talked how part of that uniqueness was his always checking on his friends, remarking that he must have
had a timetable in his head, saying that he would come and check on you about every eight to ten days, noting
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he covered a big area of Missouri, Arkansas and even Illinois. Additionally, according to Haggard, Bean would
check on you, see if you need any help and he would always be equipped with a humorous story.
"He was a gentleman as you all have said and he tended to his flock of many, many friends. His word was gold
and he was always upbeat. He was the kind of fellow when you saw him coming, you were happy [and] when he
left, you were sad. That's the Ott we miss," Haggard said.
Speaking on behalf of Congresswoman Emerson was Lingle. Emerson was absent because of issues in
Washington but asked Lingle to stress two things, how much she and her late husband loved Bean and how he
had made a difference.
"He truly made a difference long before he was a state representative but was making a difference in the lives of
people he worked with and those he lived with every single day," he said, adding, "Jo Ann said that this is just a
small way of honoring his commitment and to honor the work that he was so good at doing. Additionally Lingle
said, "For a young man starting out in this profession, he was a great example and someone I was privileged to
know and it's great that we can honor him today."
Following Lingle's brief talk, Senate Pro-Tem Rob Mayer, also a friend and colleague, came to the front and spoke
of his memories regarding Bean.
"Being around Ott Bean was just a joy. It brought happiness and pleasure and fun. He's been gone now for
several years and this group has gathered and we think back fondly on him and we're having fun and we have the
utmost respect for him. You know there is no doubt that we lost a dear friend, a wonderful person and a
dedicated representative just a little over four years ago. I agree with everyone else. It's fitting that we gather
here today as a token of our appreciation and admiration for Representative Otto Bean. As we've all said, Otto
was one of a kind." He noted how Bean always had the ability to make people laugh and take away any tension
that was in the room. Mayer also recognized Bean's service to his country by serving in the National Guard.
"He served his country in the guard. He was a leader there and people loved him and spoke highly of him there.
As it was mentioned, he was a local leader for four decades before he ever went to the House of
Representatives. He was the kind of guy that could take these younger guys and settle them down and put
everything in the proper perspective."
Mayer talked of local projects that Bean pushed for, including Boll Weevil Eradication Program, the Kennett Hope
Center and local business development.
"He was a great leader for agriculture. As they said, he had a cotton plant outside his office. You know, I've
missed Otto Bean from the day he's left us," Mayer said, adding, "He was that kind of guy. I immediately had a
bonding with him. I miss him so much to this day. To Ott's family, Janet, Jason, Barry, Claire and Little Otto, I
thank you on behalf of the people of the 25th senatorial district for sharing this wonderful man with us and I'll
just close by saying this, I remember years ago we had a pastor at our church that made a saying that stuck with
me and that saying was this, 'People don't care about how much you know until they know how much you care,'
and I think that exemplifies Otto Bean to a T. Not only did he have the knowledge but even greater than that he
had a care and love for people. Thank God for Otto Bean."
Following the sharing of memories, Representative Hampton once again took the podium and shared a few
words from a quote made by Max Cato, before presenting a copy of the bill renaming Highway 25 for Bean and
the unveiling of the sign.
"It's not the title that makes the difference. It's the concern that makes the difference," Hampton said, adding,
"And Ott had that for each and every one."
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After presentation of the bill to the family, Bean's wife, Janet, said a few words, thanking friends and colleagues
for the honor bestowed upon her late husband. She related how her husband was once a member of the
basketball team in high school and remembered a remark that he once said.
"You know, I was a member of a team. I did not do that by myself. I could not have made those goals, those
baskets if my team had not maneuvered the ball to me. I don't ever forget they are a team." Bean's wife added,
"That is the way he would feel about what you are doing here. I look out there and everyone of you were his
team. He loved you as family."
Following the presentation and unveiling of the sign refreshments were served.
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CITY LAWSUIT CALLS EPA RULES UNATTAINABLE
11:00 PM, Sep. 30, 2011
Springfield News-Leader - Written by News-Leader staff

The city of Springfield is suing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency over stormwater runoff regulations.
The lawsuit filed Friday in federal court challenges the EPA's new rules on Total Maximum Daily Load limits of
pollutants into Wilson's, Jordan and Pearson creeks.
The city believes the proposed limits are unattainable, the city indicated in a news release.
TMDL rules are designed to limit the amount of pollutants that flow into a stream and EPA is charged with
identifying the pollutant to be controlled.
New EPA rules that don't identify a specific pollutant will require the city "sharply and substantially" reduce all
stormwater runoff across the city.
In January, EPA Region 7 established TMDL limits for Pearson Creek, Wilson's Creek and Jordan Creek in
Springfield, and Hinkson Creek in Columbia.
EPA's TMDL report for Pearson, Wilson's and Jordan Creeks indicated the target is to achieve the same pollutant
level as Bryant Creek, Bull Creek, North Fork River, and Spring Creek. The most urbanized area of these four
reference streams is Bull Creek, which is only 2 percent urbanized.
Columbia is suing the EPA in relation to Hinkson Creek.
The news release indicated that Springfield has spent more than $130 million in wastewater system
improvements and $50 million in stormwater system improvements.
The EPA has not indicated why Springfield is among a group of cities that have been selected for the new
stormwater limits.
The city has filed suit at this time because it must make any objections to the TMDL limits known before the
Missouri Department of Natural Resources issues its stormwater permit to the city, which is likely to occur soon.
If the city had not filed the lawsuit prior to the state issuing the stormwater permit, case law indicates that the
city may have lost its ability to object to the unattainable TMDL limits.
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STATE AG DEPARTMENT HALTS MEAT PROCESSING AT LOCAL
BUSINESS
Sunday, October 2, 2011
By Melissa Miller - Southeast Missourian
The Missouri Department of Agriculture has imposed restrictions on a Pocahontas meat processing business after
an inspection reportedly revealed unsanitary conditions.
An inspection Friday by the members of the department's Meat and Poultry Inspection Program identified
"sanitation issues" involving meat processing equipment at Reis Meat Processing.
As a result, the facility's custom exempt processing permissions have been suspended until a satisfactory
inspection is completed. Custom exempt processing is done for livestock owners for their own consumption.
Owner Revis Reisenbichler said he has taken action to correct the sanitation violations and that the facility would
be reinspected at 7 a.m. Monday by Missouri Department of Agriculture staff.
Sanitation deficiencies observed by inspectors include:
* Trolleys observed with rust and meat particle buildup.
* Excessive number of flies observed in kill floor area, processing area, on countertops in lugs, on shelves and
throughout floor.
* Walls and doors of walk-in coolers observed with fat residue and dried blood buildup.
* Floor throughout the facility and walk-in cooler units observed with old meat particles, fat residue and soil build
up.
* Kill floor sink observed with dead flies, not working property and no soap.
* Hand meat saw observed with dried meat particles.
* Dead flies observed in packaging material container.
* Cutting boards observed with dark stains and not sanitary.
In its news release, the Missouri Department of Agriculture asks individuals who have recently conducted
business with Reis Meat Processing to carefully examine all items processed by the facility before consuming.
Customers are encouraged to contact their local health officials with any food safety-related questions and for
additional information on sanitation.
mmiller@semissourian.com
388-3646
Pertinent address:
2470 Highway C, Pocahontas, Mo.
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INSPECTORS TEMPORARILY STOP CUSTOM MEAT PROCESSING AT
JACKSON BUSINESS
Posted: Sep 30, 2011 4:14 PM CDTUpdated: Sep 30, 2011 9:45 PM CDT
KFVS - By James Long
JACKSON, MO (KFVS) - Inspectors have temporarily stopped custom meat processing after an inspection Friday at
a Jackson business.
The Mo. Dept. of Agriculture's Meat and Poultry Inspection Program stopped the custom processing at Reis Meat
Processing because of "unsanitary practices," according to the Mo. Dept. of Agriculture.
Officials say, inspectors found issues with the processing equipment Friday and decided to suspend custom
exempt processing.
Custom exempt processing is done for livestock owners for their own consumption.
Custom processing will remain suspended until inspectors deem the equipment satisfactory. An inspection will
be completed at the owner's request, according to the state.
During this time, Reis Meat Processing is not allowed to sell meat to the public. State officials say custom meat is
specially marked for use.
Consumers who have recently done business with Reis Meat Processing are asked to carefully examine the meats
processed by the business before eating, according to state officials.
For more information, contact your local health office with any food safety questions.
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STATE OFFICIALS SAY WESTMINSTER STUDENT HAS TB
Southeast Missourian
Sep 30, 8:10 PM EDT
FULTON, Mo. (AP) -- The Missouri State Health Department has notified Westminster College that one of its
students has been diagnosed with active tuberculosis.
The Fulton college says the student has been isolated from unprotected contact with others while undergoing
treatment for the disease.
The diagnosis was the result of routine tuberculosis screening at the college, whose officials are working with the
student to identify people who have had close, prolonged, regular contact with the student.
The school says there is no need for the college community to take any specific medical precautions at this time.
Tuberculosis is a disease caused by an infection transmitted through the air by a person with active TB.
Symptoms include a bad cough that lasts more than three weeks, night sweats and coughing up blood or phlegm.
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ANALYSIS: MISSOURI STILL COUNTS IN PRESIDENTIAL RACE
GOP moves away from Feb. 7 primary to March caucuses.
11:00 PM, Oct. 1, 2011
Springfield News-Leader - Written by Chris Blank, The Associated Press
JEFFERSON CITY -- Missouri Republicans ducked a February state presidential primary and chose to hold caucuses
more than a month later to avoid upsetting the national campaign schedule. The shuffle means Missouri will
dodge punishment from national Republicans, but the state still could get an early -- if unofficial -- say on the
GOP presidential candidates.
State law still sets Missouri's presidential primary on Feb. 7. The Missouri Republican State Committee instead
has chosen to award its delegates through a caucus process that starts March 17.
The Republican county caucuses in March will select delegates, who can signal allegiance to a presidential
candidate but are not required to do so, to attend the state's congressional district conventions on April 21 and
the state convention on June 2. At each of those meetings, roughly half of Missouri's delegates to the Republican
National Convention will be selected and then bound to support a particular presidential candidate.
However, Missouri law currently still requires a presidential primary on Feb. 7 -- even if Republicans are using
caucuses and the Democratic candidate will be President Barack Obama. Coming a month before Missouri's
caucuses, even a nonbinding presidential preference election would allow Missouri to leave a mark on a possible
favored candidate relatively early in the contest. Depending somewhat on what happens during the early state
caucuses and primaries, a win in a Missouri "beauty contest" could help a candidate demonstrate viability, earn
attention and shore up fundraising.
"Missouri is thought of as a swing state and a barometer state. You'd hate to lose, especially badly, but you can
gain some traction if you win," said Richard Fulton, a political science professor at Northwest Missouri State
University.
The national Republican and Democratic parties have pushed states to wait longer to hold their presidential
contests next year and have threatened to dock half the delegates to the national convention for a state that
goes too early. The national party rules allow Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada to hold their
primaries or caucuses in February. The rest are supposed to wait until at least March.
Missouri Republican Party Executive Director Lloyd Smith said the state should get attention from presidential
hopefuls. He said a tightly contested and longer duration race such as the 2008 contest could boost the attention
that Missouri gets with the state's mid-March caucuses occurring when candidates need delegates. However,
Missouri also might get less attention at the start of the campaign with a nonbinding primary.
States were facing a deadline this weekend to submit the dates for their state presidential primaries and
caucuses to the national Republican Party.
Like other statewide election campaigns, presidential primaries in Missouri could be waged heavily through TV
ads and enticing residents to spend several minutes casting a ballot at the polls. A caucus means attracting
supporters and persuading them to attend what can be a lengthy meeting. In addition, a primary could allow
Democrats who do not have their own presidential contest to weigh in on the Republican candidates. Caucuses
can attract more ardent GOP supporters, which could fuel support for more conservative presidential candidates.
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IN KC, THREE PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES SPEAK TO GOP WOMEN
By STEVE KRASKE - The Kansas City Star
Posted on Sat, Oct. 01, 2011 10:15 PM
Three GOP presidential candidates visited Kansas City on Saturday and took turns bashing President Barack
Obama.
Former Godfather’s Pizza CEO Herman Cain urged the National Federation of Republican Women, meeting at
Bartle Hall, to stay informed because “stupid people are running America.”
Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich said Obama was “the most destructive president economically since
Herbert Hoover.”
Former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum called the president’s health care reform law “a game changer for America
because it makes so many more people dependent on the government.”
“This isn’t wrong just because it takes our freedom,” Santorum said. “It denies the value of every human life, and
we as Americans cannot let that stand.”
The three were the only candidates to accept invitations to speak to the group’s national convention, which
disappointed federation leaders.
Fresh off a win in the Florida straw poll, Cain appeared to draw the most enthusiastic response from the
hundreds of women in the hall. He did it with a lot of blunt talk about the nation’s predicament.
Cain promised he would always talk straight.
“Political correctness is not my forte,” he said.
All day long, women attending this convention lined up to take part in the federation’s straw poll, whose results
will be released this morning.
All three candidates spoke of the need to cut taxes drastically and rid the nation of the health care program.
Cain touted his “999” plan — a flat tax on businesses and individuals of 9 percent and a national 9 percent sales
tax.
He admitted that he’s told all the time that he doesn’t know how Washington works. His response: “Yes, I do. It
doesn’t.”
Santorum spoke of his ability to win tough elections in the swing state of Pennsylvania. He urged 50 percent cuts
in corporate taxes as a way to spark the manufacturing sector.
Gingrich, who pushed a “Contract for America” in 1994, which helped Republicans win the House for the first
time in decades, offered a “21st Century Contract With America.” It calls for balancing the budget, creating jobs
through tax cuts and “unleashing America’s full energy production potential.”
He told The Star that Obama is “engaged in class warfare. He’s engaged in bureaucratic socialism. He doesn’t
have a clue how to create jobs.”
Gingrich said he would welcome a presidential bid from Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey. But he issued a
warning:
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“If he wants to come and play, we’re glad to have him. I think Gov. Perry (of Texas) would advise him that
running for president is a little more complicated than being governor.”
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CONVENTION BRINGS THREE GOP CANDIDATES TO KANSAS CITY
Posted: 10/01/2011
Last Updated: 23 hours and 52 minutes ago
KSHB - By: Jake Peterson
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - The Kansas City Convention Center was full of Republican women on Saturday. About 1,200
members of the National Federation of Republican women attended a conference for the group.
"I believe women will be the force in the election of 2012 and it's important that we are in the boots running on
the ground running," said organizer Violet Corbett.
The group invited all of the GOP candidates to speak, but only Newt Gingrich, Rick Santorum, and Herman Cain
attended.
All of the speakers took turns attacking current President Barack Obama.
"The American dream is under attack, the American dream is under attack, but the good news is we can take it
back," said candidate Herman Cain.
The speakers were cordial to each other, but Newt Gingrich said he has the most experience.
I think I'm in a different league than my friends, they are all good people but none of them have any significant
national experience," said Gingrich.
The women in attendance took a straw poll of who they want to win. The results will be made available on
Sunday.
Convention leaders said winning the straw poll will help the candidate going into primary season.
"It really gives them momentum,"said organizer Sue Lynch.
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MARTIN, WAGNER TOUT SIMILAR CONSERVATIVE VIEWS IN FIRST
MAJOR DEBATE
By Jo Mannies, Beacon political reporter
Posted 1:52 am Sun., 10.2.11
In their first public debate, Republican congressional hopefuls Ann Wagner and Ed Martin each staked out similar
conservative territory Saturday before a like-minded standing-room-only Chesterfield crowd.
Both seek to get rid of the federal health-insurance law, dubbed by critics as "Obamacare.
Both support the elimination of the departments of Education and Energy and all but advocated doing away with
the Environmental Protection Agency as well.
Both call for curbing illegal immigration by securing the United States' borders by fences or other means,
punishing businesses that hire illegal immigrants and deporting as many as possible.
Both declare they want to do away with unions for public employees and support passage of a "right-to-work"
law that would bar unions from requiring all workers to join if a majority in a workplace have voted for union
representation.
Both say entitlements -- Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid -- must be changed to reduce their cost.
Both emphasized their support for the right to bear arms and their opposition to abortion.
Both also decried what they see as out-of-control federal spending and excessive federal regulations, which they
blame for slowing down the economic recovery.
And both have little use for President Barack Obama.
"This president is tone deaf. He does not get it," said Wagner. "The government doesn't create jobs. ... Small and
medium businesses create jobs. Entrepreneurs create jobs."
"The guy doesn't know how to do anything with the economy," said Martin, adding later, "It's time to make sure
President Obama is a one-term president."
Martin asserted that the United States was headed in the same direction as financially troubled Greece unless
changes are made. "We have to get government inside the limits it should have," Martin said.
Saturday's debate was the first major public event featuring Wagner and Martin, who are vying for the
Republican nomination for the 2nd District congressional seat. The post is now held by Rep. Todd Akin, R-
Wildwood, who's running for the GOP nomination for U.S. Senate.
Wagner, of Ballwin, is a veteran Republican activist. She is former chair of the state GOP and most recently
served as President George W. Bush's ambassador to Luxembourg. Martin, of St. Louis, is a lawyer who has been
active in a number of Republican causes. He narrowly lost a congressional bid last fall against U.S. Rep. Russ
Carnahan, D-St. Louis.
Martin and Wagner have agreed to participate in at least 10 debates or forums before the August 2012 primary.
Saturday's was held in Chesterfield at the Drury Plaza Hotel, with the Drury family -- staunch Republicans --
donating use of the ballroom.
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Their chief differences are that Wagner continues to rack in high-profile Republican endorsements and has
amassed more cash, while Martin continues to promote himself as the scrappy conservative with strong tea
party ties.
Wagner began her opening statement Saturday by announcing the endorsement of former U.S. Attorney
General John Ashcroft -- Missouri's former governor, state attorney general, auditor and U.S. senator.
In a statement circulated at the debate, Ashcroft lauded Wagner as "a trusted, pro-life conservative'' and "an
outspoken critic of liberal Democrats and their failed policies."
Martin gently tweaked Wagner over her endorsements, which also include ones from New Jersey Gov. Chris
Christie and U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo.
Martin said he was announcing the endorsement of his wife, Carol. He also emphasized his own credentials as
former chief of staff to Gov. Matt Blunt and as a lawyer fighting on behalf of abortion opponents.
So far, no Democrat has formally announced for the 2nd District seat, although Carnahan has been encouraged
by some Democrats to explore the prospect since his current 3rd District was eliminated during the recent
redistricting process. St. Louis School Board member Bill Haas also is considering a bid.
(Carnahan now is believed to be waiting the outcome of a lawsuit challenging the redistricting.)
State House Majority Tim Jones, R-Eureka and the moderator, told the crowd that he was confident the new 2nd
District -- like the current one -- would remain solidly Republican. Jones added that he was heartened
Republicans took control of the U.S. House in the 2010 elections. Jones observed that if the Democrats had
retained control, "it might be Armageddon right now."
For more than an hour, Wagner and Martin answered a series of written questions provided by the audience.
Among the key topics:
Health care
Both candidates said that competition was the best way to curb the rising costs. Both also touted the long-
standing GOP call for expanded health savings accounts: People can put in their own money tax-free to pay for
premiums and other health-care expenses.
Unions
Both contended that unions are wielding too much power in government, and costing taxpayers too much.
Wagner said, "I do not support collective bargaining for public employees." She added that it also was "a
disgrace" that the National Labor Relations Board has challenged Boeing Co.'s decision to move a plant to a right-
to-work state.
"I would support a (national) right-to-work law if I was in Congress," Wagner said.
Martin said he believed that "right to work" was best handled on the state level, but that it should be done
legislatively, not at the ballot box. "It's very difficult to pass right-to-work" in a statewide vote, Martin said,
adding that's why Wisconsin and Ohio have sought to curb union clout legislatively.
"We need to abolish public sector unions,'' Martin said.
Entitlements
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Martin called for curbing the disability benefit now available under Social Security and cited cases where people
have received the benefit solely for being overweight.
"We the only country in the world who have poor people who are obese," Martin said.
Wagner praised the proposal of U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., to change Medicare into a voucher-style program for
people now under age 55.
"At least it's a starting point," Wagner said. She emphasized that the nation's entitlements now take up over 40
percent of the federal budget and the cost must reduced.
She also called for changing Social Security for younger workers, while Martin called Social Security "worse than a
Ponzi scheme'' because the federal government has used money collected under Social Security for other
programs.
Immigration
The duo ignited their strongest applause when they emphasized their stands against illegal immigration.
Martin called for a change in the U.S. Constitution so that citizenship is not automatically granted to children
born in the United States, whose parents are illegal immigrants.
Penalties also need to be stiffer, Martin said, recommending that "if you come here illegally, you can never be a
voting citizen."
Wagner said that people who are in the United States illegally "should not have the rights and access to the same
privileges that we as the citizenry have."
St. Louis County Republican activist Chris Howard, who sits on the state committee and co-hosted Saturday's
event, told the crowd before the debate that he was looking for "lions" to represent the 2nd District and run
Congress.
"What we have are a bunch of hyenas, trying to feast on the carcass of the money we send them," Howard said.
Afterward, Howard said Martin and Wagner both qualified as lions.
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DAVIS AIMING FOR LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR'S SEAT
BY MARK SCHLINKMANN
St. Louis Post-Dispatch - Posted: Saturday, October 1, 2011 10:00 am
Former Republican state Rep. Cynthia Davis' Constitution Party candidacy next year will be for lieutenant
governor.
Davis, 51, planned to begin a three-day swing of news conferences on Saturday to announce her third-party bid.
Davis, an outspoken social conservative from O'Fallon, Mo., promises to rip both the Democratic and Republican
parties for supporting programs that foster big government. Another emphasis is her opposition to legal
abortion.
She also has complained that campaign donations play too much a role in legislative decisions.
"I will be perfectly positioned to hold both parties accountable," she said, referring to the lieutenant governor's
race.
Davis had said several weeks ago she would run for statewide office on the ticket of the Constitution Party but
held off announcing which post she would seek.
Third-party candidates in Missouri historically have won only rarely; Davis says she'll make an effort to appeal to
independent voters to reverse that trend.
Another possibility is that her candidacy could siphon votes that would otherwise go to the Republican
nominee. House Speaker Steve Tilley of Perryville is already running for the GOP nod.
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TEMPORARY REPAIRS OF BIRDS POINT LEVEE NEARLY DONE
St. Louis Post- Dispatch - ASSOCIATED PRESS
Posted: Sunday, October 2, 2011 12:00 am
NEW MADRID, Mo. • The Army Corps of Engineers is scheduled to soon complete temporary repairs of the Birds
Point levee, but officials in southeast Missouri continue to pressure the corps to rebuild the intentionally
breached levee to its original height.
The corps used explosives to breach the levee this spring to ease flooding on the Mississippi River and help save
the nearby town of Cairo, Ill. The breach flooded 130,000 acres of Missouri farmland and destroyed dozens of
homes.
The Southeast Missourian reports that the corps expects to finish interim repairs at one of the three breached
spots early next month. The other temporary repairs should be complete by Nov. 30.
U.S. Rep. Jo Ann Emerson, R-Mo., and Missouri's senators, Republican Roy Blunt and Democrat Claire McCaskill,
have been pushing the corps to rebuild the levee to its original height — preferably before next spring.
The levee is part of a floodway designed to be breached in cases of extreme flooding, a move that lowers the
level of the Mississippi River. Other floodways also were opened in Louisiana during the flood, which was among
the worst ever along the lower Mississippi River.
Corps spokesman Jim Pogue said rebuilding Birds Point is a priority.
"Where there is a potential for the loss of life, that's always going to be at the top of the list," he said. "But the
floodway is also important. It's going to happen. It's not an 'if.' It's just a 'when.' "
Crews began working June 16 to repair nearly 15,000 feet of levee — 9,000 at the upper breach, 800 feet at the
center one and 4,700 feet at the lower one. Workers have also had to fill scour holes with sand dredged from the
river bottom, realign levee segments and remove excess water, according to a project update document.
The corps has spent $5.7 million to temporarily set the levee to a height corresponding to 51 feet on the river
gauge at Cairo. But a full restoration of the levee to 62.5 feet will cost an additional $21 million. Though that
additional funding is not currently available, Pogue said the corps intends to rebuild the levee to its pre-blast
condition.
The floodway is in Mississippi and New Madrid counties. Carlin Bennett, the presiding commissioner of
Mississippi County, said he continues to await an answer to an open-records request that he sent to the corps.
He wants to see documentation and correspondence to verify if the decision to breach the levee worked as well
as corps officials say it has.
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TORNADO CREATING JOB OPPORTUNITIES
Joplin Globe
By Josh Letner and Andy Ostmeyer - October 1, 2011
JOPLIN, Mo. — One would think the May 22 tornado would have put Joplin’s economy into a tailspin. But just the
opposite has happened.

As other places worry about stagnant housing, sluggish construction and the possibility of sliding back into a
recession, many businesses in Joplin are reporting a robust, even record-breaking year.

Construction already has set a record for the city. Home sales are double what they were a year ago.

Some long-standing restaurants and car dealers have seen sales double, and in fact are anticipating their best
year yet.

And for every job that has been lost, the tornado has created new opportunity.

One expert believes that by this time next year, if not sooner, the region may well have shaved a couple points
off the unemployment rate, making headway against an intractable problem that continues to hamper the rest of
the U.S. economy.

New opportunity

Tom Powell is one of those for whom the tornado has created new opportunity.

For years, Powell, who lives south of Joplin, ran a lawn service business in the area.

Then came May 22. When the nearly milewide tornado lifted, thousands of homes and businesses had been
destroyed. Many of them were Powell’s longtime customers.

Business, of course, was not his immediate concern.

“In the beginning, we just wanted to help everybody. I didn’t even think about our business. I was just trying to
help Suzi’s (Powell’s wife’s) parents with their house.

“About a month later, I started adding it all up and I lost about $30,000 a year in business.”

But in the storm clouds, Powell sees a silver lining.

As Joplin rebuilds, he believes many residents and businesses will opt to include a storm shelter, no longer taking
their safety for granted during a tornado warning.

“Growing up around here, the sirens go off a lot, the warnings are there a lot, but I think this has kind of changed
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the thinking,” he said when asked about the need for shelters.

Powell opened a new business, Funnel Proof Storm Shelters, and created a website of the same name, believing
that as people rebuild — and especially if incentives are made available to help with the cost — storm shelters
could become a booming Joplin business.

A 6 foot-by-8 foot in-ground shelter costs approximately $3,000 installed, he said, but costs vary depending on
whether they are above ground or in-ground, and their size. Powell sells both in-ground and above-ground
shelters.

“I thought this could be cool because you can save lives and make some money,” he said.

Jobs outlook

Jasen Jones, executive director of the Workforce Investment Board of Southwest Missouri, said there are many
stories such as Powell’s: people finding new opportunity after the storm.

Initially, nobody knew what to expect. Five hundred businesses were hit; 5,000 jobs were affected, according to
the Joplin Area Chamber of Commerce. But the largest employer, St. John’s Regional Medical Center, which
employs 2,000 people, said it would keep everyone on the payroll and reinvest upward of $1 billion in rebuilding
a new hospital campus.

In the months after the storm, seasonally adjusted unemployment remained steady — 8.0 percent in May to 8.2
percent in June and then back to 8.1 percent in July and August.

Jones thinks unemployment will soon start coming down, reflecting the number of people who are finding work
with ongoing cleanup and rebuilding.

A $12 million U.S. Department of Labor grant put 700 unemployed people to work this summer, paying many of
those workers $10 to $12 an hour, and Jones said that will soon show up in the unemployment numbers.

The number of unemployed in the Joplin metropolitan area (Jasper and Newton counties) was at 7,010 in July,
according to the Missouri Department of Economic Development, meaning the 700 jobs created since then is the
equivalent of 10 percent of the area’s unemployed.

Jones predicted unemployment could be around 6 percent next year.

“I’d be surprised if we didn’t see a good couple of points (drop).”

In fact, he said some manufacturers that were just beginning to see a rebound before the storm are telling him
they now are having trouble hiring.

“Some of the manufacturers have expressed a challenge finding individuals. There are just a lot more jobs now
than people seeking jobs in the region,” he added.
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Sue Adams, director of human resources for Able Manufacturing and past chairman of the Joplin Area Chamber
of Commerce, said the company is on the hunt for qualified workers.

Last year at this time, Able had a work force of 273 employees; now it is at 345.

“We have 15 open positions right now. We anticipate a minimum of another dozen in the next six weeks,” she
said. “We are struggling to find people. Other manufacturers in Joplin are saying the same thing.”

How long?

“We have seen a huge boost in our business,” said Mike Wiggins, owner of Granny Shaffer’s. He is past chairman
of the Missouri Restaurant Association and the current chairman of the Joplin Area Chamber of Commerce.

Things began picking up last fall for local restaurants and it continued through the spring, but business really took
off this summer.

More than two dozen Joplin restaurants were damaged or destroyed by the storm, and that helped business, but
so did the arrival of thousands of volunteers, workers, federal employees and others.

“The (restaurants) that survived since the tornado are up 100 to 200 percent over last year,” Wiggins said.

His restaurant near Seventh Street and Illinois Avenue is picking up construction trade traffic, while his Range
Line Road location is picking up business from displaced people who moved north, to Carl Junction and Webb
City, because of the population shift.

Jimmy John’s, near Fourth Street and Range Line Road, also has seen a boom.

“We have doubled our business, if not tripled,” said general manager Charly McCaslin. “We’re still doing record
numbers.”

Chris Kinslow, general manager of Applebee’s near Texas Avenue and East 32nd Street, said business is still up
there as well, although the restaurant is not as busy now as it was right after the storm. It’s not just volunteers,
contractors and others, either. Some of the locals who used to stop in once or twice a week are now coming by
five times a week, he said.

Both Kinslow and Wiggins said the economic boom brought about by the tornado will last, perhaps, for two
years.

“Then after that, who knows?” said Wiggins, adding that some of what happens afterward will depend not only
on national economic trends, but Joplin’s success at rebuilding.

Up 140 percent

John Elliott, sales manager for Roper Buick GMC, is more optimistic about the length of the economic boom.
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Roper’s Joplin dealerships were inundated in the aftermath of the tornado, which destroyed 18,000 vehicles,
according to city figures.

Many storm victims lost multiple vehicles, but only purchased one vehicle immediately after the storm in order
to get around again. Now they’re coming back.

“We are still seeing the victims coming in ... They are buying a second car or a third car,” Elliott said.

Contractors, meanwhile, are needing trucks.

“A lot of my business is truck business,” Elliott said. “They are going to need new trucks.”

All sales are up 140 percent over last year across the five Roper franchises in Joplin; truck sales are up 125
percent.

“This is by far the best year the Roper organization has ever had,” he said, adding that the company has been in
business more than 50 years.

“We forecast at least five years down the road our business is going to be able to sustain itself where it is today.”

Housing

Nationally, home sales fell again in August — for the fourth straight month — and this during the peak buying
season. Experts said it was an indication the housing market around the country is still years away from a
recovery.

Not so for Joplin.

“Houses have doubled as far as sales in a year’s time,” said Cheryl Efird, president of the Ozark Gateway
Association of Realtors. Last year, home sales hit 1,061 from May 22 through the end of August, compared with
2,107 this year.

For larger homes — four bedrooms or more — sales are triple what they were a year ago.

Traffic for building lots is red-hot, too.

“It has been a while since we had this kind of business. I barely get a lot (listed) and I get a phone call from
someone making an offer,” Efird said.

And while the median sales price of a new home fell nearly 9 percent nationally, according to the Commerce
Department, that’s not the case in Joplin, either, where 90 percent of the home sellers were getting what they
asked, Efird said.

“At this point we are still seeing that the home prices are holding,” she said. “The stronger economy here, my
projection... We are looking at a five- to seven-year completion.”
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Another record

Joplin’s best year for construction was in 2007, when building permits showed $128.1 million worth of building
inside the city limits. In the current fiscal year, which began Nov. 1, construction has hit $131.2 million, with
almost all of that coming in June, July and August. Results for September and October will still be added to this
year’s total when they are available.
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GOVERNOR VISITS CAMPUS, MAKES ANNOUNCEMENT
Park Hills Daily Journal - By KEVIN R. JENKINS Daily Journal Staff Writer
Posted: Saturday, October 1, 2011 5:15 am
While visiting the Mineral Area College campus Friday afternoon, Gov. Jay Nixon announced the school is
receiving $915,275 of a $20 million U.S. Department of Labor grant to retrain 275 unemployed Missourians
through MoHealthWINs. A statewide effort, MoHealthWINs seeks to retrain unemployed workers for
employment in growing health care fields.
The governor announced MAC’s portion of the grant at a news conference held following a brief tour of the
college’s Simulated Manikin labs in the Allied Health Careers wing. The wing, financed by “Caring for Missouri”
funds was opened last November and contains two high-tech manikins — one of a baby and the other an adult
male. A control studio between the labs allows instructors to manipulate the manikins so nursing students can
receive “real world” experience in a controlled setting.
“It was like walking into a real hospital,” said the governor when asked at the news conference his impression of
the school’s new addition.
Using the MoHealth WINs funds, MAC will launch three programs for the retraining of Missourians for health
care careers:
A new Medical Lab Technician program will train workers to prepare for a career in medical laboratories, helping
doctors and scientists run tests on blood and tissue samples that are used to diagnose and treat patients.
A new Pharmacy Technician program will help students receive the professional certificate they need to land a
job assisting pharmacists and helping customers with over-the-counter medications.
A new Maintenance Technician program will address the shortage of health equipment maintenance workers in
the state.
MAC Vice President Gil Kennon, who also serves as the college’s Career & Technical Education dean, said the
intent is to have the programs ready by fall 2012.
“The health care field is booming now, despite what the rest of the economy is doing” Kennon said. “Health-
related jobs are the kinds of careers you can’t very well farm out to another country and the need for health care
will always be there. These are solid, stable, well-paying jobs. Training for them is a particular specialty for
community colleges like MAC.”
Nixon explained that the competitive grant funds were made available through the federal Trade Adjustment
Assistance Community College and Career Training Grant Program. When the grant process was announced, the
governor brought Missouri’s community colleges together to submit a joint, comprehensive applications.
Throughout the application process, Nixon said senior leaders within his administration worked closely with
community college and Workforce Investment Board leaders to develop and craft the grant application.
In April, the governor said he submitted a strong letter in support of the application, noting that the investment
would supplement his “Big Goal” for higher education — increasing the percentage of Missourians holding a
postsecondary credential from 37 percent to 60 percent by 2020.
“By doing it this way,” Nixon said, “We received 100 percent of the grant dollars we asked for.”
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In announcing MAC’s portion of the USDL grant, the governor explained that Missouri’s 12 community colleges —
along with Linn State Technical College — had collaborated with the Missouri Department of Economic
Development and the state’s Workforce Investment Boards in applying for the federal funds.
“In total, the $20 million grant will provide training for 4,600 unemployed workers in the short term, while also
developing training programs that will benefit students for years to come,” said Nixon.
Stating in the news conference that his number one commitment is putting Missourians back to work, Gov. Nixon
said, “The MOHealth WINS initiative will help unemployed people in our state receive the education and training
they need to reenter the workforce in fields that are poised for growth. We will continue to work with our
outstanding network of community colleges across the state to ensure that the skills taught in the classroom are
the skills in demand in the workplace.”
In response to receipt of the grant, MAC president, Dr. Steven Kurtz, said, “The education and training we
provide our students at Mineral Area College prepares them to succeed in their careers and accomplish their
goals. We’re appreciative of the governor, the Workforce Investment Board and the Department of Economic
Development for being outstanding partners in our efforts. We look forward to continued collaboration in our
efforts to grow the Missouri economy.”
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LAWMAKERS' PENSIONS FAR BETTER THAN STATE WORKERS'
Several call for changes, or even eliminating pensions altogether, to cut the costs.
Written by Wes Johnson
Springfield News-Leader - 6:17 AM, Oct. 2, 2011 |
When it comes to taxpayer-supported pensions, Missouri lawmakers have crafted a better deal for themselves
than most state employees get.
That disparity has prompted a handful of state lawmakers to call for equalizing the pension playing field -- or
even doing away with pensions for new Missouri General Assembly members.
Pensions for statehouse representatives and senators are calculated with a multiplier that's more than twice as
high as the one used for general state employees.
That ensures larger pensions for lawmakers for comparable years worked.
And, legislators can start drawing their pensions at age 62, while general state employees have to wait until they
reach age 67.
State lawmakers also become fully vested in their pensions sooner -- after six years -- than state employees, who
have to work at least 10 years to become fully vested.
"Is that fair? Clearly, it is not," said state Rep. Sara Lampe, a Springfield Democrat who represents the 138th
District.
"Just because we're elected and we have the ability to write the rules doesn't mean we should be above anyone
else."
After serving seven years, Lampe is nearing the end of her House career. Term limits prevent anyone in the
House or Senate from serving longer than eight years.
Theoretically, a state lawmaker could serve up to 16 years -- and have a pension based on those years of service -
- by being elected to both the House and Senate and serving all eight years in both.
Those term limits are the key reason why Missouri lawmakers have a higher pension multiplier, a state pension
official said.
Christine Rackers, manager of investment policy and communications at MOSERS -- the Missouri State
Employee's Retirement System -- said lawmakers have given themselves pensions since MOSERS was formed in
1957.
"The goal for a career employee is 30 years of state service," Rackers said in an email.
"The formula differential between lawmakers and general employees is due to the fact that lawmakers do not
have the option of continuing in state service beyond 16 years due to re-election and term limits, and the
majority will not be able to serve more than eight years."
State rules don't prevent a lawmaker from receiving a pension from another employer, such as the military or
private industry.
It's possible for a state lawmaker to retire with multiple pensions from various sources.
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Rackers confirmed that state lawmakers and state employees pay into Social Security.
They would receive Social Security benefits -- in addition to their state pensions -- if they meet Social Security
eligibility requirements.
State Rep. Jason Smith, a Republican from Salem, said he wants to eliminate pensions for lawmakers -- from this
point on, for those newly elected --as a way to save the state a substantial amount of money in the future.
A recent USA Today survey found 10 states provide no pensions to state lawmakers at all.
In 2009, Smith filed a bill that would eliminate lawmaker pensions, but he said he couldn't get a hearing on it.
"I will re-file it again in 2012," Smith said. "With the financial difficulties we're facing at the state level, I think
nothing's off the table whatsoever. This would be a way to save the state a lot of money."
The state would save about $1 million annually in nine or 10 years if newly elected lawmakers didn't receive a
state pension, according to MOSERS.
Smith questioned why lawmakers should even get pensions.
"When I decided to run for this office, it's for public service, not public entitlement," he said.
State Rep. Shane Schoeller, a Republican who represents the 139th District north of Springfield, backs Smith's
view.
He signed Smith's first pension bill and said he would back the bill again if it's re-filed.
"I signed legislation that would take away my pension," Schoeller said. "I didn't go to the legislature to get a
pension. That's not why I'm here in Jefferson City."
Schoeller said he believes state lawmakers should be compensated for the time they're in office -- in 2010,
senators and representatives received annual pay of $35,978.
But Schoeller said nothing beyond that is needed.
State lawmakers typically meet from January through May, though they can be convened for special sessions on
narrowly focused topics. Their pay increases if they work during special sessions.
Newly elected state Rep. Lincoln Hough, a Republican who represents the 140th District east of Springfield, said
he doesn't know why lawmakers receive pensions.
"I can't tell you the reason other than it's been that way for a long time," Hough said.
He wouldn't support a bill to eliminate lawmaker pensions until he had a chance to look at language in the bill.
"I haven't really looked into any pension issue," he said. "I'm up here trying to read as much legislation as I can. I
don't feel getting a state pension factored at all into my decision to represent the people in my district."
State Sen. Bob Dixon, a Republican who represents District 30 -- Springfield and southern Greene County -- said
there have been previous unsuccessful efforts to eliminate state lawmaker pensions.
"I would welcome a discussion on the subject, and given our present financial circumstances, I think it would be
productive," Dixon wrote in an email.
" Everything should be on the table."
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FUNDING CRUNCH CREATES UNCERTAINTY FOR REPLACEMENT OF
CHAMP CLARK BRIDGE AT LOUISIANA, MO.
Published: 10/1/2011 | Updated: 10/3/2011
By MARY POLETTI - Herald-Whig Staff Writer
LOUISIANA, Mo. -- The Champ Clark Bridge, connecting the two Pike counties in Missouri and Illinois, is one of
the oldest bridges on the northern half of the Mississippi River.
Danny Miller, the presiding commissioner in Pike County, Mo., says that's great for historical heritage, but not
great for daily driving use.
"It's getting up to that 100-year mark," Miller said. "They would like to push it off for 10 years, but that bridge is
going to have an awful lot of maintenance if they wait that 10 years."
Miller is referring to the badly-needed bridge replacement the Missouri Department of Transportation has
identified as a priority for the bridge, which opened in 1928.
MoDOT has placed a new trestle for the bridge on its five-year planning list. However, the five-year likelihood of
that $80 million project is increasingly dim in the face of sharp funding cuts -- namely, the cash-strapped agency's
Bolder Five-Year Direction, which has effectively deep-sixed any projects for which funding wasn't already
allocated when the plan was implemented.
That means the bridge replacement might not come through for 10 years, MoDOT spokeswoman Tana Akright
said last week.
For Miller, that's not soon enough. He continues to strike an optimistic note, saying he hopes the bridge will be
done sooner if funds materialize elsewhere.
"They'll end up getting some federal help, and we'll get some federal dollars in there," he said. "I would venture
to say hopefully it'll materialize within the next four to five years."
Of the vehicle bridges between Minnesota and Tennessee, only the Santa Fe swing span at Fort Madison, Iowa,
and the McKinley Bridge at St. Louis are older than the Champ Clark Bridge. The McKinley Bridge, opened in
1910, was closed to traffic for six years before a major rehabilitation.
Newer bridges at Quincy, Hannibal, Mo., and Burlington and Keokuk, Iowa, have opened within the last quarter-
century.
Although state officials have said Champ Clark remains safe for travel, particularly following a major 2005
upgrade, its two lanes are a total of 20 feet wide, and semitrailer traffic frequently detours to Hannibal or St.
Louis.
The bridge, named for former congressman James Beauchamp "Champ" Clark, carries about 3,500 vehicles a day.
MoDOT has not removed the aging bridge from its priority list, particularly if alternate funding becomes
available, but Akright cautioned that lengthy environmental studies, design work and right-of-way purchases
would have to be undertaken before construction could start.
That makes the timeline as uncertain as the funding -- something Miller said county residents understand, given
the still-slack economy.
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If and when funding becomes available, Miller hopes to see a clearer picture of a timeline for the bridge's
replacement.
"When the money comes back and the economy starts getting better, I believe we will start to have more insight
time-wise on when this bridge will be replaced," he said.
It's particularly important, he said, as part of regional officials' broader vision for the future of U.S. 54, which the
Champ Clark Bridge carries over the Mississippi.
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FIRM WANTS NEW TRIAL OR $760,000 AWARD SET ASIDE IN CAPE
COUNTY AGE DISCRIMINATION CASE
Sunday, October 2, 2011
By Melissa Miller - Southeast Missourian
Jim Trickey was devastated. He couldn't sleep. He couldn't eat. He felt like a failure. The 65-year-old former
Kaman Industrial Technologies Corp. branch manager of the year didn't understand how he'd lost the job he
loved and was good at.
At 65, he was one of the oldest employees in the company, and he'd been told they needed "new blood."
According to court records, he was undermined by his co-workers at Kaman's branch office in Cape Girardeau,
given performance reviews containing false information and demoted. After he complained to Kaman's human
resources department that he was being discriminated against due to his age and filed a complaint with the
Missouri Commission on Human Rights, he was suspended without pay and asked to resign and accept a
severance offer.
In August, after three and a half years of litigation and a trial at the Rush H. Limbaugh Sr. U.S. Courthouse, a jury
returned a $760,000 verdict in Trickey's favor. On Thursday, Kaman filed a motion for a new trial or that the
damages be reduced or taken away.
Cape Girardeau lawyer J.P. Clubb, who specializes in employment law, said the amount was large for an
employment discrimination case anywhere in Missouri, let alone Southeast Missouri. For example, a plaintiff in a
Scott County sexual harassment case Clubb and his wife tried last year was awarded $125,000.
Large verdicts are thought to be less common among rural juries, said Trickey's attorney, Jerry Dobson of St.
Louis. The jurors in Trickey's trial were from Malden, Van Buren, Poplar Bluff, Ellsinore, East Prairie and Senath.
"That demonstrates juries in anywhere in Missouri when they see discrimination and injustice in the employment
context will not hesitate to award damages that sufficiently compensate the plaintiff and they'll punish a
defendant who they think ought to be punished. That is the real message conveyed by this verdict." Dobson said.
Last year, Dobson tried a sexual harassment case involving a woman who worked as a Missouri corrections
officer in Lincoln County, where the jury returned a unanimous verdict of $1 million in punitive damages against
the state.
"It was that one that made me say, 'All this stuff about rural juries, I'm not sure they're so bad,'" Dobson said.
The jury was sympathetic to the fact that the Kaman branch Trickey managed, which is now in Jackson, had
performed at an extraordinary level in the three years before his discharge, Dobson said. In December 2007,
when the Cape Girardeau Kaman branch was ranked fifth out of 166 branches, he was placed on a 90-day
Performance Improvement Plan. He was demoted before day 60 after telling the company's vice president of
human resources he was being discriminated against because of his age, Dobson said.
"It seemed they jumped the gun, especially when his company even moved up to No. 4 in sales in January of
2008," Dobson said. "They had, by their own accounts, an extraordinary month."
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On Trickey's claim of age discrimination, the jury awarded $160,000 in actual damages. On his claim they
retaliated against him after filing a complaint with the Missouri Commission on Human Rights, the jury awarded
$100,000 in actual damages and $500,000 in punitive damages.
"Verdicts that size should be a warning to employers that they are more likely to be held accountable for
discrimination, which hopefully will make them less likely to engage in discrimination," Clubb said.
"I hope others will see this verdict and understand that the little guy won one," Trickey said. "I also hope it
inspires hope in those people that are finding themselves in similar situations. I realize it seems like David and
Goliath, but remember how that story ended."
Clubb has an age discrimination case pending against another Jackson business, Buchheit.
He represents Catherine Stevens, 62, of Marble Hill, Mo., who according to court documents filed in October
2010 was allegedly paid less and eventually fired from her job as a kitchen and bath specialist at Buchheit in
Jackson due to her age. Pretrial litigation continues in Stevens' case against Buchheit; if it isn't settled out of
court, it will likely be tried sometime next year, Clubb said.
Before someone can sue an employer for age, or any other form of discrimination they must first file a complaint
with the Missouri Commission on Human Rights, which investigates complaints of discrimination in housing,
employment and public places. In fiscal year 2010, 2,109 cases were filed, with 84 percent of those for
employment discrimination. Among the employment discrimination cases, 20 percent were for age
discrimination and 32 percent were for retaliation. The commission issued 530 right-to-sue letters in
employment discrimination cases last year.
The majority of employment-related disputes are resolved before trial and are settled confidentially, Clubb said.
In cases that do go to trial, jury verdicts for actual damages can vary widely depending on the wage the employee
was earning at the time. Both state and federal law allow plaintiffs in employment discrimination cases who
receive jury verdicts in their favor to recover attorney fees from the defendants.
Senate Bill 188, passed this year by the Missouri Legislature, would have placed caps on the amounts of damages
victims in employment discrimination cases can receive and prohibit victims from suing the individuals who
engaged in discriminatory practices. It also would have prevented punitive damages from being awarded against
the state or its political subdivisions. The bill, which applied only to Missouri's courts, was vetoed by Gov. Jay
Nixon, who said in a news release in April that the bill undermined key provisions of the Missouri Human Rights
Act and rolled back decades of progress in protecting civil rights.
Trickey's case was originally filed in state court, but Kaman filed to have the case removed to federal court, which
had jurisdiction because the company is based outside Missouri, Dobson said.
mmiller@semissourian.com
388-3646
Pertinent address:
2360 N. High St., Jackson, MO
2801 Old Orchard Road, Jackson, MO
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FEDERAL RULING CAUSES WAVES AT LAKE OF THE OZARKS
St. Louis Post-Dispatch - BY JEFFREY TOMICH
Posted: Sunday, October 2, 2011 12:01 am
CAMDENTON, MO. • Roy and Karen Walker's condominium at Lake of the Ozarks represented a retirement
dream fulfilled when the couple bought it nearly a decade ago.
The unit overlooking the relatively calm Niangua arm of the lake had everything they wanted. It was near town,
right on the shoreline, with an easily accessible boat dock.
But proximity to the water has gone from a selling point to liability, their property from asset to albatross. The
Columbia, Ill., couple are among thousands of property owners along the lake now stuck in legal limbo after
being notified that all or part of their homes, decks, gazebos and patios were built on land that belongs to
Ameren Missouri's Bagnell Dam and Osage hydroelectric project.
What's more, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission — the agency that regulates the lake, the dam and the
hydroelectric plant — issued an order stating that all of the so-called nonconforming structures must be
removed.
St. Louis-based Ameren, caught in the middle of the dispute, has asked the federal agency to reconsider, at least
with respect to the 1,200-plus residences in jeopardy. The utility, which manages the shoreline under federal
oversight, wants to redraw the hydroelectric project boundary to exclude most, if not all, of the homes in danger.
Meanwhile, the Walkers and many of their neighbors at the Lake Valley Condominiums — many with substantial
portions of their life savings locked up in their homes — are scrambling for answers. Two of the development's
buildings, along with a swimming pool and new wastewater treatment plant, are supposedly situated on
Ameren's property. Some of the neighboring homes are also at risk.
Some blame the neighborhood's developer; others, the title companies or the county. Many vent at Ameren.
Almost universally, the shoreline restrictions are seen as massive overreach by the federal government. FERC has
become a four-letter word.
"How can you buy a home, pay taxes on it, take care of it and have someone say you don't own it?" Karen Walker
said. "It seems like a bad dream."
Businesses and banks fear the dispute will further depress an already fragile real estate market and chill the
region's tourism-based economy, which revolves around lake access.
"It just seems rather intrusive of the federal government to come in and tell people they need to tear down their
gazebos or their homes," said Bruce Mitchell, executive director of the Camdenton Area Chamber of Commerce.
While many affected homes were bought many years ago, at least one was constructed as recently as 2009.
Down the street from the Walkers, Joyce Hudson, 62, and her husband bought several lakefront lots in 2008 and
completed a 2,000-square-foot A-frame house and a two-car garage on the land the following spring. In January
of last year, they received a letter stating that their home is within the boundary of the Bagnell Dam project, on
Ameren's land. And "residential structures" on project lands are prohibited, it said.
In all, the couple paid $250,000 in cash to purchase the properties and build their new home. They still can't
believe they were deeded property and handed permits to build on land they don't own.
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"It was a big investment," Hudson said. "It would have been nice if someone had let the county know or
somebody know. It makes me really angry that somebody didn't stop it."
ORDER: 'REMOVE' HOMES
Ameren, then known as Union Electric Co., created Lake of the Ozarks in 1931 when it completed the 2,500-foot
Bagnell Dam impounding the Osage River. For the last 80 years, the 93-mile serpentine lake has been the
reservoir for the Osage hydroelectric plant and has been transformed into one of the nation's largest recreational
lakes. The lake's 1,150 miles of shoreline is longer than California's coast, and dotted with numerous coves and
inlets.
For 50 years, shoreline development was managed by the Army Corps of Engineers. In the 1980s, responsibility
fell to Ameren.
The dam and plant are owned and operated by the utility under a license issued by FERC. The most recent 40-
year operating license, issued in 2007, required a master plan to manage the lake and its shoreline in the face of
continued development.
Broadly, the shoreline management plan aims to balance the public's recreational interests with environmental
protection and ensure development doesn't interfere with the use of the lake for electricity generation.
The plan was a decade-long effort, going back to 2001 when Ameren first organized a team and began holding
meetings to outline common goals. The coalition included county and state officials, homeowners associations,
chambers of commerce, landowners, real estate agents, title companies and business leaders. The utility finally
submitted a proposal to FERC in the spring of 2008.
The proposed shoreline plan makes clear that Ameren knew at the time that thousands of structures, some
dating back 75 years or more, were built on utility land or easements. Some of the structures — homes, docks,
gazebos and patios — were built before any restrictions or formal permitting procedures were in place. In other
cases, they may have been improperly situated, the plan said.
Ameren proposed redrawing the project boundary to exclude as many structures — in particular homes and
condos — as possible.
FERC spent more than two years evaluating the plan. On July 26, it issued a 28-page order approving the plan
with one major change, requiring Ameren to remove the 4,000-plus structures that sit too close to the shoreline
and within the boundary of the Bagnell Dam project. In most cases, the commission said they 'should be
removed in a timely manner and the site restored to pre-existing conditions."
Ameren sought a rehearing last month, asking FERC to reconsider that piece of the 28-page order. It has asked to
be given until 2013 to propose revisions to project boundaries.
"Where it makes sense, and there's no negative impact to the natural resources of the lake, we'd like to consider
moving the project boundary and getting those homes out of the boundary," said Jeff Green, Ameren Missouri's
shoreline manager. "Our hope would be that most of the homes would be removed at that point, and we'd just
be dealing with decks, patios and gazebos."
Chambers of commerce from counties bordering the lake, banks, title companies and both of the state's U.S.
senators have backed Ameren's request for a rehearing. Sens. Claire McCaskill and Roy Blunt co-wrote a letter
asking the commission to grant the rehearing.
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FERC declined to discuss the shoreline plan and Ameren's appeal because it is the subject of a potential
rehearing.
"There's no time clock running as to when they must act," agency spokesman Craig Cano said.
UNCERTAINTY REIGNS
In the Lake Valley neighborhood, affected property owners are left with little choice but to sit and wait. They've
reached out to their congressmen, state representatives, FERC and anyone else who will listen.
Already, uncertainty caused by the property ownership questions and FERC's order is having consequences. The
sale of one unit at the condominium complex has collapsed. The owner has moved out of state, and neighbors
fear it may slip into foreclosure. Neighbors are hesitant to make improvements to their homes. They worry they
won't be able to sell if they need to.
The Hudsons have struggled with health problems and would like to move to Arizona. Their house has been on
the market for weeks. But looming questions about ownership of the property, and the prospect that it could be
condemned, has scared off any prospective buyers.
Hudson isn't sure what to do.
"We've had a lot of sleepless nights," she said.
Local business leaders say the potential ripple of the shoreline boundary dispute could reach well beyond just
those owners of lakefront property.
"It obviously creates uncertainty and apprehension in a tough economy, and that's the last thing we need," said
Gregory J. Gagnon, CEO of Central Bank of Lake of the Ozarks, the area's largest community bank.
In a letter to FERC, Gagnon said the uncertainty "could plunge the real estate market at Lake of the Ozarks into
turmoil by casting a cloud on the value of lakefront property."
Ameren's Green has been besieged with phone calls from property owners, business leaders and politicians all
looking for answers. But he has none.
No one's sure how long it will be until FERC will issue a final order. It took the agency more than two years to rule
on the plan initially.
"We're really hoping that the gravity of some of these issues that they'll respond to our rehearing request faster
than that," Green said.
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DEMONSTRATORS IN ST. LOUIS TARGET WALL STREET
St. Louis Post-Dispatch - BY TERRY HILLIG
Posted: Sunday, October 2, 2011 7:00 am
ST. LOUIS • Demonstrators gathered Saturday outside the Federal Reserve Bank in downtown St. Louis and said
they plan to be there "as long as it takes to get the point across."
Their point, as they see it, is that it's time for 99 percent of the population to speak out and act against the greed
and corruption of the richest 1 percent.
"Your vote is worthless," says one of their flyers. "Our government is corrupted. Both parties have sold us out to
Wall Street."
The group that organized the action is OccupySTL.
Paul, a 40-year-old EMT from St. Louis who declined to give his last name, said he expected other supporters to
join the protest at one time or another on Saturday. He said individual demonstrators will come and go but the
plan is to keep some demonstrators there around the clock for as long as it takes to make the point. He said it
was inspired by a demonstration that began on Wall Street in New York City two weeks ago, and others that have
arisen around the country.
"If you are not part of the 1 percent, this is your movement," he said.
Paul said the demonstrators would not block the street or sidewalks or entrances to the building. He said the
group has security officers, legal advisors and trained medical personnel. He is an EMT and his wife is a nurse.
Susan Cunningham, a 72-year-old retired teacher from Pacific, was among a dozen or so demonstrators who
were first to arrive. She said blaming labor unions, teachers, firefighters and police officers for the nation's
economic problems "doesn't wash with reality."
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CAMPAIGN, NOT POLICY, ON OBAMA'S AGENDA DURING BRIEF
STOP HERE
By Jo Mannies, Beacon political reporter
Posted 1:00 am Mon., 10.3.11
President Barack Obama will deliver on Tuesday yet another appeal to Congress to pass his American Jobs Act,
which focuses on tax breaks and physical improvements of schools, roads, bridges, railroads and airports.
But his public address will be in Dallas, not St. Louis.
Right after that address (in the home state of Republican presidential hopeful Rick Perry), the president will fly to
St. Louis for an evening filled with two campaign fundraising events that don't appear to be open for press
coverage.
Obama's lower-profile visit, which is slated to last only a few hours, is yet another sign of Missouri's lesser status
on the Democratic 2012 re-election map.
Tuesday's stop is Obama's first visit to the St. Louis region since March 2010. He was last in the state in May to
view tornado-ravaged Joplin, Mo.
Missouri is getting less presidential attention for an obvous reason. Activists on both sides have said for months
that Missouri is seen as less friendly political terrain for the president in 2012, particularly compared to other
crucial states.
The numbers tell the story. Obama narrowly lost Missouri in 2008; the state was the only swing state that year
that didn't swing Obama's way.
With his 2012 re-election prospects currently facing challenges in a number of states that Obama did carry in
2008, political experts have been saying that Missouri will likely get less attention -- and TV ads -- as the
president and his campaign focus on other states, such as Pennsylvania and Ohio, seen as more crucial and more
winnable.
Tuesday's events in St. Louis reinforce that perception, since they're primarily aimed at raising campaign money
that at the moment may primarily be spent somewhere else.
Another sign: The state's two top Democrats -- Gov. Jay Nixon and U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill -- aren't expected to
join the president during his stop.
As of Friday, a spokesman for Nixon indicated they still knew little about the president's schedule, an indication
that the governor may not be in St. Louis on Tuesday.
McCaskill has said that she would join the president if his visit didn't coincide with key Senate votes and her own
fundraiser set for Tuesday evening in Washington, D.C. Based on the timing of the president's events here, the
senator probably won'tl be in town at the time.
For McCaskill, Nixon and Missouri's other top Democrats, there's a downside to a lower presidential presence in
2012 -- less national Democratic campaign money, which often is used to bankroll the field operations aimed at
encouraging Democrats to vote and helping people get to the polls.
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A lower presence by Obama also will likely lead to less Republican attention as well, especially since the Missouri
Republican Party voted last week to award its delegates via the caucus system, not from the results of the Feb. 7
statewide presidential primary.
PRESIDENT'S SCHEDULE IN ST. LOUIS
The president will first attend a 5 p.m. reception at the Renaissance Grand Hotel downtown. Tickets ranged from
$1,000-$2,500. Gen44, the young-voter arm of the Democratic National Committee, was offering a limited
number of tickets for $250.
Obama then is to attend a big-ticket event near Forest Park, at the home of Tom Carnahan, a lawyer,
businessman and the brother of U.S. Rep. Russ Carnahan, D-St. Louis, and Missouri Secretary of State Robin
Carnahan. The cohosts include Bob Clark, chief executive of the construction firm Clayco, and veteran Democratic
activist and fundraiser Joyce Aboussie. Tickets begin at $25,000.
Tea party activists are planning to a protest outside the nearby History Museum, but some sources say that the
rally may not be allowed at that location, most likely for security reasons.
Republicans and conservative critics also have renewed the 2010 attacks against Tom Carnahan, who is part of
the Wind Capital Group that owns and operates a wind farm in north-central Missouri.
Wind Capital Group obtained $107 million in a 2009 federal stimulus grant as part of a national program to
encourage development of alternative energy. Vice President Joe Biden visited the wind farm in 2009. Sen. Roy
Blunt ran an attack TV ad last year that accused Russ and Robin Carnahan of playing a role in the awarding of the
grant. The Carnahans and the wind farm denied it.
A spokesman for Wind Capital Group said Sunday that critics mischaracterize the grant and the operation. The
stimulus grant helped pay for construction of the project, the spokesman said, with no money going to Tom
Carnahan.
The wind farm has been in operation for about a year, the spokesman said, and sells its energy to Northwest
Electric Power Cooperative, which uses the power from the farm to provide electricity to 50,000 homes in north
central Missouri.
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ST. LOUISAN PART OF EFFORT SEEKING NEW WAY OF NOMINATING
PRESIDENT
St. Louis Post-Dispatch - BY BILL LAMBRECHT
Posted: Monday, October 3, 2011 12:27 am
WASHINGTON • William H. Webster has viewed politics from a rarefied perch, as a judge in St. Louis, as FBI
director under two presidents and as Ronald Reagan's head of the CIA.
He believes that a political system that hinges on compromise mostly worked over the years. But that system, he
contends, has veered sharply toward dysfunction, which is why Webster is involved in a movement that could be
deemed revolutionary: nominating a presidential candidate via the Internet, outside of either major party's
system.
Webster, 87, is among several dozen former government officials, corporate leaders, academics and other
influential people allied in an organization called Americans Elect, which is seeking to bypass the Republican and
Democratic nominating machinery next year and instead select a presidential candidate through online voting.
Webster joined the well-funded effort, he says, out of concern about "the polarization of our political structure
and the fact that, to many people, including myself, the nominating process for president has been in the control
of the far-left Democrats and the far-right Republicans."
Americans Elect shuns the label of third party, describing itself as architects of a second way of nominating a
presidential candidate, a method that avoids the time-honored system of primaries and party caucuses that the
group says excludes many voters from meaningful participation.
A key feature of the plan requires the Americans Elect nominee to select a running mate from an opposing party.
The organization is flush with cash — $20 million raised so far from undisclosed donors, which could prompt
suspicion about where all that money comes from. Much of it will be spent on placing Americans Elect on ballots
in 50 states and the District of Columbia.
Thus far, Americans Elect is certified for the ballot in Arizona, Kansas, Nevada, Alaska and Michigan.
In Missouri, the group has collected 15,000 signatures, 50 percent more than needed. The organization intends
to complete certification in Missouri early next year by choosing an elector for each of Missouri's congressional
districts. Illinois is among 21 states allowing petition drives only in election years.
The motivation for their drive, leaders say, is satisfying a hunger by Americans for more say-so in the presidential
election process at a time when politics is subverted by the extremes.
"I think people look at the candidates and say, 'Is this really the best America has to offer?'" said Elliot Ackerman,
the group's chief operating officer. "We have come to a state in our politics where we have a tyranny of the
minority over the majority."
Ackerman, 32, was a Marine officer for eight years with tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan; he claims no
political affiliation. He is the son of Peter Ackerman, a venture capitalist, chairman of Americans Elect and
presumably among the 50 people who have contributed more than $100,000 to the effort.
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Americans Elect offers this plan: Any voter registering with it online can draft a candidate, or support a candidate
already drafted, and submit questions for candidates to answer. In April, the pool of potential nominees will be
winnowed to six through three rounds of voting.
The group says it places no restrictions on members voting in major party primaries or caucuses. So Americans
Elect participants could be helping nominate competing candidates next year.
In June, participants will vote in the party's online convention over a two-week period to determine who among
the six will represent Americans Elect in November. Rules for the convention will be published in the next few
weeks, a spokeswoman for the group said.
The six finalists will announce their running mates prior to the online vote. The ticket getting the most votes will
represent Americans Elect in November. The organization says it expects to gain access to every state's ballot by
next year.
'CIVILITY HAS EVAPORATED'
Some in the organization have had connections to the major political parties, but Americans Elect says it is not
acting on behalf of either party or any candidate. Members of the group include: Carla Hills, U.S. trade
representative in the George W. Bush administration; Gerald Rafshoon, communications director in the Jimmy
Carter White House; Tom Sansonetti, a former general counsel of the Republican National Committee; and Les
Francis, a past executive director of the Democratic National Committee.
Webster, a St. Louis native and graduate of Washington University School of Law, was named by George W. Bush
in 2002 to head the Homeland Security Advisory Council, a position he still holds under President Barack Obama.
In an interview, he harked back to recent times when, he said, politicians of opposing stripes worked at getting to
know one another, which he regards as an essential step toward compromise and solving problems.
These days, he said, members of Congress "don't know each other as respectable human beings; they're the
opposition. In consequence, the level of civility has evaporated, and it's even more pronounced when you have
radical left and radical right.
"In some quarters," Webster continued, "it's almost sinful to have anything social to say or do with people on the
other side, the wrong side. Our system is not designed to work under those circumstances."
The Americans Elect alternative, Webster contends, "would give a higher level of independence to the more
centrist or moderate candidates who feel now that they have to concede on issues of policy and platform to the
more extreme groups of their own parties."
"I think this would open up a tremendous opportunity for a vast number of Americans to be part of their
system," he said of online voting.
A LONG SHOT?
Richard Winger, a Californian who writes an authoritative ballot access newsletter, likened the effort to the
beginning of the Reform Party, founded by Ross Perot in 1995. Perot ended up the nominee in 1996, followed by
Republican defector Pat Buchanan in 2000. The party grew increasingly irrelevant.
Still, Winger said he believes that Americans Elect can succeed in its drive to place a candidate on ballots, and he
doesn't think voters will be turned off by not knowing the identity of financial backers.
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"As long as they have an honest process, keep their word that any registered voter can take part in choosing the
nominee and don't try to selfishly keep people from seeking the nomination, I don't see why it's a big deal," he
said.
Americans Elect points to polls suggesting dissatisfaction with the two-party system. In an Ipsos Public Affairs
national survey in the spring, two-thirds said they would prefer to see "major candidates from outside the two
main parties" rather than the candidates the two parties offer.
Even so, commentator and author Larry Sabato views prospects for success as a long shot. Sabato, director of the
University of Virginia Center for Politics, said organizations like Americans Elect often misinterpret polls in a way
that leads them to believe they can be a haven for independent voters. But, Sabato asserts, voters who identify
themselves as independents typically return to their voting roots, be they Democratic or Republican.
"The tug of party loyalty is a lot stronger than these groups acknowledge. I don't see how they get around that,"
he said.
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SUPER PACS SET SIGHTS ON 2012 U.S. SENATE RACE IN MISSOURI
By DAVID GOLDSTEIN - The Star’s Washington correspondent
Kansas City Star - Posted on Sun, Oct. 02, 2011 10:53 PM

WASHINGTON | Relaxed spending rules unleashed a torrent of campaign cash in the 2010 elections.
In 2012, that could become a deluge.
Court rulings and revised regulations have made it easier for donors to give as much money to campaigns as they
want and keep it secret. That could shape next year’s race for the White House and very likely the battle to
control Congress.
A case in point is Missouri’s high-profile contest for the U.S. Senate, where Democrat Claire McCaskill is running
for re-election.
“She’s going to be the focal point of Republican efforts to gain control of the Senate,” said Jonathan Collegio, a
spokesman for American Crossroads, a “super PAC” that backs conservative Republicans.
It played a role in the 2010 Senate race in Missouri that the GOP won, as well as other congressional campaigns
around the country that helped Republicans take control of the House.
Several of the Republicans running for president have similar super PACs boosting their campaign coffers. They
are independent, amped-up versions of the traditional political action committee, but free from the former
restrictions on donations and spending.
“We’re looking at what will be the most expensive election cycle in the history of the world,” predicted Bill
Burton, a former White House aide who now runs a super PAC to help finance President Barack Obama’s re-
election effort.
Super PACs are supposed to be free from any influence by the candidates or their campaigns. But like Burton’s
ties to the president, outside groups backing Texas Gov. Rick Perry, former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney
and Rep. Michele Bachmann of Minnesota all are stocked with people with strong connections to them.
There’s little question that 2012 will reach a new height in campaign spending. Campaigns inexorably become
more expensive from one cycle to the next. The total cost of the 2008 election was $5.3 billion, according to the
Center for Responsive Politics, a nonpartisan campaign watchdog group.
It could be close to $6 billion next year.
It’s also worth noting that contribution limits remain unchanged for the candidates’ own campaign committees:
$2,500 for the primary election and $2,500 for the general, a total of $5,000.
But super PACS and other related independent groups have become symbols of the new Wild, Wild West of
political spending.
“Now (a donor) can go to a super PAC and write a check for literally any amount — $5,000, $50,000, $500,000,”
said Michael Beckel, a Center for Responsive Politics spokesman. “The sky’s the limit.”
It’s the result of a U.S. Supreme Court decision in 2010 known as Citizens United. The court ruled that
corporations, unions and others could spend unlimited amounts of money on ads favoring the election or defeat
of candidates.
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The Federal Election Commission further tweaked the rules to require donor disclosure only when the
contributions are earmarked for specific ads.
The floodgates opened.
In last year’s midterm elections, more than 300 groups not affiliated with political parties spent $266 million to
influence the congressional elections. They included 84 super PACs.
In a post-election report, Public Citizen, a nonpartisan public advocacy group, found that nearly half of the
outside spending groups didn’t reveal their donors. In addition, the top 10 revealed the source for only $1 out of
every $4 they spent on the campaign.
That trend is likely to continue in 2012.
“Control of the Senate is up for grabs. You have a very competitive presidential election and the first re-election
campaign for the new Republican House,” Collegio said. “These factors will cause a record amount of money to
be spent by conservative and liberal groups. Literally, everything is at stake.”
American Crossroads and its allied group, Crossroads GPS, are the brainchild of Karl Rove, the political guru to
George W. Bush, and Ed Gillespie, a former chairman of the Republican National Committee. Together they
raised and spent more than $70 million last year, not all of its sources disclosed.
They have promised to more than triple that amount on the 2012 campaign.
Among the contests in their sights is McCaskill’s effort to hold on to her seat in the Senate.
Both Crossroads groups already have spent several hundred thousand dollars this year on ads criticizing her.
“In 2010, these groups were a real problem for Democratic candidates,” said Roy Temple, a Missouri Democratic
strategist. “In 2012, if handled properly, voters may very well hold it against the candidates who are propped up
by these groups.”
Still, McCaskill also will be aided by super PACs aligned with her allies, including one set up to support Senate
Democrats.
Meanwhile, two campaign watchdog groups, the Campaign Legal Center and Democracy 21, asked the Internal
Revenue Service recently to investigate whether certain independent spending groups deserved their tax-free
status.
But for now the outlook is for “more unregulated contributions, more undisclosed money and even greater
pressure placed on candidates,” said Anthony J. Corrado Jr., an expert on campaign finance at Colby College in
Maine.
Engaging in a bit of understatement, Corrado added: “This is going to be a very well-funded race.”
To reach David Goldstein, call 202-383-6105 or send email to dgoldsteinmclatchydc.com.
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SUSAN REDDEN: REPUBLICAN CAUCUS-GOERS WILL GIVE
PRESIDENTIAL NOD
By Susan Redden – Joplin Globe Staff Writer
October 2, 2011
JOPLIN, Mo. — Missouri Republicans who want to back their favorite among the current myriad aspirants for
president on the GOP ticket will have to plan to attend a county caucus.

State Republicans last week decided to go the caucus route, rather than officially follow the results of the Feb. 7
presidential primary set by state law. That date was too early for officials in the national Republican and
Democratic parties who had asked states not to crowd the early primary field — and threatened to take away
state delegates at the national convention if they did not comply. Missouri’s Feb. 7 election date would be the
day after the Iowa caucuses.

The county caucuses are set for March 17 and will be open to any Republican registered voter. Participants will
select delegates to attend the state’s congressional district conventions on April 21 and state convention on June
2. Delegates for the party’s national convention will be chosen at those gatherings.

Attempts to change the primary date via legislation faltered. A measure setting a March 6 primary was passed in
the regular session, then vetoed by Gov. Jay Nixon for reasons not related to the new date. The bill was on the
agenda for the special session that is under way, but action did not come quickly enough to meet deadlines on
the GOP election calendar.

SPECIAL SESSION

State lawmakers are to reconvene the special session this week and get back to job-growth measures, which
were the reason the session was called.

Nixon last week urged lawmakers to send him a jobs bill or bring the special session to a close.

He cited “productive discussions” with the House about a jobs bill he would support, and he said the Senate
already had acted on “another strong version.” He called for the two chambers to resolve their differences and
pass a “strong, fiscally responsible jobs bill.”

Another bill still pending in the special session is one sponsored by Rep. Tom Flanigan, R-Carthage, that would
generate additional state revenue by authorizing a period of tax amnesty for delinquent taxpayers. The measure,
which passed unanimously in the House, is set for action when the Senate convenes at 10 a.m. today. Flanigan
said he still is hopeful for passage of the measure.

DISASTER AID

Federal lawmakers last week cited proposals they say are aimed at helping Missouri disaster victims, including
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those still dealing with the aftermath of the May 22 tornado.

Noting the recent partisan squabbles over funding for the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Sen. Roy
Blunt said he had introduced an amendment that would add $400 million to the Community Development Block
Grant program to pick up where FEMA leaves off.

“I support finding ways to cut duplication and cut spending, but my top priority is ensuring that we implement
the fastest way to get federal aid to the people of Missouri who need disaster assistance beyond the ability of
communities or the state,” Blunt said.

U.S. Rep. Billy Long said he filed a bill last week aimed at eliminating federal relief restrictions during
emergencies. He said the FEMA Flexibility Act of 2011 would streamline FEMA assistance by removing
restrictions on federal aid to disaster-stricken areas after disaster declarations.

After disasters, Long said, victims and first responders have an immediate need for basic items. To get these
supplies to disaster victims as quickly as possible, FEMA often relies on prepurchased stockpiles placed in
Missouri and throughout the country. These stockpiles sometimes are not enough to meet the need, forcing
FEMA to buy additional items. Long’s bill would relax federal caps that limit those purchases.
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NEWS ANALYSIS: FATE OF MISSOURI SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY
INITIATIVE UNCLEAR
Sunday, October 2, 2011 | 6:49 p.m. CDT; updated 7:46 p.m. CDT, Sunday, October 2, 2011
BY DAVID A. LIEB/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JEFFERSON CITY — Although seven years and several hundred million dollars behind Kansas, Missouri might
finally be poised to enact a long-discussed initiative channeling state tax dollars to upstart companies in science-
and technology-based ventures.
Or perhaps not.
Due to an intentional legislative quirk, the Missouri Science and Innovation Reinvestment Act, which recently
passed the state legislature, contains a clause declaring that it cannot take effect unless a separate bill on state
tax incentives also passes during the current special legislative session.
Thus far, that other business incentive bill has not passed. If lawmakers cannot settle their stalemate and send
Gov. Jay Nixon that bill by the session's Nov. 5 automatic adjournment, the contingency clause in the MOSIRA
legislation could be tested in court.
The question for judges to consider: Can lawmakers legally link one piece of legislation to the enactment of
another one?
"From a layman's perspective, there's some really interesting issues there," said Kelly Gillespie, executive director
of the Missouri Biotechnology Association, a leading advocate for the MOSIRA legislation.
For example, does tying one bill to the enactment of another run afoul of requirements in the state constitution
that each bill address only one subject that is clearly expressed in its title? Does it amount to an unconstitutional
delegation of the legislature's powers to make laws? And if the contingency clause is declared void, can the rest
of the bill still be implemented?
On the surface, the answers to all of these questions might appear to be no — meaning there is no way for
MOSIRA to take effect unless that separate, broader bill on business incentives also passes and becomes law. But
there is enough uncertainty that supporters of MOSIRA are holding out hope.
"There might not be case law that tells you exactly what the outcome will be and would give us a warm and fuzzy
assurance," Gillespie said. But "we know some of these issues that surround this, especially in the case of
logrolling and separation of powers and things like that, someone might find some really interesting arguments"
to be raised in court.
In one potentially relevant case, the Missouri Supreme Court struck down a contingency clause in a 1993
education bill that would have placed a tax referendum on the ballot only if the state high court ruled in a certain
way on separate lawsuit challenging the state's school funding formula. The state Supreme Court ruled that the
contingent referendum was an improper delegation of legislative powers.
If it can be implemented, the MOSIRA legislation would create a special fund overseen by the Missouri
Technology Corp. to offer incentives to science and innovation companies. That umbrella covers firms conducting
research or making products related to agricultural biotechnology, veterinary medicine, biochemistry, energy or
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environmental issues, forestry, homeland security, information technology, medical devices, microbiology and
pharmaceuticals, among other things.
The program would be financed by annual transfers from state revenues equal to a percentage of the growth in
the wages paid to employees of existing science-based companies, using 2010 as a base year for the calculations.
In short: Tax revenues from existing biotechnology companies would be used as grants to help similar businesses
get started in Missouri.
A comparable 2004 law created the Kansas Bioscience Authority, which so far has directed about $360 million to
a fund that could top out at $581 million over 15 years. That money has been used to fund research, develop
products and entice businesses to expand or locate in Kansas. Other states also have initiatives to finance
research and start-up companies in high-tech fields. Ohio has a $2.3 billion, 14-year project. Massachusetts and
Maryland have each pledged at least $1 billion over 10 years toward life sciences initiatives.
Missouri's science-based initiative was separated by lawmakers from the broader economic development bill
because of concerns that the bigger bill's title of "relating to taxation" might not cover the creation of a program
that grants money to businesses. Yet Senate President Pro Tem Rob Mayer, R-Dexter, linked the bills with the
contingency clause — essentially leveraging the MOSIRA bill to try to spur passage of the other business incentive
bill.
This is not the first time lawmakers have stuck a contingency clause in a bill. A manual entitled "The Essentials of
Bill Drafting in the Missouri General Assembly," prepared by and for legislative staff, includes a section on how to
draft contingency clauses. One of the models cited is a 1998 education bill that made changes to the state's
school funding formula contingent upon the attorney general providing notice that school desegregation lawsuits
had been settled.
A year earlier, the governor signed a bill about procedures for administrative rules that included a multi-part
contingency clause referring to an executive order issued by then-Gov. Mel Carnahan. Attorney Brad Ketcher,
who was Carnahan's chief of staff, helped negotiate the wording of that contingency clause with lawmakers.
Ketcher said a general principle for determining whether such clauses are OK is if the state's reviser of statutes,
who literally places bills in the law books, can easily determine if the contingency has been met. Linking one bill
to the enactment of another would seem to meet that test, he said.
In the case of the MOSIRA legislation, "I think it's an appropriate contingency because it can be readily obtained if
it has occurred or not," Ketcher said. "So the reviser of statutes will have a clear benchmark to tell whether it has
been triggered."
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GROUP SEEKS MISSOURI MINIMUM-WAGE INCREASE
By Roger McKinney- Joplin Globe Staff Writer
October 2, 2011

JOPLIN, Mo. — Another petition that will be circulating in Missouri calls for placing a question on the November
2012 ballot that would increase the state’s minimum wage to $8.25 an hour.

Missouri’s minimum wage now is $7.25 an hour, the same as the federal minimum wage. The federal minimum
wage was $5.15 an hour in 2006, when a large majority of Missouri voters approved an increase in the state
minimum wage to $6.50 an hour, which took effect in 2007. The federal minimum wage reached $7.25 an hour in
July 2009.

Lara Grinich, director of Missouri Jobs With Justice, which is leading the petition effort, said the increase is
needed.

“In really difficult times like these, more and more families are depending on one income, and more and more
are depending on minimum-wage jobs,” Grinich said. “These workers will spend the money right now in local
communities.”

Asked if the effort follows too soon behind the most recent federal increase, Grinich said: “No.”

“I think there’s tremendous urgency,” she said. “No hardworking person can get by on $7.25 an hour.”

Citing information from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, the group’s news release states that wages and
salaries are at the lowest share of gross domestic product since 1955 — at 55 percent — while corporate profits
accounted for their largest share of the GDP since 1955 — at 12.6 percent.

The Missouri Chamber of Commerce and Industry already is on record against the effort. Richard Moore,
assistant general counsel and director of regulatory affairs for the Missouri chamber, said it will campaign
aggressively against the measure if it reaches the ballot.

“With the higher minimum wage, we will see higher unemployment,” Moore said. He said other states with
minimum wages set higher than the federal level have higher unemployment rates than that of Missouri.

“We’re pushing ourselves into that category,” he said.

He said 70 percent of the Missouri work force is near the borders of the state, and a higher minimum wage
would put the state at a competitive disadvantage.

Moore said a higher minimum wage also would increase prices.

“Consumers will ultimately bear the burden of this in higher prices and decreased buying power,” he said.
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Moore said the chamber’s position is that the minimum wage should be set at the federal level.

Mike Wiggins, owner of Granny Shaffer’s restaurants, said he would accept whatever decision voters make if the
proposal is placed on the ballot. He said he doesn’t think a higher minimum wage would hurt his business, if it
were approved.

But, he said, “It hurts the people it’s designed to help.”

He said his employees who were affected by the previous minimum-wage increase suddenly were making too
much to receive the state assistance they had been receiving.

Most of his employees make more than the minimum wage, with the exception of high school students, he said.

“I’m for it, if they want it,” Wiggins said of voters. “It’s up to the people.”

Wiggins is the new chairman of the Joplin Area Chamber of Commerce, but he said he wasn’t speaking for the
chamber on the issue.

Wage analysis

A publication by the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, most recently revised in February, found that minimum-
wage increases resulted in a household income increase of about $250 per quarter and increased spending by
roughly $700 per quarter for those earning minimum wage. Most of the spending was on vehicles, and the
spending was financed with increased debt.
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PIONEER HOLDS GRAND OPENING FOR NEW MADRID PLANT
Monday, October 3, 2011
Standard Democrat
NEW MADRID, Mo. -- Pioneer Hi-Bred executives celebrated the grand opening of their $60 million soybean
production plant in New Madrid on Friday.
"This new soybean production plant is a tremendous asset to the entire Pioneer organization," said Alejandro
Munoz, vice president of Americas and Global Production. "This state-of-the-art facility is the largest production
plant we have in the world."
The facility, on 129 acres near Interstate 55, begins operations this month as the area soybean harvest gets
underway.
"Agriculture is a growing industry to be in right now and we're pleased that Pioneer is bringing jobs to the area,"
Munoz said.
The plant employs more than 65 people and may hire more to handle peak operational needs.
"Pioneer is investing in Missouri and in our state's workforce, and I'm glad the state of Missouri could be a
partner in this important project for the region's economy," Gov. Jay Nixon said. "We're committed to creating
good jobs for this region and sending a clear signal to the world that when it comes to the bioscience sector,
Missouri means business."
The grand opening included a ribbon-cutting ceremony and tours of the plant.
"This new facility is vital as we continue to invest in resources that deliver value to our growers," said Judd
O'Connor, vice president, regional business director-U.S. "The increased capacity this plant delivers will
strengthen our ability to meet the increasing product needs of our growers."
Construction on the plant, which is the first Pioneer seed production facility in Missouri, began in May 2010. The
facility will primarily serve soybean growers in the southern United States.
Pioneer also has a research facility for corn, soybean, sorghum and wheat seed in Miami, Mo.
Pertinent address:
New Madrid, MO
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GRANT TO IMPACT 4,600 PEOPLE THROUGH HEALTH CARE
TRAINING
Posted: Sunday, October 2, 2011 11:00 am | Updated: 2:37 pm, Fri Sep 30, 2011.
By Karen Myers, Missourian Staff Writer
Community colleges in Missouri, including East Central College, will get a slice of $20 million in grant funds
provided through MoHealthWINS.
MoHealthWINS is a statewide effort to educate 4,600 Missourians for jobs in the health services/sciences
industry.
The grant was awarded by the U.S. Department of Labor earlier this week.
“Today, 9.1 percent of our state’s citizens are unemployed. These Missourians want to work, but many lack the
skills they need to get hired in today’s work force,” Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon wrote in a letter of support.
“MoHealthWINS will meet these unemployed Missourians where they are, providing the training, support and
flexibility they need to get back to work quickly,” the letter continued.
East Central College applied for more than $900,000 in grant funds, an ECC official said, but has not yet heard
how much the college will receive.
Target occupations for grant funds include the fields of health informatics, therapeutic services, diagnostic
services and support services.
East Central College will develop an entry-level health information technology pathway that features stackable
credentials, including noncredit and credit certificates.
Credentials will allow students to work in medical information intake, help desk support, medical billing and
coding, Web development, HIT AAS, and database development, as well as nurses, CNAs, certified medical
technicians, LPNs and RNs.
ECC has committed to the health informatics pathway, which will complement and support one of the college’s
newest majors — health information technology; as well as the therapeutic pathway, which will create new
certificate programming for certified medical technicians.
Grant funds also will allow the college to build on the certified nurse assistant program it already offers,
according to Dot Schowe, ECC’s director of public relations.
ECC will be part of a group working on diagnostic assessments, career counseling, and remediation that supports
student success in the pathways.
The college also will work with a group on flexible scheduling options for programming and the use of technology
for program delivery.
ECC will explore contextualized academics, substantial tutoring and supplement instruction support, retention
counseling, and explore credit for prior learning.
Grant money ECC receives will be used to hire faculty and staff to work through grant objectives over the three-
year grant period.
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Highlights
Other highlights of the MoHealthWINS grant include:
• Offering multiple entrance and exit points. Students can get training in short increments, stop out to work and
develop professional experience, and return to school to gain another credential.
• Providing students with the basic reading, writing, and math skills they need to function in postsecondary
education in a contextualized setting. Students will have opportunities to see how these fundamentals are
required in their field of choice.
• Offering student services to help students adjust to postsecondary coursework and cope with the challenges
they face.
• Offering courses in flexible formats, including online instruction and intensive weekend programs.
• Giving students opportunities to apply what they are learning through simulations, internships, and other
similar opportunities.
Colleges in the consortium will work together to develop new curricula tailored to the needs of the target
population collaboratively, saving money and capitalizing on the unique resources of each college.
Colleges will share equipment and specialized faculty to reduce redundancy and make efficient use of resources.
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SCHOOL BOARD TO HEAR DETAILS OF SUCCESS WITH A+ PROGRAM
Participation has been strong, but the level fluctuates by school.
Springfield News-Leader - 5:42 AM, Oct. 3, 2011
Written by Claudette Riley, News-Leader
An update on Springfield Public Schools' success with the A+ Schools Program will be presented during the school
board's study session Tuesday.
Associate Superintendent Justin Herrell is expected to provide a detailed report about the A+ program, a college
scholarship program created by state lawmakers in the 1990s.
Earlier this year, Gov. Jay Nixon suggested changes to the program. They tweak the eligibility, timeframe and the
scope of the program.
Currently, Missouri students who graduate from a designated A+ high school with a record of good grades,
attendance and citizenship can receive a scholarship to cover tuition and fees at a public two-year college.
That essential formula will not change.
Herrell is expected to present a report, posted on the district's website, that provides an overview and some
details about the A+ program in Springfield's five high schools.
It shows Central became a designated A+ school in 1997, followed by Glendale and Parkview in 2000 and Hillcrest
and Kickapoo in 2009.
While the district's overall participation in the program appears strong, the level has fluctuated by high school.
» 3,758 Springfield high school graduates have qualified to date. The highest number of qualifiers comes from
Glendale with 1,148, followed by Central with 971 and Parkview with 963.
Kickapoo and Hillcrest, the schools not designated until 2009, have 471 and 205 total qualifiers, respectively.
» With 40.1 percent, Kickapoo has the highest percentage of graduates qualifying for the program followed
closely by Parkview with 39.6 percent.
Hillcrest came in last with 24 percent.
» In 2010-11, high school students in the program logged a minimum of 27,950 hours of unpaid, school-based
tutoring. This type of community service is an essential part of the program.
Kickapoo, the largest high school, logged 7,800 tutoring hours followed by Parkview with 6,300. Hillcrest, which
has the smallest enrollment, came in last with 2,650.
» The Class of 2011 qualified for more than $3.7 million in potential post-graduate A+ scholarships.
The report shows about one-third of the 2011 graduates qualified for an A+ scholarship and -- based on
transcript requests and other data collected -- 275 of the 559 qualifiers were planning to attend a two-year
program or other institute that accepts the scholarship.
However, that data shows that 253 students planned to attend a four-year college that isn't part of the A+
program.
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The report shows each of the five high schools benefit from community partnerships and have implemented the
A+ program in various ways.
Those highlights include parent meetings, college fairs, student showcases, celebration assemblies, orientation
and scheduling help, and mentoring opportunities with the elementary or middle schools that feed into that high
school.
Finally, the report cites research and other studies that show the impact of the A+ program:
» Of the students who enrolled directly in Ozarks Technical Community College after high school, 49 percent
cited the A+ program as the primary reason to attend OTC, followed by "cost of attendance" with 29 percent.
» The state Department of Elementary and Secondary Education shows there are now 364 designated A+ high
schools across the state. The number of public high school buildings noted in the 2010-11 state directory was
608.
Designated high schools must complete a three-year application and review process designed to raise academic
expectations, reduce the dropout rate and create a career pathway for every student.
Students who want to pursue the incentive enter a written agreement with their high school that spells out
expectations. Progress is monitored so they stay on track.
Since 1997, Missouri students have received more than $163 million in A+ scholarships.
More than 125,000 Missouri students have qualified for A+ scholarships, and more than 50,000 have used that
incentive for at least one semester.
An analysis of the state's 2010 graduates, cited by the district, showed 36.4 percent of students enter a four-year
college or university and 29.1 percent enter a two-year program.
However, in Springfield, 41.5 percent of graduates entered a four-year college while 31.8 percent enrolled in a
two-year program.
At Tuesday's study session, the school board will also review a proposed policy for the A+ Schools Program.
The policy appears to put current practice in writing, outline the review or appeal process and note any
differences between the district's implementation and state expectations.
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BEKKI COOK: FROM STATE GOVERNMENT TO KINDERGARTEN
Sunday, October 2, 2011
seMissourian.com
Bekki Cook is a mom, lawyer, former secretary of state and education advocate. And like many individuals
wearing multiple hats, efficiency has been key to her success.
Recently she sat down for an interview and talked about why she pursued a career in law, her road to the
secretary of state's office, politics and policy, and her passion to help children read.
While in college at the University of Missouri, Bekki Cook's father died in a plane crash, and the experience that
followed was part of what inspired her to pursue a career as a lawyer.
"He died and my mother went through an awful lot with the probate process, a lot of legality. ... Everything was
really hard, and I thought I could be a lawyer who could represent people and be maybe a little bit better at
explaining things to the client. I could see a real need for a better connect with the client on the part of the
lawyer from my mother's perspective."
After graduating from law school, Cook's first job was at the Limbaugh Firm in Cape girardeau.
One of her colleagues while at the Limbaugh Firm was, of course, Rush Limbaugh Sr. Cook called Limbaugh, who
she referred to as Mr. Limbaugh, the "best man in the whole wide world."
Board of Education
It may be surprising to some that Cook, a Democrat, was first appointed to the state Board of Education in 1990
by Gov. John Ashcroft, a Republican.
Finishing a term of a board member from Sikeston who stepped down due to other time commitments, Cook was
asked by Ashcroft to fill the post at the recommendation of Steve Limbaugh Jr., who was not yet a judge, and
Jackson lawyer John Lichtenegger. She was reappointed to the board by Gov. Mel Carnahan in 1993.
Believing in the importance of good education, Cook took her board position seriously.
"It was incredibly important, I thought, that we set decent education policy in this state. And that's what this
board was about and is about. The state Board of Education helps set policy on how education is conducted in
this state, in the public schools K-12. And to me that was a big opportunity to participate in that."
Secretary of State
While serving on the Board of Education, Carnahan called Cook to also consider serving on a technology board.
Though she was very interested, after considering it and speaking with her husband, John Cook, who is also a
lawyer, she told the governor she appreciated the offer but would have to decline.
So it came as a shock when the governor came to her in 1994 and asked if she would consider serving as
secretary of state.
The secretary of state at that time, Judi Moriarty, had been impeached and removed from office. Cook would be
fulfilling the final two years of the term.
Cook said when the governor first called and asked if she had thought about the office, she was doubtful it would
be an option.
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She said to Carnahan, "‘Governor, you know recently I had to turn you down [for the technology board]. John just
isn't going to go for this ... You honor me beyond words, but no, I don't think that's anything that we could really
consider.'"
At Carnahan's request she agreed to speak with her husband about the opportunity.
That evening when John came home from work, initially preparing to hang Christmas lights, she stopped him and
said they needed to sit down and talk. She told him about the opportunity, and his response was an unequivocal
yes.
"‘That man is smarter than I ever gave him credit for.'" said John to Bekki. "‘You're perfect. You'd be great for this
job.'"
Despite the challenges of taking on a new office, especially one with such problems, Cook felt she could handle
the responsibility.
"It's sort of like the Boy Scout motto ‘Be prepared.' I felt I'd be a great secretary of state ... I just got a big enough
ego I guess that I thought I could do a good job. And they needed somebody who could do a good job. It was just
a fabulous challenge that I would have never dreamed of on my on. But if Mel Carnahan, who I highly respected,
thought that much of me, I thought I should think that much of myself too and go see what I could get done."
After serving the remainder of Moriarty's term, Cook was elected to a full term in 1996.
Though she had accomplished much during her six years in office, the demands of the job were tough on her
family. After taking over the position in December of 1994, Bekki's two children finished the school year in Cape
Girardeau while living with their dad. After the school year they moved to Jefferson City to stay with their mom
and go to school.
"It was a really difficult transition for the kids. My husband continued to work down here. So during the week he
was down here and he was driving back and forth, because I was doing stuff all weekend long everywhere else.
And it was a jumbled life. And our kids luckily are accomplished good kids, and they managed it pretty doggone
well. But I think if you would ask them today if they would have rather stayed in Cape Girardeau and finished
their school with their friends, they would have preferred to do that."
After six years on the job, she declined to run for re-election in 2000, citing the need to be with her family more.
Cook doesn't deny running for statewide office challenges the work-life balance.
"I've seen politicians say, ‘I've never sacrificed a day for my children. I was always there for them.' Either they
weren't doing a very good job at their office or they sometimes cheated their children. I cheated my children. I
admit it. And they don't blame me for it right now and I hope they never do."
After a four-year break from public office, Cook was asked by many people to consider running for lieutenant
governor. Feeling she was rested, she agreed and ran against fellow Cape Girardeau resident Peter Kinder. Cook
narrowly lost to Kinder by .5 percent of the vote.
Policy and politics
During her run for lieutenant governor, Cook made news by appearing with Robin Carnahan, who was running
for secretary of state, in a television ad. The two argued that Kinder and House Speaker Catherine Hanaway, who
were running against Cook and Carnahan in their respective races, should not have supported a stadium measure
in a bill which would have authorized spending $644 million in state dollars over three decades, much which
would have benefited the St. Louis Cardinals and the Kansas City Chiefs and Royals.
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St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay took exception to the ad and at the time called it "St. Louis bashing."
Cook said she understood Slay's position and his advocacy, but her opinion has not changed.
"I feel like some things ought to be able to fly pretty close on their own, or at least have their cities support it. I
didn't think that people in Southwest Missouri who live hours and hours and hours away from St. Louis should be
helping out with building a stadium up there with public funds. I think it was fine for the city to support it. Or the
county ... If Crawford County wanted to support it, fine. But I didn't think it was appropriate for the ... taxpayers
of the entire state of Missouri to build a stadium in the city of St. Louis, and I still don't feel that way."
Only one public office in Cape Girardeau County is held by a Democrat today. Asked if the local Democrat Party is
still a viable option, Cook said with a laugh, "Well I do, but apparently not very many other people do.
"You know, things have just gone a lot more conservative in southern areas in the last few decades ... Southeast
Missouri is a very southern area. And there are some trends you just can't buck. But I have my own firm beliefs
about the right way to run a government, and I believe firmly the Democrats understand if you got to have a
government, make it run right and do it. Go ahead and do it right."
Reed to Succeed
One of Cook's passions these days is helping children -- many of whom come from homes with financial struggles
-- learn to read through a United Way-sponsored program called Read to Succeed.
Last year the program launched in Cape Girardeau at Blanchard Elementary with 49 of 76 students participating
in the small group sessions over the course of the year.
Cook said the basic idea is that you start with pre-reading concepts such as learning the sounds of letters and
how to blend them. After the students gain an understanding of these basics they are introduced to "little
readers."
At the end of last school year, 74 percent of the 76 children tested above grade level expectations in reading and
all but two students were at grade level, something Cook described as a "phenomenal result." The results were
the best in the school district for kindergartners.
Cook said that this fall the first graders at Blanchard -- the former kindergartners, many of whom participated in
the Reed to Succeed program -- were tested for their reading level. Even after a summer, when some students
might "forget" some concepts, 94 percent of the students were reading above grade level.
"We're very proud of that. We think they really got the concepts and they own them. And we think that's going
to make a difference for them for the rest of their lives."
Lucas Presson is the editorial page coordinator for the Southeast Missourian. The Sunday Interview is a biweekly
feature which highlights top newsmakers.
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AMERICAN ROYAL WORLD SERIES OF BARBECUE IS A TEST AMONG
THE BEST
By ROBERT A. CRONKLETON – Kansas City Star
Posted on Sat, Oct. 01, 2011 10:15 PM
As a former staffer for then-U.S. senator Jim Talent of Missouri, Brett Thompson of Pork Barrel BBQ likes to say
his team is the only good thing coming out of Washington, D.C., these days.
On Saturday, his team members were out to prove just that as competitors in the invitational contest at the 32nd
annual American Royal World Series of Barbecue.
The barbecue this year attracted more than 500 open teams and 135 invitational teams.
“Being born and raised here, it’s always been a dream — not necessarily one that you think you will be able to
realize — that you get to come here and compete in the American Royal Invitational,” Thompson said.
This is the second year for Pork Barrel BBQ to compete at the American Royal, the first time in the invitational
competition.
Thompson, of Alexandria, Va., and the team’s head cook, Heath Hall of Washington, D.C., both worked for Talent.
After Talent lost his re-election bid, they founded Pork Barrel BBQ, a sauce and rub company, and got into
competitive cooking with Hall’s parents, Rex and Barbara Hall of Jefferson City.
“You may think you have great barbecue, but until you come to the Royal and test it against the best of the best,
that is really the only time to really find that out,” Thompson said.
Stephen Eastridge with Meat@Slim’s of Woburn, Mass., echoed that sentiment.
“You have to cook the Royal,” Eastridge said. “It is definitely on the list.”
The camaraderie and the challenge are the best things about the barbecue competitions, even though it does get
stressful when it is time to turn in the meat for competition, he said.
“All my best friends are barbecuers,” said Eastridge, whose team includes his uncle, Mike Frenzel of Walton, Ky.
This year, the American Royal added activities to make it more of a family event.
Ben and Ramit Ring of Fort Leavenworth brought their daughter Sara, 9, and son Jack, 6, out of curiosity.
“That and barbecue,” Ramit Ring said.
They made a quick pass through the Kids’ Korral, where Sara lassoed a steer’s head.
“It probably took about 13 times,” Sara said proudly.
Royal barbecue continues today
The 32nd annual American Royal World Series of Barbecue continues today from 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. The open
awards ceremony is from 4 to 6 p.m. Admission is free.
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OCCUPY ST. LOUIS WANTS CHANGE
Brad Choat - KMOX
October 3, 2011 2:15 AM
ST. LOUIS (KMOX) – The “Occupy Wall Street” movement is spreading beyond New York.
Demonstrations were held over the weekend in Boston, Los Angeles, and even here in St. Louis.
Michael Kiepe is a college student in political science and member of Occupy St. Louis, “The malfeasance of the
past ten to twelve years cannot continue.”
He and about a half-dozen others stood peacefully outside the Federal Reserve Bank downtown to show
solidarity with the New York demonstrators.
“We can’t continue to ship jobs overseas and continue to have legalized bribery at the national level as far as
elections go. There must be a new type of patriotism,” Kiepe said.
The scene in St. Louis was quite different from the one in New York. More than 700 people were arrested there
during a march on the Brooklyn
Bridge.
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MISSOURINET
SOS CARNAHAN ANNOUNCES WILL NOT SEEK 3RD TERM, 1 DEM
ANNOUNCES HE WILL
by MIKE LEAR on SEPTEMBER 30, 2011
in POLITICS & GOVERNMENT
The Secretary of State has announced she will not seek a third term. In a statement, Robin Carnahan says after 8
years in the office, she plans to return to private life. She says:
“After 8 years as Secretary of State, the time will be right for me to return to private life, to gather new ideas and
experiences and a fresh perspective. But my commitment to public service won’t stop, because I know the
challenges facing our country can’t be solved in Washington or Jefferson City alone. It will take ideas, energy and
the daily commitment and determination of all of us.”
She adds that she will remain “engaged and involved,” adding that could include running for another elected
office.
Carhanan’s current term expires in 15 months. She is a breast cancer survivor, and a campaign spokesman says
she is “fit, healthy and happy,” adding health was not a factor in her decision.
Carnahan’s brother, St. Louis Area Congressman Russ Carnahan issued his own statement on her decision not to
run:
“I’m tremendously proud of my sister Robin’s public service. For seven years, she’s done important work
protecting seniors against fraud, cutting red tape for small businesses and ensuring fair elections.”
“I encourage Missourians who share Robin’s dedication to working for the people of Missouri to select a
candidate who will take up her fight and run. I remain focused on representing the St. Louis region, working to
grow the economy and jobs and preparing for reelection in 2012.”
One Missouri democrat wasted no time in following-up on the news from Carnahan. Kansas City Representative
Jason Kander issued a statement less than half-an-hour after hers, announcing he will run for Secretary of State:
“It is important that the next Secretary of State continues moving the office forward in the most efficient and
effective manner. Our next Secretary of State must be someone who knows the difficulties small businesses face.
Our next Secretary of State must be someone who has a record of fighting fraud and corruption in government.
Our next Secretary of State must be beholden to no one but the voters. Our next Secretary of State must be
committed to working every day to making Missouri stronger.”
Two republicans have announced for Secretary of State. St. Charles Senator Scott Rupp and Napton Senator Bill
Stouffer are seeking that party’s nomination.
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GET IN LINE, FLOOD VICTIMS (AUDIO)
by BOB PRIDDY on OCTOBER 3, 2011
in FLOODING,HUMAN INTEREST
By the end of the week, the longest flood in recorded Missouri River history will be history itself. Next is the
challenge of paying for recovery from the disaster.
From Montana through Missouri, floods and high water have caused billions of dollars in damage to levees,
roads, bridges, homes, businesses, dams, and farms. Preliminary damage estimates are given in terms of
hundreds of millions of dollars but until the water goes away, definitive numbers cannot be calculated. Once they
are, what then?
That’s the big question for FEMA, the Corps of Engineers, and other disaster response agencies.
Brigadier General John McMahon, the commander of the Corps of Engineers Missouri River basin division, says
people affected by the Missouri River Flood of 2011 will just have to get in line.

                           BG John McMahon :31 mp3
He says some funding requests are “in the mill” and are doing well in terms of getting seed money for
assessments and early repair. He hopes enough money is available for levees to be rebuilt and other repairs to
be made before the 2012 runoff season starting in March.
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BLOG ZONE
SENATOR WILL KRAUS AND REPRESENTATIVE JEANIE LAUER TO
HOST TOWN HALL MEETING
by GreenSummit Dispatch on Tuesday, September 27, 2011 at 11:25am


JEFFERSON CITY — On Thursday, Sept. 29, Sen. Kraus, R-Lee’s Summit, and Rep. Jeanie Lauer, R-Blue Springs, will
host a town hall meeting in Blue Springs from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Blue Springs Country Club on 1600
NW Circle Drive.
 The focus of the town hall meeting is to provide information on the current legislative special session and
recently concluded veto session and to discuss the emphasis for the upcoming 2012 regular session. In addition,
Blue Springs Councilmen Dale Carter, Jeff Quibell, Chris Lievsay and Kent Edmondson will be in attendance to
discuss local issues.
 “These town hall meetings are important to me because they give me the opportunity to interact on a personal
level with the constituents of the 8th Senatorial District,” Sen. Kraus said. “It is vital to keep members of the local
community up-to-date on activities within the Capitol and upcoming issues and events. I look forward to
speaking with concerned citizens and addressing any questions they might have.”
If there are any additional questions about the town hall meeting, or any other concerns pertaining to the
8th District, Sen. Kraus can also be contacted at his Capitol office at (573) 751-1464 or by e-mail
at will.kraus@senate.mo.gov .
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THE FIRE’S GOING OUT
Posted on September 30, 2011 by Bob Priddy
Robin Carnahan has sent a letter to supporters saying she’s not running for a third term after months of
maintaining that she was. Just a few weeks ago she brushed off our reporter, Allison Blood, at the state fair,
reiterating that she was running. We asked her spokesman in the Secretary of State’s office several weeks ago
for an interview and never heard a peep back.
So what’s up?
We dunno.
Carnahan has sent out her vaguely-worded letter and has gone incommunicado. Calls to the campaign office go
to voice mail. Calls to the state Democratic party go to voice mail. An email to the party mouthpiece has brought
no response.
Within minutes, Rep. Jason Kander of Kansas City announced he was running. Either he was well prepared or he
got a heads-up before Carnahan’s supporters were told. He claims he found out about the same time we did,
which caused our Jessica Machetta to laugh and suggest to him that he might be in error. But that’s his story and
he’s sticking to it.
Two Republican state senators have announced–Bill Stouffer of Napton who announced his candidacy months
ago, and Scott Rupp of Wentzville, who announced his availability last month.
Behavior like Robin Carnahan’s announcement leads to a lot of speculation. There’s got to be more to this than a
decision to repudiate herself, one might think. A lot of people who have put their political faith in her for a long
time might think they deserve something better than an e-mailed letter that eventually gets around to saying,
“I’m not running for a third term after all.”
Done with politics? She doesn’t say. The Lieutenant Governor’s office is open and if Jay Nixon wins his second
term, the governorship comes open in 2016. Congressional opportunities might exist.
It’s been eleven years since Robin Carnahan told the “Don’t let the fire go out” story at her father’s funeral on
the capitol lawn.
She’s leaving the Secretary of State race. Brother Russ has been crowded out of his congressional seat.
The fire is only flickering now. And growing close to being only glowing coals.
Wish we knew why. Wish Robin would tell us.
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TKC BREAKING NEWS!!! ROBIN CARNAHAN OUT!!! ALL
CLEAR FOR KANDER & CO!!!
Tony’s Kansas City
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2011
So this isn't exactly a shocker and even as far back as the Summer everybody expected as much:

Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan will not seek re-election

That's nice, that's what everybody suspected this summer . . . Now here's the more important TKC part of the
equation that newsies won't dare consider . . .

As always, what's more important is the future . . .

RIGHT NOW THE LEADING CANDIDATE TO REPLACE ROBIN IS KANSAS CITY, MO STATE REP. JASON KANDER!!!

But not so fast . . .

There's a couple of other names already in the mix . . .

Democrats across The Show-Me State are begging for Downtown State Rep. Mike Talboy to consider the job.

And then so many folks have speculated that Jackson County Executive Mike Sanders is going to run for a state
office . . .

But here's what you d-bags haven't considered . . .

LOOK FOR THE GOP TO CALL UP A SERIOUS CANDIDATE FOR THE JOB NOW THAT IT'S VACANT AND THIS
SECRETARY OF STATE ELECTION COULD BE A SERIOUS FIGHT GIVEN THIS SECOND GOP ELECTION WAVE AMID
THE GREAT RECESSION!!!

If that's the case look for the Republicans to wage a nasty rural Missouri fight that nobody is going to like and is
mostly aimed at deporting TKC.

DEVELOPING . . .
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FOR NIXON, AN EPISODE THAT’S NOT SO SWEET
By STEVE KRASKE - The Kansas City Star Commentary
Posted on Fri, Sep. 30, 2011 10:15 PM
One thing you can say about Jay Nixon’s tenure as Missouri governor is how relatively free it has been of scandals
and big blunders.
The Democrat has navigated the ship of state through some mighty choppy waters that only begin with a way,
way down economy and a Republican-led General Assembly.
Until now, the lone exception has been E. coli-gate in the Lake of the Ozarks.
All this makes the recent Mamtek controversy stand out.
Mamtek U.S. Inc. had big plans to employ several hundred workers at an artificial-sweetener plant in Moberly.
The company broke ground on its new building. The city issued $39 million in industrial development bonds.
The state offered nearly $18 million in incentives. In July 2010, Nixon stood with former governor Bob Holden
and company officials to announce the deal and its 600 jobs. Mamtek would produce SweetO, a sugar substitute.
“SweetO is just about to make Missouri’s economy a little sweeter,” Nixon said that day.
When the company began seeking job applications, more than 3,700 people applied.
The project would show Missourians how a foreign investment like this one by the Chinese could breathe new
life into the heartland.
Today, things aren’t so sweet. Plant construction has halted. Mamtek has laid off its employees. The company
missed its first $2.2 million bond payment. Attorney General Chris Koster and the Securities and Exchange
Commission are investigating.
All of that is raising questions about whether the Nixon administration — in a rush toward adding jobs in this
sour economy — performed its due diligence or turned a blind eye.
The Columbia Tribune has raised questions about the state’s review process. Here’s an interesting one: Did the
state know that Mamtek would raise private capital by finding Chinese citizens so eager to become U.S. citizens
that they would invest $500,000 in the project to obtain visas?
Nixon was unusually off-kilter when asked about that funding stream at a news conference.
“I don’t run the Department of Economic Development,” he said, “and I don’t work details at the ground level.”
Republicans are beginning to sound bitter about SweetO.
“His (Nixon’s) team made a bad decision,” Sen. Will Kraus of Lee’s Summit said. “Why did the state offer so high a
percentage of the overall project costs?”
This all comes as the General Assembly continues to wrestle with a jobs package that includes, as its centerpiece,
making St. Louis’ Lambert airport an international cargo hub catering primarily to … the Chinese.
For many lawmakers, the bad taste over Mamtek has undermined earlier support for the bill.
It’s a mess, all right, and one that increasingly shapes up as a rare blunder for Nixon.
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CAIN WINS ANOTHER STRAW POLL, SWEEPS GOP WOMEN'S
CONVENTION MEETING IN KC
1 day, 2 hours ago
Prime Buzz - Steve Kraske
Herman Cain is quickly becoming king of the straw poll.
Cain won another one today, coasting to an easy win in a survey taken by the National Federation of Republican
Women meeting at Bartle Hall.
The breakdown:
Herman Cain – 48.9%
Rick Perry – 14.1% Mitt Romney – 13.3%
Newt Gingrich – 12.5% Rick Santorum – 6.9%
Michele Bachmann – 1.4%
Ron Paul – 0.6%
Gary Johnson – 0.4% Jon Huntsman – 0.2%
Undecided – 1.8%
Cain won that big straw poll in Florida last week. Yesterday, he won TeaCon 2011, the first Midwestern Tea Party
Convention, which drew about 1,000 people to Schaumburg, Ill., this weekend.
Cain was the only candidate to attend TeaCon, which is where he headed after leaving Kansas City.
His KC win was easy to forecast. He easily ginned up the most enthusiasm during his nearly half-hour address
Saturday morning.
What remains to be seen is whether a businessman who’s never held elected office can convince masses
of GOP voters to back him, even if many of those voters are dissatisfied with the Republican field.
Cain received 48.9 percent of the 505 total votes cast, with Rick Perry placing a distant second and Mitt
Romney placing third. The poll featured nine Republican presidential candidates.
“In a straw poll with this many candidates on the ballot, it is unusual for one candidate to receive almost half of
the votes,” said Karen Floyd, former chair of the South Carolina Republican Party and publisher of
PalladianView.com, which conducted the poll. “It is very impressive.”
Straw poll voters consisted of Republican women activists from 41 states who were registered to attend
the NFRW’s convention. “This straw poll is significant because the voters are Republican women from all across
the nation who are extremely active and influential in their states and communities,” NFRW PresidentSue
Lynch said.
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RUPP KICKS OFF
Arch City Chronicle
by dave | Sun, 10/02/2011 - 12:41pm
Meanwhile on the Republican side, Sen. Scott Rupp kicked off his Secretary of State bid this week at his St.
Charles base with over 90+ in attendance. Rupp’s speech hit national themes, tying Robin Carnahan to Barack
Obama. He never mentioned any would-be primary opponents, but staked out his claim to front-runner status
running through his legislative record of issues which can play in both the primary and general election. Illegal
immigration, autism and senate sponsor of the bill that put Prop C (Health Care Freedom Act) on the ballot in
2010 are both red meat for party faithful, but also show Rupp’s ability to put get into of hot button issues.
In his Kansas City kick-off event last week, Rupp’s host list included: Warren Erdman, Jack Craft, Terry Dunn, Terry
Kilroy and Don Munce.
And his Springfield kick-off was hosted by Joe Passanise, Mark Gardner, Neal Etheridge, Greg Horton, Jim
Penn, Michael Clarkeand Patti Penny.
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EDITORIALS … & Letters to the Editor
EDITORIAL: ATTEMPT TO REDUCE LENGTH OF RATE CASES BAD FOR
CONSUMERS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch - By the Editorial Board
Posted: Saturday, October 1, 2011 12:00 am

Shortly after he took over as the chairman of the powerful Missouri Public Service Commission, Kevin Gunn told
us that he saw his role as a consensus builder between the consumer groups and investor-owned utilities who
fight over electric rates.
His first attempt at fulfilling that role is way off the mark.
Over the last few months, outside of the public eye, Mr. Gunn has been working on a plan to give the utilities
something they have been seeking unsuccessfully from the Legislature for several years: shorter rate cases.
Since 2007, the average Ameren Missouri customer has seen a 31 percent rate hike. Four years. Four rate
increases. Isn't that fast enough?
Consumer groups understandably are upset with Mr. Gunn, both for the very idea of reducing the length of rate
cases and for how he's gone about it. The PSC is a quasi-judicial body that sits in judgment between the utilities
and their customers. Traditionally, when it wants to change a rule, the PSC opens a case and allows comment
through a public process in which all documents are posted on the PSC website.
That hasn't happened this time. Instead, Mr. Gunn, after meeting with the utilities, informed lobbyists and
attorneys for consumer groups that he agreed that the statutory 11-month deadline for rate cases was too long.
He then asked for comments, and that process is ongoing. But that process has been much less public than a
rule-making case or a legislative debate. That's Mr. Gunn's first mistake.
The more serious one is in giving away the farm and getting nothing in return for consumers.
During the years that Ameren and other utilities have been seeking shorter rate cases, consumer groups, led by
the Office of Public Counsel, have been seeking more funding to make the rate cases a fair fight.
Right now, utility companies can lawyer-up and pass all of their rate-case costs on to consumers. The OPC, which,
by statute, represents consumers using state funds, is outgunned every single time. Attempts to increase funding
for the OPC have failed.
Making the process shorter would make it impossible for the stretched OPC staff to ensure that rate increases
are justified.
"I don't see the necessity for change," Lewis Mills, the public counsel, told us. "Eleven months isn't enough time
to do a good job on any case."
Missouri's average rate case takes 10 months now, the same as the national average.
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Among the anti-consumer suggestions in Mr. Gunn's proposal is to get rid of local hearings in rate cases. Those
hearings allow St. Louis customers, for example, to participate in the process without having to go to Jefferson
City. Eliminating local hearings would be horrible public policy. Ironically, Mr. Gunn is scheduling public outreach
opportunities for the commission; one is planned at the Chesterfield Mall on Oct. 14.
Sometimes the public bodies that set rates for monopoly utilities serve the public interest by slowing down the
process. That's precisely the point Ameren, acting as a consumer, has made in asking the federal Surface
Transportation Board to lower the rates it pays for railroad service. In that case, Ameren wants a slower process
and lower rates, the very things it refuses to give utility consumers in Missouri.
Regardless of his intentions, Mr. Gunn should derail this anti-consumer train before it builds up too much steam.
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SHORT TAKE: COULD SNOOKI FIND MORE WELCOME HOME IN
MISSOURI?
St. Louis Post-Dispatch - By the Editorial Board
Posted: Saturday, October 1, 2011 12:00 am
Because economic development is all the rage in Jefferson City these days, maybe Missouri lawmakers could
make a pitch to lure MTV's reality show "Jersey Shore" to the Ozarks.
New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, no fan of the booze-induced party-at-the-beach image the show portrays for his
state, has cut a film tax credit of $420,000 that helped finance the program.
Missouri lawmakers, bogged down in discussing various tax credits in their stalled special session, should be able
to find a few hundred thousand bucks to lure Snooki, The Situation and JWoWW to Missouri. It could be the
"Snookitropolis" bill or "Snooki does Party Cove."
Let's face it, there are few rules at the well-known Lake of the Ozarks summer fun spot, and various attempts by
lawmakers to limit the . . . um . . . activity there have been fruitless, so why not cash in?
Think of the tourism dollars. Think of the image makeover. Overnight the Ozarks would go from "Retire in
Branson" to "Slackers Gone Wild." Maybe the "Ozarks Shore" crowd could take a day trip to appear on the Travel
Channel's "Truck Stop Missouri."
Snooki rasslin' a greased pig. Who wouldn't watch that?
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LADD: OPPONENTS CLOUD STEM CELL ISSUE
Springfield News-Leader – Op-Ed
11:00 PM, Sep. 30, 2011

Despite all of the stem cell breakthroughs that have occurred since passage of the Missouri Stem Cell
Amendment in 2006, a small but vocal group of opponents continues to target the voter-approved initiative that
protects this life-saving research.
The latest example comes from John Lilly ("Petitions' definitions need voters' attention," Sept. 20, News-Leader),
who takes issue with definitions in the amendment, also known as Amendment 2.
Well-informed citizens, including voters who approved the amendment to our state constitution, know it
contains the same definitions for stem cell research that are used by the American Medical Association, the
National Institutes of Health and other respected medical, health and research organizations. Opponents of the
amendment had their own narrow definitions, which Lilly seems to have adopted, that selectively and
intentionally ignored these established definitions.
Lilly correctly notes that the Missouri Stem Cell Amendment bans human reproductive cloning. In fact, the
amendment made our state one of only a few that outlaws the cloning of a human being. Thankfully, the
amendment also protects all forms of stem cell research allowed by federal law, including adult, embryonic and a
newer form that shares characteristics of both.
Polls consistently show that a large majority of people support all types of stem cell research. It offers hope for
cures, as well as proven advances against diabetes, spinal cord injury, macular degeneration, heart disease and
other afflictions.
No matter how hard opponents try to cloud the issue, Missourians understand that the Stem Cell Amendment
protects research aimed at saving the lives of our family members, friends and fellow citizens.
Dena Ladd, a former Springfield resident, is executive director of Missouri Cures, which spearheaded efforts to
pass the Missouri Stem Cell Amendment.
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CONTEXT ON JUDICIAL SELECTION
Friday, September 30, 2011
seMissourian.com
Your paper recently ran a reprint from The Wall Street Journal claiming Missourians are unhappy with our
process for selecting judges to our high courts. You've also run a letter and a column from Stan Grimm, a
distinguished local jurist.
Unfortunately, your readers are not provided the context. When Missouri lifted all caps for political contributions
in 2008, some interesting characters showed up. One of them is David Humphreys in Joplin (who by the way was
the first to trash Peter Kinder in his recent "troubles").
Humphreys funds Show-Me Better Courts, whose modest goal is to take over the judicial selection process by
returning to partisan elections, in which process he no doubt intends to be both active and generous. The
interesting argument on this group's website is that we should have partisan elections because voters don't pay
enough attention to recall elections.
Humphreys has also hired Nathan Sprowl, a professional political hit man out of Arizona. Sprowl is no Donald
Segretti, but he works with New Times newspaper in Arizona to do his dirty work. New Times owns The
Riverfront Times in St. Louis, the paper that broke/got fed the Kinder scandal. So did Kinder say "no" to
Humphreys? No one's talking. But when a distinguished jurist has one view of an independent judiciary, and the
other side hires dirty tricksters; the path for Missourians paints itself. Besides, who are these Missourians who
are unhappy with judges who can't be bought? Know anyone?
JOSH BILL, Sikeston, Mo.
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THE STAR’S EDITORIAL | AGRICULTURE OFFERS A HARVEST OF
BUDGET CUTS
Kansas City Star
Posted on Sat, Oct. 01, 2011 10:15 PM
In the summer debt ceiling deal, Congress set up a “supercommittee” to find $1.2 trillion in additional budget
cuts over the next decade. The panel began work — and so did the lobbyists. Among the most energetic are
those defending farm subsidies.
The wholesale elimination of the nation’s agricultural programs won’t happen. Yet it should be possible to push
through two important reforms: Terminate annual cash payments and create an effective income cap to curtail
subsidies for wealthy farmers. As a bonus, one might even hope for an end to ethanol subsidies.
Cash payments are outlays based on acreage and historic yield, and they are paid whether farmers grow anything
or not. Cost to taxpayers: nearly $5 billion a year.
Blake Hurst, president of the Missouri Farm Bureau, says the program should continue, partly because many
farmers still depend on those checks. Hurst says he understands that agriculture will face cuts this year, but he
would prefer that all programs continue, even at lower amounts.
That, however, would make it easier for lawmakers to add money to those budget items later. Eliminating a
program entirely ensures that the savings continue.
The Obama administration agrees that cash payments should cease. Even some farmers no longer support them.
Craig Lang, president of the Iowa Farm Bureau, told The New York Times that with the economy so weak, he
could not justify taking the money.
Lang’s perspective is apt, given that the farm economy and the overall economy have spectacularly diverged. The
last decade had five of the best years for farm income, and this year is projected to be another blowout — a 30
percent increase in farm income from 2010 to nearly $104 billion.
No one begrudges the nation’s farmers this good fortune, but the budget crisis requires substantial cuts. How can
Congress support the current level of farm spending when many of these “farmers” don’t live on the land? The
Agriculture Department says $394 million went last year to recipients who lived in cities of 100,000 or more.
A second big improvement would be a realistic income cap, meaning subsidies would stop for farmers with
incomes above the cap. The current limit is $750,000 — ridiculously high. Some have championed a limit of
$250,000, which seems more than generous. To most Americans, those with incomes at that level are rich.
Nothing wrong with that, but they don’t need money from taxpayers.
That isn’t all the supercommittee could do. It should cut the ethanol program, which costs billions and diverts 40
percent of the corn crop to fuel production, boosting prices for consumers.
For many farmers, crop insurance has become the most important source of taxpayer cash. It, too, needs reform
because it encourages farmers to plow marginal land, knowing they’ll be paid whether they produce a crop or
not.
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Nearly two thirds of the nation’s farmers — growers of fruit, vegetables, nuts, beef and poultry — do without
direct subsidies. The budget crisis is a signal that it’s time for the rest of the farm sector to get along with a lot
less of what amounts to corporate welfare.
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LAWMAKERS, GET JOB DONE
Time to act on economic development package
Springfield News-Leader
11:00 PM, Oct. 1, 2011
Missouri's state representatives and senators should remember it's about leadership and balance during this
special session.
And jobs.
We urge the Republican leadership to continue their efforts, and members to support them, in moving legislation
forward aimed at generating economic activity in Missouri.
Many Missourians are still hurting from the Great Recession. The state's unemployment rate as of August was 8.8
percent. While there have been some signs of more consumer spending (it may be a good Halloween for
retailers) and somewhat better activity nationally (the April-June quarter growth was revised upward to an
annual rate of 1.3 percent from 1 percent), lawmakers can take actions to help. And we need them to do so.
There has been a broad consensus among business and labor groups for action on the economic development
package in this legislative special session. From Daniel P. Mehan, Missouri Chamber president and CEO: "We
realize it is a controversial issue, but it is time for the legislature to finish what it started."
What was started had promise. The Senate and House leadership had claimed an agreement earlier in the
summer on a comprehensive jobs bill. It sounded as if some of the obstacles from this year's regular session had
been overcome. These included tax breaks for the proposed China cargo hub at the St. Louis airport and ending
two costly tax credit programs for the renovating of historic buildings and construction of low-income housing.
But the support in both legislative houses for these moves and for a proposal called Compete Missouri isn't as
solid as was thought. Compete Missouri is a plan backed by Gov. Jay Nixon to consolidate several state business
incentives. It would give the Department of Economic Development additional authority to provide upfront
money to businesses.
The ongoing friction between the two chambers eventually led to the present inactivity in the special session.
Just last Wednesday, Nixon called on the lawmakers to pass a jobs-creation bill or end the session.
As reported by David Lieb of the Associated Press, Republicans will caucus on Wednesday, and a vote in the
House is planned for Thursday.
We are hopeful Republican members will bring the needed mindset to achieve a balance of conflicting interests
together. Most of these issues were debated in the last session. Several of the economic proposals actually have
been around for several years. There has been more than enough time for consideration. We urge our area
lawmakers to approach next week with a "get it done" attitude.
As has been pointed out in news stories and our editorials, the 2012 General Assembly will be facing serious
budget challenges. Cooperation among Republicans and a good working relationship between the House and
Senate are essential in dealing with the tough decisions that will have to be made.
And, as if we could ignore it, let's keep in mind 2012 is an election year.
The most responsible lawmakers will be able to point back to this special session and say, "I did what was right
for Missouri. I helped create jobs."
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TOP STATES FOR DOING BUSINESS
Posted: Saturday, October 1, 2011 6:32 pm | Updated: 1:47 pm, Fri Sep 30, 2011.
By Bill Miller Sr., Missourian Editor
Which Are the Top States for Doing Business?” was the question posed prominently on the cover of Area
Development magazine. The subhead said leading consultants were surveyed and asked to pick their top state
choices in 12 critical local categories.
The magazine is a leading information vehicle for economic development officials, consultants and government
officials. Making the rankings were respected location consultants who work with a nationwide client base.
The rankings for the top states for doing business overall had Texas at the top of the list. Following Texas were, in
order: Georgia, Alabama, South Carolina, Indiana, Louisiana, North Carolina, Tennessee, Mississippi and
California. To us, the surprise was No. 10, California.
The survey for the rankings included business environment. That included overall cost of doing business;
incentive programs; business friendliness; and corporate tax environment. Then there was labor climate. There
were three considerations under labor climate: labor availability, labor costs and work force development
programs.
Next consideration was infrastructure/global access: rail and highway accessibility, certified sites and shovel-
ready program, competitive utility rates and access to global markets. Last was economy: leading in the
economic recovery.
Texas ranked No. 1 in business friendliness, corporate tax environment and overall cost of doing business.
Alabama, Louisiana and Texas were tied in incentive programs. Texas was best in overall cost of doing business.
Georgia was ranked best in labor availability and work force development programs. Mississippi was rated the
best state in labor costs.
Where’s Missouri? It was tied for fourth in rail and highway accessibility. Indiana was best in that category,
followed by Illinois and Texas. That was the only category in which our state was mentioned in the listings.
Of note is that in the infrastructure/global access category, a consideration was certified sites. Union and
Washington in Franklin County have certified, shovel- ready sites.
We hope members of the General Assembly take note of this survey. Missouri has some distance to go to be
ranked high among location consultants. Our state has made progress. We’re not there yet and we only will be in
the top 10 if there is enlightened leadership and cooperation among the political factions.
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EDITORIAL: REPUBLICAN IN-FIGHTING IS CAUSE OF JOBS BILL
STALLING PATTERN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch
By the Editorial Board | Posted: Monday, October 3, 2011 12:00 am

When it comes to the jobs bill under consideration in the long and quiet special session of the Missouri
Legislature, the state's Republican Party has reached the point at which it is time to fish or cut bait.
That was basically the message sent by Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat, on Wednesday when he suggested that
lawmakers send him a jobs bill or go home.
We have criticized Mr. Nixon's lack of leadership in pushing for the centerpiece of that bill — the so-called
Aerotropolis plan that would turn Lambert-St. Louis International Airport into a cargo hub for foreign trade.
But make no mistake: If the jobs bill fails, at this point, it's entirely a Republican political failure. Mr. Nixon has
offered support for the version of the bill passed by the Senate and the version of the bill that was discussed, but
not introduced, by House leaders. He is not standing in the way of progress here.
Republicans hold huge majorities in the House and the Senate, and it's been intraparty fighting that stalled the
jobs bill in the regular and special sessions.
The reason for the current delay is more political than substantive.
Twice now the Senate has passed a version of the bill that includes some elements of Aerotropolis, sunsets and
caps in other tax credit programs and incentives to help turn plant and animal science research into homegrown
businesses. The versions of the bills were quite a bit different. Each was a compromise. The House has yet to
debate, let alone pass, its own version.
Either of the Senate's bills would spur some job creation while reining in the long-term and unchecked growth of
other tax credit programs. The proposals, like all economic development programs, have been and always will be
a gamble. But at a time when Missourians are suffering job losses and continuing to run in place in a stalled
economy, the bills reflect serious attempts by the business community to improve the state's environment for
job creation in a variety of industries, both in the city and in agriculture-based communities across the state.
Politically, it serves Republicans no purpose to go into the 2012 elections as the party that couldn't shoot straight
and that failed to pass a jobs bill while holding all the cards.
So what are they waiting for?
The better question might be: Who are they waiting for?
Until Missouri Republicans have a 2012 gubernatorial candidate to rally behind, the various party factions lack a
unifying political force. Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder, once considered a lock to run for the GOP nomination, has been
conspicuously silent during the special session. His candidacy and ability to lead his party have been damaged
by political and personal controversies.
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Left in Mr. Kinder's fading wake are a variety of lawmakers with statewide aspirations — Sen. Brad Lager, R-
Savannah, and Speaker of the House Steve Tilley, R-Perryville, to name but two — who appear to be more
worried about their political futures than crafting a jobs solution that allows everybody to win.
There is a path to success. The jobs bill should include expiration dates for all tax credit programs so that they
have accountability. Mr. Nixon should be allowed to consolidate some of the existing economic development
incentives into his Compete Missouri proposal, but without the up-front closing costs that could be wasteful. The
freight-forwarder tax credits for Aerotropolis should be approved to start the process of luring cargo and
improving exporting opportunities.
All of this can happen if Republican leaders stand up to bring their warring factions together. The House returns
to action — or inaction— on Thursday. Who will be ready to lead?
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR, OCTOBER 3
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Posted: Monday, October 3, 2011 12:00 am


State can position region as global player
Recent attempts to link the Moberly, Mo., debacle with the international air cargo trade hub initiative at
Lambert-St. Louis International Airport are wrong.
Moberly effectively wired money to a "Nigerian prince" who emailed about a tremendous business opportunity.
The plan to establish an international trade hub at Lambert could not be more different.
Moberly's losses stem from the decision to partially fund the construction of an artificial sweetener plant by
issuing bonds to an inadequately vetted American-Chinese joint venture. Moberly incurred losses when this
company defaulted on its bond payments.
The trade hub bill would provide only performance-based tax incentives; companies could receive tax credits
only to the extent that they directly contribute to the shipment of international cargo. Furthermore, the bill
targets business activity that does not exist now, so the credits would not substantively impact the state's
existing revenue streams. If St. Louis doesn't become a "major air trade hub," the state would not incur losses.
Unlike Moberly, the trade hub initiative is the culmination of several years of negotiations between regional
leaders and the Chinese government. China Cargo Airlines, the company on behalf of which these officials have
negotiated, is a subsidiary of one of the largest companies in China, hardly a fly-by-night operation.
The Moberly debacle teaches us to be cautious with public funds and to adequately vet potential business
partners. The Aerotropolis bill contains sufficient taxpayer safeguards, and China Cargo Airlines probably is more
financially secure than Missouri.
Elected representatives must not squander this opportunity to position the region as a competitive player in the
global economy.
Nicholas Goodrich • Columbia, Mo.


Illinois must establish insurance exchange
Many working families in Illinois have had limited or no access to adequate health insurance coverage. This lack
of access also prevents small businesses from growing. We can change this, but only if Illinois acts now.
A health insurance marketplace exchange would give families and small businesses a way to compare and secure
insurance coverage. It could reduce the number of uninsured Illinoisans to 7 percent.
Illinois can establish its own exchange. If it doesn't, the federal government will establish one. There is a strong
consensus among the insurance industry, legislators, consumers and businesses that a state-based health
insurance exchange would empower Illinois consumers with greater knowledge, accessibility and control. An
exchange will expand availability, reduce the number of uninsured residents and create an efficient, competitive
and transparent health insurance marketplace.
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An exchange requires years to plan, design, build and test. By the end of 2012, the state must submit a
comprehensive plan for the operation of an Illinois exchange, as required under the federal Affordable Care Act.
If the plan is approved, the exchange must be operational for an initial enrollment period by October 2013. Only
by meeting these time frames would Illinois be able to begin providing residents coverage through its exchange
on Jan. 1, 2014. Illinois must act now to authorize establishment of an exchange.
The Legislature must pass the necessary legislation to organize an exchange in the veto session. That will allow
Illinois to better serve the public and its business community, meet federally mandated deadlines and help pave
the way towards an effective Illinois-based Exchange.
Jack Messmore • Springfield, Ill.,
Illinois Department of Insurance


Hit again
Homeowners are hit again with a property tax increase, in this case from the Zoo-Museum District ("Special
district raises tax rate," Sept. 28). Although property values have decreased recently for St. Louis-area
homeowners, negatively affecting the owners' financial worth and jeopardizing homeownership, these hardships
have not influenced the special district. The homeowner can be assured that the special districts, schools and fire
districts will continue to raise tax rates, no matter the financial climate.
Have these entities been required to reevaluate their budgets and make hard economic choices that require
reducing expenditures, as homeowners and taxpayers now are doing? Obviously, they have not.
The Zoo-Museum District, St. Louis and St. Louis County officials should develop a "pay-as-you-use" plan to
reduce the burden on area homeowners. Tourists and area visitors could be required to pay a small fee to access
the area's biggest cultural institutions.
We want to keep more of our hard-earned wages, and we want officials who are accountable and hear us when
we say enough.
Bill Mitchell • Chesterfield


Level field
Growing up during the "New Deal" years, I was aware that the Republicans were considered to be the party of
"the rich," but I have never seen them work so hard to prove that to be the case as in the last year. The middle
class seems headed for extinction, but it is considered class warfare to try to get the super-rich to pay their fair
share of taxes.
Overseas factories not only provide cheap labor, but they also make it easy to hide money from the Internal
Revenue Service.
It is time to time to try to get a level playing field for American workers. Cessna builds its newest single-engine
plane in China, dismantles it, crates it up for shipment to the United States for reassembly and sale. Boeing may
have violated regulations to build in a "right-to-work" (read anti-union) state. Labor unions have not always
behaved admirably, but we have never needed more than now to encourage their preservation.
Laurence McAneny • Granite City
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Free to go begging
It's always amusing to see the far-left view of the job creators. Pat Bagley's cartoon on the Sept. 26 opinion page
shows the employees as slaves and the job creators as plantation owners.
If the liberals continue demonizing those job creators, they will free everyone from their evil slavery (also known
as jobs) by enslaving (employing) even more people in other countries. Then everyone will be free — free to fend
for himself or go begging at the door of the ultimate plantation boss, the federal government.
Mark Kern • Swansea


The rest of the story
Colleen Carroll Campbell's column "So long, freedom of thought" (Sept. 29), about universities administering
nondiscrimination policies, does not tell the whole story. The issue at Vanderbilt University centered around a
student organization's constitution being in violation of the school's nondiscrimination policy. Ms. Campbell
made it sound as if this policy was directed only toward religious student organizations and implied that these
religious organizations were being mandated to have leaders who did not share in their core values.
Of the 380 student organizations registered at Vanderbilt, only eight are in noncompliance with the school's
nondiscrimination policy. And of those eight, five are religious student groups. There are 36 religious groups
registered at Vanderbilt. Such organizations as Vandy Catholic passed Vanderbilt's nondiscrimination
policy review without issue.
Contrary to what Ms. Campbell says, religious groups are not required to have leaders who do not share their
core values. All that's required is that the organization's constitution not be worded in such a way as to preclude
anyone from being a leader because of his beliefs. If leaders are selected the same way they were when I went to
college, the chances of someone being a leader who is not acceptable to the group are slim and none. For that
matter, how many people are going to want to join a group where they know they will not be accepted? It would
seem to me that Ms. Campbell's concerns are unfounded.
Mel Myers • St. Louis County
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LETTERS | MONDAY, OCT. 3
Kansas City Star


Regulations help all
We have begun to hear a lot of wailing and gnashing of teeth from Republicans about the onerous, “job-killing”
burden of regulations being “needlessly” placed upon the shoulders of the business community (now that
they’ve won almost all the other fights).
I am certain they would include the added testing for new strains of E. coli, as profiled in the Sept. 14 article “E.
coli to get greater scrutiny” in The Star’s Business section. Indeed, according to the article, the meat industry
already has protested that the new tests are “too expensive.”
Depends on whom you ask, I’d say. To the person who otherwise would contract kidney failure, have other long-
term complications or die, I’d bet those extra tests look sensible and affordable.
Jan S. Gephardt
Westwood


KCI for Aerotropolis
Kansas City International Airport is a superior venue for an “Aerotropolis.” I travel for work and can attest to KCI
being the most efficient airport in the nation. Its three separate terminal design would allow for the increased
cargo flights to be segregated from the passenger traffic.
It’s outside of the busiest parts of the Kansas City area with access to well-maintained I-29, I-35 and the I-435
loop.
That’s in contrast to the congestion and dilapidation of the roads surrounding Lambert-St. Louis International
Airport.
There is a large hub for rail traffic just across the Kansas state line that could also be an avenue for the increased
freight.
The Kansas City area is already a hub for quite a bit of over-the-road freight as is evidenced by the warehousing
and semi-truck facilities on I-435 at Front Street.
I was at Lambert about a month ago and parts of it are still boarded up from the tornado, which is embarrassing.
Why on earth are we re-inventing the wheel and trying to shoe-horn business into an already congested area of
our state when we have an ideal place for such a venture on this side of the state?
Chris DeWeese
Trimble, Mo.
MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS
       DAILY NEWS CLIPS
                Collected/Archived for Saturday-Monday, Oct. 1-3, 2011 - Page 116 of 118



Buffett’s new title
Warren Buffett’s new moniker should now be “The Oracle of Obamaha.”
Cathy Schroer
Overland Park


Poor unfairly blamed
Some letter writers have complained (incorrectly) that the poor pay no taxes and that people are tired of carrying
the burden for the neediest individuals among us.
I have seen hundreds of W-2 forms for poor people with families who work about 60 hours a week for the posh
hotels in Johnson County and earn shockingly little money for it. I think they have paid a debt to society through
their sweat labor.
In addition, Kansas has a high sales tax rate of about 8 percent on all food and household items that people buy.
So low- and no-income people are contributing to society.
Helen Bontrager
Kansas City, Kan.


Praise federal workers
Since 1984, anyone entering civil service employment came in under a new retirement system called the Federal
Employee Retirement System (FERS) that is based on Social Security. In order to draw from it, they have to work
until they are at least 62, which is just like the private sector. The old Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS) will
disappear after the last of those who remained under it have retired.
Federal employees have families, too. They are under a pay freeze for two years so they have done their part in
reducing the current debt. Federal employees have not had a decent cost-of-living pay raise since 1980 under
Jimmy Carter.
The government salaries and benefits that need to be slashed are those of the politicians. There is plenty of fat to
trim without going after a working segment that has been targeted since President Ronald Reagan.
D. Jeanine Wilson
Raymore


Radio station change
Concerning FM station 99.7, The Point, I am changing the radio dial to listen to another station. Why? Because
we tried listening in the morning before school and work.
We liked the music but are tired of hearing the sexual innuendos, the questionable language and lately the crude,
offensive jokes at the expense of child victims in news stories.
My family and our purchasing dollars will go elsewhere. But I am left wondering whether anyone wants to be
associated with such jokes in bad taste?
MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS
        DAILY NEWS CLIPS
                  Collected/Archived for Saturday-Monday, Oct. 1-3, 2011 - Page 117 of 118



Tracy Elford
Overland Park


Critical 2012 election
Next year’s presidential election will be crucial to the survival of the free enterprise system. Re-electing
Democrats will move us further toward a self-perpetuating entitlement culture, as perfectly demonstrated in
California, and could eventually lead us to Greece-like failed state status.
Democrats will only deal with budget problems by raising taxes and increasing government mandates and
regulation, thus stifling incentives to investment, productivity and true economic prosperity. Furthermore , they
will, dangerously, eviscerate our military and security structure. Democrats will never, ever curtail social
spending, but you can be sure they will unceasingly demagogue the issue.
But a word of advice to my nobly-motivated tea party friends: Your hard-nosed inflexibility cost a sure Republican
Senate seat pickup in Delaware and killed a viable chance to unseat Majority Leader Harry Reid.
If you nominate a Ron Paul, a Sarah Palin, a Michele Bachmann or the like, you will guarantee the re-election of
President Barack Obama, abetted by a sycophantic, adoring mainstream media, reinforced with hundreds of
millions from organized labor, trial lawyers and leftist Hollywood.
Michael T. Murphy
Prairie Village


Petraeus for president
I am a lifelong Republican and I am not happy with the slate of candidates that we have running for the office of
president. What we need, and need desperately, is someone who is trusted by all of us.
The only one in public life whom I really trust today is Gen. David Petraeus. I think he would tell us the truth and I
think he would do what is right for the country.
Gen. Petraeus, we need you. Your country needs you.
It needs you more than Iraq or Afghanistan ever needed you. Let’s get out the bumper stickers and the signs and
send some senior advisers — preferably some who have money — to talk to him about the state of the union and
why he should consider running for the office.
Democrats could certainly join this campaign. Most of them trust him, too. We are desperate. We need to get
cracking on this.
Victor Sutch
Parkville
MISSOURI SENATE COMMUNICATIONS
       DAILY NEWS CLIPS
                Collected/Archived for Saturday-Monday, Oct. 1-3, 2011 - Page 118 of 118



New traffic at museum
I recently showed an out-of town guest the Bloch Building at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. As we stepped
out of the African exhibition space, my friend suddenly grabbed my arm and pulled me back. Had she not done
this I would have stepped into the path of an oncoming airport-style people mover.
The driver was turned and talking to a 20-something couple, who were her sole passengers. She did not see me
and would have hit me. While we were there, one did hit a wall and chipped a piece out of it.
The serene spaces of the Bloch Building were once a place to stroll meditatively. I fear this simple pleasure is
over. Now it is necessary to watch your back for these vehicles.
The Bloch Building was designed to be experienced by a person walking. Enticed by gracefully curving walls and
ceilings, one is drawn ever deeper into a labyrinthine play of light. The building unfolds itself to a walking person.
For some, walking may be a hardship, but there are ways of assisting them without resorting to these large
cumbersome machines.
I hope the management looked to their liability risks before introducing these things.
Don Maxwell
Kansas City


Grammar matters
Another nail was driven in the coffin of the correct use of the pronoun “me” in a recent item I read in The Star.
“Me” is not always the wrong choice of words.
It is the correct choice when you say, “They gave me the books,” and even, “They gave John and me the books.”
Granted, it sounds less than polite when you say “They gave me and John the books,” but it would only be wrong
to use “me” if you say “John and me gave you the books.” Then it should be “John and I.”
In short, “I” is not always the correct pronoun.
Why people think it is right to say, “They gave John and I the books,” is beyond me. Or is it beyond I (offstage,
sound of fingernails scraping blackboard…way offstage, apparently)?
Nancy McDowell
Overland Park

				
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