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					Syllabus: Sonnets Week of 1/12/09

As always, plans and due dates are subject to change. STAY TUNED FOR UPDATES! Note: Research paper outline due Friday, 1/30!

Date
1/13          1/15      

Activities
Do Now Review syllabus and research paper stuff Read and paraphrase Shakespeare’s Sonnet 130 Write your own quatrain Quack 7 quiz (with grammar) Do Now Group readings of sonnets with preparation for class presentations Conferencing on secondary sources Exit slip Review literary terms and sonnet conventions Read Brooks sonnet Group work How is the theme of this sonnet different? Midterm Q & A session Midterm Jeopardy 

Homework
Midterm review due Friday

1/14



Midterm review due Friday



Midterm review due tomorrow

1/16

STUDY FOR YOUR MIDTERM!

Name: ________________________________ Ms. Krug

Class: _______________________ Period: _______

Weekly Do Now Assignment
 Wednesday, January 14: What do movies and the media suggest about love and relationships? What is different in real life?

_____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ Exit Slip: _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ 

Thursday, January 15: Literary terms review o o o o o o o Number of lines: Types: Iambic pentameter: Couplet: Quatrain: Sestet: Octave:

Write Your Own Quatrain!
Face it, we all have celebrity crushes. Let’s show our dream guys and gals some love, Shakespeare-style. You won’t have to write a whole sonnet, but you will need to write a four-line quatrain – basically one stanza of a sonnet. Describe your ideal celeb and your love for him or her in four lines. You’ll need to use an ABAB rhyme scheme and iambic pentameter. The best quatrain wins an all-inclusive dream date with his or her ideal mate…okay, maybe not…but you will get a free homework pass!

Write Your Own Quatrain!
Face it, we all have celebrity crushes. Let’s show our dream guys and gals some love, Shakespeare-style. You won’t have to write a whole sonnet, but you will need to write a four-line quatrain – basically one stanza of a sonnet. Describe your ideal celeb and your love for him or her in four lines. You’ll need to use an ABAB rhyme scheme and iambic pentameter. The best quatrain wins an all-inclusive dream date with his or her ideal mate…okay, maybe not…but you will get a free homework pass!

Write Your Own Quatrain!
Face it, we all have celebrity crushes. Let’s show our dream guys and gals some love, Shakespeare-style. You won’t have to write a whole sonnet, but you will need to write a four-line quatrain – basically one stanza of a sonnet. Describe your ideal celeb and your love for him or her in four lines. You’ll need to use an ABAB rhyme scheme and iambic pentameter. The best quatrain wins an all-inclusive dream date with his or her ideal mate…okay, maybe not…but you will get a free homework pass!

Write Your Own Quatrain!
Face it, we all have celebrity crushes. Let’s show our dream guys and gals some love, Shakespeare-style. You won’t have to write a whole sonnet, but you will need to write a four-line quatrain – basically one stanza of a sonnet. Describe your ideal celeb and your love for him or her in four lines. You’ll need to use an ABAB rhyme scheme and iambic pentameter. The best quatrain wins an all-inclusive dream date with his or her ideal mate…okay, maybe not…but you will get a free homework pass!

Should you get stuck, here are some formulas that can help you write your quatrain… 1. ___________________________ eyes are nothing like _______________; ______________is far more ________________ than _________________________; If _____________ be ______________, why then _____________________________; If _____________ be ______________, _____________________________________. I have seen _________________________________________________, But no such ________________________________________________; And in some ________________________________________________ Than in the _________________________________________________.

2.

Sonnet 106 When in accounts of historic times I come upon descriptions of very beautiful people and read the beautiful poems inspired by them, in praise of ladies now dead and lovely knights; when I see the poems catalog their beauty—their hands, feet, lips, eyes, foreheads—I realize that these ancient writers were trying to describe the same kind of beauty that you possess now. So all the praises of these writers are actually prophecies of our time; all of them prefigure you. If the writers hadn't been divinely inspired with this gift of prophecy, they wouldn't have had the skill to describe your worth. Those of us who live now may be able to see your beauty firsthand and be amazed by it, but we lack the poetic skill to describe it.

Sonnet 116 This sonnet attempts to define love, by telling both what it is and is not. In the first quatrain, the speaker says that love--"the marriage of true minds"--is perfect and unchanging; it does not "admit impediments," and it does not change when it find changes in the loved one. In the second quatrain, the speaker tells what love is through a metaphor: a guiding star to lost ships ("wand'ring barks") that is not susceptible to storms (it "looks on tempests and is never shaken"). In the third quatrain, the speaker again describes what love is not: it is not susceptible to time. Though beauty fades in time as rosy lips and cheeks come within "his bending sickle's compass," love does not change with hours and weeks: instead, it "bears it out ev'n to the edge of doom." In the couplet, the speaker attests to his certainty that love is as he says: if his statements can be proved to be error, he declares, he must never have written a word, and no man can ever have been in love.

TP-CASTT T P Title Paraphrase Before you even read the poem, guess what you think the poem might be about based upon the title. Jot down what you think this poem will be about. Write in your own words exactly what happens in the poem. Look at the number of sentences in the poem—your paraphrase should have exactly the same number. Identify imagery, figures of speech (simile, metaphor, personification, symbolism, etc), diction, point of view, and sound devices (alliteration, onomatopoeia, rhythm, and rhyme). The ones you identify should be seen as a way of supporting the conclusions you are going to draw about the poem. Examine the word choice, images, and details that suggest the speaker's attitude and contribute to understanding. What is that attitude? Rarely does a poem begin and end the poetic experience in the same place. The poet's understanding of an experience is a gradual realization, and the poem is a reflection of that understanding or insight. Watch for the following keys to shifts: • key words, (but, yet, however, although) • punctuation (dashes, periods, colons) • stanza divisions • changes in line or stanza length or both • irony • changes in sound that may indicate changes in meaning • changes in word choice Now look at the title again. What new insight does the title provide in understanding the poem? What is the poem saying about the human experience, motivation, or condition? What subject or subjects does the poem address? What do you learn about those subjects? What idea does the poet want you take away with you concerning these subjects? Remember that the theme of any work of literature is stated in a complete sentence.

C Connotation A Attitude S Shifts

T T

Title Theme

T P

Title Paraphrase

C

Connotation

A S

Attitude Shifts

T T

Title Theme

Gwendolyn Brooks was born in 1917 and grew up on Chicago’s South Side (where president-elect Barack Obama got his political career started!). Sometimes Brooks is considered to be part of the Harlem Renaissance, although she didn’t live in Harlem. In 1985, she was named Poet Laureate of the United States, one of the highest honors a poet can receive. Most importantly, she is probably Ms. Krug’s favorite poet.

the sonnet-ballad Oh mother, mother, where is happiness? They took my lover's tallness off to war, Left me lamenting. Now I cannot guess What I can use an empty heart-cup for. He won't be coming back here any more. Some day the war will end, but, oh, I knew When he went walking grandly out that door That my sweet love would have to be untrue. Would have to be untrue. Would have to court Coquettish death, whose impudent and strange Possessive arms and beauty (of a sort) Can make a hard man hesitate--and change. And he will be the one to stammer, "Yes." Oh mother, mother, where is happiness?

1. What stands out to you about the poem? What do you remember, feel, question, and see when you read and hear the poem? There are no wrong answers! 2. What personal experiences, emotions, and beliefs influenced your reaction? Does the poem recall memories? How does it connect to your attitudes or perceptions? 3. Underline specific words and lines in the poem that triggered your reactions. What word, phrase, image, or idea was important to your reactions? 4. How is the theme of this sonnet different from other sonnets we’ve read?

Gwendolyn Brooks was born in 1917 and grew up on Chicago’s South Side (where president-elect Barack Obama got his political career started!). Sometimes Brooks is considered to be part of the Harlem Renaissance, although she didn’t live in Harlem. In 1985, she was named Poet Laureate of the United States, one of the highest honors a poet can receive. Most importantly, she is probably Ms. Krug’s favorite poet.

The Rites for Cousin Vit Carried her unprotesting out the door Kicked back the casket-stand. But it can’t hold her, That stuff and satin aiming to enfold her, The lid’s contrition nor the bolts before. Oh oh. Too much. Too much. Even now, surmise, She rises in sunshine. There she goes Back to the bars she knew and the repose In love-rooms and the things in people’s eyes. Too vital and too squeaking. Must emerge. Even now, she does the snake-hips with a hiss, Slaps the bad wine across her shantung, talks Of pregnancy, guitars and bridgework, walks In parks or alleys, comes haply on the verge Of happiness, haply hysterics. Is.

1. What stands out to you about the poem? What do you remember, feel, question, and see when you read and hear the poem? There are no wrong answers! 2. What personal experiences, emotions, and beliefs influenced your reaction? Does the poem recall memories? How does it connect to your attitudes or perceptions? 3. Underline specific words and lines in the poem that triggered your reactions. What word, phrase, image, or idea was important to your reactions? 4. How is the theme of this sonnet different from other sonnets we’ve read?

Name: ________________________________________ Sonnet 29 When, in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries And look upon myself and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possess'd, Desiring this man's art and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, Haply I think on thee, and then my state, Like to the lark at break of day arising From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven's gate; For thy sweet love remember'd such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings. Sonnet 106 When in the chronicle of wasted time I see descriptions of the fairest wights And beauty making beautiful old rhyme In praise of ladies dead and lovely knights, Then in the blazon of sweet beauty's best, Of hand, of foot, of lip, of eye, of brow, I see their ántique pen would have expressed Ev'n such a beauty as you master now. So all their praises are but prophecies Of this our time, all you prefiguring, And for they looked but with divining eyes, They had not skill enough your worth to sing. For we which now behold these present days, Have eyes to wonder, but lack tongues to praise. Sonnet 116 Let me not to the marriage of true minds Admit impediments. Love is not love Which alters when it alteration finds, Or bends with the remover to remove: O no! it is an ever-fixed mark That looks on tempests and is never shaken; It is the star to every wandering bark, Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks Within his bending sickle's compass come: Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks, But bears it out even to the edge of doom. If this be error and upon me proved, I never writ, nor no man ever loved.


				
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