Canning Street Primary School

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					                  CANNING STREET PRIMARY SCHOOL

                              DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

                             DRAFT FEBRUARY 2004


1.    Preface
1.1   Canning Street Primary is one of 6 schools identified by the Local Education Authority
      (LEA) as in need of modernisation and is included in the second round of the
      Newcastle Schools Private Finance Initiative (PFI). Each of the schools has been
      identified as requiring significant capital investment to resolve current difficulties with
      the buildings and external school environment. The Council has secured funding
      through Department for Education and Skills (DfES) credits to deliver, in partnership
      with the private sector, modern fit-for-purpose school facilities which will enable the
      effective delivery of education to pupils. A key element of the PFI procurement of new
      schools is the provision and enhancement of facilities for use by the wider community.

1.2   Canning Street Primary School lies to the north of Adelaide Terrace, the district centre
      for the West End of Newcastle. In April 2002 Newcastle City Council resolved that
      Adelaide Terrace and Condercum Road area should be the district heart for the west
      end. The new district heart should provide existing and expected residents with better
      shopping facilities and will also ensure improved health resource facilities,
      community/public services and opportunities for other commercial and residential
      developments. The modernisation of Canning Street Primary School will form an
      important aspect in the renewal of the area.

1.3   Canning Street Primary currently has approximately 350 pupils with a net capacity of
      420. It also has a 26 place nursery. The current buildings are quite modern but there
      are a number of operational difficulties including small classrooms, inadequate
      storage, poor heating and ventilation and noise transmission between classrooms.
      The nursery is also too small to accommodate total demand and has to share some
      facilities with the main school. The school does have ample playing field area and
      playground surfaces, but the playing field has poor drainage. The school suffers from
      traffic congestion when pupils arrive and leave the school as the main entrance is
      located on Wellfield Road which is quite narrow. School buses have difficulty turning
      and this adds to the problem. In addition, the car park is not large enough to cater for
      all staff parking which results in cars being parked in the surrounding streets. Security
      is a major problem and the site unfortunately has to be protected by a steel security
      fence and CCTV.

1.4   The preferred approach is to rebuild the school facilities, although possible retention of
      the existing halls is seen as desirable. The new buildings will be built on the existing
      site. There is therefore an opportunity to enhance the schools visibility and
      relationship to the local community.

1.5   The purpose of this development brief is to enable the Local Planning Authority to
      inform the PFI bidders and therefore potential developers, of the land use planning
      and transportation opportunities and constraints for the school site, the relevant policy
      considerations and statutory requirements which must be addressed in the
      submission of a planning application for proposed development.

2.    The Site and Surrounding Area
2.1   A site plan of the site is provided in Appendix 1. The gently sloping site is bounded on
      four sides by Dolphin Street to the south, the back lane of residential properties facing
      onto Condercum Road to the west and, Wellfield Road to the north. A 2m high black
      painted palisade fence separates the site from an area of open space to the east. The
      existing single storey school is visually pleasing sitting amongst semi mature
      landscaping on the boundaries that screens the buildings. However, to the south
      there is no landscaping which allows an open outlook onto the playing fields, enclosed
      by security fencing.

2.2   The Primary school is set within a residential area. To the north, the gables of North
      Benwell Terraces - an area of older private sector terraced housing - face the school.
      These gables have a number of habitable rooms facing onto the site. There are also
      two ground floor shops one of which is vacant. Opposite the school on Wellfield Road
      is an area of hard open space containing a number of pieces of art known locally as
      the Benwell Crow. Unfortunately this area has been prone to vandalism and not
      subject to repair or maintenance. The North Benwell Terraces has been declared a
      Housing Renewal Area in order to bring about radical changes within the local housing
      market. This will initially be driven by Neighbourhood Management which it is hope
      will be followed by investment in the buildings to bring about owner occupation. To
      the south the Gill Street Estate built in the 1960’s is subject of a feasibility study which
      aims to provide options and costs for the redesign/layout of the estate. The feasibility
      study will also consider options and costs of the conversion of unpopular 1 bedroom
      flats on this estate. Funding is being sought to take forward the findings of the
      feasibility study and implement a major programme of estate remodelling,
      conversions, environmental improvements and redevelopment. To the east is an area
      of open space that has recently been improved. The area includes a large number of
      facilities including a hard surface area for football, basket ball, skateboard; children’s
      play area and informal grassed areas. The open space is overlooked by properties on
      Ferndale Road. Adjacent to the security fence, a north-south unadopted footpath links
      North Benwell Terraces with Adelaide Terrace. To the west is the back lane for the
      properties facing onto Condercum Road. This back lane which has been traffic
      calmed to reduce “rat running” would appear to pose a security risk for not only the
      school, but to the adjacent residents. Various security measures are evident on the
      top of the school fence and high walls enclosing the rear yards. The properties on
      Condercum Road have a number of habitable rooms overlooking the site.

2.3   To the south east of the site there is the existing Dolphin Street Community Centre
      housed in temporary portable buildings.

2.4   To the south of the Community Centre the Primary Health Care Trust and City Council
      have come together to develop a new Health Centre, Customer Service Centre and
      replacement Community Centre on the site of the former Majestic Cinema recently
      demolished by the City Council. This will replace the existing health centre on
      Atkinson Road and provide a ‘one-stop-shop’ for public services.
3.    Development Opportunities
3.1   The modernisation of Canning Street School has the potential not just to inform but to
      set the agenda for subsequent developments in the area, as well as acting as a
      catalyst for wider qualitative improvements in the locality. The development will need
      to reflect this by being a bespoke quality response presenting clear opportunities, not
      only for the school but the wider community.

3.2   The improvement of the school will tackle the current operational difficulties identified
      earlier such as small classrooms, inadequate storage, poor heating etc.

3.3   The redesign of the school, its location and layout will also allow it to open up visually
      and become a clearer community building. In particular there will be opportunities to
      enhance the schools visibility and relationship to the local community. The re
      examination of the layout of the school will also ensure a fresh look at current
      transportation issues. These include traffic congestion, school bus access, car
      parking, pedestrians and cycle routes.

3.4   The modernisation will ensure that the playing field has appropriate drainage and, with
      a Community Use Agreement, it will open up the grounds to the wider community who
      currently experience a shortage of open space and sport’s pitches.

4.    Design
4.1   Good quality design will be vital to any proposal.

4.2   There have been many recent publications and guidance particularly relating to civic
      developments and in particular schools from the Government and other related
      bodies. Specifically, these include “The Value of Good Design” by CABE (2002)
      “Client Guide – Achieving well designed Schools through schools PFI” by CABE
      (2002). Schools for the Future DfES building bulletin 95 the DfES exemplar designs
      and Treasury Taskforce – Private Finance Technical Note No. 7 “How to Achieve
      Design Quality in PFI Projects”. These highlight the importance good design practices
      in educational environments identifying the relationship between the design quality of
      schools and improved student performance as well as the need for a well-informed
      developer who appreciates and understands the links between good design and
      education standards. “Better Civic Buildings and Spaces” by CABE (2003) also
      describes how all building initiatives that local authorities are involved with should be
      seen as civic projects and that schools have a major impact on the public’s view of
      their neighbourhoods. These guides are extremely useful in showing what can be
      achieved and what is expected from modern developments. Development of this site
      will be expected to adhere to the principles and criteria laid out in these guides.

4.3   The school is currently visually separated from the wider community and district
      centre. The modernisation will need to ensure the school is a focal point for the
      community with clear linkages to the north and to the south west. The western back
      lane would appear to presents a security risk to the school and adjacent properties
      due to lack of natural surveillance. An opportunity to rationalise the layout of the area
      and improve the areas security arises with this development. There may also be
      opportunities to dove tail the modernisation of the school and potential works to the
      back lane with the proposed Health Centre and Customer Service Centre to create a
      new civic focal point at the junction of Dolphin Street and Condercum Road. An
      alternative may be to upgrade this back lane to a proper roadway including improved
       junction arrangements. This could include lay-by parking for drop off points (with or
       without any additional facility within the school itself). As well as providing an
       opportunity to improve the amenity and security of the western boundary this could go
       a long way toward mitigating the problems of difficult access and vehicle congestion.
       It would also tie in well with potential improvements around the proposed Health
       Centre/Customer Service Centre to create a new civic focal point at the junction of
       Dolphin Street and Condercum Road. Off site improvements in the landscaping and
       the treatment of the pedestrian approaches to the site from Condercum Road will be
       required. There may be some loss of trees and soft landscaping which will need to be
       replaced elsewhere within the site. However as the planting is no more than 15 years
       old this can be easily achieved on the relatively short term.

4.4    The retention of the existing hall at the school will clearly be a challenge in terms of
       layout and integrating the existing with the new development, particularly if this is to
       include an improved visual relationship with the district heart

4.5    The new school building should be of the highest design quality and well integrated
       within the context of its setting and specifically the topography. Developers should not
       be overly constrained by the surrounding built context but should be mindful of
       retaining open space and the amenity of existing residents in adjacent properties in
       line with Policy H2 of the Unitary Development Plan (UDP).

4.6    Developers will be required to demonstrate a respect for the local setting by showing
       imaginative design and high standards of materials and landscaping in line with UDP
       Policies EN 1, EN 1.1.

4.7    Any design should be planned to take maximum advantage of passive solar gain and
       southerly elevations in the interests of developing sustainable buildings. The school
       should have a higher proportion of glazing in its southerly aspect, which should face
       within 15° of south. Schemes that include other aspects such as sustainable building
       methods and materials, energy and water conservation, and sustainable energy
       production, would be preferable.

4.8    The design should be mindful to maximise the safety of the building and users.
       Accordingly the development should conform to the guidelines in “Secured by
       Design”, an initiative supported and managed by the Association of Chief Police
       Officers. “Secured by Design” is aimed at encouraging the building industry to adopt
       crime prevention measures to assist in reducing the opportunity for crime and fear of
       crime. Security measures should be introduced as apart of the design process with
       natural surveillance and appropriate lighting encouraged throughout the development.
       The existing fencing is not appropriate in a community context or conducive to dual-
       use by pupils and the general public for after school hours activity.

4.9    A design statement should accompany any application for the development of this
       site, outlining design principles involved in the layout, visual appearance of the
       development and its wider context.

4.10   Developers must be aware of the implications of the Disability Discrimination Act
       1995 (as amended by the Special Educational Needs and Disability Act 2001)
       and to British Standard BS 8300 : 2001 which is the best practice standard with
       regards to access for all. Good access for all goes beyond wheelchair access, and
       includes wayfinding, signage, tactile and sensory information, the use of colour and
       tonal contrast. Newcastle City Council adopts a policy which requires all public
       buildings to pass British Standard BS 8300 and therefore to achieve this best practice
       standard. Proposals will be expected to be accompanied with an accessibility
       statement detailing how the schools have been designed to be fully inclusive with
       regard to disabled users.

5      Transportation
5.1    The City Council aims to provide access to a safe and efficient transport system. This
       will provide vital support to economic, social and commercial activity and be a stimulus
       for employment, social and recreational development opportunities. The
       transportation policies within the UDP deal with all modes of travel in detail and the
       relative transportation priorities of the Council, including specific development control
       policies.

.5.2   A school travel plan to underpin sustainable transport to this site will be a requirement
       of any planning permission that may be granted. It is expected that both the
       infrastructure provided and also the layout of the development will maximise the use
       and accessibility of walking, cycling and public transport.

5.3    A movement framework must be included as part of any site evaluation criteria. This
       is an illustrative plan indicating where movement exists or is to be created, whether it
       is pedestrian based and/or vehicular. This should aid the decisions of locating for
       example, buildings, entrances, accesses, and other spaces for different types and
       volumes of movement.

5.4    The pupil catchment area should be analysed to determine pedestrian routes outside
       of, and leading to the school site, as children living adjacent to a school boundary may
       have a circuitous walk to a single main entrance. Multiple pedestrian / cycle entrances
       should therefore be a prime consideration. The site should be permeable for the users
       and encourage the use of sustainable forms of transport.

5.5    Priority must be given to the movement of pedestrians over the movement of vehicles.
       Prioritising pedestrian desire lines to and through the site. Pedestrians, especially
       children will always take the shortest route between two points, therefore circuitous
       indirect routes which could encourage children to cross carriageways must be
       avoided.

5.6    Walk and cycle routes must also be segregated from vehicular traffic. Positive
       segregation of pedestrians / cyclists and vehicular traffic, at access points and within
       the site. Narrow planted areas between footway and carriageway can not be
       considered as adequate segregation to discourage walking in carriageways. The
       design of the pedestrian and vehicular routes should be naturally surveyed providing
       safe, secure and convenient routes.

5.7    Cycle routes must be provided into the site and to the cycle parking area. Cycle
       routes within the school can be shared with pedestrians, however, unless the cycle
       parking facilities are suitably sited the cyclist could be discouraged when faced with an
       unnecessarily long walk between cycle park and main entrance. Cycle stands must
       be provided in a prominent position, be naturally surveyed and undercover. Staff
       shower(s) must also be provided to complement the cycling facilities.
5.8    A drop off / pick up area for parents must be provided within the curtilage of the site.
       This car parking must not be located adjacent to the main entrance(s) although it
       should be naturally surveyed. The level of parking provision and the drop off facility
       will need to be established to ensure it sufficiently meets the needs of the school
       without overprovision which could encourage car use. Parking provision should take
       account of Policy T4.5, Development Control Statement 23, PPG 13 and the most
       recent interim parking standards policy, pending a review of the Unitary Development
       Plan (Development Control Committee 15 March 2002).

5.9    The access and access road layout must facilitate service vehicles (up to
       pantechnicon size) and school buses without over-running.

5.10   Any alterations to existing accesses, or proposed accesses into the site should be
       discussed with Transportation Developments at an early stage. Redundant accesses
       will need to be removed and the highway reinstated at the applicant’s expense.
       Vehicular access to the site should be amended to increase segregation and to
       ensure highway safety as the current junction spacing is inadequate and could pose a
       safety hazard. Any new access from Wellfield Road or Dolphin Street would need to
       adhere to current junction spacing standards as to ensure highway safety. Should the
       preferred access be off Dolphin Street, it would also need to be amended at the
       junction with Condercum Road to manage the changes in traffic movement.

5.11   Provision, amendment or removal of highway infrastructure (guard-rail, zigzags etc)
       and legal orders to facilitate the school on the site must be identified and agreed with
       the Highway Authority, these works would be undertaken by the City Council at the
       applicants expense. Should the school move to a new site a school safety zone
       would need to be provided around the new site. Where the existing site may be used
       to mitigate against the loss of the open space, as part of the change of use of site, the
       existing school infrastructure and the revoking of the associated legal orders would
       need to be undertaken by the City Council at the applicants expense.

5.12   The above clauses deal with potential specific design issues however, for the
       avoidance of doubt, works on the immediate adjacent highway network to facilitate
       any new design should form part of the site works for that development.

6.     Sport England and Playing Field Policy
6.1    The developer should ensure that there will be no net loss of playing field at the
       school and shall have regard to the Council’s Draft Playing Pitch Strategy. Any
       proposed development on existing playing field, will only be permitted if it satisfies the
       requirements of Planning Policy Guidance Note 17. Planning for Open Space, Sport
       and Recreation. There are a number of technical design guidance notes by Sport
       England on different aspects of sport facility design that should be referred to by the
       developer.

6.2    The Town & Country Planning (Playing Fields) (England) Direction 1998 states that
       planning authorities must notify Government Office North East (GO-NE) when there is
       an outstanding objection from Sport England, to proposals to develop local authority
       owned playing fields and those which are currently used, or have been used during
       the past 5 years, by educational institutions.
6.3   Sport England’s Planning Policy Statement is attached to the Development Brief
      which illustrates their policies on planning applications for development on playing
      fields. The developer should liaise with Sport England prior to the submission of a
      planning application to ensure that sports issues have been appropriately incorporated
      in the scheme and that they are provided with all the necessary information required
      to properly assess the proposals.

6.4   The developer will also be required to enter into a community use agreement with the
      City Council prior to bringing the new school into use.

7.    Open Space
7.1   Open space is essential to the City’s health and wellbeing’ and provides ‘opportunities
      for exercise, development of sporting skills, relaxation and fresh air’. The developer
      should note that the site will be subject to open space policies within the Councils
      Unitary Development Plan and the most relevant policies are OS1, OS1.4 and OS1.5
      Reference should also be made to the City’s Draft Parks and Green Space Strategy,
      “Green Spaces…Your Spaces” (2003).

7.2   Any development of a replacement school in the grounds of an existing school will
      result in a temporary loss of open space. The Council expects that the footprint of any
      new building will be no greater than that of the existing building and any loss of open
      space should be replaced with at least equivalent quantity and quality of open space
      elsewhere on the site and should be of a high landscape quality. Therefore, there will
      be no long term loss of open space at this site. However the developer will be
      required to address the issue of temporary playing field provision whilst development
      is taking place.

7.3   Currently Elswick has 0.44 hectares of local open space per 1,000 population, short of
      the adopted standard identified in policy OS 1.2. There is no publicly accessible
      spaces for outdoor sport. This illustrates a need for an increase in both of these types
      of open space in the area. The community use agreement will be a method of
      ensuring that the area can be made publicly accessible as either local open space or
      as space for outdoor sport in order to address current deficiencies. In order for this to
      be viable to is important that the pitch area, including the drainage, is of sufficient
      quality to accommodate the increased levels and intensity of use.

8.    Landscaping and Ecology
8.1   A number of trees are present around the edge of the site, most notably on the north
      and west boundaries where the landscaping is rather overcrowded and in need of
      selective thinning and pruning work. New tree planting will be encouraged, and this
      should be of native species. Shrub planting should also be incorporated within the
      layout design, although the most appropriate character and type will depend on the
      final form of the development proposed.

8.2   Your Wildlife - The Newcastle Biodiversity Action Plan (October 2001), describes how
      important open spaces are for wildlife and people. Among it’s targets is to incorporate
      the conservation and enhancement of wildlife into public open spaces, and ensure
      that all open spaces have areas managed for wildlife by 2011; 50% of them by 2006.
      Importantly, all city schools are targeted to have nature conservation areas or
      elements within their grounds by 2011. These targets could be aided by the provision
      of landscaping for wildlife in the design, or where appropriate, the maintenance of
      existing habitats.

8.3   There are substantial areas of tree and shrub planting within the site, all associated
      with the previous redevelopment some 15 years ago. The trees are primarily located
      around all the perimeters of the site. The shrub planting areas are mainly found in the
      areas immediately associated with the building, particularly to the north and west
      sides, and around the perimeter of the yard. There is also a hedge with trees around
      the perimeter of the playing field area. This is an exposed site, and every opportunity
      should be taken to maximise shelter within the school building and grounds. This
      should include the retention and enhancement of the existing planting.

8.4   In accordance with the City’s tree strategy “Trees Newcastle” (April 2002) healthy
      trees should be retained where possible, and where trees have to be removed these
      should be replaced elsewhere within the site. However because all the trees are
      relatively young their impact is significantly easier to replace on the short-term than
      more mature specimens. Additional tree planting is to be encouraged, particularly as
      this is not a neighbourhood with high levels of tree cover at present. As far as
      possible any replacement and additional tree planting should be of native species.

8.5   The shrubs should also be retained as far as possible, and again any loss should be
      compensated for elsewhere within the site. However the opportunity can be taken for
      addressing any issues of inappropriate or over-dense planting within the site. New
      shrub planting is to be encouraged as part of the redevelopment package, although in
      species choice and layout this should take into account the issues of security and
      visibility which are clearly significant on this site. There are also a number of “garden”
      areas created within the grounds which again should be retained or, if unavoidable,
      replaced elsewhere. In both cases the timescale for satisfactory replacement is, in
      any case, relatively short. The hedge around the playing field area should also be
      retained, and any gaps or thin areas enhanced.

8.6   At present the yard consists essentially of a single large area with little segregation.
      Such layouts can result in significant conflict between different user groups (older
      versus younger, active versus passive etc). The allocation of distinct and discrete
      areas for different age groups and types of play is an important issue, and this should
      be incorporated into all levels of the design of the external spaces. As well as distinct
      areas for active play a number of smaller areas should be provided, perhaps
      incorporating seating or low walls, which encourage passive recreation, conversation
      and imaginative play.

9.    Energy and Sustainable Development
9.1   The Council has adopted “A Charter for the Environment” which seeks to reduce the
      amount of the earth’s resources we use through the promotion of sustainable forms of
      development. The charter draws particular attention to the efficient use of water,
      energy and materials.

9.2   In accordance with Policy SD1.4, the Council will expect developers to show they
      have designed the buildings to maximise Passive Solar Gain. The buildings should
      also include appropriate energy efficiency measures such as an increase in the levels
      of insulation, improving the specification of boiler equipment. Development should be
      able to take advantage of passive solar gain, through both the consideration of
      building orientation and detailed design. In addition, active sustainable technologies,
       such as solar water heating or the incorporation of photovoltaic cells may be suitable.
       The design implications for the application of renewable energy technologies should
       be incorporated and celebrated in the external design of elevations and roof structures
       where appropriate. Encouragement is given to make appropriate sustainable
       technologies positive design features of proposed development. Where possible,
       development should also allow for the future incorporation of such facilities in the
       detailed design of the south facing elevations.

9.3    There is a clear aspiration for the local community to benefit from the substantial
       investment that will take place in the area. Training and employment schemes for the
       community will be sought.

10.    Art in the Environment
10.1   Distinctive works of art help to create a sense of identity. Policy EN1.3 encourages
       the provision of new works of art in development and improvement schemes. In
       determining any planning applications the authority will have regard to the
       contributions made by any such works to the appearance of the scheme and the
       amenity of the area.

11.    Contamination and Ground Stability
11.1   Policy POL6 of the UDP requires developers to undertake a thorough site
       investigation where a site is, or may be contaminated. The investigation must identify
       the nature of contamination together with the remedial measures required to treat or
       remove it in accordance with the best practicable environmental option appropriate to
       the proposed development and the nature of the site. This should be done prior to
       any planning application. It is understood that the LEA have undertaken these
       investigations and the findings included within the output specification.

12.    Development Policy
12.1   The site is allocated in Newcastle's Unitary Development Plan, as Education
       Establishment with attached Open Space and accordingly the open space is protected
       by UDP Policies OS1.4 and OS1.5. There are a number of other policies relevant to
       the development of this site discussed above. Copies of the policies are attached in
       Appendix IIl.




Appendix I Scale 1:1250 Site location plan
Appendix II Sport England Planning Policy Statement
Appendix III Policies relevant to the site
                   Appendix I
1:1250 Site Plan
Appendix II
                                                                    Appendix III
RELEVANT UDP POLICIES

Energy Efficiency

SD1.4 THE DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF RENEWABLE ENERGY WILL BE ENCOURAGED BY:

      A.   MAXIMISING PASSIVE SOLAR GAIN THROUGH BUILDING DESIGN AND ORIENTATION

      B.   INTRODUCING PHOTOVOLTAIC CELLS ONTO APPROPRIATE BUILDINGS

      C.   UTILISING BIO GAS FROM ENERGY CROPS OR WASTE; AND

      D.   THE DEVELOPMENT OF WIND TURBINES IN SUITABLE LOCATIONS

Design

EN1   ALL DEVELOPMENT WILL BE REQUIRED TO MEET HIGH STANDARDS OF DESIGN.

EN1.1 ALL DEVELOPMENT WILL BE REQUIRED TO MEET HIGH STANDARDS OF DESIGN IN
      ACCORDANCE WITH THE FOLLOWING PRINCIPLES:

      A.   RETAINING THE BEST BUILDINGS;

      B.   TAKING FULL ADVANTAGE OF LANDFORM, LANDSCAPE AND OTHER SITE FEATURES;

      C.   INTEGRATING DEVELOPMENT INTO ITS SETTING WITH REGARD TO THE SCALE AND
           PATTERN OF SURROUNDING BUILDINGS AND SPACES, AND LINKS IN THE PEDESTRIAN
           ROUTE NETWORK;

      D.   RELATING TO THE MATERIALS AND DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS OF SURROUNDING
           BUILT DEVELOPMENT;

      E.   FACILITATING SAFE PEDESTRIAN MOVEMENT;

      F.   DESIGNING FOR EQUAL ACCESSIBILITY FOR ALL USERS REGARDLESS OF AGE OR
           DISABILITIES, AND MINIMISING OPPORTUNITIES FOR CRIME;

      G.   ENSURING NEW BUILDINGS ARE ADAPTABLE TO USE FOR OTHER PURPOSES;

      H.   A COMPREHENSIVE AND CO-ORDINATED APPROACH TO NEW DEVELOPMENTS OF
           MORE THAN ONE BUILDING ;

      I.   INCORPORATING HARD AND SOFT LANDSCAPING AS AN INTEGRAL PART OF DESIGN,
           MAXIMISING TREE PLANTING WHERE APPROPRIATE, AND PROVIDING FOR ITS LONG
           TERM MAINTENANCE;

      J.   MINIMISING ADVERSE IMPACTS ON NEARBY LAND USES;

      K.   MINIMISING IMPACTS ON ACTIVITIES ON NEIGHBOURING OPEN LAND AND
           COUNTRYSIDE; AND

      L.   MAXIMISING THE USE OF BUILDINGS, STRUCTURES AND LAND FORMS TO SCREEN
           NOISE SENSITIVE DEVELOPMENT AND SPACES.
Landscaping and trees

EN3.2 WHERE APPROPRIATE, DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS SHALL RETAIN WOODLAND, TREES,
      HEDGEROWS AND SHRUBS, AND THE COUNCIL WILL ATTACH CONDITIONS FOR THEIR
      PROTECTION DURING AND AFTER CONSTRUCTION; WHERE SUCH FEATURES ARE WORTHY
      OF PROTECTION BUT THEIR LOSS IS UNAVOIDABLE REPLACEMENT PLANTING WILL BE
      REQUIRED.

Protection of open space

OS1   THE BEST POSSIBLE STANDARDS IN THE RANGE, AMOUNT, DISTRIBUTION, ACCESSIBILITY
      AND QUALITY OF OPEN SPACE WILL BE SOUGHT THROUGHOUT THE CITY BY:

      A.   PREVENTING THE LOSS OF OPEN SPACE TO DEVELOPMENT;

      B.   MAINTAINING AND IMPROVING EXISTING OPEN SPACE;

      C.   CREATING NEW OPEN SPACE WHERE OPPORTUNITIES OCCUR AND IN ASSOCIATION
           WITH NEW DEVELOPMENT;

      D.   PROMOTING RECREATION IN THE COUNTRYSIDE THROUGH SCHEMES FOR
           ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENT, PUBLIC ACCESS, AND APPROPRIATE FACILITIES;
           AND

      E.   PURSUING PROVISION FOR ALL NEEDS IN THE COMMUNITY, INCLUDING THOSE OF
           CHILDREN, THE ELDERLY, AND PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES.

OS1.2 IN THE DETERMINATION OF PLANNING APPLICATIONS FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT,
      THE COUNCIL WILL HAVE REGARD TO THE FOLLOWING STANDARDS IN ASSESSING THE
      APPROPRIATE AMOUNT AND DISTRIBUTION OF OPEN SPACE REQUIRED AS PART OF, AND
      AS A RESULT OF, THE PROPOSALS;

      A.   NEIGHBOURHOOD AND CITY CENTRE PARKS – SUBSTANTIAL PUBLIC SPACES
           PROVIDING FOR A RANGE OF ACTIVE AND PASSIVE PURSUITS FOR PEOPLE OF ALL
           AGES AND ABILITIES. MOST HOUSEHOLDS SHOULD BE WITHIN 0.5 KM OF A PUBLIC
           PARK OF 6 HECTARES MINIMUM;

      B.   LOCAL OPEN SPACES – 1.2 HECTARES FOR 1,000 PERSONS;

      C.   SPACES FOR OUTDOOR SPORT – PROVIDING FACILITIES FOR INDIVIDUAL
           PARTICIPATION IN SPORT AS WELL AS FOR ORGANISED TEAM GAMES – 1.1
           HECTARES PER 1,000 POPULATION, INCLUDING EDUCATION FACILITIES USED BY THE
           PUBLIC;

      D.   OTHER SPECIALIST RECREATION FACILITIES – SPACES PROVIDING OPPORTUNITIES
           FOR HORTICULTURE AND KEEPING ANIMALS, E.G. ALLOTMENTS AND STABLES -–
           ALLOTMENT PLOTS SHOULD BE AVAILABLE FOR APPROXIMATELY 5% OF THE
           POPULATION OF 30-75 YEARS; AND

      E.   THE AVAILABILITY OF AREAS OF NATURE CONSERVATION VALUE, COUNTRYSIDE
           CHARACTER, COMMUNITY WOODLAND OR COUNTRY PARKS WHICH CAN PROVIDE
           FOR A WIDE RANGE OF PASSIVE RECREATIONAL ACTIVITY.

OS1.4 DEVELOPMENT WHICH WOULD CAUSE DEMONSTRABLE HARM TO ANY PUBLIC OPEN
      SPACE, OR PRIVATE OPEN SPACE FOR OUTDOOR SPORT, WILL NOT BE ALLOWED. HARM
      INCLUDES LOSS OF THE SPACE IN WHOLE OR PART. DEVELOPMENT, THEREFORE WILL
      ONLY BE ALLOWED IN EXCEPTIONAL CIRCUMSTANCES IN ACCORDANCE WITH POLICY
      OS1.5. HARM WILL BE ASSESSED ACCORDING TO THE IMPACT ON THE VALUE, ACTUAL OR
      POTENTIAL, OF THE OPEN SPACE FOR ANY ONE OR MORE OF THE FOLLOWING PURPOSES:

      A.   INCLUSION WITHIN A GREEN WEDGE LINKED TO THE COUNTRYSIDE OR LAND OF
           COUNTRYSIDE CHARACTER WITHIN THE URBAN AREA;
       B.   PROVISION FOR PARTICULAR SPORT OR OTHER ORGANISED RECREATIONAL
            ACTIVITY;

       C.   PROVISION FOR INFORMAL OR CASUAL RECREATION, INCLUDING CHILDREN’S PLAY
            AND RECREATIONAL ROUTES;

       D.   PROVISION FOR HORTICULTURAL OR OTHER SIMILAR SPECIALISED RECREATION
            SUCH AS ALLOTMENTS AND PIGEON CREES;

       E.   OPENNESS AND/OR GREENERY PROVIDING VISUAL RELIEF IN A BUILT-UP AREA;

       F.   CONTRIBUTION TO THE AMENITY OF A LOCALITY; OR

       G.   PRESERVATION OF A WILDLIFE HABITAT OR CONTINUITY OF A WILDLIFE CORRIDOR.

OS1.5 DEVELOPMENT AFFECTING AN OPEN SPACE SUBJECT TO POLICY OS1.4 MAY ONLY BE
      ALLOWED IF ANY OF THE FOLLOWING EXCEPTIONAL CIRCUMSTANCES APPLY:

       A.   IT IS FOR RECREATIONAL PURPOSES RELEVANT TO THE USE OF THE SPACE; OR

       B.   IT IS FOR NEW OR IMPROVED ESSENTIAL LOCAL COMMUNITY FACILITIES FOR WHICH
            THERE IS NO SUITABLE ALTERNATIVE SITE; OR

       C.   THE ONLY MEANS OF RETAINING OR ENHANCING THE OPEN SPACE IS THROUGH
            DEVELOPMENT OF A SMALL PART; OR

       D.   ALTERNATIVE PROVISION OF EQUIVALENT COMMUNITY BENEFIT IS MADE
            AVAILABLE.

Noise and Vibration

POL8   NOISE SENSITIVE DEVELOPMENT EXPOSED TO UNACCEPTABLE LEVELS OF NOISE FROM
       ROADS, EXISTING INDUSTRIAL AREAS OR OTHER NOISE GENERATING USES WILL ONLY BE
       ALLOWED IF IT COMPLIES WITH THE DEVELOPMENT CONTROL POLICY STATEMENT 22 -
       NOISE AND VIBRATION AND INCORPORATES SATISFACTORY ATTENUATION MEASURES.

Transport

T2.1   THE FOLLOWING HIERARCHY OF ROADS IS DEFINED IN ORDER TO MANAGE MOVEMENT ON
       THE HIGHWAY NETWORK FOR THE PURPOSES OF POLICY T2:

       1.    Strategic highway

       2.    Main distributor road

       3.    Secondary distributor road

       4.    Local road

       5.    Local access road or pedestrian priority street

Parking

T4.5   DEVELOPMENT SHALL PROVIDE PARKING WHICH SATISFIES OPERATIONAL
       REQUIREMENTS. PROVISION IN EXCESS OF THIS REQUIREMENT WILL BE DETERMINED IN
       RELATION TO THE IMPACT OF DEVELOPMENT ON THE ENVIRONMENT. PARKING PROVISION
       WILL BE MET BY:

       A.    THE IMPLEMENTATION OF PARKING STANDARDS ON SITE; OR

       B.    THE PAYMENT, BY DEVELOPERS TO THE CITY COUNCIL, OF A COMMUTED SUM SO
             THAT ALTERNATIVE PROVISION CAN BE MADE ELSEWHERE; OR
       C.    THE PROVISION OF CAR PARKING SPACES BY THE DEVELOPER ON AN ACCEPTABLE
             SITE ELSEWHERE IN THE LOCALITY.

H2     DEVELOPMENT WHICH WOULD HARM THE AMENITY OF ANY DWELLING, OR GROUP OF
       DWELLINGS WILL NOT BE ALLOWED. IMPACT ON RESIDENTIAL AMENITY WILL BE
       ASSESSED WITH PARTICULAR REGARD TO:

       A.    PROTECTING THE CHARACTER OF THE LOCALITY AND OF THE EXISTING BUILDING
             IN THE CASE OF ALTERATIONS, EXTENSIONS OR CONVERSIONS;

       B.    PROTECTING TREES AND OTHER SOFT LANDSCAPING OF AMENITY VALUE;

       C.    ENSURING SATISFACTORY DAYLIGHT, SUNLIGHT, OUTLOOK AND PRIVACY FOR ALL
             DWELLINGS, EXISTING AND PROPOSED, PARTICULARLY IN RELATION TO GOOD
             EXISTING STANDARDS IN THE LOCALITY;

       D.    AVOIDING THE INTRODUCTION OF SUCH ADDITIONAL ACCESSES, TRAFFIC OR
             PARKING AS WOULD INCREASE VISUAL INTRUSION, NOISE OR DISTURBANCE, OR
             PREJUDICE ROAD SAFETY; AND

       E.    ENSURING THAT NON-RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT AND/OR ASSOCIATED
             OPERATIONS WILL NOT HARM RESIDENTIAL AMENITY THROUGH AN INCREASE IN
             NOISE, DISTURBANCE, SMELLS, FUMES OR OTHER HARMFUL EFFECTS.

T5.3   CYCLING IN NEWCASTLE WILL BE ENCOURAGED BY:

       A.    PROVIDING A SIGNED CITYWIDE NETWORK OF CYCLE ROUTES SEPARATE, WHERE
             POSSIBLE, FROM MAJOR TRAFFIC FLOWS;

       B.    ENSURING CYCLISTS’ NEEDS ARE TAKEN INTO ACCOUNT IN THE DESIGN OF
             HIGHWAY AND TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT SCHEMES;

       C.    ENSURING CYCLISTS’ NEEDS ARE CONSIDERED AS PART OF NEW DEVELOPMENT
             AND WHERE APPROPRIATE, REQUIRING THAT FACILITIES, INCLUDING PARKING, ARE
             PROVIDED, TO SATISFY OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS;

       D.    PROVIDING CYCLE PARKING FACILITIES AT APPROPRIATE LOCATION IN THE CITY
             CENTRE, LOCAL SHOPPING CENTRES AND ELSEWHERE;

       E.    PROVIDING ACCESS TO ROAD SPACE OTHERWISE SHARED BY BUSES AND SERVICE
             VEHICLES WHERE APPROPRIATE; AND

       F.    PROVIDING EDUCATION, TRAINING AND PUBLICITY WHICH ENCOURAGE SAFE AND
             GOOD CYCLING PRACTICE.

T7.1   WHERE A PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT WOULD GENERATE TRAFFIC CAUSING
       DEMONSTRABLE DANGER OR INCONVENIENCE ON THE PUBLIC HIGHWAY, OR OTHER
       SERIOUS HARM TO THE LOCAL ENVIRONMENT, AND WHICH COULD NOT BE
       SATISFACTORILY MITIGATED BY PLANNING CONDITIONS AND/OR PLANNING OBLIGATIONS,
       PERMISSION WILL BE REFUSED.

T7.2   DEVELOPMENT REQUIRING IMPROVEMENTS TO THE PUBLIC HIGHWAY WILL NOT BE
       ALLOWED UNLESS:

       A.    APPROPRIATE CONTRIBUTIONS ARE OBTAINED FROM DEVELOPERS.

       B.    THE OPERATIONAL, ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL INTERESTS OF THOSE
             AFFECTED BY DEVELOPMENT ARE PROPERLY SAFEGUARDED;

       C.    IT IS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE STANDARDS OF THE HIGHWAY AUTHORITY; AND
          D.        APPROPRIATE PROVISION IS MADE FOR PUBLIC TRANSPORT, PEDESTRIANS,
                    CYCLISTS AND HORSERIDERS.

OTHER RELEVANT POLICES

a)        Development Control Policy Statements (1998)

          Advice is offered to prospective developers on various topics that are covered by
          Development Control Policy Statements (DCPS) within the UDP. Those considered
          relevant to the site are:

          DCPS14 – Security shutters and grilles
          DCPS 16 – Crime prevention
          DCPS 19 – Landscaping
          DCPS 22 – Noise and vibration
          DCPS 23 – Parking standards for cars and cycles

b)        Your Wildlife – The Newcastle Biodiversity Action Plan (October 2001)

c)        “Trees Newcastle” – The City’s Tree Strategy (2002)

d)        “Green Spaces…Your Spaces” – The City’s Draft Parks and Green Space Strategy
          (2003)

e)        Regeneration Plan West End July 2001

f)        A Charter for our Environment 2001




Neil Wilkinson
18 February 2004




canning street dev brief
EJ

				
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