AP ENGLISH Literature and Composition 12 syllabus by gv35B81

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    AP ENGLISH Literature and Composition 12
           Woodland Hills High School
Instructor : Mrs. Silverman
Room: 126
e-mail: silvli@whsd.net

                              Student Syllabus
Course Description
Students in this course are engaged in the careful reading and critical analysis of
imaginative literature. Through close reading of selected literary works, they will
develop critical standards for interpreting the effects writers create by means of the
artful manipulation of language. To achieve these goals, students study individual
works and their characters, action, structure, and language. They consider large-
scale literary elements such as form and theme, and smaller-scale elements such as
figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. The writing assignments focus
on the critical analysis of literature and include expository, analytical, and
argumentative essays. If a student performed at the basic or below basic level on the
reading or writing PSSA exam during 11th grade, this course is not recommended.
This course prepares students to take the AP examination in Literature and
Composition in May of the Senior year.

Course Goals and Student Expectations
AP English students are expected to contribute to class everyday and be
independent learners. A climate of learning is only made possible with cooperation
and class participation. The class will be conducted as a seminar/meeting. AP
English students should be prepared to read, write, and discuss literature every day.
AP English students are capable and motivated students who want to learn.

Students will:

   Attend class daily and participate in class discussions.
   Study materials presented in class and in the readings.
   Complete daily homework assignments.
   Pass quizzes and tests on content studied at a minimum of 75% mastery.
   Complete one writing project on an outside reading each marking period.
   Complete the Advanced Placement examination.
   Research, write, and present the Senior Project (graduation requirement).
   Use language and organize ideas in a clear, coherent, and persuasive manner.
   Develop critical standards for prose and poetry in regard to meaning, structure,
    value, time period, and relate these ideas with student experiences.


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   Explain and interpret ideas and themes presented in selected literature through
    discussion and writing.
   Apply critical analyses through writing and speaking.
   Write critical and expository essays which interpret literature and poetry.
   Write and revise compositions in response to interpretive exercises, activities, and
    class discussions to explain literary selections.

Course Content by Unit
        UNIT 1: THE SHORT STORY: SOCIAL AND HISTORICAL VALUES

TEXT: Glencoe Literature Textbook
      Warriner’s Handbook: Holt 6th Course
      2007 AP English Literature and Composition Released Exam

OBJECTIVES:

   Identify and characterize the narrator through an analysis of voice.
   Draw inferences in the analysis of character by analyzing the language and tone
    of the narration.
   Articulate how imagery, tone, and narrative technique can be used to reveal
    theme from reading and responding to short stories in writing.
   Recognize in fictional prose the three elements of style: grammar, rhythm &
    sound, and diction and practice in sentence writing using a variety of sentence
    structures and styles referenced in Warriner’s Handbook: Holt 6th Course.
   Interpret textual evidence and formulate a well-argued thesis based on close
    textual analyses of structure, style (figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and
    tone), and social/historical values of early 20th century life.

ASSESSMENTS:

   Write a timed in-class essay on style and imagery (sample AP exam prompt from
    2007 AP English Literature and Composition Released Exam).
   Peer assessment of timed essay response, as well as revision according to
    teacher feedback during student-teacher conferences, as well as large group
    instruction, for the 5-paragraph essay.
   Write a 5-paragraph essay on a student selected story from Dubliners, which
    explicitly interprets the novel’s structure, style (figurative language, imagery,
    symbolism, and tone), and social/historical values of early 20th century life.

    UNIT 2: SOCIAL AND CULTURAL VALUES PRESENTED THROUGH SATIRE

TEXTS: Glencoe Literature Textbook
       The Canterbury Tales, by Geoffrey Chaucer
       Warriner’s Handbook: Holt 6th Course
       2007 AP English Literature and Composition Released Exam


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OBJECTIVES:

   Identify and define the techniques employed by authors such as Swift, Sartre, or
    Chaucer for the use of satiric language in regards to the social/historical values of
    the literary era.
   Analyze the universality of satirical themes presented in each unit text through the
    use of figurative language, humor, and irony to convey the social/historical values
    of the literary period represented.
   Compare & contrast satirical themes in the literary works with modern rhetorical
    strategies in writing before and after student-teacher conferencing, large group
    teacher instruction, and peer revision of written compositions.
   Argue for or against the relevance of the satirical piece through the analyses of
    the social/historical mores through timed in-class writing (sample AP prompts
    from 2011 AP English Literature and Composition Released Exam).
   Analyze and use textual support to judge the satirical work’s artistry and quality.
   Edit and revise timed in-class writing through peer editing and instructor feedback
    for the purpose of writing a well argued thesis.

ASSESSMENTS:

   Develop a thesis that judges the satirical work’s artistry and quality.
   Write a timed in-class essay that explains and judges the artistry and quality of
    the satirical piece, and argue its relevance to modern rhetorical devices (sample
    AP prompts from 2011 AP English Literature and Composition Released Exam).
   Peer edit and revise sample AP essay according to student-teacher conferencing,
    large group teacher instruction, and teacher written suggestions from drafts.
   Revise and edit the in-class essay into a formal extended 5-paragraph analytical
    essay that evaluates the techniques employed in the use of satiric language.
   Orally present and retell a student-selected passage from one of the unit’s satires
    that employs satiric language in the context of a modern setting.

                                  UNIT 3: TRAGEDY

TEXTS: Beowulf, Anonymous;
       Hamlet, by William Shakespeare
       Warriner’s Handbook: Holt 6th Course
       2007 AP English Literature and Composition Released Exam

OBJECTIVES:

   Identify and define new vocabulary through the Shakespearian Insults activity.
   Match Shakespearian vocabulary with modern vocabulary.
   Develop knowledge of subordinate and coordinate clauses through teacher
    instruction, written practice, and group discussion.
   Discuss teacher feedback and instruction and revise these insults utilizing a
    variety of sentence structures, including uses of subordination and coordination.
   Complete a character analysis by examining actions and words of the characters.

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   Graph the complication and explication of the plots and subplots.
   Articulate universal themes that are common to great tragedy.
   Evaluate plot, character, theme, and language as elements of tragedy.
   Rewrite one section of Beowulf and Hamlet into modern English.

ASSESSMENTS:

   Perform Shakespearian soliloquies using newly learned vocabulary, sentence
    variety, and subordination and coordination.
   Complete unit vocabulary test.
   Complete grammar exam on complex sentences: subordination and coordination.
   Create and write a modern prose soliloquy that is evaluated for the use of unit
    vocabulary, a variety of sentence structures, and subordination/coordination.
   Re-write one section of Beowulf into a modern epic poem.
   Complete an analytical reading log, which addresses the social and historical
    values of the time period,
   Compare/contrast Beowulf to a modern hero of their choice and write an
    analytical response that evaluates your choice utilizing peer revision of first drafts.
   Orally present and retell a student-selected passage from one of the unit’s satires
    that employs satiric language in the context of a modern setting.
   Write a character analysis and memorize one soliloquy spoken in any act.

                              UNIT 4: MODERN DRAMA

TEXTS: Fences, by August Wilson
       Death of a Salesman, by Arthur Miller
       Warriner’s Handbook: Holt 6th Course
       2007 AP English Literature and Composition Released Exam

OBJECTIVES:

   Complete a character analysis by examining the words, thoughts, and actions of
    the characters.
   Define and argue, for or against, illusion vs. reality in the plays through an
    examination of the subtleties of language.
   Identify and discuss the author’s use of motif, symbolism, tone, imagery, and irony
    in modern drama.
   Classify the components and break down the logical organization of the multi-
    paragraph essay (Warriner’s Handbook: Holt 6th Course).
   Discuss the importance of essay introductions and the significance of thesis
    statements through teacher’s large group instruction and samples from student
    writing.
   Practice the process of writing and revising the drafts of the multi-paragraph
    essay (at least 3 drafts) utilizing teacher instruction and comments, as well as
    peer revision and editing.
   Apply teacher and peer comments from revision and write the final copy of the
    multi-paragraph essay.

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   Evaluate final copy of the essay; address any questions or problems regarding
    logical organization of the essay, the thesis statement, and whether or not
    revision strategies/comments improved the final copy.

ASSESSMENTS:

   Complete a peer revision worksheet – attached to each draft of the multi-
    paragraph essay that focuses on content, logical organization of ideas, style
    (subordination and coordination), and grammar mechanics appropriately, as well
    as unit vocabulary.
   Complete a written annotated reading log that focuses on the author’s use of
    motif, symbolism, tone, imagery, and irony in modern drama.
   Compose several drafts and revise the multi-paragraph essay according to
    teacher instruction/feedback and peer revision; evaluate or argue for either
    theme: illusion vs. reality from either Death of a Salesman or Fences, utilizing a
    critical essay on the play for illustrative, specific support of the thesis statement.

                                  UNIT 5: THE NOVEL

TEXT: Glencoe Literature Textbook
      Native Son, by Richard Wright
     Warriner’s Handbook: Holt 6th Course
     2007 AP English Literature and Composition Released Exam

OBJECTIVES:

   Explore the modern philosophies of Existentialism and Absurdism in literature
    paying attention to how the author uses a balance of generalization and specific,
    illustrative detail to illustrate these philosophies.
   Articulate the various themes of the novels.
   Define unit vocabulary and write compositions utilizing the unit vocabulary with a
    variety of sentence structures (including subordination and coordination) to
    increase vocabulary and grammar skills (Warriner’s Handbook: Holt 6th Course).
   Identify, define, and explicate examples of the following rhetorical devices: simile,
    metaphor, personification, apostrophe, metonymy, allegory, symbol, paradox,
    hyperbole, understatement, irony, and illusion.
   Discuss how people generalize one another according to stereotypes and how
    the unit’s authors may or may not stereotype these characters accordingly.
   Apply a balance of generalization and specific details in writing through teacher
    instruction/feedback from multiple drafts of essay on existentialism vs. absurdism.

ASSESSMENTS:

   Develop a thesis that evaluates the novel’s artistry and quality.
   Write a timed in-class essay that explains and evaluates the artistry and quality of
    the novel, and argues its relevance towards modern 21st century issues (sample
    AP prompts from 2011 AP English Literature and Composition Released Exam).

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   Written revision of the sample AP essay according to teacher instruction,
    comments and peer revision.
   Revise and edit the in-class essay into a formal extended multi-paragraph
    analytical essay that evaluates and discusses how people stereotype one another
    and how the unit’s authors stereotype these fiction characters accordingly.
   Write and revise an outside-of-class essay illustrating how the themes of the
    novel are examples of existentialism or absurdism using a balance of
    generalization and specific, illustrative detail from Native Son and The Stranger as
    support (at least 3 drafts that utilize teacher comments and peer revision
    comments).

                                   UNIT 6: POETRY

TEXT: Norton Literature: 8th ed. (various poems)
      Glencoe Literature Textbook
      Warriner’s Handbook: Holt 6th Course
      2007 AP English Literature and Composition Released Exam

OBJECTIVES:

   Choose and utilize words for their connotations as well as denotations.
   Analyze the effectiveness of poetry that conveys experience through the use of
    sensory imagery.
   Distinguish between "total meaning" and "prose meaning" in poetry.
   Apply logical organization enhanced by techniques to increase coherence such
    as repetition, transition, and emphasis in poetry.
   Identify, define, and evaluate the effectiveness of alliteration, assonance,
    consonance, rhyme, and refrain.
   Scan lines of poetry to determine poetic foot and line (Norton Literature: 8th ed).
   Discuss the effective use of rhetoric, controlling tone, establishing and maintaining
    voice, and achieving appropriate emphasis through diction and sentence structure
    in large group teacher led instruction.
   Interpret tone in student-generated poems after teacher instruction and small-
    group student led discussion activity.

ASSESSMENTS:

   Teach a poetry lesson to the class that clearly displays the effective use of
    rhetoric, controlling tone, establishing and maintaining voice, and achieving
    appropriate emphasis through poetic devices (symbolism, metaphor, simile,
    rhyme, and rhythm) including diction and verse/sentence structure.
   Using a sample poem from the AP exam, write an in-class timed analysis arguing
    how the poem’s organization and poetic techniques of repetition, transition, and
    emphasis are essential to interpreting the poem’s imagery (sample AP prompt
    from 2011 AP English Literature and Composition Released Exam).
   Revise second draft according to written teacher instruction/feedback on student
    drafts and peer revision comments done in small groups or pairs.

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   Compose final draft utilizing teacher feedback and peer revision comments.

             UNIT 7: RESEARCH WRITING UNIT – SENIOR PROJECT

TEXT: MLA Handbook for Research Writers
     Warriner’s Handbook: Holt 6th Course
     Student Research sources

OBJECTIVES:

   Research, write, and present the Senior Project (graduation requirement).
   Identify a topic of interest to research.
   Develop a thesis statement that can be researched, analyzed, argued, and
    supported by expert critical sources for the purpose of writing a 5-8 page research
    paper.
   Use language and organize ideas in a clear, coherent, and persuasive manner.
   Discuss and explain the effective use of rhetoric, controlling tone, establishing and
    maintaining voice, and achieving appropriate emphasis through diction and
    sentence structure before and after teacher instruction by writing note cards.
   Develop logical organization skills utilizing MLA Format in a Sentence Outline to
    increase student awareness of the topic’s coherence, repetition, transitions, and
    emphasis of ideas and research details.
   Apply a balance of generalization and specific, illustrative details using MLA
    format to cite research through several written drafts before and after teacher
    instruction and peer revision of writing.
   Present and provide a 20 minute timed presentation with the option of several
    visual aids.

ASSESSMENTS (PA Writing Assessment Rubric):

   Preliminary written topic proposal and thesis statement followed by teacher
    feedback and comments.
   Write specific, illustrative details from research sources using a minimum of 20
    Note cards following MLA Guidelines (MLA Handbook For Research Writers).
   Develop research into a formal sentence outline following MLA Format (MLA
    Handbook For Research Writers).
   Compose several drafts of 5-8 page research paper utilizing peer revision and
    teacher feedback and instruction on MLA formatting guidelines before and after
    each draft.
   Revise drafts to achieve the perfect final copy of the 5-8 page research paper.
   Demonstrates effective use of rhetoric, tone, voice, diction, and sentence
    structure appropriate for a formal research paper.
   Develop and write an outline for a speech that persuades, explains, and argues
    the Sr. Project focus/thesis during a timed 20 minute student presentation.

The Senior Project is a graduation requirement. It is based on a self-selected
topic; however, all projects must be academically challenging and intellectually

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rigorous. The project requires a written and detailed proposal. Parents/guardians
must approve the project. Once the proposal is granted, the research process
begins. The end product must meet the academic standards for Language Arts and
the requirements of this project.

The Senior Project will be an ongoing assignment throughout the year.
Students are required to conduct independent research and write the drafts of this
project outside of class. Students will hand in components of the project at various
stages throughout the school year. The Senior Project will be a major part of each
six-week grading period. It will also make up the mid-term and final grade for
this course (see the Senior Project Unit Plan for details and due dates).


                                  Plagiarism Policy

Students, who plagiarize the Senior Project, or any other assignment, will
automatically receive a zero. A discipline report will also be issued for any incident of
plagiarism. Remember that guidance counselors write recommendations for college
admissions and scholarship awards. Parents/guardians will be notified immediately.


Student Evaluation/Assessment
Students will earn their grades based on the following methods of assessment:
    Reading selection quizzes and tests
    Written assignments/special projects
    Essays written in response to sample AP examination questions
    Oral Presentations
    Class Participation
    Large and small group discussion
    Senior Project

A straight point system will be used. Students must maintain a minimum of 75% to
remain in AP English. Student scores are calculated by the following formula:

 [Student’s number of points / the total number of points assigned = % grade]

The Woodland Hills School District grading system is:

                                     90-100% = A
                                      80-89% = B
                                     70-79% = C
                                     60-60% = D

AP courses are weighted courses. Students receive weighted credit only if the grade
is an “A” or a “B”. If an “A” normally yields four points in a non-AP course, an “A” in
an AP course yields five points. This ultimately affects the student QPA calculation.

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Homework & Classroom Policies

Student learning is directly correlated to the amount of time spent on learning. AP
English students are very busy students. A short writing assignment or quiz will be
given without notice to check for understanding of the readings and to initiate
discussion of the literature. AP English students are often excused from class to
attend college visitations, field trips, and GATE programs. The following procedures
for absences are in effect:

   If you are absent due to illness, you have one day from your return to class to
    make up the assignment for full credit.
   If you are present on the day of a test or a timed writing, you are expected to take
    the test or to write the essay on the assigned day, regardless of an absence
    (excused or otherwise) during the interim.
   If you are excused from class for a college visitation, GATE program, or a special
    field trip, you are expected to inform me of the absence two days in advance of
    the absence.
   You are expected to have your assignments completed and submitted on the due
    date if you are present in school.
   If you are absent on the due date of an assignment, you must submit that
    assignment on the day that you return to school.
   If you are absent on the day in which a test is given, you must arrange to make up
    the test within 2 days of your return to class. If the test has not been made-up
    within the week, you will receive no credit for the test.

                                 Due dates/Deadlines

        AP English students are expected to complete all assignment on the due date.
College does not allow students extensions on assignments. In order to receive full
credit for an assignment, students must turn the assignment in on the date it is due.
The deadline is the last day an assignment can be submitted for partial credit.
Assignments will not be accepted after the deadline. No credit will be given for
incomplete assignments. Students will always know the due date and the deadline
for an assignment.
        Oral Presentations must be presented on time. We cannot hold the whole
class up because a student is not prepared to give an oral presentation. All oral
presentations are scored. Students, who are not prepared to present, will receive no
credit for the assignment.

Primary Course Materials
Students will be developing a study guide as we participate in the course. The study
guide will be a three-ring notebook/binder. All students are required to obtain a
three-ring binder. The contents will include, but are not limited to the following:
 Class notes
 Glossary of literary terms

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   Reviews of basic rules for writing conventions, grammar, and punctuation
   Sample AP examination questions and responses
   AP examination and diagnostic tests
   A list of favorite literary quotes and responses to those quotes
   Reading logs
   Creative writing – poems, personal essays, and narratives
   Evaluation rubrics

Students are responsible for bringing the following materials to class everyday:
 Pen/Pencil
 Textbook
 3-Ring Binder

                           Primary Literature Selections

       Beowulf (Signet Classics) (Paperback - Sep 1, 1999)
       The Stranger by Albert Camus and Matthew Ward (Paperback - Mar 13, 1989)
       Dubliners (Penguin Modern Classics) by James Joyce and Terence Brown
        (Paperback - Feb 3, 2000)
       Hamlet (Folger Shakespeare Library) by William Shakespeare (Mass Market
        Paperback - Jul 1, 2003)
       Sound and Sense: An Introduction to Poetry by Laurence Perrine and Thomas
        R. Arp (Paperback - Sep 1991)
       No Exit and Three Other Plays by Jean-Paul Sartre (Paperback - Oct 23,
        1989)
       Native Son (Perennial Classics) by Richard Wright (Paperback - Aug 2, 2005)
       Macbeth (Folger Library) by William Shakespeare (Paperback - Sep 1, 2002)
       Fences by August Wilson (Paperback - Jun 1, 1986)
       The Canterbury Tales (Penguin Classics) by Geoffrey Chaucer and Nevill
        Coghill (Paperback - Feb 4, 2003)
       1984 (Signet Classics) by George Orwell and Erich Fromm (Mass Market
        Paperback - Jul 1, 1997)
       Pride and Prejudice (Bantam Classics) by Jane Austen (Mass Market
        Paperback - Dec 1, 1983)
       The Norton Anthology of English Literature (Single-Volume 8th Edition) by
        Stephen Greenblatt (Paperback - Mar 15, 2006)

Supplemental Materials and Suggested Reading List
Required Independent Readings

       Students are required to independently read one assigned thematic outside
        reading per unit of study.
       Essay questions are selected from previous Advanced Placement exams.
       Students will read and write annotated reading logs of analytical essays
        written to critique the selected text.

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      Students must support written responses with quotes from critical essays with
       references back to the text.
      Student essays must be structured with an introduction, body, and conclusion.
      Students must include a thesis statement in the introduction; the conclusion
       contains evidence addressed specifically to the thesis statement.


              Suggested College-Bound Independent Reading List:

      A Clockwork Orange, A.                       The Twelfth Night, W.
       Burgess                                       Shakespeare
      As I Lay Dying, W. Faulkner                  Wuthering Heights, E. Bronte
      The Piano Lesson, A. Wilson                  A Lesson Before Dying, E.
      Brave New World, A. Huxley                    Gaines
      Their Eyes Were Watching God,                The Awakening, K. Chopin
       Z. Hurston                                   A Tale of Two Cites, C. Dickens
      Othello, W. Shakespeare                      A Modest Proposal, J. Swift
                                                    No Exit, Jean Paul Sartre


Acknowledgement [cut here and returns this portion to Mrs. Silverman]

The classroom instructor reserves the right to modify/change the content of this
syllabus to meet classroom and student needs. Keep this syllabus in your binder. I
will ask for it!

Please write your signature below to indicate that you have read and understood the
student expectations, the class procedures, and the course requirements.



Student signature: ______________________________ Date: _______



Parent/Guardian signature: ______________________________          Date: ________




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