Review for Academic Latin 2 Midterm up to Ecce ch 10 in 2013 for posting pages 1 11

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Review for Academic Latin 2 Midterm up to Ecce ch 10 in 2013 for posting pages 1 11 Powered By Docstoc
					                                      Academic Latin 2              p. 1                       Nōmen
                                      Review for Midterm, up to Ecce Romani Chapter 10 + the Imperfect Tense   1/23/12

    FORMAT : Mostly multiple choice and matching, with some short answer and short
       translation. You will have to write out the verb ending song. And you will have to
       put the noun endings in a chart.

               FOCUS: Material/information in Ecce Romani up to ch. 10, as follows:
)              (1) Grammar up to ch. 10, especially ch. 04 to ch. 10 + the Imperfect Tense.
)              (2) Vocabulary & Derivatives up to chapter 10 (see vocab. packet + your cards)
)              (3) Culture up to Ch. 10 (see culture packet)

    TIPS for studying Vocabulary:
    1) Review your vocabulary cards : make a pile of the words you don’t know, and work
         on that pile of unfamiliar words until they are learned.
    2) Fill out the Vocabulary Packet with the 3 columns
    3) Have someone quiz you on meanings and have them ask you to give derivatives.
    4) Record them & play them back before you go to sleep,
    5) Recite them to a pet or stuffed animal: Do whatever it takes to learn the words
         thoroughly!

    TIPS for studying Culture:
            1) Fill out the culture packet.
            2) Review class notes.
            3) Make cards of the different terms, important dates, gods and heroes, etc.
            4) Review Roman Numerals

    TIPS for studying GRAMMAR:
             1) Fill out the rest of this packet.
             2) Review class notes and chapter worksheets.
             3) Know your subject and direct object endings for nouns & adjectives + the
                uses of the ablative case
             4) Remember the verb ending song, sung to the tune of Frère Jacques
          Person and #            Frère Jacques melody for Translate these examples…You may
                                  Latin Verb endings       have to look some words up.
          1st Person Singular                  =           petō =
    This chart is on the midterm!!!




                                       2nd Person Singular                =                ambulās =
                                       3rd Person Singular                =                parat =
                                       1st Person Plural                  =                amāmus =
                                       2nd Person Plural                  =                curritis =
                                       3rd Person Plural                  =                mittunt =
                                       INFINITIVE                         =                clāmāre

                                      IMPERATIVE sing.                     =                ambulā =
                                      IMPERATIVE plural                    =                currite =
What is a verb? DEFINE and give 3 examples in Latin with translations:
Academic Latin 2              p. 2                       Nōmen
Review for Midterm, up to Ecce Romani Chapter 10 + the Imperfect Tense        1/23/12


     Verb Conjugation Practice #1: Now try giving all these Latin endings on just one
     verb & translating them…Take the verb mordeō, mordēre = to bite
 Person and #           Latin forms mordēre      English translations of each form
 1 st Person Singular


 2nd Person Singular
 3rd Person Singular
 1st Person Plural
 2nd Person Plural
 3rd Person Plural
 INFINITIVE
 IMPERATIVE sing.
 IMPERATIVE plural
 Negative Command sing                                Don’t bite!
                                 nōlī mordēre
 (nōlī + infinitive)
 Negative Command                                     Don’t bite!
                                 nōlīte   mordēre
 plural  (nōlīte + infinitive)


       Verb Conjugation Practice #2: Let’s try that again to reinforce the verb
       friendings. This time, let’s try an –āre type verb: parō, parāre = to prepare
 Person and #          Latin forms parō, parāre      English translations of each form
 1st Person Singular
 2nd Person Singular
 3rd Person Singular
 1st Person Plural
 2nd Person Plural
 3rd Person Plural
 INFINITIVE
 IMPERATIVE sing.
 IMPERATIVE plural
 Negative Command sing
 (nōlī + infinitive)
 Negative Command
 plural  (nōlīte + infinitive)
   What is a complementary infinitive (see ch. 5)?

    Academic Latin 2              p. 3                       Nōmen
    Review for Midterm, up to Ecce Romani Chapter 10 + the Imperfect Tense                   1/23/12
         Verb Conjugation Practice #3: Now let’s try the irregular verb: sum, esse = to be
         (see chapter 8 if stuck)
        Person and #          Latin forms sum, esse     English translations of each form
        1 st Person Singular


        2nd Person Singular
        3rd Person Singular
        1st Person Plural
        2nd Person Plural
        3rd Person Plural
        INFINITIVE


  Verb Conjugation Practice #4: Conjugate the irregular verb: possum, posse = to be able
    Person and #         Latin forms possum, posse English translations of each form
    1 st Person Singular


        2nd Person Singular
        3rd Person Singular
        1st Person Plural
        2nd Person Plural
        3rd Person Plural
        INFINITIVE


                                          The Imperfect Tense for verbs

    1.   The imperfect tense occurs in the                                     (present, past, future)
    2.   What does the word “imperfect” mean?
3. The imperfect involves                                              actions in the past.    [Circle all that apply]


         repeated           habitual     single         completed             on-going       continuous
   4.       Draw a picture of an animal that represents the imperfect tense + a balloon of its sound.
   5.       In the space below, also draw a picture of a photographic tool that suggests the imperfect tense.
 What is the difference between a transitive verb and an intransitive verb (see ch. 4)?

Academic Latin 2              p. 4                       Nōmen
Review for Midterm, up to Ecce Romani Chapter 10 + the Imperfect Tense                    1/23/12
     Verb Conjugation Practice #5: …Take the verb mordeō, mordēre = to bite…and
     conjugate it in the imperfect tense in Latin with at least 2 English translations.
 Person and #           Latin forms mordēre         2 English translations of each form
 1 st Person Singular


 2nd Person Singular
 3rd Person Singular
 1st Person Plural
 2nd Person Plural
 3rd Person Plural

     Verb Conjugation Practice #6: …Take the verb parō, parāre = to prepare …and
     conjugate it in the imperfect tense in Latin with at least 2 English translations.
 Person and #           Latin forms parāre          2 English translations of each form
 1 st Person Singular


 2nd Person Singular
 3rd Person Singular
 1st Person Plural
 2nd Person Plural
 3rd Person Plural

     Verb Conjugation Practice #7: …Take the verb dormiō, dormīre = to sleep …and
     conjugate it in the imperfect tense in Latin with at least 2 English translations.
 Person and #           Latin forms dormīre         2 English translations of each form
 1 st Person Singular


 2nd Person Singular
 3rd Person Singular
 1st Person Plural
 2nd Person Plural
 3rd Person Plural                   dormiēbant             they were sleeping, they used to sleep,
                                                           they kept sleeping, they slept (a lot)
     Verb Conjugation Practice #8: …Take the irregular verb sum, esse = to be…and
     conjugate it in the imperfect tense in Latin with at least 2 English translations.
 Person and #           Latin forms sum, esse       2 English translations of each form
 1 st Person Singular
                                      eram           I was, I used to be
   Academic Latin 2              p. 5                       Nōmen
   Review for Midterm, up to Ecce Romani Chapter 10 + the Imperfect Tense               1/23/12
       2nd Person Singular
       3rd Person Singular
       1st Person Plural
       2nd Person Plural
       3rd Person Plural

Verb Conjugation Practice #9: …Take the irregular verb possum, posse = to be able…and
conjugate it in the imperfect tense in Latin with at least 2 English translations.
   Person and #         Latin forms possum, posse      2 English translations of each form
   1 st Person Singular


       2nd Person Singular
       3rd Person Singular
       1st Person Plural     poterāmus                      we were able, we used to be able,
                                                            we could
       2nd Person Plural
       3rd Person Plural


                                         Noun/Adjective Friendings
  1.       What is a noun? Define:
  2.       What is an adjective? Define:
  3.       There are 3 genders in Latin…give the 2 we have seen:
  4.       A noun will change its ending, depending on how it is                  in the sentence.
  5.       Use #1: Subject. What is a subject & what case is it?


  6.       Circle the 6 subject endings: -a -am      -um    -us      -ae   -em   -ī     -er       -ēs
  7.       Use #2: Direct Object. What is a direct object & what case is it?


  8.       Circle the 6 direct object endings: -a    -am    -um      -ās   -ae   -em    -ī -ōs -ēs
  9.       Use #3, which is the object of motion towards, has the same endings as the
  10.      Use #4: For Location with in or sub (in, under) use the                                case.
  11.      Use #5: For Location with prope or ad (near, at) use the                               case.
  12.      Use #6: For Objects of Motion Away From take the                                       case.
  13.      Circle the 5 Ablative case endings: -a -ā -um -īs         -ae   -e    -ibus -ō         -ēs
                                    Academic Latin 2              p. 6                       Nōmen
                                    Review for Midterm, up to Ecce Romani Chapter 10 + the Imperfect Tense          1/23/12
                                14.      A good way to remember the different ways to translate the ablative case is the
                                           abbreviation WFBIOU (radio station of the FBI?) which means:
                                     Rule: Since adjectives describe nouns, they usually have the same endings in these
                                     three respects same gender (masculine/feminine), same number (singular or plural),
                                     and same use (subject, direct object, object of motion towards, etc).

                                15.      Fill in the chart of Latin Noun/Adjective…use the endings’ bank.           ENDINGS’ BANK

                                      “Use” and Number          1st Pattern   2nd Pattern      3rd Pattern     FriENDINGS’
                                                                (Feminine)    (Masculine)      (M & F)            BANK
                                      Nominative Singular       -             -       -        varies          -am        -er   -ibus
  This chart is on the midterm!!!




                                      Accusative Singular       -             -                -               -ēs        -ās   -e
                                      Ablative Singular         -             -                -               -e         -ae   -ēs
                                      Vocative Singular         -             -        -       -               -a -a -ae        -um

                                      Nominative Plural         -             -                -               -ī    -ī   -em   -ā
                                      Accusative Plural         -             -                -               -us        -ōs   -ēs
                                      Ablative Plural           -             -                -               -ō         -īs   -īs
                                      Vocative Plural           -             -                -               = nom sing       -er

    16. Now let’s try attaching these Noun/Adj. endings to real Latin words!
“Use” or Case and Number      1st Pattern noun:    2nd Pattern noun:    3rd Pattern noun:
                              bulla (Fem) = bubble oculus (M) = eye     pes, pedis (M) = foot
Nominative Singular
Accusative Singular                                                                                          pedem
Ablative Singular

Nominative Plural
Accusative Plural
Ablative Plural


    17. Now let’s try more… Attach the Noun/Adj. endings to real Latin words!
“Use” or Case and Number     1st Pattern noun:       2nd Pattern noun:     3rd Pattern noun:
                             cista (F.) = box, trunk aper, aprī (M) = boar lex, legis (F) = law
Nominative Singular
Accusative Singular                                                                        aprum             legem
        Academic Latin 2              p. 7                       Nōmen
        Review for Midterm, up to Ecce Romani Chapter 10 + the Imperfect Tense                               1/23/12
Ablative Singular

Nominative Plural
Accusative Plural
Ablative Plural


  18.        Now let’s add an adjective to describe a noun. Match the adjective
             fractus/fracta “broken” with the following nouns. Please note that -us/-a adjectives like
             frigidus/frigida or magnus/magna, etc., cannot take 3rd pattern endings. Then, think of gender: if
             feminine put 1st pattern on the adjective; if masculine, put 2nd pattern endings on the adj.
“Use” or Case and Number                   1st Pattern noun:            2nd Pattern noun:             3rd Pattern noun:
                                           raeda (F.) = carriage        nasus (M) = nose              dēns, dentis (M) = tooth
Nominative Singular                                                                                   dēns


Accusative Singular                                                                                   dent


Ablative Singular                                                                                     dent


Nominative Plural                                                                                     dent


Accusative Plural                                                                                     dent

Ablative Plural                                                                                       dent


                                                   TRANSLATION FORMULA
             Step 1. Find the Subject…(if there isn’t a separate noun as subject, go to step 2 and translate verb ending)
             Step 2. Go to the verb and translate it. Pay attention to your friendings.
             Step 3. translate Direct Object (if verb is transitive)
             Step 4. translate everything else in the sentence: prepositional phrases, adverbs, etc.

     19.     Translate the following sentences, each with a complementary infinitive:
 a. Sextus in rīvum frīgidum cadere nōn vult.

 b. puerī ex arbore magnā descendere timēbant.

 c. Marcus ex hortō lupōs molestōs repellere poterat.

 d. puellae in silvā et agrīs errāre saepe volēbant.

 e. puerōs defessōs pater iubet magnās cistās in raedam pōnere =
      Academic Latin 2              p. 8                       Nōmen
      Review for Midterm, up to Ecce Romani Chapter 10 + the Imperfect Tense           1/23/12
    20.    Give the meanings or sense(s) of the following prefixes:
           ab-(abs-)                                       inter-
           ad-                                             mis-
           ante-                                           ob-
           con-(com-)                                      per-
           contra-                                         post-
           counter-                                        pro-
           de-                                             re-
           dis-                                            sub-
           ex-(e-)                                         super-
           in-                                             trans-
21. What do the following roots mean? Think of English words that come from these roots
        (+ prefixes if possible). Example: -tract-: “drag, draw; consider.” Abstract, attract,
        contraction, detract, distraction, extract, protractor, retract, subtract, etc.

           a. –port-:                                                           import
           b. –vid-(-vis-):                                                     provide
           c. –act-(-ag-):                                                      agenda
           d. –scrib-(-script-):                                                describe
           e. –voc-:                                                            vocation
           f. –spect-:                                                          respect
           g. –labor-:                                                          elaborate
           h. –scend (-scens-):                                                 transcend
           i. –duc-:                                                            introduce
           j.    –pel(l)-(-puls-):                                              expulsion
           k. –vent-(-ven-):                                                    convene
           l. –aud-:                                                            audible
           m. –dorm-:                                                           dormant
           n. –vol-:                                                            volition
           o. –leg- (-lect-) :                                                  lecture
     Academic Latin 2              p. 9                       Nōmen
     Review for Midterm, up to Ecce Romani Chapter 10 + the Imperfect Tense             1/23/12
I.       Select the correct word(s) from the brackets & Translate on a separate paper:
1.       Iulius ad                    currit. [arbor, arborem, arbore]
2.       Iulius ad                    currēbat. [arboribus, arborēs]
3.       Iulia sub                    sedet. [ramus, ramōs, ramīs]
4.       Iulia sub                    sedēbat. [arbor, arbore, arborem]
5.       Puellae ex                   ambulant. [aqua, aquam, aquā]
6.       Puellae ē                    ambulābant. [silva, silvam, silvā]
7.       Puellae ad                   ambulant. [villa, villam, villā]
8.       Puellae ad                   ambulābant. [arbor, arbore, arborem]
9.       Multī servī in                      laborant. [agrī, agrōs, agrīs]
10.      Multī servī in                      laborābant. [ager, agrō, agrum]
11.      Amicam Cornelia ē                          ducit. [villae, villam, villā]
12.      Amicam Cornelia ē                          ducēbat. [cubiculum, cubiculō]
13.      Amicam Cornelia in                         ducit. [ager, agrōs, agrīs]
14.      Amicam Cornelia et Flavia in                      ducēbant. [ludus, ludīs, ludum]
15.      Servī sub                    dormiunt. [arborēs (nom), arborēs (acc), arboribus]
16.      Servī sub ramīs “were sleeping.” [dormiēbat, dormiēbant, dormiēbam]
17.      Puerī per agrōs “are running”. [currunt, currēbant, currit]
18.      Puerī per agrōs “kept running”. [currunt, currēbant, currit, currēbātis]
19.      Cornelius ad                redīre vult. [urbe, urbem]
20.      Cornelius ad                redīre volēbat. [arena, arenam, arenae]
21.      ex hortō celeriter “I am leaving.” [exit, exeō, exīs, exeunt]
22.      ex hortō celeriter “I was leaving.” [exībat, exībant, exībātis, exībam]
23.      ex hortō subito et identidem “y’all were leaving.” [exībat, exībant, exībātis, exībam]
24.      Flāvia clamat, “Ubi      “are you”               , Cornelia?” [estis, es, sum]
25.      Flāvia clamat, “Ubi         “were you” , Cornelia?” [erātis, erās, eram]
26.      Flāvia clamat, “Ubi      “are we”                , Cornelia?” [estis, es, sumus]
27.      Flāvia clamat, “Ubi         “were you” , Cornelia et Syra?”          [erātis, erās, eram, eramus]
28.      Cornelia ianitorem                        nōn vult. [excitāre, excitat, excitās]
    Academic Latin 2             p. 10                       Nōmen
    Review for Midterm, up to Ecce Romani Chapter 10 + the Imperfect Tense                                 1/23/12
29.     Nōs omnēs hodie Rōmam                                                   . [redīre, redīmus, redītis]
30.     Nōs omnēs hodie Rōmam                                                   . [redībam, redībāmus, redībātis]
31.     Cur patrem                                   , Marce? [vexās, timēt, amātis]
32.     Cur patrem                                   , Marce? [vexābās, timēbat, amābātis]
33.     Necesse est epistulās statim                                   . [tradit, legere, legimus]
34.     Necesse erat epistulās statim                                  . [tradit, legere, legimus]
35.     Prīnceps senatorēs                           . [consulere vult, consulere volunt]
36.     Prīnceps senatorēs                           . [consulere volēbat, consulere volēbant]
37.     Cur vōs omnes simul                                   ? [discedere, discedimus, discedere paratis]
38.     Cur vōs omnes simul                                   ? [discēdēbātis, discēdēbāmus, discedere]
39.     Amica Corneliam in agrōs                                       . [adveniunt, ducit, amat]
40.     Amicae Corneliam in agrōs                                      . [ducēbat, ducēbant, ducēbās]
41.     Cur per agrōs                                         , puellae? [currere, curritis, excitātis, curris]
42.     Cur per agrōs                                         , puellae? [currēbātis, excitābātis, currēbas]
43.     Iānitor Corneliam non                                 . [audiō, audiunt, audit]
44.     Iānitorem Cornelia non                                . [audiēbam, audiēbant, audēbat]
45.     Ego nōn                    quod Rōmam redīre nōlō. [dormimus, surgere, surgo]
46.     Ego nōn                    quod Rōmam redīre nōlēbam. [dormiēbāmus, surgēbam, dormiēbāmus]
47.              Cornelia in agrīs nōn conspicit. [Servōs, Servī, Servus, Servīs]
48.              Cornelia et mater in agrīs nōn conspiciēbant. [Servus, Servī, Servum, Servī ]
49.     Senatorēs Romanī omnēs in                                      sunt. [urbe, urbem, urbēs]
50.     Multī senatorēs Romanī in                                      erant. [urbe, urbem, urbs]
51.     Walk, puer temerārī1! [ambulāre, ambulā, ambulāte, ambulās, nōlī ambulāre ]
52.     Walk, puerī temerāriī! [ambulāre, ambulā, ambulāte, ambulās, nōlī ambulāre ]
53.     Serve, “don’t rush” per agrōs! [festinā, nōn festināre, nōlī festināre, nōlīte festināre]
54.     Servī, “don’t rush” per agrōs! [festinā, nōn festināre, nōlī festināre, nōlīte festināre]



1
 This is a vocative singular: whenever the 2nd declension nominative ends in –ius, the vocative becomes a long i (-ī).
Otherwise, remember, that if the nominative is –us, then the vocative is –e (see #53)
Academic Latin 2             p. 11                       Nōmen
Review for Midterm, up to Ecce Romani Chapter 10 + the Imperfect Tense       1/23/12

     1. Explain the following terms in a complete sentence. Give examples also.


     a. transitive verb



     b. intransitive verb



     c. linking verb



     d. verb complement (w/ linking verb)



     e. subject



     f. direct object



     g. Object of Motion Towards



     h. Complementary infinitive



     i. impersonal verb



     j.   adjective/noun agreement

				
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