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APPLICANTS GUIDE - Emergency.nsw.gov.au - NSW Government

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APPLICANTS GUIDE - Emergency.nsw.gov.au - NSW Government Powered By Docstoc
					Natural Disaster Resilience Program
Auxiliary Disaster Resilience Grants
              Scheme



     APPLICANTS GUIDE

           Released June 2012
              Version 1.00
The New South Wales Applicants Guide for the Auxiliary Disaster Resilience Grants Scheme
(ARDGS) has been developed to provide you with information on how to apply for funding
under this scheme.

If you require further assistance or advice in relation to your application please contact the
Ministry for Police and Emergency Services.

       Ministry for Police and Emergency Services
       Level 2, Quad 1, 8 Parkview Drive
       Sydney Olympic Park NSW 2127
       PO Box 6976
       Silverwater NSW 2128
       T (02) 8247 5920 F (02) 8247 5951
       adrgs@mpes.nsw.gov.au
       www.mpes.nsw.gov.au




Auxiliary Disaster Resilience Grants Scheme – Applicants Guide                                   1
Contents
Part 1 – Background ..................................................................................................................... 3
Part 2 – What type of funding is available? ................................................................................... 3
Part 3 – Who can apply for funding? ............................................................................................. 3
Part 4 – What type of projects are eligible/ineligible? ................................................................... 3
Part 5 – How to complete the application form ............................................................................. 5
Part 6 – How to submit the application ....................................................................................... 10
Part 7 – How you will be notified if your application is successful ................................................ 10
Part 8 – What is the funding process for successful applicants? ................................................... 10
Part 9 – Other Natural Disaster and Emergency Management Funding Programs ......................... 11
Part 10 – Definitions .................................................................................................................. 12
Appendix 1 – Specific Requirements for Community Education Awareness and Engagement (EAE)
Projects ..................................................................................................................................... 13




Auxiliary Disaster Resilience Grants Scheme – Applicants Guide                                                                                 2
Part 1 – Background
Natural disasters occur regularly in NSW. They cause hundreds of millions of dollars of damage each
year to homes, businesses and the state's infrastructure, along with serious disruption to
communities.

To address risks associated with natural disasters the Auxiliary Disaster Resilience Grants Scheme
(ADRGS) is established under the joint Commonwealth and NSW Government Natural Disaster
Resilience Program.

This guide is for local agency project managers who wish to apply for funding under the ADRGS. It
explains the information required and the process involved in submitting an application.


Part 2 – What type of funding is available?
The Auxiliary Disaster Resilience Grants Scheme (ADRGS) will deliver funding to local agencies to
undertake natural disaster risk reduction activities and enhance emergency management capability,
that contribute to safer, sustainable communities more resilient to the effects of natural disasters.
For information on the other funding programs available refer to page 11. Funding for the ADRGS
will generally comprise of a two thirds contribution from combined Commonwealth/State funds with
one third contribution from the agency for the approved project costs.


Part 3 – Who can apply for funding?
Organisations eligible to apply for funding under the ADRGS are:

        Local agencies with disaster mitigation and emergency management responsibilities (e.g.
        Local Governments, Local Aboriginal Land Councils, unincorporated remote communities,
        and regional organisations of councils).

Local agencies may apply for funding either individually or jointly with other eligible applicants. The
amount of each agency’s contribution is to be negotiated between the local agencies involved.

In some cases, the private or non-government sector (including state-owned corporations) may wish
to undertake and fund measures under the ADRGS. Such participation by the private or non-
government sector is permitted but applications must be supported by the relevant Local or District
Emergency Management Committee.


Part 4 – What type of projects are eligible/ineligible?
Eligible projects
A range of activities which enhance emergency management capability or reduce natural disaster
risks.

To qualify projects must either address multiple hazards or natural hazards other than flood or bush
fire and address the eligibility and assessment criteria in the application form.



Auxiliary Disaster Resilience Grants Scheme – Application Guide                                           3
Types of eligible projects include:

        Research or technical studies of disaster risk, community vulnerability, resilience measures
        etc
        Development of community engagement strategies
        Structural works to protect against damage (e.g. disaster proofing of existing buildings at risk
        and other engineered works that offer protection from natural disasters)
        Disaster warning systems
        Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data for disaster resilience purposes
        Non-recurrent capability development activities.

Some project types have additional requirements that need to be addressed in the application
and/or supporting documents. These are:

        Emergency Operations Centre Enhancements - Upgrades and enhancements to Emergency
        Operations Centres (EOCs) are subject to additional requirements. Funding will only be
        provided where the applicant can demonstrate that suitable facilities are unable to be
        identified or additional equipment is needed to ensure they meet necessary standards.
        Projects must comply with the Emergency Operations Centres Policy – April 2011 (a copy is
        available from the Ministry for Police and Emergency Services). Any application for EOC
        enhancements must be accompanied by evidence that the Local Emergency Management
        Committee has certified that the project is in compliance with the Policy.

        Community Education Awareness and Engagement Projects - Community Education
        Awareness and Engagement (EAE) projects are an important way of enhancing resilience.
        However the nature of community engagement means that many of these projects, though
        well-intentioned, don’t succeed. Applications for EAE projects must meet the additional
        requirements in Appendix 1. In particular the applicant will need to demonstrate that the
        project is part of a broader EAE strategy or integrated scheme and that it has the necessary
        resources to maintain the project into the future. Projects to develop EAE strategies (as
        opposed to implementing them) are subject to the same restrictions.

Ineligible projects
Projects that include expenditure on the following areas will not generally be eligible for funding
under the ADRGS:

        General operating or business as usual activities or ongoing financial support for existing
        activities
        Response or recovery expenditure
        Costs associated with the ownership of capital items (e.g. depreciation, maintenance,
        property management)
        Reimbursement for works and measures already undertaken including debt repayment or
        the refinancing of existing loans
        Projects that are designed to protect or which provide a commercial advantage to new
        developments (this is and will remain the responsibility of the developer and should be
        controlled through land use planning measures)
        Projects that primarily address risks associated with flooding or bush fire.




Auxiliary Disaster Resilience Grants Scheme – Applicants Guide                                         4
The preparation of Emergency Risk Management (ERM) studies is not an eligible activity under the
ADRGS and is the responsibility of emergency management committees. The Ministry for Police and
Emergency Services provides support to emergency management committees undertaking the
Emergency Risk Management process.


Part 5 – How to complete the application form
Preparing to complete the form
Ensure that you complete all sections of the application form (except where marked “if applicable”)
and Attachments A and B. Failure to complete the required sections of the form may result in your
application being deemed ineligible.

If relevant, pages from appropriate risk management studies or plans must also be attached in
support of your application. If in doubt you should to seek advice from the Ministry for Police and
Emergency Services.

Section 1        Application Details
In this section we need to know the details of the agency applying for the grant.

The agency name and Australian Business Number (ABN) that you provide, must be your agency’s
legal name and correct ABN as they appear on the Australian Business Register (ABR) website
www.abr.gov.au. Your organisation must be incorporated in order to receive funding under the
ADRGS.

The contact person for your project should be familiar with the details of both your application and
your project. This person will be sent all correspondence in relation to your application. You are
also required to provide details of your General Manager, CEO or equivalent.

Section 2        Project Details
The project name should clearly reflect what the project is about. For example, if the project
involves the construction of signs along the tsunami evacuation routes and assembly areas, you
would name your project “Tsunami Evacuation Routes”.

The project summary should clearly describe in a few sentences what the project will do.

The Project Area/Locations are where your project is located or the area that will benefit most from
the project. This may be different from the town and postcode that is part of the business address.
Include the relevant local government area (www.dlg.nsw.gov.au), and state
(www.streetlist.elections.nsw.gov.au) and federal electorate (http://www.aec.gov.au/esearch). If
more than one, list them.

Section 3        Project Type and Hazards
In this section you will be required to select:

        The natural disaster hazard(s) which your project will address
        The project type




Auxiliary Disaster Resilience Grants Scheme – Applicants Guide                                         5
Select the natural disaster hazard being addressed from the list provided. If more than one select the
relevant box. If the project addresses all natural hazards select that box.

What type of project are you applying for?

        Works – Projects that aim to deliver actual risk reduction in the community. These include all
        structural mitigation projects, community education development programs, warning
        systems and emergency management capability and capacity development.
        Design – Investigation, design and costing of a specific structural mitigation project or other
        risk reduction works.
        Risk Study – Research or information seeking project, for example a coastal erosion study or
        evaluation of the effectiveness of a community education program.

Section 4       Project Outputs and Outcomes
In this section you are required to describe the project and explain how it will reduce the risk of the
natural disaster hazard(s) or enhance emergency management capability (for studies and research
projects, include the methodology to be used). If applicable, advise if any other options were
considered and why this particular option was chosen.

You need to list the project outputs and project outcomes which will be used during the acquittal of
the project. Clear outputs and outcomes are required.

        Project outputs – are those physical items that will be produced by the project. For example:
        reports, brochures, GIS layers etc. You should be as specific as possible.
        Project outcomes – are what the project aims to achieve. For example: identification of
        natural disaster risks, improved community awareness, increased warning times, property
        protection etc.

Give details of any complementary or other measures planned. If this project is part of a larger
scheme or project, provide details of the larger scale scheme/project.

Give details of any existing works, emergency management measures or related activities that
address the natural disaster risks or capability measures related to the project. For example research
activities, planning measures and controls, existing mitigation structures, evacuation routes,
operations centres, refuge areas, and emergency management plans. You need to comment on their
effectiveness taking into account issues such as capacity and limitations, age, state of repair etc.

Provide details of any relevant previous studies or research that is relevant to the project. Provide
the name of the study/report, author and year published and advise if a copy is attached to your
application. Explain how the outcomes of the studies support the proposed project.

Section 5       Eligibility Criteria
In this section you are required to address how your project meets the eligibility criteria. You need to
make the case for your project being eligible and address all criteria. Applications for funding must
be for new activities and not seek reimbursement for works and measures already undertaken.

        Locally Based
        Projects must address risks at a local or regional level. State-wide projects should apply for
        funding under the State Emergency Management Projects Program.



Auxiliary Disaster Resilience Grants Scheme – Applicants Guide                                            6
        Pilot/Trial, Studies or Capital Works
        Only pilots, trials, research, capital works or other ‘one-off’ projects are eligible. ADRGS will
        not fund projects applying for ongoing rollout of programs, maintenance or other
        implementation activities.

        Disaster Resilience is Principal Benefit
        The principal benefit of the project must be improved disaster resilience in the community.

        Addresses Natural Hazards
        The project should address multiple natural hazards or a single natural hazard other than
        flood or bush fire. Exceptional projects that address non-natural hazards may be considered.

        Identified in a Risk Management Plan
        Projects must be identified in an Emergency Risk Management Study or multiple hazard-
        specific risk management plans (e.g. both a floodplain risk management plan and bushfire
        risk management plan). Exceptional projects may be identified through an After Action
        Review.

Section 6        Assessment Criteria
If considered eligible, the following criteria will be used to assess the priority of projects. The
response to these criteria will primarily determine the priority that the project receives.

        Multi-Hazard Benefit
        Projects that address multiple hazards will be prioritised higher than projects that address
        single hazards.

        Partnerships
        Projects that are undertaken in partnership with other key stakeholders and will receive
        higher priority. In particular projects that secure contributions, financial or in-kind, from
        other partners will be favourably considered.

        Wide Community Benefit
        Projects that benefit broad sections of the community, across the social, economic, built and
        natural environments will receive higher priority.

        Benefit across Prevention, Preparedness, Response & Recovery
        Projects that aim to increase resilience across the prevention, preparedness, response and
        recovery (PPRR) aspects of emergency management will receive higher priority.

        Cost Effectiveness
        Projects that represent value for money while achieving the outputs and outcomes.

        Strategic Alignment
        Projects that align with strategic objectives of a local government or other locally based
        emergency management organisations will receive higher priority.




Auxiliary Disaster Resilience Grants Scheme – Applicants Guide                                              7
        Readiness to proceed
        You need to advise if the project is ready to proceed. Projects should be ready to proceed as
        soon as funding is approved. Examples of documents you may need to consider for your
        project include:

             Preliminary investigations and design work
             Development approval
             Environmental, heritage and risk assessments
             Any other approvals or permits


Section 7        Adverse Impacts
This section requires you to provide details and explain how any adverse impacts resulting from this
project will be addressed.

        Environment – describe any adverse environmental impacts, such as loss of habitat, reduced
        river flows, construction noise etc;
        Cultural Heritage – describe any expected losses to cultural heritage, or heritage amenities
        in the area; and
        Risk Transfer – will the project increase other risks in the area.

Section 8        Project Management
In this section you need to explain how the project will be undertaken and managed. Indicate who
will be the Project Manager (agency staff, contractor or consultant) and the project reporting
arrangements / management structures.

Section 9        Maintenance (for works projects only)
In this section you will need to detail how the project will be maintained. Who will be the
responsible authority for maintenance? How long are the project outputs expected to last? Is a
detailed maintenance plan required for the project? If a maintenance plan is required it will be a
required output of the project and should be specified in Section 4.

Summarise the expected maintenance actions, the frequency of maintenance required and an
estimate of the project’s annual maintenance cost. Maintenance costs are not eligible for funding
under the ADRGS and must be met in full within an agency’s annual budget.

Section 10       Exceptional Circumstances Waiver
Funding for the ADRGS will generally comprise of a two thirds contribution from combined
Commonwealth/State funds with one third contribution from the agency for the approved project
costs. The agency contribution, however, may be reduced or waived in exceptional circumstances
for low capacity local councils, Local Aboriginal Land Councils or remote unincorporated
communities. In certain circumstances, a waiver of one or more of the usual conditions of
application, reporting and/or accountability may also be permitted.

If an exceptional circumstances waiver of one or more of the conditions above is sought, you need to
explain why application of normal cost-sharing or reporting arrangements would cause financial
hardship or otherwise preclude your agency’s participation in the ADRGS. You should consider issues
such as local agency rate revenue and capability to raise funds, local agency expenditure and service



Auxiliary Disaster Resilience Grants Scheme – Applicants Guide                                       8
area, population affected, degree of risk and level of vulnerability of the affected community,
anticipated level of risk protection etc.

Section 11      Supporting Documentation
In this section you need to detail the supporting documentation that will be provided with your
application. Where the supporting document is a risk management plan detail the name, type, date
and page numbers attached.

Generally, projects should be supported by one of the following:

        An Emergency Risk Management Study
        Both a Floodplain Risk Management Plan and Bushfire Risk Management Plan (where both
        documents identify a multi-hazard treatment option such as community education)
        Another risk-based study or plan (such as a Coastal Zone Management Plan)
        An After Action Review that specifically identifies the project.

Please add any other comment which you believe will further enhance your application for funding.

Section 12      Declaration
This section is to be signed by the agency’s General Manager, Chief Executive or equivalent after
electronic submission.

Attachment A            Project Budget (GST Exclusive)
In this section you are required to provide information on the income and expenditure of the project
together with the level of funding sought. DO NOT include GST.

Income
Insert the amount of Funding Requested in the relevant box. The form will calculate the appropriate
Applicant’s Contribution on the basis that the Commonwealth/State Governments will provide up to
two thirds combined funding towards the approved projects cost unless an exceptional
circumstances waiver has been sought in Section 10. If a waiver is applied for you will be able to
vary the amount in the Applicant’s Contribution.

If you specify any “Other Income” you need to include the source and nature of that contribution.

Expenditure
Itemise the different expenditure elements in this section and provide as much detail as possible on
the cost breakdown of the project. For example: community consultation, mapping, design,
construction, project management, advertising etc. DO NOT include GST.

Attachment B            Project Workplan
This section requires you to provide a workplan for the project showing major activities and their
anticipated start and end dates.

Major project stages/tasks include needs analysis, survey, environmental impact assessment,
modelling, design, construction etc.




Auxiliary Disaster Resilience Grants Scheme – Applicants Guide                                         9
Part 6 – How to submit the application
All applications must be submitted electronically to be considered for funding.

Electronic Submission
Once the form has been completed please submit your application to adrgs@mpes.nsw.gov.au

Please attach to this email any supporting documentation required. Where supporting
documentation is larger than 10MB it should be submitted on CD/DVD with the hard copy
declaration. Please note this in the email if this is the case.

You may attach a scanned copy of the signed declaration (Section 12) to the email.

Submission of Declaration
The declaration may also be submitted in hard copy along with any CD/DVD copies of supporting
documentation larger than 10MB. Ensure that electronic submission is completed prior to posting
hard copy documentation. The postal address is:

Auxiliary Disaster Resilience Grants Scheme
Ministry for Police and Emergency Services
PO Box 6976
Silverwater NSW 2128


Part 7 – How you will be notified if your application is successful
The Ministry for Police and Emergency Services in collaboration with technical experts will assess
and recommend applications for funding. The NSW Minister for Police and Emergency Services
approves and announces successful projects. The General Manager, Chief Executive or equivalent
from each successful agency will then receive a letter from the Minister advising them of their
successful application. Staff from the Ministry for Police and Emergency Services will contact the
nominated contact on the application to prepare a funding agreement.

Following the announcement of successful projects, unsuccessful project applicants will receive a
letter outlining why the application was unsuccessful.


Part 8 – What is the funding process for successful applicants?
After the announcement agencies will be contacted with details of the funding process. Before
commencing the project agencies will be required to confirm and expand on the details provided on
the project work plan and project budget submitted with the application.

A Funding Agreement will then be prepared, to be signed by the agency General Manager, Chief
Executive or equivalent. Depending on the project size, type and agency capacity a variety of
payment schedules are available. No work on the project is to commence until the Funding
Agreement is signed. Once the Funding Agreement is signed agency project managers should consult
with the Ministry for Police and Emergency Services, and its technical advisors, in the development
of a tender brief (where relevant) and assessment of tender proposals.




Auxiliary Disaster Resilience Grants Scheme – Applicants Guide                                       10
Quarterly reports of project progress are to be submitted every quarter after the Funding
Agreement is signed (even if the project has not commenced). Project managers will be required to
submit evidence for each payment claim including evidence of project commencement and
completion.


Part 9 – Other Natural Disaster and Emergency Management Funding
Programs
The following funding grants schemes are also available some of which are also supported by the
Natural Disaster Resilience Program. Further information should be sought from the relevant agency
(in bold) regarding availability, timeframes and criteria for applications under these schemes.

       Bush Fire Risk Management Grants (Including the Bush Fire Risk Management Grants
       Scheme, the Brigade Support Fund, Fire Mitigation Works Fund and Local Government
       Fund).

       These programs are administered by the NSW Rural Fire Service and provide financial
       support to councils and eligible public land managers to prepare bush fire risk management
       plans (and associated background studies) implement bush fire risk management plans to
       reduce bush fire risk to both existing and future development through a range of measures
       including capital works and maintenance.

       Floodplain Risk Management Grants (Including the State Flood Mitigation Program and
       Floodplain Risk Management Grants Scheme).

       These programs are administered by the Office of Environment and Heritage and provide
       financial support to councils and eligible public land managers to prepare floodplain risk
       management plans (and associated background studies) implement floodplain risk
       management plans to reduce flood risk to both existing and future development through a
       range of measures as outlined in the floodplain development manual.

       Emergency Volunteer Support Scheme
       This program is administered by the Ministry for Police and Emergency Services and
       delivers funding to emergency management volunteer agencies, either directly to volunteer
       groups or to the agencies themselves, to support volunteer recruitment and retention.

       State Emergency Management Projects Program
       This program is administered by the Ministry for Police and Emergency Services and directs
       funding to Government Agencies, non-Government Organisations and in some cases the
       Private Sector (where such organisations have defined roles in emergency management
       plans) to undertake research and development, trial or pilot programs of state-wide benefit.
       Non-Government Organisations and the private sector (including state-owned corporations)
       must ensure their applications are appropriately sponsored.




Auxiliary Disaster Resilience Grants Scheme – Applicants Guide                                   11
Part 10 – Definitions
For the purposes of the NSW Applicants Guide the following definitions apply:

Disaster mitigation – Measures taken in advance of, or after, a disaster aimed at decreasing or
eliminating the impact of disaster on society and the environment.

Emergency management – A range of measures to manage risks to communities and the
environment, including the organisation and management of resources for dealing with all aspects
of emergencies. Emergency management involves the plans, structures and arrangements which are
established to bring together the normal endeavours of government, voluntary and private agencies
in a comprehensive and coordinated way to deal with the whole spectrum of emergency needs,
including prevention, preparedness, response and recovery.

Natural disaster – A serious disruption to a community or region caused by the impact of a naturally
occurring, rapid onset event that threatens or causes death, injury or damage to property or the
environment, and which requires significant and coordinated multi-agency and community
response. Any one, or a combination, of the following can cause serious disruption to communities,
infrastructure and the environment: bushfire; cyclone, earthquake; flood; landslide; storm; storm
surge; tornado or tsunami.

Resilience – The capacity to prevent/mitigate, prepare for, respond to and recover from the impacts
of disasters.




Auxiliary Disaster Resilience Grants Scheme – Application Guide                                   12
Appendix 1 – Specific Requirements for Community Education Awareness
and Engagement (EAE) Projects
Introduction
Public education awareness and engagement activities are arguably one of the most effective
mitigation measures when implemented properly. However, if implemented poorly they are unlikely
to achieve their objectives. To ensure that the grants for EAE activities are effective they are subject
to greater requirements than other more easily measured activities.

When undertaking the design and development of activities applicants should refer to the Australian
Emergency Manual: Guidelines for the Development of Community Education, Awareness &
Engagement Programs (2010). In particular projects must seek to comply with the 6 Principles of
effective practice in community education, awareness and engagement (Chapter 16):

    1. Localise programs and activities where possible.

    2. Develop a program theory model for present and new programs and activities that will
       provide a template for detailed planning and implementation, a ‘roadmap’ for evaluation
       and a permanent record of the thinking that occurred during program development.

    3. Develop a small suite of programs and/or activities that focus on achieving different
       intermediate steps (processes) along the pathway from ‘risk awareness’ to ‘preparedness’
       (planning, physical preparation, psychological preparation) that are integrated into a general
       plan for enhancing natural hazard preparedness in a locality or region.

    4. Where appropriate, consider an integrated approach to planning, program development and
       research.

    5. Conduct and report frequent evaluations of programs and activities to continually enhance
       the evidence base for what works in particular contexts in community safety approaches.

    6. Optimise the balance between ‘central’ policy positions, agency operational requirements
       and specialist expertise on the one hand and community participation in planning, decision
       making, preparation and response activities on the other.

An application for an EAE project must address how the project will comply with these principles.

Strategies and Integrated Programs
In order to be eligible for funding under the ADRGS community EAE projects should seek to:
    1. Develop a comprehensive community engagement strategy or integrated program;
    2. Implement an element of a comprehensive community engagement strategy or integrated
        program; or
    3. Evaluate such a strategy or element.




Auxiliary Disaster Resilience Grants Scheme – Application Guide                                      13
Localisation of content
Projects must seek to tailor content or program delivery to the local context in order to add value to
existing state-level and state-wide programs. This localisation should address, where relevant:
         The specific local hazards and risks that affect the area (e.g. location of floodprone areas,
         bushland urban interface).
         The particular vulnerabilities of the area (e.g infrastructure that might be affected)
         Emergency preparedness advice that is appropriate for the local risks and vulnerabilities
         (e.g. information targeted at CALD, aged, businesses etc.)
         Information on the local emergency responders including where relevant contact
         information (e.g. for the local gas or electricity provider; providing local numbers for
         emergency services is generally not appropriate)

Use of NSW and Commonwealth Content
Use of NSW and Commonwealth Government content verbatim is encouraged provided that there is
appropriate attribution and links back to original content. Permission may need to be sought for use
of some resources. In particular prominent links to existing EAE programs (such as ‘Prepare, Act,
Survive’, ‘Floodsafe’ etc.) should be made within the content.

Branding
There are a large number of existing preparedness and emergency services ‘brands’ in this sector.
The introduction of new branding is not appropriate except where strong justification can be made
for the proposed branding. Branding includes:
         Logos
         Taglines, slogans
         Program names
         Characters

Evaluation
All EAE activities must budget funds for evaluation or make provision for evaluation activities in
future years of the project. Evaluation should go beyond simple assessment of the dissemination of
information and include research into outcomes in terms of effectiveness of the information in
changing attitudes, patterns of thinking, and behaviours.




Auxiliary Disaster Resilience Grants Scheme – Applicants Guide                                      14

				
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