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					        volunteering
          in Kenya
            the agape volunteer information book




                    0845 519 8469
www.agape-volunteers.com                       info@agape-volunteers.com

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   Agape Volunteers, 36 Westaway Heights, Barnstaple, Devon, United Kingdom, EX31 1NY
       08450 519 8469    www.agape-volunteers.com     info@agape-volunteers.com
Dear Volunteer,

Thank you for your interest in Agape Volunteers! This booklet provides all the information you need about
volunteering with us in Kenya. We hope to make you feel completely comfortable with your volunteering
experience, prepare you for your orientation and minimise any culture shock on arrival. If you have any
questions that are not addressed in this booklet please email us on info@agape-volunteers.com.

Guillaume Lefevre
CEO and founder, Agape Volunteers




                                                          2


                  Agape Volunteers, 36 Westaway Heights, Barnstaple, Devon, United Kingdom, EX31 1NY
                      08450 519 8469    www.agape-volunteers.com     info@agape-volunteers.com
the booking process
you can complete the online booking form & you
will usuallly get a responce within 24 hours.

If you have not already done so, the first step in the booking process is to fill out a
registration form on our website. We will process your application, check if there is space
on your chosen programme and send you a welcome letter, usually within 24 hours. You
will be assigned a personal trip advisor who will answer any remaining questions you might
have and guide you through every step of your preparation.

We do not charge a registration fee, and we will ask you to pay your programme fee to
secure your space on your chosen placement. You will be directed to our online payment
site, which is powered and secured by PayPal, and your payment will be confirmed as
soon as possible. All of your payments are refundable up to 30 days before you travel,
minus a small transfer charge, so you can make sure you are completely happy with your
arrangements. After this date, your fee will have been
distributed to your host family in order for them to provide     you will be assigned                 a
your food and accommodation.
                                                                       personal trip advisor
Once you receive your payment confirmation email, your                 who will answer any of
trip advisor will provide you with details about your host             your questions
family, the address of your placement and the names of any
other volunteers you will be working with. They will help you book flights, arrange a safari
or any other trips you might want to take, and support you in your preparation. Your trip
advisor will ask you for your airline details, arrival time, flight number and other journey
information, to arrange someone to pick you up from the airport. They will also send you
information about acquiring a visa in Nairobi, which normally costs about £20. You will also
receive a list of emergency contact numbers and a final email wishing you the best of luck!




                                                         3


                 Agape Volunteers, 36 Westaway Heights, Barnstaple, Devon, United Kingdom, EX31 1NY
                     08450 519 8469    www.agape-volunteers.com     info@agape-volunteers.com
your arrival
you will meet the staff responsible for you whilst
volunteering, discuss your goals and aims for your trip,

A member of Agape staff will be there to collect you as soon as you arrive, and it is likely that
there will be other volunteers with you on your flight. If your placement is in the city, you will be
taken straight to your host family to begin settling in. If you will be volunteering further afield,
you may spend the first night in the city
before continuing your journey the next day.

Your first day will be an orientation day. This
is very important to ensure a smooth start to
your volunteering experience, and you will
be given key information about the area you
are working in, receive guidance on safety
during your project, and be briefed on any
house rules whilst living with your host family.
You will meet the staff responsible for you
whilst volunteering, discuss your goals and
aims for your trip, and get to know the other
volunteers you will be working with.




                                                         4


                 Agape Volunteers, 36 Westaway Heights, Barnstaple, Devon, United Kingdom, EX31 1NY
                      08450 519 8469   www.agape-volunteers.com     info@agape-volunteers.com
accommodation
you will be living in volunteer groups of between
4 and 16 in homes near your placement.

You will be living in volunteer groups of between 4 and 16 in homes near your placement.
Your host family will provide bunk beds, a mattress, pillows and usually a mosquito net, but
you should bring your own sleeping bag. In line with the Christian values in most Kenyan
households, all rooms are single-sex. If you wish to
volunteer as a couple, please inform us beforehand and we        You will be living
will do our best to accommodate you.
                                                                       closely with other
All of our home-stays in Nairobi have electricity but very few
                                                                       volunteers and
have running water, instead using drainage pipes and water             family members
tanks stored inside the house. It is unlikely that you will be
able to shower as often as you are used to, so please be prepared for this! Your family may
also have certain house rules, such as not leaving the house after dark, which are in place for
your safety. Please respect their concern, as your wellbeing is of the utmost importance. You
will be living closely with other volunteers and family members, so please be understanding of
their needs.

Most of our home stays have a vibrant evening atmosphere that means you will never be short
of entertainment! There will often be games and activities, including African poker, a particular
favourite of the Agape staff. There will be singing and dancing and playing with the children of
the family, and the local people will always be keen to talk with you about your life at home.


food:
Breakfast and dinner will be provided for you with your host family. Breakfast will be bread,
butter, jam, eggs and chai, a type of African tea. Kenyan food often has an Indian influence,
and dinner consists of rice, beans, mixed vegetables, chapatis, ugali and stewed meat. You
are encouraged to try out the local vendors and stalls near your placement for lunch; they
provide food very cheaply and you will be promoting Agape’s support for the community,
as well as having the opportunity to sample local cooking. However, your host mum will
provide you with a packed lunch if you prefer. It is recommended that you drink only bottled
water during your stay, which is available in most shops. If you have any special dietary
requirements, do let us know and your host family will be informed.




                                                         5


                 Agape Volunteers, 36 Westaway Heights, Barnstaple, Devon, United Kingdom, EX31 1NY
                     08450 519 8469    www.agape-volunteers.com     info@agape-volunteers.com
weekends
weekends are available for volunteers to
pursue their own activities.

African schools teach on Saturdays, and although this is optional for teaching volunteers,
it usually involves lots of games rather than serious lessons. Even volunteers who are not
teaching find it enjoyable and worth attending at least once. Families traditionally attend church
on Sundays and this is optional for volunteers, although you may find your host family ask you
to try it.

Weekends are also times for volunteers
to pursue their own activities. We provide
everyone with a free Nairobi city tour
including visits to monkey parks, animal
orphanages and other places of interest.
This can be taken on any Sunday during
your stay. You are welcome to visit the other
volunteers and there is plenty to see and
do across the city. Your host family will give
you advice about the best places to visit and
how to get there.

Sports are very popular at the weekend,
with huge varieties of sports played in the
different communities. You are welcome to bring your own equipment and teach new sports to
the children in the community, but any participation is greatly appreciated!




                                                         6


                 Agape Volunteers, 36 Westaway Heights, Barnstaple, Devon, United Kingdom, EX31 1NY
                     08450 519 8469    www.agape-volunteers.com     info@agape-volunteers.com
longer trips
many of our volunteers, choose to take a longer
trip during their time in Kenya,

Many of our volunteers, especially those on extended stays, choose to take a longer trip
during their time in Kenya. You will receive more detailed information on this when you sign up
to a project and again when you reach your host family. However, some suggestions are listed
here to enable you to budget effectively.

In Africa, you have access to the best national parks in the world, and nearly all volunteers
choose to take a safari. You will be asked if you want to book a safari when you pay your
programme fee, and you don’t have to choose a date, just
the length of time you want to go for. You can then pick              As a volunteer you are
a departure date when you have received your schedule
and have met some people that you might want to go with.
                                                                      entitled to reduced
You can also book a safari through your host family once              rates on safaris
you arrive, but booking in advance means you can avoid
withdrawing large amounts of money. As a volunteer you are entitled to reduced rates on
safaris – the cost is just £80 a day all inclusive, about 1/3 of the tourist price.
Mount Kenya and Kilimanjaro are within reach of most projects. The climb is generally
available for around £300.

Visiting Uganda provides the opportunity to take part in extreme sports including white water
rafting in the Nile, bungee jumping and quad biking. This trip is available for around £180.
Diani Beach near Mombasa has white beaches and is a beautiful place to go with other
volunteers. Shuttles run there regularly and a weekend away there is available for around £60.




                                                        7


                Agape Volunteers, 36 Westaway Heights, Barnstaple, Devon, United Kingdom, EX31 1NY
                     08450 519 8469   www.agape-volunteers.com     info@agape-volunteers.com
IDP Camp
one of two in Kenya which house the people who lost
their homes during the electoral problems in 2007

The IDP is an Internally Displaced Persons camp, one of two in Kenya which house the people
who lost their homes during the electoral problems in 2007. Despite many of these issues
having been resolved, these people have found it hard to return home. Conditions are very
poor, with over 5000 people living in temporary tented accommodation. Unfortunately, after
the withdrawal of the UN in 2008, Agape is the only full time aid organization in operation
there. Alleviating the suffering of the people in these camps is currently the highest ranked of
all our aims across the continent.

We take our work there very seriously and run frequent medical and food distribution trips
to the camp in the Central Rift Valley. As part of your program fee you are entitled to up to a
three night stay in the IDP camp to help our efforts, although
most volunteers choose just to spend a day there. Our trips        We run frequent
leave Nairobi for the IDP camp every weekend, and return           medical and food
regularly throughout the week, so you can choose the exact
length of your stay. During your time there, you will live in
                                                                   distribution trips
the school built there by Agape in 2010. You do not have           to the camp
to go to the IDP camp if you feel uncomfortable about it in
any way, however many of our volunteers and staff describe it is as an incredibly worthwhile
and eye-opening experience. Whilst there, you will be teaching some classes in the school,
distributing food, water and medical supplies, checking on the welfare of all the families and
helping to construct more permanent housing that is so desperately needed.

If you have any questions, please contact us on info@agape-volunteers.com.




                                                         8


                 Agape Volunteers, 36 Westaway Heights, Barnstaple, Devon, United Kingdom, EX31 1NY
                     08450 519 8469    www.agape-volunteers.com     info@agape-volunteers.com
your preparations
we strongly recommend that you seek medical
advice before your placement begins

We strongly recommend that you seek medical advice before your placement begins, to make
sure you receive all the correct vaccinations. Your doctor will be able to give you personal
advice about the extra immunisations you may require, but the vaccinations we
recommend are:


mandatory                            strongly recommend                   recommended
•	   Yellow Fever                    •	   Tuberculosis                    •	   Cholera
                                     •	   Hepatitis A                     •	   Rabies
                                     •	   Hepatitis B
                                     •	   Typhoid
                                     •	   Tetanus



malaria
We strongly recommend taking a course of anti-malaria tablets during your placement.
Malarone is the most popular form of treatment thanks to the limited side effects, which
can be minimised further by taking the drug with food or milky drinks. Other options such
as Doxycycline or Proguanil are also widely available. Please bear in mind that Kenya is
a chloroquine-resistant malaria zone. It is important that you remember to continue your
medication after you return home to cover the incubation period of the disease.

As with all diseases you may encounter, prevention is extremely important. Please bring a
strong insect repellent and a good-quality mosquito net, and your chances of becoming ill will
be greatly reduced. Again, we recommend that you speak with your doctor before travelling to
arrange prevention and treatment specific to your requirements.




                                                            9


                    Agape Volunteers, 36 Westaway Heights, Barnstaple, Devon, United Kingdom, EX31 1NY
                        08450 519 8469    www.agape-volunteers.com     info@agape-volunteers.com
safety
During your orientation you will be made familiar with our
safety procedures & staff will always be on hand to help

During your orientation you will be made familiar with our safety procedures, and our in-
country staff will always be on hand to give you guidance and make sure no major issues
occur. However, we have included a section on safety to acquaint you with scenarios which
might arise and ensure you are as well-prepared as possible for life in Africa.
In general, we advise that no volunteer should be out
alone after dark, and that volunteers should stay indoors         Africans are friendly
after 9pm. Exceptions are made when volunteers are                people by nature,
with Agape or project staff. Africans are friendly people
                                                                  especially towards
by nature, especially towards volunteers who are helping
their community. People might stop you and say hello,             volunteers who
and it is polite to respond, but they will understand if you      are helping their
are busy and can’t chat for long. However, a stereotype           community.
of westerners and volunteers is that they are rich, and it is
best to apologise and leave if you are asked for money. Giving money outside established
programmes can be counterproductive and even dangerous as it may draw unwanted
attention to you. Never agree to visit a stranger’s home.

Many children live on the streets in Nairobi and around other placement areas. There are
enough projects in circulation to cater for nearly all street children. Begging children are often
already enrolled in a support program, or they may have made the decision not to enter care if
they do not like regimented regime. Giving money only encourages this. We understand it can
be difficult to refuse a child help, but if you are concerned, make a note of where they were
and tell your host family.




                                                        10


                 Agape Volunteers, 36 Westaway Heights, Barnstaple, Devon, United Kingdom, EX31 1NY
                     08450 519 8469    www.agape-volunteers.com     info@agape-volunteers.com
safety cont.
Matatus are the most common form of African transport,
and are a cross between a minibus and a taxi

Transport in Kenya is also very different from western transport systems. Matatus are the
most common form of African transport, and are a cross between a minibus and a taxi. They
are often “pimped”, with neon lights, TV screens and speakers, and they are a cheap and
entertaining way to travel. A 5 mile journey will cost around 20p. However, due to the cramped
conditions there is a risk of pickpocketing. Never take any valuables or large amounts of
money with you on one.

HIV is also a risk, particularly for volunteers working on medical related placements. HIV can
spread through an exchange of bodily fluid, through unprotected sex, sharing needles or
exposing an open wound to another person’s blood, among other routes. To avoid infection,
always wear gloves when dealing with blood injuries, even if you have no cuts yourself. Further
precautions are discussed in orientation.

Support during your placement and emergency measures
Agape Volunteers has a 100% safety record and we have every intention to keep this intact.
In order to achieve this we provide you with huge amounts of support both before, during
and after your stay. It all starts with this very booklet which is geared towards preparing you
as much as is possible for your stay in Africa. The use of personal trip advisers means that
whenever you contact Agape, you always talk to the same person, who knows you and any
special needs or requests you have. Once in Africa the orientation we provide you with then
prepares you fully for your stay and we cover safety in much greater detail at this point, once
we are able to demonstrate some of the things that we must warn you about. Fully qualified
members of Agape’s team conduct all transport around Africa and there will be at least two
members of staff with you on airport trips and long journeys. If you wish to be escorted from
your home-stay to your placement, we can make arrangements for this to happen for as long
as you wish. All of our home-stays are compound based and are guarded at night.




                                                        11


                 Agape Volunteers, 36 Westaway Heights, Barnstaple, Devon, United Kingdom, EX31 1NY
                     08450 519 8469    www.agape-volunteers.com     info@agape-volunteers.com
safety cont.
Should you fall ill during your stay, you must ensure that
your travel insurance; that is mandatory with Agape

Should you fall ill during your stay, you must ensure that your travel insurance; that is
mandatory with Agape Volunteers, covers all medical expenses. We will take you to a doctor
or a hospital if you require this and make every effort to assist your recovery. Should you have
to return home early, in accordance with our terms and conditions, we cannot be liable for
your extra travel costs, however, we will support you as much as possible both from the UK
and Africa to get your flight changed as soon as is possible.

We do not envisage ever having to deal with a situation where all volunteers must leave
a country. However, it would be naive of us to make contingency plans for this. On the
‘volunteering policy’ that you fill out before you leave, we collect contact information and
passport details. This allows us to make embassy contact in the event of any emergency. Rest
assured full contingency plans are in place for any evacuation procedure, if you wish to view
these, please contact Guillaume Lefevre on gee@agape-volunteers.com.




                                                        12


                 Agape Volunteers, 36 Westaway Heights, Barnstaple, Devon, United Kingdom, EX31 1NY
                     08450 519 8469    www.agape-volunteers.com     info@agape-volunteers.com
fundraising
volunteers often fundraise to either fund their trip or to
donate to a project they feel is particularly worthwhile.

Many of our volunteers fundraise before they leave for Africa, either to fund their trip or
to donate to a project they feel is particularly worthwhile. Agape supports both of these
processes and we are happy to help where we can. If you would like any further information or
fundraising ideas please contact anthony@agape-volunteers.com.




kit list
below is a recommended kit list for all volunteers to
pack for there trip to Kenya

•	   Sleeping bag                                    •	   Medicines
•	   Mosquito net                                    •	   Malaria tablets
•	   Clothing                                        •	   Immodium
•	   T -shirts                                       •	   Aspirin
•	   Shorts                                          •	   Ibuprofen/Paracetamol
•	   Lightweight trousers and tops                   •	   Any other medication
•	   Jumper and jeans for evenings                   •	   First aid kit
•	   Sports clothing                                 •	   Insect repellent
•	   Smart clothes for church                        •	   Water bottle
•	   Trainers                                        •	   Cards and games
•	   Sandals                                         •	   Penknife
•	   Day shoes                                       •	   Music
•	   Hat                                             •	   Books
•	   Plenty of underwear                             •	   Teaching aids (if required)
•	   Towel                                           •	   Sports equipment (if required)
•	   Toiletries




                                                          13


                  Agape Volunteers, 36 Westaway Heights, Barnstaple, Devon, United Kingdom, EX31 1NY
                       08450 519 8469   www.agape-volunteers.com     info@agape-volunteers.com
spending money
in Kenya, most volunteers find around £30 a week
sufficient for spending money

In Kenya, most volunteers find around £30 a week sufficient for spending money. You should
leave around £5 a week to buy drinking water when you are out and about, and the same
again for a week’s worth of lunches, if you want to buy from vendors. Matatu rides cost around
10 pence a trip and are not a major expense. You may wish to bring money for gifts and
shopping in markets.

your departure
Your transport back to the airport is covered by your program fee. If you inform your host
family of your flight time they will arrange your transport with one of the drivers. As with all air
travel, it is a good idea to leave an extra 2 hours before your flight departs.
Nairobi airport sometimes practises departure tax, whereby departing passengers are subject
to a £20 fee before leaving the country. Most airlines include this in your return ticket price.
You can check this with your airline in advance or have a spare £20 just in case.
It is polite to give your host family a small gift before you leave, and many volunteers like to
bring something from their own country so it is more personal. Another option is to ask your
family if there is anything they need whilst you are there and then buy a gift locally.




                                                         14


                  Agape Volunteers, 36 Westaway Heights, Barnstaple, Devon, United Kingdom, EX31 1NY
                      08450 519 8469    www.agape-volunteers.com     info@agape-volunteers.com
appendix: teaching specific info
below you will find specific information related to the
programmes run in Kenya


teaching - typical day
School starts at 9am with an assembly and prayers, and then you will usually teach two
lessons before morning break at 11am. During breaks, you’ll be helping the teachers serve
porridge and joining in with the children’s games. At 12 you will teach one more lesson before
lunch.

Lunch runs from 1pm until 2pm, and again you might be asked to help serve the children’s
lunch before heading out to meet other volunteers for your own lunch. Children tend to be
harder to teach in the afternoons, so afternoon lessons from 2pm until 4pm are used for PE
and games up to three times a week.

After school you can choose to help out with sports practices or continue the children’s
games, and this is often the most rewarding part of the day. Dinner is usually at about 7pm
back with your host family, before games among the volunteers and then bed around 10pm.



teaching - project advice
You will be placed in a primary school which teaches children aged between 2 and 14 years.
The curriculum is therefore quite straightforward, but all children sit state exams which check
the progress of both the pupils and the school as a whole. You will be teaching classes such
as English, Maths, Science, Religion, Social Studies and Games. A local teacher will teach the
pupils’ first language, Kiswahili, but if you learn a few basic phrases to use (included in this
booklet) then the children will respond to you very quickly and respect you as a teacher.




                                                        15


                 Agape Volunteers, 36 Westaway Heights, Barnstaple, Devon, United Kingdom, EX31 1NY
                     08450 519 8469    www.agape-volunteers.com     info@agape-volunteers.com
appendix teaching cont.
below you will find specific information related to the
programmes run in Kenya


Games are a fantastic way to teach children of all ages. Word games such as hangman
have proved particular favourites in the past, as they develop the children’s spelling and
concentration. These games can be quite challenging in a second language, so giving the
children words to guess from a particular theme is often helpful. Dictation is a very effective
if slightly less engaging method of teaching which significantly aids the development of the
children’s English. Hearing a native voice is the best way for them to learn how words are
pronounced and sentences are structured. In Maths, you can try teaching the times tables
in competition format, with sweets as prizes. Don’t be afraid to use your imagination and
initiative when teaching; the more exciting you can make your classes, the more information
your pupils will retain. If you are volunteering for a while, you can make your classroom your
own by getting the children to make posters and decorating the room with their work. During
your orientation you will receive much more detailed advice on how and what to teach, so
don’t worry if you feel underprepared at this stage.




                                                        16


                 Agape Volunteers, 36 Westaway Heights, Barnstaple, Devon, United Kingdom, EX31 1NY
                     08450 519 8469    www.agape-volunteers.com     info@agape-volunteers.com
appendix orphanage specific info
below you will find specific information related to the
programmes run in Kenya


typical day
In the morning, your duties will be based around the school, making sure the orphans who
attend school elsewhere are there on time. Then you will be assisting with morning lessons,
which begin at 9am. At 11am, you will be handing out porridge for break time, as well as
playing with the children. At 12 you can either return to the classroom, or help prepare lunch.

Lunch runs from 1pm until 2pm, and after serving the orphans, you are free to meet the other
volunteers. In the afternoon, you’ll be looking after the younger children in the orphanage,
reading stories, playing games and watching over naptime. At around 4pm the older orphans
will begin to return from school, and you’ll be helping them with homework, cooking dinner
and assisting with other chores. They might also go to sports practices or to meet friends, and
the volunteers are encouraged to go along. Dinner is usually at about 7pm back with your host
family, before games with the other volunteers and then bed around 10pm.

project advice
Your teaching-based duties will be very similar to those described in the teaching placement
supplement, so you might find those suggestions about this aspect of your work useful for
planning lessons and ordering your ideas. As with all placements, learning a little Kiswahili will
quickly gain you the respect of the children you are working with. Aside from teaching, the
most valuable work you do will simply be spending time with the orphans, playing with them,
helping with homework and getting to know them. Forming friendships and helping to foster
a sense of family and community is hugely beneficial, as it is something that many of these
children will have lacked throughout their lives. As well as spending time with the children on
an informal basis, you may also be asked to organise games or other evening activities. You
will also be carrying out more practical work including cooking, cleaning and other domestic
chores, so plenty of enthusiasm and energy is a must!




                                                        17


                 Agape Volunteers, 36 Westaway Heights, Barnstaple, Devon, United Kingdom, EX31 1NY
                     08450 519 8469    www.agape-volunteers.com     info@agape-volunteers.com
appendix medical specific info
below you will find specific information related to the
programmes run in Kenya


typical day
Your day will begin at the clinic at 9am. After discussing the day ahead with the local staff,
you will be assisting with rounds, assessing new patients and checking the conditions of the
overnight patients. Any treatment will be done by the local doctors or under their supervision
at first, but as you progress you will increasingly be allowed to work unaccompanied.

After getting lunch with the other volunteers, you may be asked to assist on major procedures
which take place in the afternoon. It is unlikely that you will play a major role in these, but if a
doctor thinks you are capable, he will ask for your help.

The clinics usually close around 5pm, and medical volunteers usually either help out with
games at another Agape project or return to their host families. Dinner is at about 7pm, before
games with the other volunteers and then bed around 10pm. If you are assisting with a birth,
these shifts will usually start at around 9pm.

project advice
Medicine is practised very differently in Kenya from westernised countries. No matter what
your level of experience is, you will spend your first few days shadowing an African duty
doctor and learning African techniques, before gaining the confidence to practise on your own.
You will not be asked to perform any procedure you do not feel comfortable with. Observing
the techniques closely will be invaluable, and please do not hesitate to ask if you need
something repeated. If you are asked to assist with surgery or with a birth, then do take it as
a compliment! Despite the physical and emotional effort involved, it is an incredibly rewarding
and valuable experience.




                                                        18


                 Agape Volunteers, 36 Westaway Heights, Barnstaple, Devon, United Kingdom, EX31 1NY
                      08450 519 8469   www.agape-volunteers.com     info@agape-volunteers.com
appendix HIV work specific info
below you will find specific information related to the
programmes run in Kenya


typical day
After breakfast with your host family and the other volunteers, you will head to your placement.
Placement work starts at 9am, and you will always begin at the HIV centre to discuss the day
ahead with the staff. Testing is usually done in the morning. You may want to carry out tests
and counselling in a group with other volunteers or members of staff at first, and help will
always be available with these aspects of your work.

Lunch is from 1pm until 2pm, and you are free to meet up with the other volunteers on your
placement. After lunch, you will be carrying out home visits with another member of staff. Each
visit lasts for 45 minutes, and you will be delivering food, checking on the children and getting
to know the families you are working with. At around 3pm on some days you may go into a
local school with a group and another staff member to present a talk on the dangers of HIV
and how it may be prevented.

At 5pm, the clinics close, and HIV volunteers either join in with another project, playing games
and looking after the children, or return to their host families. Dinner will be at about 7pm,
followed by games with the other volunteers, and then bed around 10pm.

project advice
The HIV programme is one of the most demanding placements that Agape runs, so being
as mentally prepared for your challenge as possible will be helpful. You will receive specific
information and assistance with counselling and testing during your orientation, and help
will always be on hand throughout your project. Education is perhaps the most accessible
of your duties, but also one of the most important, as knowledge that is taken for granted
in westernised countries is not nearly so widespread in Kenya. You will also be visiting sick
families to distribute food and medicine, but you will always be accompanied on these visits.
Despite the challenging nature of this project, it is one of the most rewarding, and you will
receive plenty of support both before and during your work.




                                                        19


                 Agape Volunteers, 36 Westaway Heights, Barnstaple, Devon, United Kingdom, EX31 1NY
                     08450 519 8469    www.agape-volunteers.com     info@agape-volunteers.com
appendix sports specific info
below you will find specific information related to the
programmes run in Kenya


typical day
In the morning, you will be teaching your own class in the school you are based in or carrying
out other duties around the school. Lessons start at 9am, and run until morning break at 11am
when you will be leading games and activities. Lessons start again at 12pm, and you may
spend time assisting another teacher or preparing for your afternoon sessions.

Lunch is from 1pm until 2pm, and you are free to meet the other volunteers. After lunch, you
will be teaching sports classes until school ends at 5pm. However, the children love to practise
sports and play games during the evening, and joining is one of the most enjoyable parts of
being a volunteer. You may be joined by volunteers from other placements at this time. As
schools and parks are the safest parts of the community, you are particularly encouraged to
stay with the children.

At 7pm, you’ll be heading back to your host family for dinner. After dinner there is time for
games or cards with the other volunteers, before bed at around 10pm.

project advice
Your teaching-based duties will be very similar to those described in the teaching placement
supplement, so you might find those suggestions about this aspect of your work useful for
planning lessons and ordering your ideas. You will be designing your own sports development
programme as part of your work, so having a few ideas in advance will be helpful! Football is
by far the most popular African sport, and whilst you are encouraged to introduce a new sport
into the curriculum, you may need to be flexible when explaining foreign tactics to the children.
You may also need to bring any equipment you need if you wish to teach something new, as
the supply is very limited in most Kenyan schools. Your project advisor will be able to advise
you of what is already there and what you may need to bring. Whilst the children will be at their
most enthusiastic during your lessons, you will find that learning a couple of basic phrases in
Kiswahili will quickly earn you their respect.




                                                        20


                 Agape Volunteers, 36 Westaway Heights, Barnstaple, Devon, United Kingdom, EX31 1NY
                     08450 519 8469    www.agape-volunteers.com     info@agape-volunteers.com
basic kiswahili
below you will find basic kiswahili that you will find
likely use on a day to day basis


greetings:
Jambo- hi/hello
Hujambo?- ( Lit. Is anything the matter ) How are you?
Sijambo? Good/Fine
Salama- Fine/Peaceful
Habari za nyumbani?- ( Lit. What is the news at home?) How is home?
Habari za shule?- How is school?

your name:
Jina lako ni nani? – What is your name?
Jina langu ni Asha- My name is Asha.

basic vocabulary:
Asante – Thank you
Tafadhali- Please
Ndiyo- yes
Hapana- no
Samahani- pardon me/excuse me
Kwaheri- goodbye
Kwa nini?- why?
Kwa sababu- because
Hodi!- May I come in?
Karibu- Come on in/welcome




                                                       21


                Agape Volunteers, 36 Westaway Heights, Barnstaple, Devon, United Kingdom, EX31 1NY
                    08450 519 8469    www.agape-volunteers.com     info@agape-volunteers.com
basic kiswahili cont.
below you will find basic kiswahili that you will find
likely use on a day to day basis


basic vocabulary in the classroom:
Mwalimu- Teacher
Mwanafunzi- Student
Kitabu- Book
Kalamu- Pen
Karatasi- Paper
Ukurasa- Page
Soma- Read
Andika- Write
Swali- Question
Nina swali- I have a question
Sijui- I don’t know
Jibu- Answer
Sema kwa sauti- Speak louder
Sema tena- Say again/repeat
Kazi ya nyumbani- Homework
Sentensi- Sentence
Zoezi- Exercise
Mazungumzo- Dialogue

further study
Rosetta Stone do a very good comprehensive introduction to Swahili which is available from
all good book stores and includes an interactive CD.




                                                       22


                Agape Volunteers, 36 Westaway Heights, Barnstaple, Devon, United Kingdom, EX31 1NY
                    08450 519 8469    www.agape-volunteers.com     info@agape-volunteers.com

				
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