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Figurative Language

VIEWS: 6 PAGES: 34

									Figurative Language: Tropes

Change in the meaning of words
Figurative language

 is language that goes beyond the normal
  meaning of the words used. It’s language
  that is not meant to be taken literally.
 (metaphors and similes are examples of
  figurative language)
  – Example:
    Her eyes are like two diamonds. (her eyes
    aren’t actually diamonds—it’s figurative, not
    literal)
What is figurative language?
Here are some examples. What do you
 think figurative language means?

 The wind whispered softly through the
  trees.
 The cafeteria pizza was a soggy, droopy
  piece of cardboard.
 The teacher glared like a furious dragon.
What is figurative language?

                The wind
                whispered through
                the trees

                Can wind really
                whisper?

                What is the author
                trying to tell us
                about wind?
What is figurative language?
 The cafeteria pizza
  was a soggy, droopy
  piece of cardboard.



 Is the pizza really
  cardboard?

 What is the author
  trying to tell us about
  the pizza?
What is figurative language?
               The teacher glared
               like a furious
               dragon.

               Was the teacher
               really a dragon?

               What is the author
               trying to tell us
               about the teacher?
What is figurative language?
 Figurative language
  expresses an idea that
  goes beyond the actual
  meaning of the words

 Wind can’t
  whisper…but the
  expression gives you
  an idea of how the
  wind sounds
Types of Figurative Language
 Simile - a comparison between two unlike
  objects using like or as.
 Similes are easy to spot!!

Examples:


 The team’s center looked like a skyscraper.
 My love is like a red, red rose.
 We were as quiet as frightened mice.
Types of Figurative Language
Metaphor - a comparison between two unlike
  things that does not use “like” or “as”

 A metaphor is a bit more sophisticated than a
  simile.
 In a metaphor, a poet writes that X is Y. Readers
  understand that we are not to take the comparison
  literally, but that the metaphor helps us to see X in
  a new way.
Examples:
 My brother is a prince.
 Richard was a lion in the fight.
 Her eyes are dark emeralds. Her teeth are pearls.
Types of Figurative Language
  Personification – to give human thoughts and qualities
  to non-human objects.

Examples:
 John Milton calls time “the subtle thief of youth” (599).

 Homer refers to “the rosy fingers of dawn” (599).

 The stars smiled down on us.

 An angry wind slashed its way across
  the island.
Personification (continued)
The tree stood tall and
  proud by the curving
  path

 How is this sentence
  showing the tree doing
  something that trees
  don’t really do?
Practice: example 1
The airplane landed as gracefully as a
ballerina.

What is it?
 Personification
 Simile
 Metaphor
answer: Example # 1
The airplane landed as gracefully as a
ballerina.

What is it?

 Simile
Example # 1
The airplane landed as gracefully as
a ballerina.
Interpret the simile
 What is the author
  comparing?
 What is the author
  trying to tell us?
Practice: Example #2
The water smashed angrily against the
rocks.

What is it?
 Personification
 Simile
 Metaphor
Answer: Example #2
The water smashed angrily against the
rocks.

What is it?
 Personification
Example #2
The water smashed angrily against the
rocks.

Interpret the personification!
 What is the water
  doing that water doesn’t
  really do?
 What is the author trying to
  tell us about the water?
Practice: Example #3
My brother’s room was a dark, mysterious
cave.

What is it?
 Personification
 Simile
 Metaphor
Answer: Example #3
My brother’s room was a dark, mysterious
cave.

What is it?

 Metaphor
Example #3
My brother’s room was a dark, mysterious
cave.

Interpret the metaphor!
 What is the author
  comparing?

 What is the author trying
  to show about the
  brother’s room?
Types of Figurative Language
Onomatopoeia (o no mat o pee ya) – a word
 that sounds like what it means

Examples:
buzz
cock-a-doodle-doo
whip
Onomatopoeia (continued)




   The onomatopoeic Snap, Crackle
             and Pop!

      -- Kellog’s Rice Crispies
Onomatopoeia (continued)
"Onomatopoeia every time I see ya
  My senses tell me hubba
  And I just can't disagree.
  I get a feeling in my heart that I can't describe. . . .
   It's sort of whack, whir, wheeze, whine
   Sputter, splat, squirt, scrape
   Clink, clank, clunk, clatter
   Crash, bang, beep, buzz
   Ring, rip, roar, retch
   Twang, toot, tinkle, thud
   Pop, plop, plunk, pow
   Snort, snuck, sniff, smack
   Screech, splash, squish, squeak
   Jingle, rattle, squeal, boing
   Honk, hoot, hack, belch."

   (Todd Rundgren, "Onomatopoeia")
Types of Figurative Language
Allusion – referring to a person, idea, event,
  etc. from art, culture, or history to get across
  an idea.

  – Allusion means 'reference'

  – Allusion relies on the reader being able to
    understand the allusion and being familiar with
    the meaning hidden behind the words.
Allusion (continued)
Examples:
 She is the Brittany Spears of our school!
  – What would this mean about the girl he/she is
   describing?


 Describing someone as a "Romeo" makes
  an allusion to the famous young lover in
  Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare.
Types of Figurative Language
Hyperbole – exaggeration used for emphasis
   – Often for dramatic or humorous effect


Examples:
 I’m so hungry I could eat a horse!


   – Could I literally eat an entire horse? NO!
   – Why would I say that if I didn’t mean it?
   – To show I am really, really hungry.
Practice: Is it hyperbole,
personification, allusion,
onomatopoeia, simile, or metaphor?
1. Alladin
  Jafar: Gazeem was obviously less than
  worthy.
  Iago: Wow! There’s a big surprise! I think
  I'm going to have a heart attack and die,
  from that surprise.


   Answer: hyperbole
Practice: Is it hyperbole, allusion,
onomatopoeia, personification,
simile, or metaphor?
 2. Austin Powers: International Man of
  Mystery

Austin: She's the village
bicycle! Everybody's
had a ride.
  Answer: metaphor
Practice: Is it hyperbole, allusion,
onomatopoeia, personification, simile, or
metaphor?
 Ferris Bueller’s Day Off


Cameron: What'd I do?
 Ferris: You killed the car.


 Answer:
 personification
Practice: Is it hyperbole, allusion,
onomatopoeia, personification,
simile, or metaphor?
 Ghostbusters


Egon: "I feel like the floor of a taxi cab."

  Answer:
  simile
           Practice: Is it hyperbole, allusion,
           onomatopoeia, personification, simile, or
           metaphor?
            Family Guy
            Tom Tucker: A bit of breaking news. A
            local family is forced out of their home by
            ghosts. Who are they gonna call?
Answer:
allusion
            Diane Simmons (sighs):
            Ghostbusters, Tom.

            Tom Tucker: No, Diane. Their insurance
            company. That's just stupid what you said.
Practice: Is it hyperbole, allusion,
onomatopoeia, personification, simile, or
metaphor?
 Hot Shots!
"I've fallen for you like a blind roofer.“
                           Answer: simile

                  “I could never find time for
                  love -- too heavy -- it's an
                  anchor that drowns a man.”


                                 Answer: metaphor
Practice: Is it hyperbole, allusion,
onomatopoeia, personification, simile, or
metaphor?
 Mary Poppins


Mary Poppins: In every job that must be done,
 there is an element of fun. You find the fun
 and - SNAP - the job's a game!

                          Answer: onomatopoeia
Practice: Is it hyperbole, allusion,
onomatopoeia, personification, simile, or
metaphor?
 Meet the Parents
Greg "Gaylord" Focker: “The only way that I
 would ever let go of my bag would be if
          you came over here right now and
          tried to pry it from my dead,
          lifeless fingers, okay?”

                       Answer: hyperbole

								
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